Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF WISNIEWSKA v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 9072/02/2011
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 29/11/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No violation of P1-1
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF BARBARA WIÅšNIEWSKA v. POLAND
(Application no. 9072/02)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
29 November 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Barbara Wiśniewska v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
David Thór Björgvinsson, President,
Lech Garlicki,
George Nicolaou,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Vincent A. De Gaetano, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 November 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 9072/02) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Polish national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 1 February 2002.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Białystok. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged that a requisition order and the expropriation of her land had been in breach of her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
4. On 12 June 2007 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. In 1996 the Gdańsk Municipal Office issued an initial approval for a development project on land owned by the applicant (decyzja o warunkach zabudowy i zagospodarowania terenu) providing, on the basis of a local land development plan adopted in 1993, for the improvement and resurfacing of Słowacki Street and the construction of a roadway. On 18 December 1997 the Gdańsk Municipal Council adopted a local land development plan for the construction of a road junction in the vicinity of the applicant’s land, indicating that there was a pressing need to improve and widen a road leading from the city centre to the airport. On 21 December 1999 the Gdańsk Municipal Office (Urząd Miejski) issued another approval for the construction of the roadway, based on the provisions of the local land development plan adopted on 18 December 1997.
6. On 29 March 2000 the Pomorze Governor approved a construction project for the roadway.
A. Expropriation proceedings
7. The applicant owned forty-three plots of a total surface of 4.77 hectares. In September 1999 an estimate of the value of seven plots, covering 6,656 square metres, was prepared by expert R.Å». with a view to their expropriation. That expert assessed the market value of the land at 479,919 Polish zlotys (PLN).
8. On 21 October 1999 a negotiation meeting was held at the Gdańsk Municipal Office. The town offered PLN 479,912 as compensation for plots nos. 47/30, 47/32, 47/34, 47/36, 55/7, 60/1 and 61, at PLN 70.08 per square metre, calculated on the basis of the September 1999 estimate. The applicant refused to accept this price and argued that the market value of a square metre of similar land in the town was approximately PLN 600.
9. In February 2000 another expert, J.K., estimated the value of the applicant’s properties at PLN 63.70 per square metre, based on the agricultural character of the land. On 2 March 2000, referring to that report, the Gdańsk Municipal Office, acting on behalf of the Mayor of Gdańsk, fixed a two-month time-limit for the applicant to conclude a contract for the sale of her land for the sum of PLN 479,912. It informed her that if further negotiations failed, expropriation proceedings would be instituted and the land would be expropriated against payment of compensation in the amount of PLN 423,987.
10. On 26 April 2000 another negotiation meeting was held. The Municipal Office proposed conditions identical to those proposed in October 1999. The applicant reiterated her position as to the price and submitted that she would accept replacement property within the limits of the municipality as compensation.
11. On 8 May 2000 expropriation proceedings were instituted.
12. On 29 May 2000 an administrative hearing was held in the Gdańsk Municipal Office. The applicant proposed that the City should give her PLN 300 per square metre for her land, but her offer was rejected. The applicant again suggested that she should be given other plots in exchange for her land, but that solution was rejected on the ground that the City did not have any suitable plots at its disposal.
13. In June 2000 expert J.K. updated the estimate, having regard to the passage of time and the increase in market prices. She assessed the price of the applicant’s land at PLN 439,296. In the same month, an expert commissioned by the applicant assessed the price of the land at PLN 2,374,749.
14. On 27 June 2000 the Mayor of Gdańsk gave a decision by which the seven plots referred to in paragraph 7 above were expropriated. The amount of compensation for the land and the fence constructed on it was fixed at PLN 465,537. It was to be paid within 14 days from the date on which the expropriation decision became final. He observed that the amount of the compensation had been fixed on the basis of an estimate prepared by an expert, with reference to prices of similar plots on the local real estate market in June 2000.
15. The applicant appealed. She argued that the decision was in breach of sections 128, 130 and 134 of the Land Administration Act 1997. She submitted that it was based on the estimate drawn up in September 1999, which no longer reflected current prices of land. She referred to the case-law of the Supreme Administrative Court according to which compensation for expropriated land should take into consideration current local market prices for similar types of land and, also, prices of such land sold by the municipality by way of tender. She referred to a privately commissioned estimate prepared by a certified expert (see paragraph 13 above), according to which the price of 1 square metre of comparable land in Gdańsk at that time was PLN 356.
16. On 25 January 2001 the Pomorze Regional Office, acting on behalf of the Pomorze Governor, upheld the expropriation decision, noting that it had been given in order to have the local land development plan implemented. The expropriation was therefore in the public interest. The negotiations between the parties had failed. Two estimates drawn up for the purpose of the negotiations were consistent and indicated, in the light of prices paid for properties of a similar character and location, that the market value of the property concerned was PLN 60-70 for 1 square metre. In the circumstances, the decision was lawful.
17. The applicant appealed to the Supreme Administrative Court. She argued that the price the municipality had offered during the negotiations bore no reasonable relation to the market value of her land. The municipality had refused to offer her replacement property, despite the fact that at the time it had been selling numerous properties to private buyers by way of tender.
At a hearing held on 23 May 2001 the applicant applied for a stay of the enforcement of the expropriation decision. The court refused, noting that the enforcement of the decision had been stayed ex lege because of the authorities’ failure to submit their reply to the applicant’s appeal within the time-limit.
18. By a judgment of 25 July 2001 the Supreme Administrative Court quashed the Governor’s decision. The court observed that the modernisation of Słowacki Street was in the public interest as it was a part of the No. 7 trunk road. It further noted that in the light of the documents in the case file it had not been shown beyond doubt that the expropriation of all of the applicant’s designated plots had been necessary in order to implement the road construction project. In their decisions the authorities had failed to refer to the maps and plans prepared in connection with the local land development plan and road construction projects to show that the plots concerned were indeed covered by those projects.
19. The court further addressed the question of the compensation fixed by the contested decision. It noted that the authorities, when holding the administrative hearing on 29 May 2000, had failed to respect the relevant procedural provisions. Under the provisions of Article 89 of the Code of Administrative Procedure the purpose of an administrative hearing was to ensure, in a situation where there was a discrepancy between expert opinions as to compensation, that the experts were questioned and the discrepancy elucidated. Furthermore, the parties should have been given an opportunity to put questions to the experts and to make oral statements before the administrative authority. No such measures had been taken. The court noted that the hearing had been held prior to the date on which the last expert opinion concerning the compensation had been prepared. There was no proof in the case file that this last opinion had ever been served on the applicant.
20. The judgment with its written reasons was served on the applicant’s lawyer on 9 August 2001.
21. The expropriation and compensation proceedings before the appellate authority were later conducted again. The Pomorze Regional Office informed the parties that the administrative hearing would be held again and requested the Gdańsk Municipal Office to submit further evidence as to the prices of similar properties. Ultimately two hearings were held, on 3 September 2001 and 22 January 2002. Three experts were questioned. The parties were invited to consult the case file.
22. On 25 February 2002 the Pomorze Governor upheld the first-instance decision in its part concerning the expropriation. He fixed the amount of compensation to be paid to the applicant at PLN 554,898. He referred to the expert opinions prepared for the purposes of the proceedings and explained which evidence and conclusions had been considered credible. He reiterated that the land concerned was of an agricultural nature.
23. Compensation was paid to the applicant on 27 February 2002. She accepted it, but observed that the amount was unsatisfactory. She subsequently appealed, submitting that the method by which the compensation had been fixed was to her detriment, that the second-instance authority had failed to respect the guidance contained in the judgment of the Supreme Administrative Court and that the amount of compensation did not reasonably correspond to the value of the land.
24. On 31 May 2005 the Supreme Administrative Court quashed the contested decision, finding that the method used to establish the value of the expropriated land was not in compliance with the applicable legal regulations. In particular, the expert opinion prepared by J.F., heavily relied on by the first-instance authority, was based on prices applicable in June 2000. The proceedings were subsequently conducted again. The Governor invited the parties to submit new evidence and to consult the case file. Another expert was appointed and submitted his evaluation report, assessing the value of the applicant’s property at PLN 725,231.
On 28 April 2006 another administrative hearing was held before the second-instance authority. A time-limit was fixed for the parties to submit new evidence. Both the applicant and the Gdańsk Municipal Office availed themselves of that right.
25. On 4 July 2006 the Governor issued a new decision. It upheld the first-instance expropriation decision and increased the amount of compensation to PLN 725,232, with reference to the new expert report.
26. On 2 August 2006 the applicant, represented by a lawyer, appealed, submitting arguments similar to those on which she had relied in her previous appeal.
27. On 3 August 2006 the applicant revoked the power of attorney given to her lawyer.
28. On 29 September 2006 the Gdańsk Administrative Court rejected her appeal, noting that the applicant had failed to pay court fees. This decision was served on the applicant’s new lawyer on 18 October 2006.
On 22 October 2006 the applicant requested the court to grant her retrospective leave to appeal out of time. She submitted that she had dismissed one lawyer and retained another one during the appellate proceedings. She had not been aware that the court fee should have been paid.
29. On 29 December 2006 the Gdańsk Administrative Court refused to grant the applicant retrospective leave to appeal out of time, considering that she had failed to inform the court about the alleged changes in her legal representation and to demonstrate that she had not been at fault in failing to pay the court fee. The applicant’s new lawyer appealed against that decision.
30. On 2 March 2007 the Supreme Administrative Court upheld the refusal to grant the applicant leave to appeal out of time. It observed that the applicant had failed to show that she had not been at fault in neglecting to pay the court fee. She had informed the first-instance court of her decision to revoke her first lawyer’s power to act on her behalf on 24 October 2004. Under the applicable procedural provisions, that was the date on which the revocation had taken effect.
31. As a result, the first-instance decision on expropriation and compensation became final. On 27 April 2007 the Gdańsk Municipality paid the applicant the outstanding amount of PLN 170,333.
32. On 20 September 2006 the Gdansk District Court rejected the applicant’s claim by which she sought compensation for the fact that from September 2000 onwards the municipality had been using her land without a valid expropriation decision. The court considered that the applicant’s claim could not be examined before a civil court and had to be dealt with in administrative proceedings.
B. Proceedings to have the enforcement of the expropriation decision suspended
33. By a decision of 16 May 2001 the Pomorze Regional Office, acting ex officio, stayed the enforcement of the expropriation decision given on 25 January 2001 (see paragraph 14 above), having regard to the fact that the applicant had lodged an appeal against it. It referred to section 9 of the Land Administration Act.
34. The Gdańsk Road Management Office (Zarząd Dróg i Zieleni) appealed against that decision. It argued that the mere fact that the applicant had contested the first-instance expropriation and compensation decision could not justify the staying of its enforcement. The construction of the road, which was by then well advanced, should not be delayed as this would entail serious financial loss. They further referred to concrete technical difficulties in the road construction and its logistics, caused by the fact that work which had already started could not be continued on the applicant’s land, such as the impossibility of using that land for transport purposes.
35. On 29 June 2001 the President of the National Housing and Local Land Development Office quashed the contested decision on formal grounds and ordered that the enforcement issue be re-examined.
36. On 10 August 2001 the Pomorze Regional Office, acting ex officio, resumed the enforcement of the expropriation decision, having regard to the judgment of the Supreme Administrative Court of 25 July 2001 dismissing the applicant’s appeal against the requisition order (see paragraph 43 below). It observed that following that judgment, the Office had a legal right to take possession of the land concerned, which was needed for the construction project.
C. Proceedings concerning the requisition order in respect of the applicant’s land
37. After the first-instance expropriation decision had been given on 27 June 2000 (see paragraph 14 above) and when the applicant’s appeal against it was pending, on 7 August 2000 the Mayor of Gdańsk issued a requisition order allowing the Gdansk Road Management Office, on the basis of Article 122 of the Land Administration Act, to take possession of the applicant’s property with a view to starting construction work. He stated that it was necessary in order to proceed with the implementation of the already well-advanced road construction project and to prevent serious social and financial costs that further delay in the realisation of that project would cause.
38. The applicant appealed against that decision, emphasising that it was unlawful. She argued that no final expropriation decision in respect of her property had been given. The grounds invoked by the Mayor in the requisition order were drafted in very broad terms. The Mayor had failed to indicate, with reference to the concrete circumstances of the case, why it was necessary in the applicant’s case to impose such a serious restriction on the exercise of her still valid ownership rights. No relevant and sufficient reasons for the occupation of her land had been advanced. In particular, the mere fact that expropriation proceedings had been instituted and construction work was about to start did not warrant the conclusion that such a serious restriction of her ownership rights was justified.
39. In September 2000 road construction work commenced on the neighbouring plots. No work had yet been carried out on the applicant’s land. On 5 September 2000 the applicant applied to the Gdańsk Regional Building Works Inspector for the work on her land to be stopped. On 6 October 2000 the Inspector informed the applicant that no work had yet been conducted on her land. On 20 October 2000 on-the-spot inspection, in the presence of the applicant, confirmed that fact.
40. On 5 December 2000 the Governor of Pomorze dismissed the applicant’s appeal against the requisition order of 7 August 2000, fully endorsing the arguments relied on by the first-instance authority.
The applicant appealed against that decision before the Supreme Administrative Court, asking the court to stay the enforcement of the requisition order.
41. On 23 May 2001 the court refused the applicant’s request for a stay of the enforcement of the requisition order, holding that to allow her request would defeat the very purpose of the requisition order.
42. On 15 June 2001 the Pomorze Regional Office requested the Supreme Administrative Court to give priority to the examination of the applicant’s appeal against the requisition order, referring to the fact that the construction work had been seriously delayed because no work could be done on the applicant’s land. The significant investment of public funds, the advanced stage of realisation of the project and the serious disturbance to traffic caused by the construction work called for priority to be given to the case.
43. By a judgment of 25 July 2001 the Supreme Administrative Court dismissed the applicant’s appeal. It observed that the expropriation proceedings had been conducted with a view to modernising the town’s road network, facilitating access to the local airport and reducing the number of road accidents on Słowacki Street. This was clearly in the public interest. The fact that the municipality had no final legal title to occupy the applicant’s property was the only remaining obstacle to starting the construction work on that property. It also hindered progress of the construction work carried out on the neighbouring properties. The Court referred to Article 122 of the Land Administration Act, which expressly provided for requisition orders in the absence of final expropriation decisions if a delay would make the implementation of a public-interest project impossible.
D. Proceedings concerning the road construction building permit
44. On 13 December 2000 the company commissioned by the municipality to carry out the work – the above-mentioned Gdansk Road Management Office – applied to the Gdańsk Municipal Office for a building permit for road construction work to be carried out on the applicant’s land. In April 2001 the applicant applied for the proceedings to be stayed, arguing that in the absence of the final decision on expropriation the Office had no legal right to take possession of her land. On 13 April 2001 the Road Management Office requested the Municipal Office to take steps to resolve the difficulties concerning the legal status of the applicant’s land, arguing that construction work on that stretch of road had advanced, with the exception of the 300 metres planned on the applicant’s land.
45. The proceedings concerning the application for the building permit were subsequently stayed, the authorities having regard to the fact that in the absence of the expropriation decision the construction company had no right to take possession of the land, and that under the applicable building regulations such a right was an essential prerequisite for requesting a building permit.
46. On 10 August 2001 the Pomorze Regional Office resumed the proceedings, having regard to the judgment of the Supreme Administrative Court of 25 July 2001 dismissing the applicant’s appeal against the requisition order (see paragraph 18 above). It observed that that judgment had conferred on the building company the right to take possession of the applicant’s land for construction purposes, even in the absence of a final expropriation decision confirmed by the administrative court.
47. On 14 August 2001 the Pomorze Regional Office issued the building permit as per the application, thereby authorising the construction company to start the construction work on the plots concerned. The applicant appealed against that decision, reiterating that as long as she had not been expropriated no one had the right to build on her land.
48. On 16 August 2001 the construction company took possession of the applicant’s land. The construction work started shortly afterwards.
49. On 12 November 2001 the Chief Building Works Inspector dismissed the applicant’s appeal and upheld the building permit. The applicant appealed, reiterating essentially that the building permit could not be given because the expropriation proceedings had not been concluded.
50. On 22 May 2002 the construction of the road was officially completed. On 23 January 2002 a decision authorising use of the road by the public was given.
51. On 27 June 2003 the Supreme Administrative Court dismissed the applicant’s appeal against the building permit. It dismissed the applicant’s arguments that the building company had had no legal right to take possession of her land. It noted that the first-instance expropriation decision had been given on 7 June 2000 (see paragraph 14 above). On 7 August 2000 the first-instance requisition order had been given (see paragraph 37 above). The latter order had become final and enforceable following the judgment of 25 July 2001 (see paragraph 43 above). The court held that that judgment had to be deemed to have conferred on the building company the right to possess the land within the meaning of the building regulations.
52. The court stressed that requisition orders were necessary for public-interest works to be able to go ahead where expropriation proceedings were still pending but the works should nevertheless be carried out to prevent certain negative consequences. Such a decision did not infringe the owner’s rights although it did limit them temporarily.
53. A requisition order should be assessed in the context of the expropriation proceedings seen as a whole. Such an order was usually given after the first-instance expropriation decision had been issued. The applicable legal regulations expressly allowed for such orders to be given. The court referred to Article 108 of the Code of Administrative Procedure and to section 122 of the Land Administration and Expropriation Act 1997. Expropriation and requisition orders were two different legal institutions. They conferred different rights on the public authorities. A requisition order was clearly of a temporary character. It was obvious that its legal effects differed from those produced by a decision on expropriation. However, it conferred on the authorities a right to take possession of the land and to use it for public-benefit purposes. By introducing a requisition order into the Land Administration and Expropriation Act 1997 the legislature had intended to avoid situations where expropriation could be blocked as a result of appeals lodged by the affected parties.
54. In the court’s opinion, if one accepted the applicant’s argument that the requisition order did not confer a right to take possession of the land for building purposes, the very purpose of the requisition order would be defeated.
55. A requisition order could not per se be regarded as a violation of ownership. It did not replace the expropriation decision and did not deprive the owner of his or her ownership right; at most it limited it temporarily until the termination of the expropriation proceedings. This was justified under Article 64 § 3 of the Constitution (see paragraph 59 below). The court recalled that the right of property was not an absolute right.
56. The court observed that in the circumstances of the case the grant of the building permit did not infringe the law despite the exceptional character of the applicant’s situation and the pending expropriation proceedings. The applicant’s case demonstrated that, in practice, requisition orders were necessary. In certain cases, it would have been impossible to realise the public-benefit purposes for which expropriation proceedings had been instituted without having recourse to requisition orders.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Constitutional protection of property rights
57. Article 21 of the Constitution provides:
“1. The Republic of Poland shall protect ownership and the right of succession.
2. Expropriation shall be allowed only in the public interest and against payment of just compensation.”
58. Article 31 of the Constitution reads:
“Freedom of the person shall receive legal protection.
Everyone shall respect the freedoms and rights of others. No one shall be compelled to do that which is not required by law.
Any limitation upon the exercise of constitutional freedoms and rights may be imposed only by statute, and only when necessary in a democratic state for the protection of its security or public order, or to protect the natural environment, health or public morals, or the freedoms and rights of other persons. Such limitations shall not violate the essence of freedoms and rights.”
59. Article 64 of the Constitution provides:
“1. Everyone shall have the right to ownership, other property rights and the right of succession.
2. Everyone, on an equal basis, shall receive legal protection regarding ownership, other property rights and the right of succession.
The right of ownership may be limited only by means of a statute and only to the extent that it does not violate the essence of such right.”
B. Relevant provisions of the land expropriation legislation
60. On 1 January 1998 the Land Administration Act of 21 August 1997 (Ustawa o gospodarce nieruchomościami – “the Land Administration Act”) entered into force. Under section 112 of that Act expropriation consists in the removal, by way of an administrative decision, of ownership rights or other rights in rem. Expropriation can be carried out where public-interest aims cannot be achieved without restriction of those rights and where it is impossible to acquire those rights by way of a civil law contract.
61. Under section 113 an expropriation can be carried out only for the benefit of the State Treasury or the local municipality.
62. Section 122 provides that in cases defined by Article 108 of the Code of Administrative Procedure (see paragraph 68 below) the administrative authority is empowered to issue a requisition order allowing an entity carrying out works for the public benefit to enter and take possession of land in respect of which a decision on expropriation has been given, if a delay would make realisation of the public-benefit works impossible. A clause of immediate enforceability (rygor natychmiastowej wykonalności) may be issued in respect of such an order.
63. In accordance with section 128 § 1 of the Act, expropriation is to be carried out against payment of compensation corresponding to the value of the property right concerned. Under section 130 § 1 of the Act, the amount of compensation is fixed regard being had to the status and value of the property on the day on which the expropriation decision was given. The value of the property is estimated on the basis of an opinion prepared by a certified expert.
64. Section 131 provides for the possibility of awarding the expropriated owner a replacement property if he or she so agrees.
65. Pursuant to section 132, compensation must be paid within fourteen days from the date on which the expropriation decision becomes subject to enforcement.
66. Section 134 provides for the market value of the expropriated property to serve as a basis on which the amount of compensation is fixed. The following criteria are to be taken into consideration when establishing the market value of the property: its type, location, the use to which it has been put, the existence of any technical infrastructure on the property, its overall state and current prices of properties in the municipality.
C. Immediate enforceability of non-final administrative decisions
67. In situations specified by Article 108 of the Code of Administrative Procedure, local State administration can authorise an entity charged with the implementation of a public-interest project to occupy the property concerned immediately if a delay would render the implementation of the project impossible.
68. Article 108 of the Code provides for an administrative decision to be rendered immediately enforceable, even if further appeal against it is available, when this is necessary for the protection of life or limb, or for the protection of the national economy against serious damage, or for the protection of other societal interests.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
69. The applicant complained that she had suffered a disproportionate interference with her property rights as a result of the measures taken in respect of her land. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
70. The Government submitted that the judgment of the Supreme Administrative Court of 25 July 2001 had been served on the applicant’s lawyer on 9 August 2001. That judgment had ultimately conferred on the authorities the right to take possession of the applicant’s plot. The subsequent decisions given in the case had only been the consequence of the fact that that right had been conferred on the authorities. The application had been lodged with the Court seven months later, on 1 March 2002. The applicant had therefore failed to submit her application to the Court within the time-limit of six months provided for in Article 35 of the Convention.
71. The Court is of the view that dates of final decisions in the case for the purposes of Article 35 of the Convention should be established with due regard being had to the subject-matter of the case and the essential purpose which the applicant wished to achieve (see Trzaskalska v. Poland, no. 34469/05, §§ 36-37, 1 December 2009, mutatis mutandis). It observes that the applicant complained that the expropriation decision, the amount of compensation awarded to her and the cumulative effect of all the measures taken in respect of her property had been in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. By the judgment relied on by the Government the Supreme Administrative Court upheld the requisition order. However, other sets of proceedings relevant for the protection of the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions were subsequently conducted until 2007. The Court considers that that judgment cannot therefore be deemed to be the date which triggered the running of the six-month period provided for by Article 35 of the Convention.
72. This preliminary objection of the Government must therefore be rejected.
73. The Government further submitted that the applicant had failed to exhaust all the domestic remedies available under Polish law.
74. In so far as the applicant complained about the expropriation decision and about the amount of compensation which she had received, the Government argued that she had failed to pay the court fee for her appeal against the Governor’s decision of 4 July 2006 upholding the expropriation decision and fixing the amount of compensation at PLN 725,232. As a result, the Gdańsk Regional Administrative Court had rejected the appeal on 29 September 2006. The applicant’s subsequent efforts to be granted leave to appeal out of time had been unsuccessful. The applicant had thereby lost the opportunity of challenging the expropriation decision and the amount of compensation due.
75. The Government relied also on the fact that in the context of the expropriation proceedings the applicant had failed to:
- complain about the length of the expropriation proceedings by alleging a violation of her right under the 2004 Act to have her case examined within a reasonable time in judicial proceedings;
- complain under Article 37 of the Code of Administrative Procedure about the administrative authorities’ failure to give decisions within a reasonable time;
- claim compensation, in civil proceedings, for damage caused by the excessive length of the expropriation proceedings.
76. The Court reiterates at the outset that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies referred to in Article 35 of the Convention obliges those seeking to bring their case against the State before an international judicial organ to use first the remedies provided by the national legal system. In order to comply with the rule, normal recourse should be had by an applicant to remedies which are available and sufficient to afford redress in respect of the breaches alleged (see, among many other authorities, Aksoy v. Turkey, 18 December 1996, §§ 51–52, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI). The condition of exhaustion of domestic remedies is not satisfied if a remedy has been declared inadmissible for failure to comply with a formal requirement (see, among many other authorities, Ben Salah Adraqui and Dhaime v. Spain (dec.), no. 45023/98, decision of 27 April 2000, ECHR 2000-IV).
77. In so far as the Government’s arguments relate to the expropriation and compensation proceedings, the Court notes that it was open to the applicant to challenge the expropriation decision and the amount of compensation determined therein by way of an appeal to the administrative courts of first, and ultimately also of second instance. The domestic authorities rejected her appeal to the administrative court as she had failed to pay the court fee. She thus failed to have recourse to a relevant remedy concerning both the expropriation and the amount of compensation which she then challenged before the Court.
78. It follows that this part of the application must be declared inadmissible for failure to exhaust relevant domestic remedies.
79. In so far as the Government argued that the applicant should have had recourse to specific remedies applicable in respect of length of proceedings, the Court observes that the applicant did not complain before the Court about an alleged breach of her right to have her case heard within a reasonable time, within the meaning of Article 6 of the Convention.
80. The Government further submitted that the applicant had failed to seek compensation for profits lost during the period when the authorities had occupied her property on the basis of the requisition order.
81. The Court observes that the applicant failed to seek compensation in administrative proceedings for profits lost during the period when the authorities had occupied her land on the basis of the requisition order, as indicated in the decision of the Gdańsk Regional Court of 6 December 2006. In so far as the present application can be said also to concern lost profits, it must be declared inadmissible in this part for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. However, the scope of the present application is broader as the applicant complained about all the measures and decisions given in her case taken together and their cumulative impact on the effective exercise of her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
82. The Court notes that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The Government
83. The Government submitted that the expropriation of the applicant’s land had been indispensable for the realisation of a public goal – the broadening and improvement of Słowacki Street – planned under the local land development plans. That road was one of the main thoroughfares of the Gdańsk-Gdynia-Sopot agglomeration. It provided access to the city airport and connected the city with its western ring-road. Traffic congestion in Gdańsk was very serious, especially in the street concerned. The improvement of the roadway would definitely contribute to solving the communication problems in the city. This had been confirmed by the Supreme Administrative Court in the expropriation proceedings.
84. They further argued that the expropriation of the applicant’s land was in accordance with law. All the decisions issued in connection with the proceedings had been based on the relevant legal provisions, notably the 1997 Land Administration Act. The proceedings had been conducted in conformity with the applicable procedural provisions. At each stage of the proceedings the applicant had had opportunities to present her position and use the available remedies. Her justified objections had been taken into account.
85. The Government submitted that the requisition order had been based on Article 122 of the 1998 Land Administration Act. Its lawfulness had been re-examined and it had been upheld by the Pomorze Governor’s decision of 5 December 2000 and subsequently by the Supreme Administrative Court in its judgment of 25 July 2001 (see paragraph 43 above). The applicant’s complaints about the requisition order and its consequences had not taken the ratio legis behind the order into account. It was necessary precisely in cases where the expropriation proceedings had not been finalised because the party had appealed against the expropriation and where the public investment works had nevertheless to go ahead. A requisition order was necessary where the need to protect an important public interest, including the national economic interest, required that immediate measures be taken and where there was a risk that delay would impede the realisation of the public-interest purpose for which the expropriation had been decided. A requisition order did not automatically infringe the owner’s rights although it limited them temporarily.
86. The Government were of the view that in the present case the applicant had not suffered an excessive burden. She had owned forty-three plots, only seven of which had been affected by the measures complained of. Before the expropriation proceedings had started she had not used the plots. They had remained undeveloped, with no technical infrastructure on them. They had in fact been wasteland, considered for tax purposes as farmland. They had not brought any income to the applicant. She remained the owner of most of her land and there were no obstacles to her using the remaining plots, access to which had been possible during the construction work. In any case, the construction work on the applicant’s plots had been completed within a short period of time. Therefore any inconvenience that might have resulted from the work carried out on the plots concerned could not have been serious. In addition, the modernisation of Słowacki Street must have improved access to the remaining plots of the applicant’s land.
87. The Government concluded that the interference complained of had been prescribed by law, had pursued the general interest and had not imposed an excessive burden on the applicant.
(b) The applicant
88. The applicant submitted that her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions had been breached. Despite the fact that she had been the lawful owner of her land, the decisions given by the authorities had deprived her of her right to use and obtain profits from the property.
89. In particular, the authorities had given a requisition order in the absence of a final and enforceable expropriation decision. The appellate proceedings against the expropriation decision had been pending at that time. The reasoning of the requisition order had been laconic. The authorities had failed to justify it by referring to relevant and sufficient grounds to show that heavy losses would indeed be incurred by a delay in its enforcement. As a result of the non-final decision being subject to immediate enforcement, the applicant had suffered a serious breach of her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
90. The applicant referred to the Court’s judgment in the case of AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, Series A no. 108. She expressed the view that the procedures conducted in her case had failed to afford her a reasonable opportunity of putting her case to the responsible authorities. Her property had been occupied and the construction work had started when the expropriation proceedings were still pending and substantive questions crucial for the assessment of the lawfulness of the expropriation were under examination by the authorities. The work on her land should not have gone ahead on the basis of the requisition order – which was, by its nature, only a temporary measure – in the absence of a final and enforceable decision on expropriation and compensation.
91. The applicant argued that the measures taken in her case had been unlawful, in particular because the authorities had breached Article 122 of the 1997 Land Administration Act. That provision allowed for a requisition order to be given only if a decision on expropriation had already been given. In the applicant’s case no final expropriation decision had existed at the time when the requisition order had been given, and the work had proceeded on the basis of that order.
92. The applicant concluded, referring to the case of Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden (23 September 1982, Series A no. 52), that in her case, having regard to its circumstances seen as a whole, a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by measures depriving her of her possessions had not been respected.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) The applicable principles
93. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which guarantees the right to the protection of property, contains three distinct rules: “the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, ‘distinct’ in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule” (see, as a recent authority with further references, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 52, ECHR 2007-...).
94. In order to be compatible with the general rule set forth in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1, an interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 107, ECHR 2000-I).
95. A taking of property under the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value will normally constitute a disproportionate interference that cannot be justified under Article 1. The provision does not, however, guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances, since legitimate objectives of “public interest” may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see Papachelas v. Greece [GC], no. 31423/96, § 48, ECHR 1999-II, with further references).
96. The Court will generally respect the domestic authorities’ judgment as to what is in the general interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 49, ECHR 1999-V). However, it cannot remain passive, in exercising the European supervision incumbent on it, where a domestic court’s interpretation of a legal act appears “unreasonable, arbitrary or ... inconsistent ... with the principles underlying the Convention” (see Pla and Puncernau v. Andorra, no. 69498/01, § 59, ECHR 2004-VIII). The State has obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to take measures necessary to protect the right of property and it is the Court’s duty to ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the Contracting Parties to the Convention, and not to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by a national court unless Convention rights and freedoms may have been infringed (see Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal, Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 83, ECHR 2007-I).
(b) Application of the foregoing principles to the circumstances of the case
(i) The nature of the interference
97. The Court notes that it has already declared the applicant’s complaint concerning the expropriation proper and the amount of compensation she received inadmissible. It must now examine the remainder of the application. It observes that the gist of the applicant’s complaint is that all her efforts to stop the construction work in the absence of a final expropriation decision failed.
98. The Court notes that the measures complained of did not deprive the applicant of her ownership, but subjected the use of her possessions to significant restrictions; hence, it may be regarded as a measure to control the use of property.
(ii) The lawfulness of the interference
99. The Court recalls that an essential condition for an interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful. The rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II). The principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law be sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see, among other authorities, Hentrich v. France, 22 September 1994, § 42, Series A no. 296-A, and Lithgow and Others v. the United Kingdom, 8 July 1986, § 110, Series A no. 102).
100. In this connection the Court reiterates that it is in the first place for the domestic authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 86, ECHR 2005 - ).
101. In the present case the proceedings concerning expropriation and the amount of compensation to be paid were still pending when the authorities decided to issue the requisition order in respect of the property concerned. The Court observes that, under Article 130 of the Polish Code of Administrative Procedure, lodging an appeal against a first-instance administrative decision suspends the execution of that decision. However, the administrative authorities are empowered to order that a decision be immediately enforceable pending the appeal in the situations specified in Article 108 of the Code of Administrative Procedure, namely when it is necessary for the protection of life or limb, or to protect the national economy against serious damage. Furthermore, a specific regulation in the context of expropriation proceedings – Article 122 of the Land Administration Act – empowers the administrative authorities to allow entities commissioned to carry out public works to take possession of land in respect of which a first-instance expropriation decision has been given. So the requisition order had a legal basis in domestic law. Furthermore, in the proceedings in which the applicant contested the lawfulness of the building permits, the authorities, including the administrative courts, held that the permits in question had conferred on the building company a right to take possession of her land necessary for the building permit purposes.
102. The Court is therefore prepared to accept that the interference complained of satisfied the requirement of lawfulness within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(iii) The aim of the interference
103. Any interference with a right of property can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public interest. The Court reiterates that, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, 17 October 2002, § 85, and Elia S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 37710/97, § 77, ECHR 2001-IX).
104. In the present case the Court accepts that the measures contested by the applicant pursued the legitimate aim of furthering a municipal plan to improve the road situated in the vicinity of the applicant’s land.
(iv) The proportionality of the interference
105. The Court must next examine whether the interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions struck the requisite fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, or whether it imposed a disproportionate and excessive burden on the applicant (see, among many other authorities, Jahn and Others, cited above, § 93).
106. In the area of land development and town planning, the Contracting States should enjoy a wide margin of appreciation in order to implement their policies (see Terazzi S.r.l., and Elia S.r.l., both cited above, and Skibińscy v. Poland, no. 52589/99, § 59, 14 November 2006). In particular, in the area of road construction this wide margin of appreciation is justified by the fact that excessive delays could entail serious expenditure to the public purse, over and above the planned costs and increase nuisance suffered by owners of properties adjacent to the land on which those projects are carried out.
Nevertheless, in the exercise of its power of review, the Court must determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions (see, mutatis mutandis, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, cited above, § 69).
107. The Court appreciates that the enforcement of a requisition order in the absence of a final and enforceable decision on the merits of the expropriation and compensation case can give rise to serious and sometimes irreparable restrictions on the exercise of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of one’s possessions. However, it has to have regard to the specific circumstances of an individual case. In this connection, the Court first notes the Government’s submission that only a small part of the applicant’s property was affected by the measures complained of.
108. The Court next notes that the applicant’s land was of an agricultural character. It has not been argued, let alone shown, that there were houses or technical infrastructure on that land or that it was developed in any other way. It further notes that the applicant did not challenge the Government’s argument that before 2000, when the expropriation proceedings had started, the land had not been used for agricultural purposes and had lain fallow for an unspecified period of time. It was not in dispute between the parties that throughout the material time the applicant did not live on the land concerned. Hence, the applicant has not shown that the measures complained of interfered with any specific use, economic or otherwise, to which she had put the land.
109. Although Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, in order to assess the proportionality of the interference the Court looks at the degree of protection from arbitrariness that is afforded by the proceedings in the case (see Hentrich, cited above, § 46). In particular, the Court examines whether the proceedings concerning the interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions were attended by the basic procedural safeguards. It has already held that an interference cannot be legitimate in the absence of adversarial proceedings that comply with the principle of equality of arms, enabling argument to be presented on the issues relevant for the outcome of a case (see Hentrich, cited above, § 42, and Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002-IV). A comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable procedures (see AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 24 October 1986, Series A no. 108, p. 19, § 55; Hentrich, cited above, p. 21, § 49; and Jokela, cited above, § 45).
110. The Court has already noted that the requisition order was given when the expropriation and compensation proceedings were still pending. However, the authorities were not authorised to proceed immediately with its enforcement. Despite the fact that the purpose of the requisition order was to speed up the development of the land, it was open to the applicant to challenge that order, first by way of appeal to a higher administrative authority and, subsequently, by appealing to the administrative court. The Court further observes that it was also open to the applicant to challenge the measures taken by the authorities in respect of her property by contesting the road construction building permit. She availed herself of these opportunities. The cases were vigorously argued in two parallel sets of proceedings. There is no indication that during the proceedings the applicant, who was represented by lawyers, was unable to present her arguments to the authorities.
111. In addition, the proceedings before the administrative court were attended by full judicial procedural guarantees.
112. The Court notes that in its judgment of 25 July 2001, concerning the applicant’s appeal against the requisition order, the Supreme Administrative Court observed that the fact that the municipality had no final legal title to occupy the plots concerned was the last and only remaining obstacle to starting the construction works, thus impeding the progress in the already well-advanced project and rendering ineffective expropriations effected with respect to the neighbouring properties. In its judgment of 27 June 2003, concerning the applicant’s challenge to the building permit, the Supreme Administrative Court observed that a requisition order did not replace the expropriation decision and did not deprive the owner of his or her ownership rights, but at most it limited them temporarily until the completion of the expropriation proceedings. It further noted that the applicant’s case demonstrated that the requisition orders were in practice necessary. In certain cases, it would have been impossible to realise the public-benefit purposes for which expropriation proceedings had been instituted without having recourse to requisition orders.
The Court is satisfied that the domestic judicial authorities carefully weighed the arguments in favour of the applicant on the one hand and, on the other, those indicating that the requisition order was, in the circumstances of the case, necessary.
113. The Court further observes that throughout the proceedings concerning the requisition order and after it was ultimately upheld by the Supreme Administrative Court on 25 July 2001, the first-instance decision on expropriation, given on 27 June 2000, remained in existence. At no point in time did a situation arise where work was conducted on the applicant’s land on the basis of that order in the absence of any decision on expropriation (compare and contrast, Kolona v. Cyprus, no. 28025/03, § 72, 27 September 2007). Nor did a situation ever arise where the authorities allowed public construction work to be carried out on the applicant’s property without valid land development plans grounding the expropriation decisions in the public interest. At no point in time, therefore, was the applicant left in a state of uncertainty as to whether her land would ultimately be subject to expropriation (compare and contrast, Skibińscy, cited above, §§ 79 and 90).
114. The Court further notes that the construction work on the land concerned started in August 2001. Hence, no work had commenced on the applicant’s property before the lawfulness of the requisition order was examined by the Supreme Administrative Court in its judgment of 25 July 2001.
115. Furthermore, the Court notes that the fact that the requisition order was given while the expropriation and compensation proceedings were still pending had no bearing on the applicant’s procedural or substantive rights arising in these parallel sets of proceedings. The authorities continued to examine the applicant’s successive appeals. Neither the requisition order nor the building permit affected in any way the amount of compensation which was ultimately paid to the applicant. Hence, the fact that the authorities issued the requisition order and the building permit neither thwarted the applicant’s efforts to obtain adequate compensation nor prevented her from arguing her case.
116. The Court observes that in the expropriation proceedings the applicant did not oppose the expropriation as such but, rather, challenged the amount of compensation offered. Thus, a requisition order in respect of land which in any event had not been used by the applicant for any specific purpose cannot be said to have imposed an excessive burden on her.
117. The Court further observes that the applicant obtained compensation in the amount of PLN 554,898 as early as 27 February 2002. Merely six months after construction work had started on the land concerned. Therefore, she had already obtained most of the compensation in the amount of PLN 725,232 to which she was ultimately entitled under the final expropriation and compensation decision of 4 July 2006. Hence, the applicant’s case differs from cases where applicants were deprived of their ownership and subsequently had to wait a long time before compensation was fixed or paid to them (compare and contrast, Malama v. Greece, no. 43622/98, § 51, ECHR 2001-II). Moreover, the passage of time and the resulting increase in land prices was taken into account by the authorities when the final compensation figure was calculated.
118. Having regard to the circumstances of the case seen as a whole, the Court concludes that a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights and that the burden on the applicant was neither disproportionate nor excessive.
119. There has therefore been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares admissible the applicant’s complaint about the authorities’ failure to stop the construction work in the absence of a final expropriation decision and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 November 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early David Thór Björgvinsson Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione di P1-1
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA BARBARA WIÅšNIEWSKA C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 9072/02)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
29 novembre 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Barbara Wiśniewska c. Polonia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
David Thór Björgvinsson, Presidente, Lech Garlicki Giorgio Nicolaou, Päivi Hirvelä Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić Vincenzo A. De Gaetano, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Sezione Cancelliere,
Avendo deliberato in privato 8 novembre 2011,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 9072/02) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino polacco, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), 1 febbraio 2002.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato con OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica in Białystok. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero di Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse che un ordine di requisizione e l'espropriazione della sua terra erano state in violazione del suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
4. 12 giugno 2007 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Decise anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Nel 1996 l’Ufficio Municipale Gdańsk emise un'approvazione iniziale per un progetto di sviluppo su terra posseduta dal richiedente (decyzja o warunkach zabudowy i zagospodarowania terenu) prevedendo, sulla base di un piano di sviluppo di terra locale adottata nel 1993 per il miglioramento e riemergendo di Strada di Słowacki e la costruzione di una carreggiata. 18 dicembre 1997 il Consiglio Municipale di Gdansk adottò un piano di sviluppo di terra locale per la costruzione di un congiungimento di strada nel vicinato della terra del richiedente, indicando che c'era un bisogno incalzante di migliorare ed allargare una strada che conduce dal centro urbano all'aeroporto. 21 dicembre 1999 l’Ufficio Municipale di Gdańsk (Urząd Miejski) emesso un'altra approvazione per la costruzione della carreggiata, basato sulle disposizioni del piano di sviluppo di terra locale adottate 18 dicembre 1997.
6. 29 marzo 2000 il Governatore di Pomorze approvò un progetto di costruzione per la carreggiata.
A. Procedimenti di Espropriazione
7. Il richiedente possedette quaranta-tre aree di una superficie totale di 4.77 ettari. A settembre 1999 una stima del valore di sette aree, mentre coprendo 6,656 metri di piazza, fu preparato dall’esperto R.Ż. nella prospettiva della loro espropriazione. Che esperto valutò il valore di mercato della terra a 479,919 zlotys polacchi (PLN).
8. 21 ottobre 1999 un negoziazione incontrando fu contenuto al Ufficio Municipale di Gdansk. La città offrì PLN 479,912 come risarcimento per aree N. 47/30, 47/32, 47/34, 47/36, 55/7 che 60/1 e 61, a PLN 70.08 per metro quadrato hanno calcolato sulla base della stima Settembrina del 1999. Il richiedente rifiutò di accettare questo prezzo e dibatté che il valore di mercato di un metro quadrato di terra simile nella città era verso PLN 600.
9. A febbraio 2000 un altro competente, J.K., valutò il valore delle proprietà del richiedente a PLN 63.70 per metro di piazza, basato sul carattere agricolo della terra. 2 marzo 2000, assegnando a che rapporto, il Ufficio Municipale di Gdansk, agendo in favore del Sindaco di Gdańsk fisso un tempo-limite di due - mesi per il richiedente per concludere un contratto per la vendita della sua terra per la somma di PLN 479,912. L'informò che se le ulteriori negoziazioni andassero a vuoto, procedimenti di espropriazione sarebbero avviati e la terra sarebbe espropriata contro pagamento del risarcimento nell'importo di PLN 423,987.
10. 26 aprile 2000 un altro negoziazione incontrando fu contenuto. L'Ufficio Municipale propose le condizioni identico a quelli proposti ad ottobre 1999. Il richiedente reiterò la sua posizione come al prezzo e presentò che lei avrebbe accettato proprietà di sostituzione all'interno dei limiti del municipio come risarcimento.
11. Sul 2000 procedimenti di espropriazione di 8 maggio fu avviato.
12. In 29 maggio 2000 un'udienza amministrativa fu contenuta nel Ufficio Municipale di Gdansk. Il richiedente propose che la Città avrebbe dovuto dare PLN 300 per metro quadrato per la sua terra, ma la sua offerta fu respinta. Il richiedente suggerì di nuovo che lei dovrebbe essere data le altre aree in cambio per la sua terra, ma che soluzione fu respinta sulla base che la Città non aveva qualsiasi aree appropriate alla sua disposizione.
13. A giugno 2000 J.K competenti. aggiornò la stima, mentre avendo riguardo ad al passaggio di tempo e l'aumento in prezzi di mercato. Lei valutò il prezzo della terra del richiedente a PLN 439,296. Di stesso mese, un esperto commissionato col richiedente valutò il prezzo della terra a PLN 2,374,749.
14. 27 giugno 2000 il Sindaco di Gdańsk diede una decisione con la quale le sette aree assegnarono ad in paragrafo 7 sopra fu espropriato. L'importo del risarcimento per la terra ed il recinto costruito su sé fu fissato a PLN 465,537. Sarebbe pagato entro 14 giorni dalla data sulla quale la decisione di espropriazione divenne definitivo. Lui osservò che l'importo del risarcimento era stato fissato sulla base di una stima preparata da un esperto, con riferimento a prezzi di aree simili sul beni immobili locale introdotto sul mercato a giugno 2000.
15. Il richiedente fece appello. Lei dibatté che la decisione era in violazione di sezioni 128, 130 e 134 della Terra Amministrazione Atto 1997. Lei presentò che fu basato sulla stima stesa a settembre 1999 che più rifletteva prezzi correnti di terra. Lei si riferì alla giurisprudenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema secondo la quale il risarcimento per terra espropriata dovrebbe prendere nell'esame prezzi di mercato locali e correnti per tipi simili di terra e, anche, prezzi di simile terra venduti dal municipio con modo di nave appoggio. Lei assegnò un privatamente stima autorizzata preparata da un esperto munito di certificato (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra) secondo che il prezzo di 1 metro quadrato di terra comparabile in Gdańsk a quel tempo era PLN 356.
16. 25 gennaio 2001 l’ Ufficio Regionale di Pomorze, agendo a favore del Governatore di Pomorze, sostenne la decisione di espropriazione, mentre notando che era stato dato per implementare il piano di sviluppo di terra locale. L'espropriazione era perciò nell'interesse pubblico. Le negoziazioni fra le parti erano andate a vuoto. Due stime stese per il fine delle negoziazioni erano coerenti ed indicate, nella luce di prezzi pagata per proprietà di un carattere simile ed ubicazione che il valore di mercato della proprietà riguardata era PLN 60-70 per 1 metro quadrato. Nelle circostanze, la decisione era legale.
17. Il richiedente fece appello alla Corte amministrativa Suprema. Lei dibatté che il prezzo il municipio aveva offerto durante il foro di negoziazioni nessuna relazione ragionevole al valore di mercato della sua terra. Il municipio aveva rifiutato di offrire la sua proprietà di sostituzione, nonostante il fatto che al tempo stava vendendo proprietà numerose ad acquirenti privati tramite nave offerta.
Ad un'udienza sostenuta in 23 maggio 2001 il richiedente fatto domanda per una sospensione dell'esecuzione della decisione di espropriazione. La corte rifiutò, mentre notando che l'esecuzione della decisione era stata sospesa ex lege a causa delle autorità l'insuccesso di ' per presentare la loro replica al ricorso del richiedente all'interno del tempo-limite.
18. Con una sentenza di 25 luglio 2001 la Corte amministrativa Suprema annullò la decisione del Governatore. La corte osservò che la modernizzazione della Strada di Słowacki era nell'interesse pubblico come sé era una parte del N.ro 7 strada di tronco. Notò inoltre che nella luce dei documenti nella causa registri non si aveva mostrato senza possibilità di dubbio che l'espropriazione di tutte l'aree designate di richiedente era stata necessaria per implementare il progetto di costruzione di strada. Nelle loro decisioni le autorità erano andate a vuoto a riferirsi alle mappe e piani preparò in collegamento col piano di sviluppo di terra locale e costruzione di strada proietta mostrare che le aree riguardate furono coperte davvero con quelli progetti.
19. La corte rivolse inoltre la questione del risarcimento fissata con la decisione contestata. Notò che le autorità, quando sostenendo l'udienza amministrativa in 29 maggio 2000, non era riuscito a rispettare le disposizioni procedurali ed attinenti. Sotto le disposizioni di Articolo 89 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa il fine di un'udienza amministrativa era assicurare, in una situazione dove c'era una discrepanza fra opinioni competenti come a risarcimento che gli esperti sono stati messi in dubbio e la discrepanza delucidò. Inoltre, le parti sarebbero dovute essere date un'opportunità di mettere questioni agli esperti e fare dichiarazioni orali di fronte all'autorità amministrativa. Nessuno simile misure erano state prese. La corte notò che l'udienza era stata contenuta prima della data sulla quale la scorsa opinione competente riguardo al risarcimento era stata preparata. C'era nessuno impermeabile nell'archivio di causa che questa scorsa opinione mai era stata notificata sul richiedente.
20. La sentenza con le sue ragioni scritto fu notificata sull'avvocato del richiedente 9 agosto 2001.
21. L'espropriazione e procedimenti di risarcimento di fronte all'autorità di appello furono condotti più tardi di nuovo. Il Ufficio Regionale di Pomorze informò le parti che l'udienza amministrativa sarebbe contenuta di nuovo e sarebbe richiesta il Ufficio Municipale di Gdansk per presentare altre prove come ai prezzi di proprietà simili. Ultimamente due udienze furono contenute, il 2001 e 22 gennaio 2002 di 3 settembre. Tre esperti furono interrogati. Le parti furono invitate per consultare l'archivio di causa.
22. 25 febbraio 2002 il Governatore di Pomorze sostenne la decisione di prima - istanza nella sua parte riguardo all'espropriazione. Lui fissò l'importo del risarcimento per essere pagato al richiedente a PLN 554,898. Lui si riferì alle opinioni competenti preparate per i fini dei procedimenti e spiegò quali attestano e conclusioni erano state considerate credibili. Lui reiterò che la terra riguardata era di una natura agricola.
23. Il risarcimento fu pagato al richiedente 27 febbraio 2002. Lei l'accettò, ma osservò che l'importo era insoddisfacente. Lei fece appello successivamente, mentre presentando che il metodo col quale era stato fissato il risarcimento era al suo danno che l'autorità di secondo-istanza era andata a vuoto a rispettare la guida contenuto nella sentenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema e che l'importo del risarcimento non corrispose ragionevolmente al valore della terra.
24. In 31 maggio 2005 la Corte amministrativa Suprema annullò la decisione contestata, mentre trovò che il metodo stabiliva il valore della terra espropriata non era in ottemperanza con le regolamentazioni legali ed applicabili. In particolare, l'opinione competente preparata con J.F., si appellò pesantemente su con l'autorità di prima - istanza, fu basato su prezzi applicabile a giugno 2000. I procedimenti furono condotti successivamente di nuovo. Il Governatore invitò le parti a presentare prova nuova e consultare l'archivio di causa. Un altro perito fu nominato e presentò il suo rapporto di valutazione, mentre valutando il valore della proprietà del richiedente a PLN 725,231.
28 aprile 2006 un'altra udienza amministrativa fu contenuta di fronte all'autorità di secondo-istanza. Un tempo-limite fu fissato per le parti per presentare prova nuova. Sia il richiedente ed il Ufficio Municipale di Gdansk si giovò a di quel il diritto.
25. 4 luglio 2006 il Governatore emise una decisione nuova. Sostenne la decisione di espropriazione di prima - istanza ed aumentò l'importo del risarcimento a PLN 725,232, con riferimento al rapporto competente e nuovo.
26. 2 agosto 2006 il richiedente, rappresentato con un avvocato fece appello, mentre presentando argomenti simile a quelli su che lei si era appellata nel suo ricorso precedente.
27. 3 agosto 2006 il richiedente revocò la procura data al suo avvocato.
28. 29 settembre 2006 la Corte amministrativa di Gdańsk respinse il suo ricorso, mentre notando che il richiedente non era riuscito a pagare parcelle di corte. Questa decisione fu notificata sull'avvocato nuovo del richiedente 18 ottobre 2006.
22 ottobre 2006 il richiedente richiese la corte per accordare il suo permesso retrospettivo per fare appello fuori termini. Lei presentò che lei aveva respinto un avvocato ed aveva trattenuto un altro uno durante i procedimenti di appello. Lei non era stata consapevole che la parcella di corte sarebbe dovuta essere pagata.
29. 29 dicembre 2006 la Corte amministrativa di Gdańsk rifiutò di accordare il richiedente permesso retrospettivo per fare appello fuori termini, mentre considerando che lei non era riuscita ad informare la corte sui cambi allegato nella sua rappresentanza legale e dimostrare che lei non era stata a colpa nel non riuscire a pagare la parcella di corte. L'avvocato nuovo del richiedente fece appello contro quel la decisione.
30. 2 marzo 2007 la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne il rifiuto per accordare il permesso di richiedente per fare appello fuori termini. Osservò che il richiedente non era riuscito a mostrare che lei non era stata a colpa nel trascurare pagare la parcella di corte. Lei aveva informato la corte di prima - istanza della sua decisione per revocarla il potere di primo avvocato per agire sul suo conto 24 ottobre 2004. Sotto le disposizioni procedurali ed applicabili che erano la data sulla quale la revoca aveva preso effetto.
31. Di conseguenza, la decisione di prima - istanza sull'espropriazione ed il risarcimento divenne definitivo. 27 aprile 2007 il Municipio di Gdańsk pagò il richiedente l'importo in essere di PLN 170,333.
32. 20 settembre 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Gdansk respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente con la quale lei chiese il risarcimento per il fatto che dal settembre 2000 in avanti il municipio stava usando la sua terra senza una decisione di espropriazione valida. La corte considerò che la rivendicazione del richiedente non poteva essere esaminata di fronte ad una corte civile e potrebbe essere dovuta per essere data con in procedimenti amministrativi.
B. Procedimenti per far sospendere l'esecuzione della decisione di espropriazione
33. Con una decisione di 16 maggio 2001 il Pomorze Ufficio Regionale, agendo ex l'officio, sospese l'esecuzione della decisione di espropriazione data 25 gennaio 2001 (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra), avendo riguardo ad al fatto che il richiedente aveva depositato un ricorso contro sé. Si riferì a sezione 9 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra.
34. L’Ufficio della Gestione delle Strade di Gdańsk (Zarząd Dróg gli Zieleni) fece appello contro quel la decisione. Dibatté che il fatto mero che il richiedente aveva contestato l'espropriazione di prima - istanza e decisione di risarcimento non poteva giustificare il sospendere della sua esecuzione. La costruzione della strada con la quale era poi bene avanzò, non dovrebbe essere differito come questo comporterebbe perdita finanziaria e seria. Loro si riferirono inoltre alle difficoltà tecniche e concrete nella costruzione di strada e le sue logistiche, causò col fatto che lavoro che già aveva cominciato non poteva essere continuato sulla terra del richiedente, come l'impossibilità di usare che terra per fini di trasporto.
35. 29 giugno 2001 il Presidente dell'Alloggio Nazionale ed Ufficio dello Sviluppo della Terra Locale annullò la decisione contestata su motivi formali ed ordinò che il problema di esecuzione sia riesaminato.
36. 10 agosto 2001 l’Ufficio Regionale si Pomorze, agendo ex officio, riprese l'esecuzione della decisione di espropriazione, mentre avendo riguardo ad alla sentenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema di 25 luglio 2001 che respinge il ricorso del richiedente contro l'ordine di domanda (vedere paragrafo 43 sotto). Osservò che seguendo che sentenza, l'Ufficio aveva un diritto per prendere proprietà della terra riguardata che fu avuto bisogno per il progetto di costruzione.
C. Procedimenti riguardo all'ordine di requisizione a riguardo della terra del richiedente
37. Dopo la decisione di espropriazione di prima - istanza era stato dato 27 giugno 2000 (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra) e quando il ricorso del richiedente contro sé era pendente, 7 agosto 2000 il Sindaco di Gdańsk emise un ordine di domanda che concede l’Ufficio della Gestione delle Strade di Gdansk, sulla base di Articolo 122 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra portare proprietà della proprietà del richiedente con una prospettiva a lavoro di costruzione iniziale. Lui affermò che era necessario per procedere con l'attuazione del progetto di costruzione di strada già bene-avanzato ed ostacolare costi sociali e finanziari seri che l'ulteriore ritardo nella realizzazione di che progetto causerebbe.
38. Il richiedente fece appello contro che decisione, enfatizzando che era illegale. Lei dibatté che nessuna definitivo decisione di espropriazione in riguardo della sua proprietà era stata data. I motivi invocati col Sindaco nell'ordine di domanda furono redatti in termini molto larghi. Il Sindaco non era riuscito ad indicare, con riferimento alle circostanze concrete della causa perché era necessario nella causa del richiedente per ancora imporre tale restrizione seria sull'esercizio di lei diritti di proprietà validi. Nessuno ragioni attinenti e sufficienti per l'occupazione della sua terra erano state avanzate. In particolare, il fatto mero che procedimenti di espropriazione erano stati avviati e lavoro di costruzione stava quasi per cominciare non garantisca la conclusione che tale restrizione seria dei suoi diritti di proprietà è stata giustificata.
39. A settembre 2000 lavoro di costruzione di strada cominciò sulle aree vicine. Nessun lavoro era stato eseguito ancora sulla terra del richiedente. 5 settembre 2000 il richiedente fece domanda al Gdańsk Ispettore dei Lavori dell'Edificio Regionale per il lavoro sulla sua terra essere fermatosi. 6 ottobre 2000 l'Ispettore informò il richiedente che nessun lavoro era stato condotto ancora sulla sua terra. Il 20 ottobre 2000 un’ispezione sul posto, in presenza del richiedente confermò quel fatto.
40. 5 dicembre 2000 il Governatore di Pomorze respinse il ricorso del richiedente contro l'ordine di domanda di 7 agosto 2000, mentre girando pienamente gli argomenti si appellati su con l'autorità di prima - istanza.
Il richiedente fece appello contro che decisione di fronte alla Corte amministrativa Suprema, chiedendo alla corte di sospendere l'esecuzione dell'ordine di domanda.
41. In 23 maggio 2001 la corte rifiutò la richiesta del richiedente per una sospensione dell'esecuzione dell'ordine di domanda, mentre sostenendo che concedere la sua richiesta avrebbe sconfitto il molto fine dell'ordine di domanda.
42. 15 giugno 2001 il Ufficio Regionale di Pomorze richiese alla Corte amministrativa Suprema per dare priorità all'esame del ricorso del richiedente contro l'ordine di domanda, mentre riferendosi al fatto che il lavoro di costruzione era stato differito seriamente perché nessun lavoro potrebbe essere fatto sulla terra del richiedente. L'investimento significativo di finanziamenti pubblici, lo stadio avanzato di realizzazione del progetto ed il disturbo serio per trafficare causò col lavoro di costruzione mandato a chiamare priorità per essere dato alla causa.
43. Con una sentenza di 25 luglio 2001 la Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse il ricorso del richiedente. Osservò che i procedimenti di espropriazione erano stati condotti nella prospettiva di modernizzazione della rete stradale della città, facilitando accesso all'aeroporto locale e riducendo il numero di incidenti stradali sulla Strada di Słowacki. Questo chiaramente era nell'interesse pubblico. Il fatto che il municipio aveva nessun definitivo titolo legale per occupare la proprietà del richiedente era l'ostacolo rimanente e solo ad avviando il lavoro di costruzione su quel la proprietà. Impedì anche il progredire del lavoro di costruzione eseguito sulle proprietà vicine. La Corte si riferì ad Articolo 122 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra che previde espressamente per ordini di domanda nell'assenza di definitivo decisioni di espropriazione se un ritardo avesse fatto l'attuazione di un progetto di pubblico-interesse impossibile.
D. Procedimenti riguardo al permesso di lavori di costruzione della strada
44. 13 dicembre 2000 la società commissionata col municipio per eseguire il lavoro - l’Ufficio della Gestione delle Strade di Gdansk summenzionato -fece domanda all Ufficio Municipale di Gdansk per una licenza per far eseguire dei lavori di costruzione sulla terra del richiedente. Ad aprile 2001 il richiedente fece domanda per i procedimenti per essere sospeso, mentre dibattendo che nell'assenza della definitivo decisione su espropriazione l'Ufficio non aveva nessun diritto per prendere proprietà della sua terra. 13 aprile 2001 l'Ufficio della Gestione della Strada richiese l'Ufficio Municipale per prendere passi per chiarire le difficoltà riguardo alla condizione giuridica della terra del richiedente, mentre dibattendo che lavoro di costruzione su che tende di strada aveva avanzato, con l'eccezione dei 300 metri progettata sulla terra del richiedente.
45. I procedimenti riguardo alla richiesta per la licenza di edificio furono sospesi successivamente, le autorità che hanno riguardo ad al fatto che nell'assenza della decisione di espropriazione la società di costruzione aveva nessuno diritto prendere proprietà della terra, e che sotto le regolamentazioni di edificio applicabili tale diritto era un requisito indispensabile essenziale per richiedere una licenza di edificio.
46. 10 agosto 2001 il Ufficio Regionale di Pomorze riprese i procedimenti, mentre avendo riguardo ad alla sentenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema di 25 luglio 2001 che respinge il ricorso del richiedente contro l'ordine di domanda (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra). Osservò che che sentenza aveva conferito sulla società di edificio il diritto per prendere proprietà della terra del richiedente per fini di costruzione, anche nell'assenza di una definitivo decisione di espropriazione confermata con la corte amministrativa.
47. 14 agosto 2001 il Ufficio Regionale di Pomorze emise la licenza di edificio come per la richiesta, con ciò autorizzava la società di costruzione per avviare il lavoro di costruzione sulle aree riguardò. Il richiedente fece appello contro che decisione, reiterando che come lungo come le non era stato espropriato nessuno aveva diritto a costruire sulla sua terra.
48. 16 agosto 2001 la società di costruzione prese proprietà della terra del richiedente. Il lavoro di costruzione cominciò brevemente dopo.
49. 12 novembre 2001 l'Ispettore dei Lavori dell'Edificio Principale respinse il ricorso del richiedente e sostenne la licenza di edificio. Il richiedente fece appello, mentre essenzialmente reiterando che la licenza di edificio non poteva essere data perché i procedimenti di espropriazione non erano stati conclusi.
50. In 22 maggio 2002 la costruzione della strada fu completata ufficialmente. 23 gennaio 2002 fu resa una decisione di autorizzazione all’uso della strada col pubblico.
51. 27 giugno 2003 la Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse il ricorso del richiedente contro la licenza di edificio. Respinse gli argomenti del richiedente che la società di edificio non aveva avuto nessun diritto per prendere proprietà della sua terra. Notò che la decisione di espropriazione di prima - istanza era stata data 7 giugno 2000 (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). 7 agosto 2000 l'ordine di requisizione di prima - istanza era stato dato (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra).Quest’ultimo ordine era diventato definitvo e esecutivo successivamente alla sentenza di 25 luglio 2001 (vedere paragrafo 43 sopra). La corte sostenen che questa sentenza doveva essere ritenuta per avere conferito sulla società di edificio il diritto per possedere la terra all'interno del significato delle regolamentazioni di edificio.
52. La corte sottolineò che ordini di domanda erano necessari per pubblico-interessa lavori per essere in grado andare avanti dove ancora erano pendenti procedimenti di espropriazione ma i lavori dovrebbero essere eseguiti ciononostante per ostacolare le certe conseguenze negative. Tale decisione non infranse i diritti del proprietario benché li limitasse temporaneamente.
53. Un ordine di domanda dovrebbe essere valutato nel contesto dei procedimenti di espropriazione visto nell'insieme. Tale ordine di solito si dava dopo che la decisione di espropriazione di prima - istanza era stata emessa. Le regolamentazioni legali ed applicabili lasciarono spazio espressamente a simile ordini per essere dato. La corte si riferì ad Articolo 108 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa ed a sezione 122 della Terra Amministrazione e l'Espropriazione Atto 1997. L'espropriazione ed ordini di domanda erano due istituzioni legali diverse. Loro conferirono diritti diversi sulle autorità pubbliche. Un ordine di domanda chiaramente era di un carattere provvisorio. Era ovvio che i suoi effetti legali differirono da quelli prodotti con una decisione su espropriazione. Comunque, conferì sulle autorità un diritto per prendere proprietà della terra ed usarlo per fini di pubblico-beneficio. Con introducendo un ordine di domanda nella Terra Amministrazione e l'Espropriazione Atto 1997 la legislatura aveva inteso di evitare situazioni dove l'espropriazione potrebbe essere bloccata come un risultato di ricorsi depositato con le parti affettate.
54. Nell'opinione della corte, se uno accettasse l'argomento del richiedente che l'ordine di domanda non conferì un diritto per prendere proprietà della terra per costruire fini, il molto fine dell'ordine di domanda sarebbe sconfitto.
55. Un ordine di domanda non poteva per se sia considerato una violazione di proprietà. Non sostituì la decisione di espropriazione e non spogliò il proprietario di suo o il suo diritto di proprietà; al massimo lo limitò temporaneamente sino alla conclusione dei procedimenti di espropriazione. Questo fu giustificato sotto Articolo 64 § 3 della Costituzione (vedere paragrafo 59 sotto). La corte richiamò che il diritto di proprietà non era un diritto assoluto.
56. La corte osservò che nelle circostanze della causa la concessione della licenza di edificio non infranse la legge nonostante il carattere eccezionale della situazione del richiedente ed i procedimenti di espropriazione pendenti. La causa del richiedente dimostrò che, in pratica, ordini di domanda erano necessari. Nelle certe cause, sarebbe stato impossibile per rendersi conto dei fini di pubblico-beneficio per i quali procedimenti di espropriazione erano stati avviati senza avere ricorso ad ordini di domanda.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. protezione Costituzionale di diritti di proprietà
57. Articolo 21 della Costituzione prevede:
“1. La Repubblica della Polonia proteggerà proprietà ed il diritto di successione.
2. All'espropriazione sarà concesso solamente nell'interesse pubblico e contro pagamento del risarcimento equo.”
58. Articolo 31 delle letture di Costituzione:
“La libertà della persona riceverà tutela giuridica.
Ognuno rispetterà le libertà e diritti di altri. Nessuno sarà obbligato per fare che quale non è richiesto con legge.
Qualsiasi limitazione sull'esercizio delle libertà costituzionali e diritti può essere imposta solamente con statuto, e solamente quando necessario in un stato democratico per la protezione della sua sicurezza od ordine pubblico, o proteggere il naturale ambiente, salute o morale pubblica, o le libertà e diritti di altre persone. Simile limitazioni non violeranno l'essenza delle libertà e diritti.”
59. Articolo 64 della Costituzione prevede:
“1. Ognuno avrà il diritto a proprietà, gli altri diritti di proprietà ed il diritto di successione.
2. Ognuno, su una base uguale riceverà tutela giuridica riguardo a proprietà, gli altri diritti di proprietà ed il diritto di successione.
Il diritto di proprietà può essere limitato solamente con vuole dire di un statuto e solamente alla misura che non viola l'essenza di così corretto.”
B. disposizioni Attinenti della legislazione di espropriazione di terra
60. 1 gennaio 1998 l'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra di 21 agosto 1997 (Ustawa nieruchomościami di gospodarce di o-“l'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra”) entrò in vigore. Sotto sezione 112 di che l'espropriazione di Atto consiste nell'allontanamento, con modo di una decisione amministrativa, di diritti di proprietà o gli altri diritti in rem. L'espropriazione può essere eseguita dove pubblico-interessa scopi non possono essere realizzati senza restrizione di quelli diritti e dove è impossibile per acquisire quelli diritti con modo di un contratto di diritto civile.
61. Sotto sezione 113 che un'espropriazione può essere eseguita solamente per il beneficio della Tesoreria Statale o il municipio locale.
62. Sezione 122 prevede che in cause definite con Articolo 108 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa (vedere paragrafo 68 sotto) l'autorità amministrativa è conferita poteri per emettere un ordine di domanda che concede un'entità che esegue lavori per il beneficio pubblico per entrare e prendere proprietà di terra in riguardo del quale è stata data una decisione su espropriazione, se un ritardo rendesse realizzazione della pubblico-beneficio funziona impossibile. Una clausola di esecutorietà immediata (wykonalności di natychmiastowej di rygor) può essere emesso in riguardo di tale ordine.
63. Nella conformità con sezione 128 § 1 dell'Atto, l'espropriazione sarà eseguita contro pagamento di risarcimento che corrisponde al valore del diritto di proprietà riguardato. Sotto la sezione 130 § 1 dell'Atto, l'importo del risarcimento è fissato riguardo ad essere aveva allo status e valore di nel giorno la proprietà sulla quale fu data la decisione di espropriazione. Il valore della proprietà è valutato sulla base di un'opinione preparata con un esperto munito di certificato.
64. Sezione 131 prevede per la possibilità di assegnare una proprietà di sostituzione il proprietario espropriato se lui o lei così concorda.
65. Facendo seguito a sezione 132, il risarcimento deve essere pagato entro quattordici giorni dalla data sulla quale la decisione di espropriazione diviene soggetto ad esecuzione.
66. Sezione 134 prevede per il valore di mercato della proprietà espropriata per notificare come una base sulla quale è fissato l'importo del risarcimento. Il criterio seguente sarà preso nell'esame quando stabilendo il valore di mercato della proprietà: il suo tipo, ubicazione, l'uso al quale è stato fissato l'esistenza di qualsiasi infrastruttura tecnica sulla proprietà, il suo stato complessivo e prezzi correnti di proprietà nel municipio.
C. esecutorietà Immediata di decisioni amministrative non-definitie
67. In situazioni specificate con Articolo 108 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa, amministrazione Statale e locale può autorizzare un'entità accusata con l'attuazione di un progetto di pubblico-interesse per occupare la proprietà immediatamente riguardata se un ritardo rendesse l'attuazione del progetto impossibile.
68. Articolo 108 del Codice prevede per una decisione amministrativa immediatamente essere reso esecutivo, anche se l'ulteriore ricorso contro sé è disponibile, quando questo è necessario per la protezione della vita o squarta, o per la protezione dell'economia nazionale contro danno serio, o per la protezione di altri interessi di società.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
69. Il richiedente si lamentò che lei aveva sofferto di un'interferenza sproporzionata coi suoi diritti di proprietà come un risultato delle misure preso in riguardo della sua terra. Lei si appellò su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
70. Il Governo presentò che la sentenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema di 25 luglio 2001 era stata notificata sull'avvocato del richiedente 9 agosto 2001. Che sentenza aveva conferito ultimamente sulle autorità il diritto per prendere proprietà dell'area del richiedente. Le decisioni susseguenti date nella causa erano state solamente la conseguenza del fatto che che diritto era stato conferito sulle autorità. La richiesta era stata depositata sette mesi più tardi con la Corte, 1 marzo 2002. Il richiedente non era riuscito perciò a presentare la sua richiesta alla Corte all'interno del tempo-limite di sei mesi previde per in Articolo 35 della Convenzione.
71. La Corte è della prospettiva che data di definitivo decisioni nella causa per i fini di Articolo 35 della Convenzione dovrebbe essere stabilito con dovuto riguardo ad essere aveva alla materia-questione della causa ed il fine essenziale che il richiedente desiderò realizzare (vedere Trzaskalska c. la Polonia, n. 34469/05, §§ 36-37, 1 dicembre 2009 mutatis mutandis). Osserva che il richiedente si lamentò che la decisione di espropriazione, l'importo del risarcimento assegnò a lei e l'effetto cumulativo di tutte le misure presi in riguardo della sua proprietà era stato in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Con la sentenza si appellata su col Governo la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne l'ordine di domanda. Comunque, gli altri set di procedimenti attinente per la protezione del diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà fu condotto successivamente sino a 2007. La Corte considera che questa sentenza non può essere ritenuta perciò per essere la data che provocò la gestione del periodo di sei mesi previsto dall’ Articolo 35 della Convenzione.
72. Questa eccezione preliminare del Governo deve essere respinta perciò.
73. Il Governo presentò inoltre che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire tutte le via di ricorso nazionali disponibili sotto legge polacca.
74. In finora come il richiedente si lamentò della decisione di espropriazione e dell'importo di risarcimento che lei aveva ricevuto, il Governo dibatté, che lei non era riuscita a pagare la parcella di corte per il suo ricorso contro la decisione del Governatore di 4 luglio 2006 sostenendo la decisione di espropriazione e fissando l'importo del risarcimento a PLN 725,232. Di conseguenza, la Corte amministrativa Regionale di Gdańsk aveva respinto il ricorso 29 settembre 2006. Gli sforzi susseguenti del richiedente essere accordato permesso di fare appello fuori termini erano stati senza successi. Il richiedente aveva perso con ciň l'opportunità di impugnare la decisione di espropriazione e l'importo di quota di risarcimento.
75. Il Governo si appellò anche sul fatto che nel contesto dei procedimenti di espropriazione il richiedente aveva fallito nel:
- lamentarsi della lunghezza dei procedimenti di espropriazione adducendo una violazione del suo diritto sotto l'Atto del 2004 per avere la sua causa esaminò all'interno di un termine ragionevole in procedimenti giudiziali;
- lamentarsi sotto l’Articolo 37 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa delle autorità amministrative dell'insuccesso nel dare decisioni all'interno di un termine ragionevole;
- rivendicare il risarcimento, in procedimenti civili, per danno causato dalla lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti di espropriazione.
76. La Corte reitera all'inizio che l'articolo dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali ha assegnato ad in Articolo 35 della Convenzione obbliga quelli che cercano di portare la loro causa contro lo Stato di fronte ad un organo giudiziale ed internazionale usare le via di ricorso prima previde con l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale. Per attenersi con l'articolo ricorso normale dovrebbe essere avuto con un richiedente a via di ricorso che sono disponibili e sufficiente per riconoscere compensazione in riguardo delle violazioni addotte (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Aksoy c. la Turchia, 18 dicembre 1996, §§ 51–52 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI). La condizione dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali non si soddisfa se una via di ricorso è stata dichiarata inammissibile per inosservanza con un requisito formale (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Salah Adraqui Dentro e Dhaime c. la Spagna (il dec.), n. 45023/98, decisione di 27 aprile 2000 ECHR 2000-IV).
77. In finora come gli argomenti del Governo riferisca all'espropriazione e procedimenti di risarcimento, la Corte nota che era aperto al richiedente per impugnare la decisione di espropriazione e l'importo del risarcimento determinati therein con modo di un ricorso alle corti amministrative di primo, ed ultimamente anche di seconda istanza. Le autorità nazionali respinsero il suo ricorso alla corte amministrativa siccome lei non era riuscita a pagare la parcella di corte. Lei non riuscì così ad avere ricorso ad una via di ricorso attinente che riguarda sia l'espropriazione e l'importo di risarcimento che lei impugnò poi di fronte alla Corte.
78. Segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere dichiarata inammissibile per insuccesso per esaurire via di ricorso nazionali ed attinenti.
79. In finora come il Governo dibattuto che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto avere ricorso alle specifiche via di ricorso applicabile in riguardo di lunghezza di procedimenti, la Corte osserva che il richiedente non si lamentò prima la Corte di una violazione allegato del suo diritto per avere la sua causa ascoltato all'interno di un termine ragionevole, all'interno del significato di Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
80. Il Governo presentò inoltre che il richiedente non era riuscito a chiedere il risarcimento per profitti perse durante il periodo quando le autorità avevano occupato la sua proprietà sulla base dell'ordine di domanda.
81. La Corte osserva che il richiedente non riuscì a chiedere il risarcimento in procedimenti amministrativi per profitti perse durante il periodo quando le autorità avevano occupato la sua terra sulla base dell'ordine di domanda, siccome indicato nella decisione del Gdańsk Corte Regionale di 6 dicembre 2006. In finora come la richiesta presente si puň dire anche che concerna profitti perduti, deve essere dichiarato inammissibile in questa parte per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali. Comunque, la sfera della richiesta presente è più larga come il richiedente si lamentò di tutte le misure e decisioni date nella sua causa presa insieme ed il loro impatto cumulativo sull'esercizio effettivo del suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
82. La Corte nota che questa parte della richiesta non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il Governo
83. Il Governo presentò che l'espropriazione della terra del richiedente era stata indispensabile per la realizzazione di una meta pubblica -l'ampliamento e miglioramento di Strada di Słowacki- progettati sotto i piani di sviluppo di terra locali. Che strada era una delle idrovie principali dell'agglomerazione di Gdańsk-Gdynia-Sopot. Offriva accesso all'aeroporto urbano e collegava la città con la sua anello-strada occidentale. La congestione di traffico in Gdańsk era molto seria, specialmente nella strada riguardata. Il miglioramento della carreggiata contribuirebbe definitivamente a risolvendo i problemi di comunicazione nella città Questo era stato confermato con la Corte amministrativa Suprema nei procedimenti di espropriazione.
84. Loro dibatterono inoltre che l'espropriazione della terra del richiedente era in conformità con legge. Tutte le decisioni emesse in collegamento coi procedimenti erano state basate sulle disposizioni legali ed attinenti, notevolmente l'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra del 1997. I procedimenti erano stati condotti in conformità alle disposizioni procedurali ed applicabili. A ciascuno scenico dei procedimenti il richiedente aveva avuto le opportunità di presentare la sua posizione ed usare le via di ricorso disponibili. Le sue eccezioni allineato erano state prese in considerazione.
85. Il Governo presentò che l'ordine di domanda era stato basato su Articolo 122 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra del 1998. La sua legalità era stata riesaminata ed era stato sostenuto con la decisione del Governatore di Pomorze di 5 dicembre 2000 e successivamente con la Corte amministrativa Suprema nella sua sentenza di 25 luglio 2001 (vedere paragrafo 43 sopra). Le azioni di reclamo del richiedente dell'ordine di domanda e le sue conseguenze non avevano preso i legis del rapporto dietro all'ordine in considerazione. Era precisamente necessario in cause dove i procedimenti di espropriazione non erano stati resi definitivo perché la parte aveva fatto appello contro l'espropriazione e dove i lavori di investimento pubblici dovevano andare avanti ciononostante. Un ordine di domanda era necessario dove il bisogno di proteggere un importante interesse pubblico, incluso l'interesse economico e nazionale richiesto che misure immediate siano prese e dove c'era un rischio che ritardo impedirebbe la realizzazione del fine di pubblico-interesse per la quale l'espropriazione era stata decisa. Un ordine di domanda non infranse automaticamente i diritti del proprietario benché li limitasse temporaneamente.
86. Il Governo sia della prospettiva che nella causa presente il richiedente non aveva subito un carico eccessivo. Lei aveva posseduto quaranta-tre aree solamente sette di che erano state colpite con le misure si lamentarono di. Prima che i procedimenti di espropriazione avevano cominciato lei non aveva usato le aree. Loro erano rimasti non sviluppati, senza infrastruttura tecnica su loro. Loro avevano infatti stato terra desolata, considerato per fini di tassa come terreno coltivato. Loro non avevano portato qualsiasi reddito al richiedente. Lei rimase il proprietario della maggior parte della sua terra e non c'erano ostacoli a lei usando le aree rimanenti, accesso a che era stato possibile durante il lavoro di costruzione. In qualsiasi la causa, il lavoro di costruzione sulle aree del richiedente era stato completato entro un periodo breve di tempo. Perciò qualsiasi il disturbo che sarebbe stato il risultato del lavoro eseguito sulle aree riguardate non poteva essere serio. In oltre, la modernizzazione della Strada di Słowacki ha dovuto migliorare l’accesso alle rimanenti aree della terra del richiedente.
87. Il Governo concluse che l'interferenza si lamentò di era stata prescritta dalla legge, aveva intrapreso l'interesse generale e non aveva imposto un carico eccessivo sul richiedente.
(b) Il richiedente
88. Il richiedente presentò che il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà era stato violato. Nonostante il fatto che lei era stata il proprietario legale della sua terra, le decisioni date con le autorità l'avevano spogliata del suo diritto per usare ed ottenere profitti dalla proprietà.
89. In particolare, le autorità avevano dato un ordine di domanda nell'assenza di un definitivo e decisione di espropriazione esecutiva. I procedimenti di appello contro la decisione di espropriazione erano stati pendenti a quel il tempo. Il ragionamento dell'ordine di domanda era stato laconico. Le autorità erano andate a vuoto a giustificarlo con riferendosi ai motivi attinenti e sufficienti per mostrare che perdite pesanti sarebbero state incorse in davvero con un ritardo nella sua esecuzione. Come un risultato della non-definitivo decisione che è soggetto ad esecuzione immediata, il richiedente aveva sofferto di una violazione seria del suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
90. Il richiedente si riferì alla sentenza della Corte nella causa di AGOSI c. il Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986 la Serie Un n. 108. Lei espresse la prospettiva che le procedure hanno condotto nella sua causa non era riuscito a riconoscerla un'opportunità ragionevole di mettere la sua causa alle autorità responsabili. La sua proprietà era stata occupata ed il lavoro di costruzione aveva cominciato quando i procedimenti di espropriazione ancora erano questioni pendenti ed effettive cruciali per la valutazione della legalità dell'espropriazione era sotto esame con le autorità. Il lavoro sulla sua terra non avrebbe dovuto seguire avanti la base dell'ordine di domanda-quale era, con la sua natura, solamente una misura provvisoria –in assenza di una decisione definitiva e esecutiva sull'espropriazione ed il risarcimento.
91. Il richiedente dibatté che le misure prese nella sua causa era stato illegale, in particolare perché le autorità avevano violato Articolo 122 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra del 1997. Che disposizione lasciò spazio ad un ordine di domanda per essere dato solamente se una decisione su espropriazione già fosse stata data. Nella causa del richiedente nessuna definitivo decisione di espropriazione era esistita al tempo quando l'ordine di domanda era stato dato, ed il lavoro aveva proceduto sulla base di quel l'ordine.
92. Il richiedente concluse, mentre riferendosi alla causa di Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia (23 settembre 1982, Serie Un n. 52), che nella sua causa, avendo riguardo ad alle sue circostanze viste nell'insieme, una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso con misure che la spogliano delle sue proprietà non erano state rispettate.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) I principi applicabili
93. La Corte reitera che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che garantisce il diritto alla protezione di proprietà contiene tre articoli distinti: “il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono ‘' distinti nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo” (vedere, come una recente autorità con gli ulteriori riferimenti, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) la Terra Ltd c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 52 ECHR 2007 -...).
94. Per essere compatibile con l'articolo generale insorga avanti la prima frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1, un'interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà deve prevedere un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 107 ECHR 2000-io).
95. Una presa di proprietà sotto la seconda frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 senza pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente riferito al suo valore costituirà un'interferenza sproporzionata che non può essere giustificata sotto Articolo 1 normalmente. Comunque, la disposizione non garantisce un diritto al pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze, poiché obiettivi legittimi di “interesse pubblico” può richiedere meno che rimborso del pieno valore di mercato (vedere Papachelas c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31423/96, § 48, ECHR 1999-II con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
96. La Corte rispetterà le autorità nazionali la sentenza di ' generalmente come a che che è nell'interesse generale a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 49 il 1999-V di ECHR). Comunque, non può rimanere passivo, nell'esercitare la soprintendenza europea in carica su sé, dove l'interpretazione di una corte nazionale di un atto legale sembra “irragionevole, arbitrario o... incoerente... coi principi che sono posto sotto alla Convenzione” (vedere Pla e Puncernau c. l'Andorra, n. 69498/01, § 59 ECHR 2004-VIII). Lo Stato ha obblighi sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per prendere misure necessarie proteggere il diritto di proprietà e è il dovere della Corte di assicurare l'osservanza degli appuntamenti si impegnato con le Parti Contraenti alla Convenzione, e non trattare con errori di fatto o legge commise presumibilmente con una corte nazionale a meno che diritti di Convenzione e le libertà sono potute essere infrante (vedere Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo, Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. il Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 83 ECHR 2007-io).
(b) Applicazione dei principi precedenti alle circostanze della causa
(i) La natura dell'interferenza
97. La Corte nota che già ha dichiarato l'azione di reclamo del richiedente riguardo all'espropriazione corretto e l'importo del risarcimento che lei ha ricevuto inammissibile. Ora deve esaminare il resto della richiesta. Osserva che l'essenza dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente è che tutti i suoi sforzi di fermare il lavoro di costruzione nell'assenza di una definitivo decisione di espropriazione andarono a vuoto.
98. La Corte nota che le misure si lamentarono di non spoglino il richiedente della sua proprietà, ma sottoposero l'uso delle sue proprietà a restrizioni significative; da adesso, può essere considerato una misura per controllare l'uso di proprietà.
(ii) La legalità dell'interferenza
99. I richiami di Corte che una condizione essenziale per un'interferenza per essere ritenuto compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale. L'articolo di legge, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II). Il principio della legalità presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale sono sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro richiesta (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Hentrich c. la Francia, 22 settembre 1994, § 42 la Serie Un n. 296-un, e Lithgow ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 8 luglio 1986, § 110 la Serie Un n. 102).
100. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che è nel primo posto per le autorità nazionali, notevolmente le corti interpretare e fare domanda diritto nazionale (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 86 ECHR 2005 -).
101. Nella presente causa i procedimenti riguardo all'espropriazione e l'importo del risarcimento per essere pagato ancora erano pendenti quando le autorità decisero di emettere l'ordine di domanda in riguardo della proprietà riguardò. La Corte osserva che, sotto Articolo 130 del Codice polacco di Procedura Amministrativa, depositando che un ricorso contro una prima - istanza decisione amministrativa, sospende l'esecuzione di quel la decisione. Comunque, le autorità amministrative sono conferite poteri per ordinare che una decisione immediatamente è esecutiva durante il ricorso nelle situazioni specificate in Articolo 108 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa, vale a dire quando è necessario per la protezione della vita o squarta, o proteggere l'economia nazionale contro danno serio. Inoltre, una specifica regolamentazione nel contesto di procedimenti di espropriazione-Articolo 122 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra -conferisce poteri le autorità amministrative per concedere entità commissionate per eseguire lavori pubblici per prendere proprietà di terra in riguardo del quale è stata data una decisione di espropriazione di prima - istanza. Quindi l'ordine di domanda aveva una base legale in diritto nazionale. Inoltre, nei procedimenti nei quali il richiedente contestò la legalità dell'edificio permette, le autorità, incluso le corti amministrative contennero che le licenze in oggetto aveva conferito sulla società di edificio un diritto per prendere proprietà della sua terra necessaria per i fini di licenza di edificio.
102. La Corte è perciò preparata per accettare che l'interferenza di cui ci si lamenta ha soddisfatto il requisito della legalità all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(iii) Lo scopo dell'interferenza
103. Qualsiasi interferenza con un diritto di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se notifica un interesse pubblico e legittimo. La Corte reitera che, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c. Italia, 17 ottobre 2002, § 85, ed Elia S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 37710/97, § 77 ECHR 2001-IX).
104. Nella presente causa che la Corte accetta che le misure contestarono col richiedente intraprese lo scopo legittimo di favorire un piano municipale per migliorare la strada situata nei pressi della terra del richiedente.
(iv) La proporzionalità dell'interferenza
105. La Corte deve esaminare seguente se l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà previde l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, o se impose un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo sul richiedente (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Jahn ed Altri, citata sopra, § 93).
106. Nell'area di sviluppo di terra e città progettando, gli Stati Contraenti dovrebbero godere un margine ampio della valutazione per implementare le loro politiche (vedere Terazzi S.r.l., ed Elia S.r.l., sia citò sopra, e Skibińscy c. la Polonia, n. 52589/99, § 59 14 novembre 2006). In particolare, nell'area di costruzione di strada questo margine ampio della valutazione è giustificato col fatto che ritardi eccessivi potessero comportare spesa seria al denaro pubblico, su e sopra dei costi progettati e fastidio di aumento subiti con proprietari di proprietà adiacente alla terra sulla quale sono eseguiti quelli progetti.
Nell'esercizio del suo potere di revisione, la Corte deve determinare ciononostante, se l'equilibrio richiesto fu sostenuto in una maniera conforme col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. la Svezia, citata sopra, § 69).
107. La Corte aumenta di valore che l'esecuzione di un ordine di domanda nell'assenza di un definitivo e decisione esecutiva sui meriti dell'espropriazione e causa di risarcimento può dare aumento a serio e qualche volta restrizioni irreparabili sull'esercizio del diritto al godimento tranquillo delle proprietà di uno. Deve comunque, avere riguardo ad alle specifiche circostanze di una causa individuale. In questo collegamento, la Corte prima nota, l'osservazione del Governo che solamente una piccola parte della proprietà del richiedente è stata colpita con le misure si lamentò di.
108. La Corte nota seguente che la terra del richiedente era di un carattere agricolo. Non è stato dibattuto, affittò mostrato da solo, che c'erano alloggi o infrastruttura tecnica su che terra o che fu sviluppato in qualsiasi l'altro modo. Nota inoltre che il richiedente non impugnò l'argomento del Governo che di fronte a 2000, quando i procedimenti di espropriazione avevano cominciato, la terra non era usata per fini agricoli e giaceva maggese da un periodo non specificato di tempo. Non era in controversia fra le parti che in tutto il tempo di materiale il richiedente non esistè sulla terra riguardata. Da adesso, il richiedente non ha mostrato che le misure si lamentarono di interferì con qualsiasi lo specifico uso, economico o altrimenti a che lei aveva messo la terra.
109. Benché Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti per valutare la proporzionalità dell'interferenza la Corte guarda al grado di protezione da arbitrarietà che è riconosciuta coi procedimenti nella causa (vedere Hentrich, citata sopra, § 46). In particolare, la Corte esamina se i procedimenti riguardo all'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà fu frequentato con le salvaguardie procedurali e di base. Già ha contenuto che un'interferenza non può essere legittima nell'assenza di procedimenti di opposizione che si attengono col principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio, argomento abilitante per essere presentato sui problemi attinente per la conseguenza di una causa (vedere Hentrich, citata sopra, § 42, e Jokela c. la Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45 ECHR 2002-IV). Una prospettiva comprensiva deve essere presa delle procedure applicabili (vedere AGOSI c. il Regno Unito, sentenza di 24 ottobre 1986 la Serie Un n. 108, p. 19, § 55; Hentrich, citata sopra, p. 21, § 49; e Jokela, citata sopra, § 45).
110. La Corte già ha notato che l'ordine di domanda fu dato quando l'espropriazione e procedimenti di risarcimento ancora erano pendenti. Comunque, le autorità non furono autorizzate per immediatamente procedere con la sua esecuzione. Nonostante il fatto che il fine dell'ordine di domanda era ad accelerazione lo sviluppo della terra, era aperto al richiedente per impugnare che ordine, prima con modo di ricorso ad un'autorità amministrativa e più alta e, successivamente, con facendo appello alla corte amministrativa. La Corte osserva inoltre che era anche aperto al richiedente per impugnare le misure prese con le autorità in riguardo della sua proprietà con contestando la costruzione di strada che costruisce licenza. Lei si giovò a di queste opportunità. Le cause furono dibattute vigorosamente in due set di parallelo di procedimenti. Non c'è indicazione che durante i procedimenti il richiedente che fu rappresentato con avvocati era incapace per presentare i suoi argomenti alle autorità.
111. In oltre, i procedimenti prima che la corte amministrativa fu frequentata con le piene garanzie procedurali giudiziali.
112. La Corte nota che nella sua sentenza di 25 luglio 2001, riguardo al ricorso del richiedente contro l'ordine di domanda la Corte amministrativa Suprema osservò che il fatto che il municipio aveva nessun definitivo titolo legale per occupare le aree riguardato era lo scorso ed ostacolo solamente rimanente ad avviando la costruzione lavora, mentre impedendo così il progresso nel progetto già bene-avanzato e le espropriazioni inefficaci che rendono effettuarono riguardo alle proprietà vicine. Nella sua sentenza di 27 giugno 2003, riguardo alla richiesta del richiedente alla licenza di edificio la Corte amministrativa Suprema osservò che un ordine di domanda non sostituì la decisione di espropriazione e non spogliò il proprietario di suo o i suoi diritti di proprietà, ma al massimo li limitò temporaneamente sino al completamento dei procedimenti di espropriazione. Notò inoltre che la causa del richiedente dimostrò che gli ordini di domanda erano in pratica necessario. Nelle certe cause, sarebbe stato impossibile per rendersi conto dei fini di pubblico-beneficio per i quali procedimenti di espropriazione erano stati avviati senza avere ricorso ad ordini di domanda.
La Corte si soddisfa che le autorità giudiziali e nazionali pesarono attentamente gli argomenti in favore del richiedente sulla mano del un'e, sull'altro, quelli che indicano che l'ordine di domanda era, nelle circostanze della causa, necessario.
113. La Corte osserva inoltre che in tutto i procedimenti riguardo all'ordine di domanda e dopo che fu sostenuto ultimamente con la Corte amministrativa Suprema 25 luglio 2001, la decisione di prima - istanza su espropriazione determinato 27 giugno 2000, rimasto in esistenza. A nessun punto in tempo una situazione faceva sorge dove lavoro fu condotto sulla terra del richiedente sulla base di che ordine nell'assenza di qualsiasi decisione su espropriazione (compari e contrapponga, Kolona c. la Cipro, n. 28025/03, § 72 27 settembre 2007). Né una situazione mai sorse dove le autorità permisero a lavoro di costruzione pubblico di essere eseguito sulla proprietà del richiedente senza sviluppo di terra valido progetta base le decisioni di espropriazione nell'interesse pubblico. A nessun punto in tempo, perciò il richiedente lasciato in un stato dell'incertezza come ad era se la sua terra sarebbe ultimamente soggetto all'espropriazione (compari e contrapponga, Skibińscy, citata sopra, §§ 79 e 90).
114. La Corte nota inoltre che il lavoro di costruzione sulla terra riguardata cominciato ad agosto 2001. Da adesso, nessun lavoro aveva cominciato sulla proprietà del richiedente di fronte alla legalità dell'ordine di domanda fu esaminato con la Corte amministrativa Suprema nella sua sentenza di 25 luglio 2001.
115. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il fatto che l'ordine di domanda fu dato mentre l'espropriazione e procedimenti di risarcimento ancora erano pendenti non avuto nascendo sui diritti procedurali o effettivi del richiedente che sorgono in questi set paralleli di procedimenti. Le autorità continuarono ad esaminare i ricorsi successivi del richiedente. Né l'ordine di domanda né l'edificio, permettono colpito in qualsiasi il modo l'importo di risarcimento che fu pagato ultimamente al richiedente. Da adesso, il fatto che le autorità emisero l'ordine di domanda e la licenza di edificio né contrastò gli sforzi del richiedente di ottenere il risarcimento adeguato né le impedì dal dibattere la sua causa.
116. La Corte osserva che nei procedimenti di espropriazione il richiedente non oppose l'espropriazione come simile ma, piuttosto, impugnò l'importo del risarcimento offerto. Così, un ordine di domanda in riguardo di terra che in qualsiasi evento non era usato col richiedente per qualsiasi non si può dire che lo specifico fine abbia imposto un carico eccessivo su lei.
117. La Corte osserva inoltre che il richiedente ottenne il risarcimento nell'importo di PLN 554,898 come presto come 27 febbraio 2002. Soltanto sei mesi dopo che lavoro di costruzione aveva cominciato sulla terra riguardata. Lei già aveva ottenuto perciò, la maggior parte del risarcimento nell'importo di PLN 725,232 al quale lei fu concessa ultimamente sotto la definitivo espropriazione e decisione di risarcimento di 4 luglio 2006. Da adesso, la causa del richiedente differisce da cause dove richiedenti furono privati della loro proprietà e successivamente doveva aspettare un tempo lungo prima che il risarcimento fosse fissato o pagato a loro (compari e contrapponga, Malama c. la Grecia, n. 43622/98, § 51 ECHR 2001-II). Inoltre, il passaggio di tempo e l'aumento risultante in prezzi di terra fu preso in considerazione con le autorità quando la definitivo cifra di risarcimento fu calcolata.
118. Avendo riguardo ad alle circostanze della causa viste nell'insieme, la Corte conclude, che un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo e che il carico sul richiedente era né sproporzionato né eccessivo.
119. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara ammissibile l'azione di reclamo del richiedente delle autorità l'insuccesso di ' per fermare il lavoro di costruzione nell'assenza di una definitivo decisione di espropriazione ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 29 novembre 2011, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early David Thór Björgvinsson Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.