Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SALIBA AND OTHERS v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 20287/10/2011
STATO: Malta
DATA: 22/11/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary damage - reserved ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF SALIBA AND OTHERS v. MALTA
(Application no. 20287/10)
JUDGMENT
(Merits)
STRASBOURG
22 November 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision


In the case of Saliba and Others v. Malta,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Päivi Hirvelä,
George Nicolaou,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
David Scicluna, ad hoc judge,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 November 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 20287/10) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by 18 Maltese nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 5 April 2010.
2. The applicants were represented by Dr OMISSIS and Dr OMISSIS, lawyers practising in Valletta. The Maltese Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Dr Peter Grech, Attorney General.
3. The applicants alleged that the two successive takings of their property had amounted to a disproportionate interference with their rights as protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and that the Constitutional Court proceedings had taken an unreasonably long time to be decided, contrary to Article 6 § 1.
4. On 17 December 2010 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. Mr V. De Gaetano, the judge elected in respect of Malta, was unable to sit in the case (Rule 28 of the Rules of Court). The President of the Chamber accordingly appointed Mr David Scicluna to sit as an ad hoc judge (Rule 29 § 1(b)).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1922, 1920, 1962, 1958, 1955, 1953, 1935, 1933, 1958, 1959, 1968, 1964, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1957, 1962 and 1959 respectively. The ninth, tenth, twelfth and thirteenth applicants live in the United Kingdom, the eleventh applicant lives in the United States and all the other applicants live in Malta.
A. Background of the case
7. The applicants or their ancestors (hereinafter “the applicants”) were owners of half an undivided share of several properties in Senglea, namely, five apartments on the ground floor and an adjacent entrance giving access to another twenty apartments above. At the time when the property was acquired, for the price of 345 pounds sterling (approximately 400 euros (“EUR”)), it was leased and occupied by various third parties.
8. This property was damaged during the Second World War and war-damage compensation was due to the owners under the War Damage Ordinance.
9. By a declaration of 27 February 1951 the Government took possession of this property under title of “possession and use” in accordance with the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance (see relevant domestic law). Under this title the owners were paid a yearly acquisition rent of 88 Maltese liras (“MTL”) − approximately EUR 205 for the entire property. This rent was calculated on the rental value declared by the owners to the Land Valuation Office.
10. Subsequently, without requesting prior consent from the owners and without having the plans of the property as it stood, the Government demolished the property and built a new set of apartments on wholly different plans, using part of the property to widen a road. The Government noted that permission for demolition was not necessary since they had legal possession of the property. At the time since the city of Senglea had been totally bombarded and consisted of a pile of rubble, the Government were engaged in an intensive restructuring and construction exercise, taking possession of properties and rebuilding the area with residences for social accommodation. In doing this the applicants alleged that the Government had also appropriated to themselves the war-damage compensation due to them. The Government considered this allegation to be unsubstantiated.
11. On 24 September 1991 the owners wrote to the Commissioner of Lands (“COL”) requesting compensation for their property. They suggested the sum of MTL 105,000 – approximately EUR 244,584. Receipt of their request was acknowledged but the claim remained unanswered.
12. By a declaration of 22 June 1993 the Government acquired the said property under the title of “public tenure” according to the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance (see relevant domestic law). Under this title the owners continued to be paid EUR 205 per year for the entire property.
13. In the meantime, this property was allocated as housing to third parties and included a shop.
14. The applicants pointed out that in 1988 the Government had declared that it would no longer be resorting to takings under titles of “possession and use” or “public tenure”. During political debate, the Deputy Prime Minister had in fact referred to such takings as a nefarious method of acquisition. Indeed, in the past twenty years the Government had converted takings under title of “possession and use” or “public tenure” to takings under “outright purchase”. The latter provided for a more favourable form of compensation, namely the market value of the property at the time of taking. The applicants submitted a number of examples reflecting this allegation (for example, Legal Notice nos. 271 and 272 of 2010 converting previous takings to outright purchases, and declaration no. 578 of 31 August 1990 substituting a declaration of taking under possession and use of a few months earlier with an outright purchase, following complaints by the owners. In the latter case the property had also been demolished and rebuilt and was being used for social housing).
15. The applicants also submitted an expert report valuing the entire property in Senglea at EUR 950,000. Thus, their share as owners of half an undivided share was worth EUR 475,000.
2. Proceedings before the Civil Court in its constitutional jurisdiction
16. On 13 March 1998 the applicants brought constitutional redress proceedings. Invoking Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 14 they requested that the court find a violation of their rights as a consequence of the actions taken by the COL and to grant adequate compensation. Given the way the application was presented the Government did not plead non-exhaustion in respect of the failure of the applicants to institute proceedings before the LAB.
17. The case was set down for hearing on 25 March 1998. On 25 September 1998 the court-appointed architect was requested to conduct an on-site inspection to determine whether the property built by the Government was indeed built on the applicants’ property and what use was being made of the ground floor. The report was submitted on 5 January 1999; however, the court-appointed expert failed to draw up an estimate of the value of the property in issue and the applicants’ request for additional terms of reference to be given to the expert was rejected on 16 December 1999 on the basis that the value of the property was irrelevant to the merits of the claim. Subsequently, on 7 September 2001 the case was adjourned pending negotiations regarding the possibility of reaching an amicable solution to the case. This having failed, the proceedings continued on 20 February 2002 at the applicants’ request. On 14 November 2002 the applicants requested the court to make written submissions. On 1 March 2005 the applicants requested that the case be suspended pending the determination of another constitutional case that could have affected the merits of their case. The hearing of submissions recommenced on 22 May 2007. The Government filed their written submissions on 12 September 2007 and the case was scheduled for judgment on 9 October 2007.
18. By a judgment of 16 October 2008 the Civil Court (First Hall), acting in its constitutional jurisdiction, rejected their claims. It held that, since the applicants were still owners of the said property, the taking under both titles could not be considered a deprivation of property but a control of the use of such property. This control had been necessary in view of the fact that the property had been ruined in the war and that there had been a need to provide social housing in the post-war years. For the same reasons, even assuming that the taking under title of public tenure had been a deprivation of possessions, it would have been in the public interest. In respect of the fair balance required, the court observed that, when the State was pursuing economic reform or social justice, less reimbursement was due than the full market value. While it was true that the recognition rent payable to the applicants was not high and there were no prospects for it to be increased in future years, it was comparable to the rents applicable under the controlled rents regime in force in respect of other old properties. Moreover, in the present case the owners had not been required to incur expenses for the building of the new apartments or for their maintenance and when the property had been originally purchased by the owners’ ancestors it was already rented to third parties to which such regulated rents applied. In consequence, it could not be said that the applicants had borne an excessive burden. The court found that their related complaint under the same provision in respect of the unauthorised demolition could not be examined ratione temporis.
19. Lastly, as to the complaint regarding the difference in treatment as a result of the taking under title of public tenure as opposed to an outright purchase, the court held that the choice was specifically available to the Government. However, according to the policy in force, takings under titles of possession and use were converted to outright purchases in cases where the properties were used for commercial purposes. Other properties, where the Government wished to keep control of the expropriated property, were taken under title of public tenure. While this choice allowed for a large margin of appreciation, the applicants had not proved that other people in an analogous position had been treated more favourably and it did not appear that the policy had been applied arbitrarily or in a discriminatory fashion in the applicants’ case.
3. Constitutional Court proceedings
20. On appeal, by a judgment of 6 October 2009 the Constitutional Court upheld the first-instance judgment.
21. Primarily, it noted that the applicants had been acquiescent for a period of forty years before they ever solicited any action from the authorities or the relevant courts. On the merits, it confirmed that the interference did not amount to a deprivation since quite apart from retaining the title of ownership, the applicants had continued to receive rent in respect of the said property and to have standing to institute proceedings in respect of complaints relating to the property. Thus, not all the legal rights of the owners had been extinguished.
22. It further noted that the legality of the interference and the public interest involved were not disputed. Indeed, the law (section 12(3) of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance, prior to its amendment) allowed the State to carry out works on property taken under possession and use, without any specific limitation. Moreover, the property which had been demolished and rebuilt had been taken in a damaged state, and any complaints about the entitlement to war-damage compensation remained unsubstantiated and were irrelevant to the main complaint in issue.
23. The decision as to under which title the property could be taken fell within the margin of appreciation of the State. As to the fair balance and the relevant amount of compensation, while it was true that a rent of EUR 205 was by today’s standards low for the property in issue, the value of the property had to reflect the values applicable in 1951 and not 2009. It noted that the applicants had not even contested the amount of rent due before the Land Arbitration Board (“LAB”) and that their acquiescence had led to a situation where even if they had wanted to do so, they could not prove the boundaries of the property. However, it was also true that the authorities had failed in their duty to draft a report as to the state and the boundaries of the property before they demolished it and created new plans for it. Thus, at this stage it was impossible to determine the actual boundaries of the property and in this state of uncertainty it was not surprising that the applicants had not taken up the procedure before the LAB. In any event, the court was of the view that the complaint was manifestly ill-founded.
24. As to the complaint under Article 14, it noted the witness testimony from the Department of Lands to the effect that takings under absolute purchase had occurred, although they generally related to commercial properties; that there had been cases were the Government had acted differently and acquired property by outright purchase following a taking by title of possession and use; that there was no hard policy regulating what type of taking was required in each case; and that to the witness’s knowledge there had been no political or other specific reasons motivating such an action. The court concluded that the fact that it had been established that other property had been taken by absolute purchase was not enough to prove discriminatory treatment and therefore there could not be a violation of the said provision.
25. The Constitutional Court further criticised the delay of ten and a half years which the first-instance court had taken to decide on the case even though a good part of the delay had been attributable to the applicants who, inter alia, had taken four and a half years to make submissions.
4. Developments after the Constitutional Court proceedings
26. Following the introduction of the application with the Court (April 2010), on 3 June 2010 the Government issued a declaration that the property was being taken under title of absolute purchase. The property was valued in terms of section 22 of the Ordinance and the compensation offered was that of EUR 168,417.43.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance
27. Section 5 of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance (“the Ordinance”), Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta provides for three methods of acquisition by the Government of private property. It reads as follows:
“The competent authority may acquire any land required for any public purpose, either -
(a) by the absolute purchase thereof; or
(b) for the possession and use thereof for a stated time, or during such time as the exigencies of the public purpose shall require; or
(c) on public tenure:
Provided that after a competent authority has acquired any land for possession and use or on public tenure the conversion into public tenure or into absolute ownership of the terms upon which such land is held shall always be deemed to be an acquisition of land required for a public purpose and to be in the public interest:
Provided also that, subject to the provisions of articles 14, 15 and 16, a competent authority may acquire land partly by one and partly by another or others of the methods in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c):
Provided further that where the land is to be acquired on behalf and for the use of a third party for a purpose connected with or ancillary to the public interest or utility, the acquisition shall, in every case, be by the absolute purchase of the land.”
28. Section 13 regarding compensation reads, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“ (1) The amount of compensation to be paid for any land required by a competent authority may be determined at any time by agreement between the competent authority and the owner, saving the provisions contained in subarticle (2).
(2) The compensation shall in the case of acquisition of land for temporary possession and use be an acquisition rent and in the case of acquisition of land on public tenure be a recognition rent determined in either case in accordance with the relevant provisions contained in article 27.”
29. The Ordinance provides that compensation in respect of absolute purchase is calculated in accordance with the applicable “fair rent”, as agreed by the parties following the Government’s offer or as established by the LAB. In respect of public tenure, section 27(13) of the Ordinance provides as follows:
“The compensation in respect of the acquisition of any land on public tenure shall be equal to the acquisition rent assessable in respect thereof in accordance with the provisions contained in subarticles (2) to (12), inclusive, of this article, increased (a) by forty per centum (40%) in the case of an old urban tenement and (b) by twenty per centum (20%) in the case of agricultural land.
30. In so far as relevant, section 19(1) and (5) reads as follows:
(1) When land has been acquired by a competent authority for use and possession during such time as the exigencies of the public purpose shall require, the owner may, after the lapse of ten years from the date when possession was taken by the competent authority, apply to the Board for an order that the land be purchased or acquired on public tenure or vacated within a period of one year from the date of the order, and the land shall either be vacated or acquired on public tenure or purchased upon compensation to be determined in accordance with the provisions of this Ordinance or of any Ordinance amending or substituted for this Ordinance.
(5) Public tenure shall of its nature endure in perpetuity, without prejudice to any consolidation by mutual consent or otherwise according to law of that tenure with the residual ownership of the land; and the recognition rent payable in respect thereof shall in every case be unalterable, without prejudice to the effects of any consolidation, total or partial. The residual ownership of land held on public tenure with the inherent right to receive recognition rent, shall, for all purposes of law, be deemed to be an immovable right by reason of the object to which it refers and shall be transferable according to law at the option of the owner, from time to time, of that right.
31. Thus, while a taking under title of “possession and use” is intended for a determinate period of time, a taking under title of “public tenure” is for an indeterminate period of time, possibly forever, and the relevant recognition rent is to remain unaltered for its duration.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
32. The applicants complained that both takings of their property had amounted to a disproportionate interference with their property rights, particularly in the light of the insignificant amount of compensation paid, the meagre public interest involved and the fact that they had lost the compensation due for war damage. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
33. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
34. The Government contended that the applicants had not instituted proceedings before the Land Arbitration Board to contest the amount of rent they were receiving. It followed that they had not exhausted domestic remedies.
35. The applicants submitted that there was no use in bringing proceedings before the LAB, since the latter was bound by the law in calculating compensation, and the law provided for ridiculously low amounts. Moreover, they had instituted constitutional redress proceedings which had not resulted in the rejection of their complaint on the ground of non-exhaustion of ordinary remedies. Indeed, even the constitutional jurisdictions had acknowledged that since no plans existed as to what constituted the applicants’ property, such proceedings would have been complicated.
36. The Court reiterates that according to Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, it may only deal with an issue after all domestic remedies have been exhausted. The purpose of this rule is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, among other authorities, Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 74, ECHR 1999-V). Article 35 § 1 is based on the assumption, reflected in Article 13 (with which it has a close affinity), that there is an effective domestic remedy available in respect of the alleged breach of an individual’s Convention rights (see Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 152, ECHR 2000-XI). Thus the complaint submitted to the Court must first have been made to the appropriate national courts, at least in substance, in accordance with the formal requirements of domestic law and within the prescribed time-limits. Nevertheless, the obligation to exhaust domestic remedies only requires that an applicant make normal use of remedies which are effective, sufficient and accessible in respect of his Convention grievances (see Balogh v. Hungary, no. 47940/99, § 30, 20 July 2004). The existence of such remedies must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but also in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness (see Mifsud v. France (dec.) [GC], no. 57220/00, ECHR 2002-VIII).
37. The Court would emphasise that the application of the rule of exhaustion must make due allowance for the fact that it is being applied in the context of machinery for the protection of human rights that the Contracting Parties have agreed to set up. Accordingly, it has recognised that Article 35 must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. It has further recognised that this rule is neither absolute nor capable of being applied automatically; in reviewing whether it has been observed it is essential to have regard to the particular circumstances of each individual case (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 69, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV, and Sammut and Visa Investments v. Malta (dec.), no. 27023/03, 28 June 2005).
38. In the present case the applicants instituted constitutional proceedings before the Civil Court alleging a breach of their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. They further appealed to the Constitutional Court against the Civil Court’s judgment rejecting their claim. As the applicants had complained of a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in its entirety, the domestic courts examined whether all the requirements of this provision had been complied with, notably the existence of a “fair balance” and of a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed, the aim sought to be achieved and the respect of the individual’s fundamental rights. Indeed, while noting that proceedings before the LAB had not been instituted the courts did not reject the claim for non-exhaustion of ordinary remedies. Having acknowledged that the rent received by the applicants was very low, they nevertheless concluded that the complaint was ill-founded.
39. The Court considers that, in raising this plea before the domestic constitutional jurisdictions, which did not reject the claim on procedural grounds but examined the substance of it, the applicants made normal use of the remedies which were accessible to them and which related, in substance, to the facts complained of at the European level (see, mutatis mutandis, Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta, no. 35349/05, §§ 39-40, ECHR 2006-X; and Amato Gauci v. Malta, no. 47045/06, § 35, 15 September 2009).
40. It follows that the Government’s objection should be dismissed.
2. Other grounds for declaring the complaint inadmissible
41. The Court reiterates that its jurisdiction ratione temporis covers only the period after the ratification of the Convention or its Protocols by the respondent State. From the ratification date onwards, all of the State’s alleged acts and omissions must conform to the Convention or its Protocols and subsequent facts fall within the Court’s jurisdiction even where they are merely extensions of an already existing situation (see, for example, Yağcı and Sargın v. Turkey, 8 June 1995, § 40, Series A no. 319-A, and Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão and Others v. Portugal, nos. 29813/96 and 30229/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-I). The Court reiterates that the application of legislation affecting owners’ rights over many years constitutes a continuing interference for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 210, ECHR 2006-...).
42. The Court notes that the issue raised by the present complaint is the successive takings under different regimes and the amount of rent received by the applicants throughout the relevant periods. It further notes that it has not been contested that such measures constituted an interference with the applicants’ right of property. It follows that the Court is competent ratione temporis to deal with the complaint particularly in so far as it relates to the period following 23 January 1967, when the Convention and Protocol No. 1 entered into force in respect of Malta.
43. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant
44. The applicants submitted that the interference constituted a deprivation of possessions as the applicants had been deprived of control over the property. The demolition and rebuilding of the property had not been subject to their approval, and the new construction had been based on totally new plans. Moreover, the property had been held under possession and use for forty-two years, notwithstanding that the law provided that taking under this title was to be temporary. Furthermore, the Government had appropriated the war-damage compensation, which was due to the applicants following payments they had made which rendered them eligible for it.
45. In any event, the applicants contended that the compensation received by them was unreasonable and disproportionate. The acquisition rent was linked to the property’s rental value prior to the Second World War, it was fixed in time and did not allow for increases reflecting the cost of living and fluctuations in the market, and could therefore not reflect the real value of the property. When this was transformed into recognition rent, it was subject to an increase of 40%; however, the sum still remained very low as this was again dependent on the initial acquisition rent. Again, this sum was fixed in time notwithstanding that under public tenure the property was taken permanently. Thus, as time went by, the rent they received was significantly more inconsequential compared with prices on the open market, the rent being established decades before and not having any prospect of a future increase. These amounts were to be considered a pittance, particularly against the fact that the Government were receiving rent from the current tenants, and that part of the property was being used as a commercial business. The applicants further considered that in their claim for compensation they were at a disadvantage since no plans existed to show what their property used to consist of.
46. Lastly, they noted that the fact that the Government had, in 2010, chosen to acquire the property under title of absolute purchase could not suffice to correct the situation which they had endured over numerous years. In particular, they noted that the compensation being offered was once again inappropriate.
(b) The Government
47. The Government submitted that the taking under title of possession and use and/or public tenure constituted a control of the use of the property since the applicants had not been divested of their ownership rights.
48. This taking had been carried out in the public interest. The building had been demolished and rebuilt for the purposes of creating social housing, to provide accommodation for those persons who had been left without as a consequence of the war. Even assuming that a shop had also been built on their property, a matter which the applicants could not prove since they could not submit plans of the delimitations of their property, the shop served the interest of the surrounding community. They claimed that this public interest subsisted to date. They further noted that the applicants had not really contested the aim of the taking before the domestic courts.
49. The Government submitted that the interference had not imposed an excessive individual burden on the applicants. Indeed the applicants had not instituted proceedings before the LAB to obtain an order that the land be acquired by the Government by title of absolute purchase or public domain, or requesting that the premises be vacated; nor did they contest the amount of rent payable. Thus, any burden suffered had been due to their inertia. Once the property had been taken over under title of public tenure, the rent they received had risen by 40%. Moreover, this calculation had been based on the rental values declared by the applicants, and this was the same rent that would have applied had the property been leased to private tenants. The Government noted that, in the present case, the applicants had no obligation to maintain or repair the premises. Moreover, the premises had been rebuilt entirely at the Government’s expense. It followed that unlike in the case of Hutten-Czapska (cited above), the applicants did not risk making a loss on the rent of the property.
50. The Government further considered that since the State had incurred the expenses of rebuilding the property, the owners could not recover compensation for works which they had never undertaken. Indeed, according to the law (the then Article 11 (2) of the Ordinance), the Government could carry out any such work on the land which any person having an unrestricted interest in the land would be entitled to do by virtue of that interest. The Government submitted that prior approval by the owners was therefore not called for.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Applicable rules in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
51. As the Court has stated on a number of occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98; Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I; and Saliba v. Malta, no. 4251/02, § 31, 8 November 2005).
52. The Court notes that from 1951 to 1993 the property, which was demolished as early as the 1950s, was taken under title of “possession and use”. Under this title, the taking was meant to be temporary. However, the applicants failed to request the termination of the measure or its conversion to an outright purchase, as provided for by law. Thus, the measure under this title persisted for forty years during which time the applicants never lost their right to sell the property and the ownership title was never transferred to third parties; in fact they continued to receive rent from the Government in its respect. Although in the present circumstances the sale was improbable, both because little interest lay in the purchase of property which cannot be used, and because of the fact that the boundaries were not clearly established, the Court cannot accept that the measure complained of amounted to a de facto expropriation. However, the applicants’ right of property was severely restricted: they could not exercise the right of use in terms of physical possession as the building was occupied by third parties. Thus, this constituted a means of State control of the use of property, which should be examined under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
53. As to the second period, namely after 1993, during which the property was taken under title of public tenure, the restrictions remained the same as above. However, the Court observes that public tenure implies that the property is taken permanently. Consequently, the applicants were not simply restricted in or temporarily deprived of their use and enjoyment of the property (see, conversely, Erkner and Hofauer v. Austria, 23 April 1987, § 74, Series A no. 117, and Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52). The Court reiterates that in the absence of a formal expropriation, that is to say a transfer of ownership, the Court must look behind the appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of (ibid). In the Court’s view, the measures taken by the authorities were aimed at subjecting the applicants’ property to a continued tenancy in favour of third parties, with a view to eventually taking it from them permanently, as was confirmed by the recent offer (2010) to take the property by means of outright purchase. Therefore, the Court considers that it is possible that the interference over the second period went beyond State control of the use of property, verging on what could be equated to a de facto expropriation.
54. Nevertheless, the Court notes that the applicable principles are similar, namely that, in addition to being lawful, a deprivation of possessions or an interference such as the control of use of property must also satisfy the requirement of proportionality.
55. As the Court has repeatedly stated, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, §§ 69-74, and Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999-VII).
56. The Court notes that in Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq v. Malta (no. 26771/07, 5 April 2011) which dealt with the same system, the Court, adopting the Constitutional Court’s approach, also concentrated its assesment on the proportionality of the measure.
(b) Whether the Maltese authorities respected the principle of lawfulness
57. In the present case, it has not been disputed by the parties that the measures were carried out in accordance with the provisions of the Ordinance. The measures complained of, namely the successive takings, were, therefore, “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(c) Whether the Maltese authorities pursued a “legitimate aim in the general interest”
58. Any interference with the enjoyment of a right or freedom recognised by the Convention must pursue a legitimate aim. The principle of a “fair balance” inherent in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 itself presupposes the existence of a general interest of the community (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 148, ECHR 2004-V).
59. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the “general” or “public” interest. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property. Here, as in other fields to which the safeguards of the Convention extend, the national authorities accordingly enjoy a margin of appreciation.
60. The notion of “public” or “general” interest is necessarily extensive. In particular, spheres such as housing of the population, which modern societies consider a prime social need and which plays a central role in the welfare and economic policies of Contracting States, may often call for some form of regulation by the State. In that sphere decisions as to whether, and if so when, it may fully be left to the play of free market forces or whether it should be subject to State control, as well as the choice of measures for securing the housing needs of the community and of the timing for their implementation, necessarily involve consideration of complex social, economic and political issues (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, §§ 165-66).
61. Finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, the Court has on many occasions declared that it will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the “public” or “general” interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy, [GC], no. 22774/93, § 49, ECHR 1999-V, and, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski, cited above, § 149).
62. In the present case, the Court can accept the Government’s argument that the measures were aimed at creating social housing, to provide accommodation for those persons who had been left without, as a consequence of the war. Thus, the measures had a legitimate aim in the general interest, as required by the second paragraph of Article 1.
(d) Whether the Maltese authorities struck a fair balance between the general interest of the community and the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions
63. In the present case, the Court firstly notes that while the public interest requirement has been met, it is clear that what might have been justified years ago, will not necessarily be justified today (see Amato Gauci, cited above, § 60). Thus, in its balancing exercise the Court will have to determine whether such a measure, to the detriment of owners, is still justified and proportionate sixty years after the war.
64. The Court notes that the applicants’ property was taken under title of possession and use in 1951 and subsequently under title of public tenure in 1993. It follows that for more than six decades the applicants have not been able to make any use of their property. Throughout the sixty years the owners (the applicants own half an undivided share) have received a rent of not more than EUR 205 per year for a property which consisted, inter alia, of twenty-five apartments. The Court notes a discrepancy in the facts as presented by the parties: while both parties agree that the law provided for a 40% increase for recognition rent vis-á-vis what had been the acquisition rent, the applicants stated that the owners had received EUR 205 per year in rent throughout the whole period, without alleging that after 1993 the increase had not been applied to them. It follows that the rent paid from 1951-1993 was presumably even less than EUR 205 per year. However, the Court will make its assessment on the premise that the owners always received EUR 205 in rent, as confirmed by the applicants.
65. Thus, the Court observes that the owners effectively received the strikingly low sum of EUR 0.68 per month for each of the twenty-five apartments. Indeed, the constitutional jurisdictions themselves asserted that the rent “was by today’s standards low for the property in issue”. The Court notes that the law did not provide for any increase according to the cost of living and other factors but, as confirmed by the Constitutional Court, it had to be tied to the rental values of 1951. This factor has to be seen against the background of the State’s economic situation today which surely cannot be compared to that of a post-war nation. In this light, the Court cannot but find that this system could lead to unreasonable results. In the present case, the fact that the property was rebuilt by the Government is not sufficient to establish that the original property was worthless. Indeed, when it was originally taken, the applicants, who had previously paid contributions towards this fund, were due war-damage compensation which, at the time, would have enabled or at least helped in the reconstruction of the damaged premises, had it remained in their possession. The Court considers that the amount of rent received by the owners is manifestly disproportionate to the market value of the building (as submitted by the applicants in their just satisfaction claims). The fact that, as argued by the Government, the rent received was in line with the rent laws applicable on the island, does not favour the Government’s case. Indeed, the Court has on various occasions held that various legislation regarding controlled rents in Malta was in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Ghigo v. Malta, no. 31122/05, §§ 69-70, 26 September 2006; Edwards v. Malta, no. 17647/04, §§ 78-79, 24 October 2006; Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta, no. 35349/05, §§ 79-80, ECHR 2006-X; and Amato Gauci, cited above, § 62).
66. Even though, as argued by the Government, in the present case the applicants were not made to cover the costs of extraordinary maintenance or repairs to the building, the Court cannot but note that the sum at issue – amounting to less than EUR 18 per month for the entire property – is extremely low and can hardly be seen as fair compensation for the use of such property. The Court is not convinced that the interests of the owners, “including their entitlement to derive profits from their property” (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 239), have been met.
67. In the present case, having regard to the applicants’ state of uncertainty as to whether they would ever recover their property, which has been subject to successive regimes (possession and use and subsequently public tenure) for sixty years, the meagre amount of acquisition/recognition rent received by the applicants throughout this period, but particularly over the most recent decades, the rise in the standard of living in Malta over these decades and the diminished need to secure social housing compared to the post-war era, the Court finds that a disproportionate and excessive burden was imposed on the applicants. The latter were required to bear most of the social and financial costs of supplying housing accommodation to third parties (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 225, and Amato Gauci, cited above, § 63; see also Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, cited above, § 59). It follows that the Maltese State has failed to strike the requisite fair balance between the general interests of the community and the protection of the applicants’ right of property.
68. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
69. The applicants further complained of the fact that the Constitutional Court proceedings took an unreasonably long time to be decided. They relied on Article 6 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal ...”
70. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
71. The Government contended that the complaint made under Article 6 that the constitutional jurisdictions had taken an unreasonably long time to decide the case had never been brought before the domestic courts as the applicants had failed to institute a new set of constitutional proceedings in this respect. Arguing that such a remedy would be effective, the Government made reference to domestic case-law, namely Lawrence Cuschieri v. the Honourable Prime Minister (6 April 1995), Perit Joseph Mallia v. the Honourable Prime Minister (15 March 1996), and The Honourable Judge Dr Anton Depasquale v. the Attorney General (19 September 2001), where the constitutional jurisdictions had taken cognisance of complaints against the Constitutional Court in relation to the fairness of proceedings under Article 6 of the Convention. In the first of these cases, the Constitutional Court held that it could not a priori exclude review of questionable behaviour or actions of the constitutional jurisdictions. In the Perit Joseph Mallia case, both the first-instance court exercising its constitutional jurisdiction and the Constitutional Court on appeal had upheld the applicant’s claims and had found a violation of Article 6.
72. The applicants submitted that instituting a new set of constitutional redress proceedings with the risk of them taking once again an unduly long time, together with the extra expenses involved, would have been a further prejudice on top of the violations they had suffered at the hands of the State.
73. As mentioned above in paragraph 36, in accordance with Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, the Court may only deal with an issue after all domestic remedies have been exhausted. The purpose of this rule is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, among other authorities, Selmouni v. France [GC], cited above, § 74). Thus, the complaint submitted to the Court must first have been made to the appropriate national courts, at least in substance, in accordance with the formal requirements of domestic law and within the prescribed time-limits (see Zarb Adami v. Malta (dec.), no. 17209/02, 24 May 2005). However, the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies requires an applicant to have normal recourse to remedies within the national legal system which are available and sufficient to afford redress in respect of the breaches alleged. The existence of the remedies in question must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness. There is no obligation to have recourse to remedies which are inadequate or ineffective (see Micallef v. Malta [GC], no. 17056/06, § 55, ECHR 2009-...). The speed of the procedure of the remedial action may also be relevant to whether it is practically effective for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, McFarlane v. Ireland [GC], no. 31333/06, § 123, ECHR 2010-...).
74. The Court observes that in Ferré Gisbert v. Spain (no. 39590/05, § 39, 13 October 2009), it held that the sole remedy available against a Constitutional Court judgment is an individual petition before the Court under Article 34 of the Convention. In this case the Spanish legal system did not allow, either in practice or in law, the institution of a new set of constitutional proceedings against the proceedings and a final judgment of the Constitutional Court. Such a limitation is common amongst member States adopting constitutional court remedies for alleged human rights breaches (for example, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany and Poland). However, in the Maltese legal system the applicants could have − both in law and in practice − lodged a fresh set of constitutional proceedings complaining of the first set of constitutional proceedings. As established by the Government, such cases would not a priori be declared inadmissible.
75. In such a circumstance the Court is called on to examine whether the constitutional remedy against a Constitutional Court judgment could be considered accessible and effective, in the present case.
76. The Court considers that, as evidenced by a plurality of cases brought before the Maltese Constitutional Court, there is no reason to doubt that Constitutional Court proceedings are accessible and that they are a remedy capable of providing redress for human rights violations by means of binding judgments.
77. However, what is of concern to the Court is the length of another set of constitutional proceedings at a stage where an applicant’s initial complaint would have been conclusively decided possibly after several years of litigation before various levels of the domestic courts, including the constitutional jurisdictions. The Court notes that lodging a constitutional application involves a referral to the First Hall of the Civil Court and the possibility of an appeal to the Constitutional Court. The Court has already held that this is a cumbersome procedure, especially since practice shows that appeals to the Constitutional Court are lodged as a matter of course (see Sabeur Ben Ali v. Malta, no. 35892/97, § 40, 29 June 2000 and Kadem v. Malta, no. 55263/00, § 53, 9 January 2003, where the Court held that the relevant proceedings are invariably longer than what would qualify as “speedy” for Article 5 § 4 purposes). The length of these proceedings is furthermore aggravated by the fact that they may be adjourned sine die pending any proceedings concerning the substantive complaints before this Court. In consequence, the Court considers that, even though the domestic legal system allows for such a new complaint to be lodged, the length of the proceedings detracts from their effectiveness (see McFarlane v. Ireland [GC], cited above, § 123). It notes that in the present case the applicants had been involved in proceedings which lasted for eleven years before the constitutional jurisdictions.
78. It follows that, even though in the Maltese legal system domestic law provides for a remedy against a final judgment of the Constitutional Court, in view of the specific situation of the Constitutional Court in the domestic legal order (see Ferré Gisbert, cited above, § 39) the Court considers that in circumstances such as those of the present case it is not a remedy which is required to be exhausted.
79. The Government’s objection that domestic remedies have not been exhausted is therefore rejected.
80. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
81. The applicants submitted that the Government were to blame for a number of adjournments, and a number of adjournments had been made by the court for no apparent reason. They noted that the Constitutional Court itself had reprimanded the Civil Court (First Hall) for the length of the first-instance proceedings, noting that under no circumstances should a case before the Constitutional Court take so long to be decided.
82. The Government submitted that the applicants’ behaviour had contributed to the delay before the constitutional jurisdictions, and not that of the Government or the courts. Indeed the applicants had requested various adjournments, they had not always appeared before the court and it had taken the applicants four years to file submissions. Moreover, it had been the applicants who had requested that the proceedings be stayed pending the outcome of another case, which according to the Government was irrelevant to the facts of the case. It followed that there had not been a violation of the reasonable time principle.
83. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see Bezzina Wettinger and Others v. Malta, no. 15091/06, § 87, 8 April 2008).
84. The Court observes that, as stated by the Constitutional Court, the applicants’ case, which dealt with their property rights and can therefore be regarded as of importance to the applicants, was not particularly complex.
85. The Court notes that the proceedings started on 13 March 1998, the first-instance judgment was delivered on 16 October 2008 and the proceedings were concluded on appeal on 6 October 2009. The constitutional proceedings thus lasted eleven years and seven months at two levels of jurisdiction. It is, however, clear that the crux of the delay was the period of ten and a half years before the first-instance court.
86. The Court notes (see appendix) that there were at least forty adjournments at first instance, of which fifteen were requested by the applicants or due to their absence, particularly over a period of two years when they requested extensions in order to file their submissions. However, it took the court five adjournments in order to deliver judgment, some adjournments were not explained and six adjournments were given over a span of more than a year and a half, pending the outcome of another case. In reply to the Government’s argument as to whether any other case may have been pertinent or not to the applicants’ case, the Court considers that once the court granted the adjournments for this purpose, it is presupposed that it found them to be relevant. Moreover, in this respect the Court notes that the courts remain responsible for the conduct of the proceedings before them and ought therefore to have weighed the advantages of the continued adjournments pending the outcome of other cases against the requirement of promptness (see, mutatis mutandis, Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, cited above, § 43).
87. Having examined all the material submitted to it, and having regard to its case-law on the subject, the Court considers that although a certain delay was indeed attributable to the applicants, bearing in mind the domestic courts’ responsibility in the conduct of proceedings, the overall length of the proceedings was excessive and failed to meet the “reasonable time” requirement.
88. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
89. The applicants complained that the taking under title of “public tenure” as opposed to “outright purchase”, as was customary, amounted to discrimination contrary to Article 14, which reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
90. The applicants submitted that their property had not been taken under title of outright purchase as should have been done years back, in line with the practice which applied to similar situations. Even if this had been due to an overburdened system or administrative lethargy (as transpired during domestic proceedings), they considered that the wait had constituted discriminatory treatment.
91. The Government submitted that during the domestic proceedings the applicants had not proved that there had been any analogous property taken over by outright purchase. Moreover, they had not specified on which ground they had allegedly been discriminated. In any case, given the circumstances of the case and the need to provide social housing in a post war era any difference in treatment would have been objectively justified.
92. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
93. Having regard to the finding relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. (see paragraph 67 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether, in this case, there has been a violation of Article 14 (see, for example, Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 103, ECHR 2000-XII; and Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, § 91, 6 October 2005).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
94. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
95. The applicants claimed EUR 712,500 in respect of pecuniary damage: EUR 475,000 for their half of the value of the property (estimated at EUR 950,000 according to an architect’s report) and EUR 237,500 in rent over the years calculated at 50% of their share of the value of the property. They further claimed EUR 100,000 in non-pecuniary damage.
96. The Government submitted that the applicants were not due a lump sum amounting to the value of the property, such a lump sum, would be due only now that a taking under outright purchase was in progress. As to the rent, the Government noted that the buildings existing today were built and were being maintained by the Government. Moreover, they were totally different from the buildings which existed before the war. Thus, the applicants’ claims were unfounded. Indeed according to an application by one of the co-owners who is not an applicant in the present proceedings, it transpired that the value of a half undivided share in 1983 was EUR 1,300. Thus, according to the Government the increase of value given to the premises by the applicants’ architect was baffling. Moreover, the Government considered that the premises had had no commercial potential and that the owners would in any event have been bound by controlled rent laws. They, therefore, considered that no pecuniary damage was due.
97. As to non-pecuniary damage the Government also considered that none was due, and that in any event any award by the Court should not exceed EUR 5,000 to be shared among all eighteen applicants.
98. The Court notes that it has found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in so far as the applicants have not been receiving an adequate amount of rent in respect of their property which was taken by the Government under various titles. The Court therefore rejects the applicants’ claim for a lump sum representing the value of the property. The Court should, however, proceed to determine the compensation to which the applicants are entitled in respect of the loss of the enjoyment of their property which they have suffered since 1967, when the Convention and the relevant protocol entered into force in respect of Malta, to the date of the Court’s judgment in this respect, since the Court has not been informed that this regime has come to an end following the Government’s intention to take over the property by outright purchase. Such compensation should consist in a sum representing an adequate amount of rent which the applicants should have received over the years. The Court is of the view that the applicants’ submissions in respect of the rent are entirely speculative and do not give any details as to actual and realistic rental values. Therefore, they cannot reasonably be considered to reflect an acceptable valuation of the rental value on the market over the years. However, the Government have not submitted any proper estimates or concrete calculations as to rental values over the years.
99. Bearing in mind the above, the Court considers that the question of compensation for pecuniary damage in so far as it relates to the adequate amount of rent is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent State and the applicants (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
100. Bearing in mind the violations found in the present case the Court awards the applicants, EUR 3,000 each in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
101. The applicants also claimed EUR 2,785.82 as set out in the taxed bill of costs plus interest at 8 % and EUR 615 in legal fees (appeal application) for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and EUR 2,102.68 for those incurred before the Court.
102. The Government submitted that the amount claimed for proceedings before this Court was excessive, and considered that EUR 1,500 would suffice. As to the amount of costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts, the Government noted that no evidence had been submitted proving that the costs due to the Government had been paid. Moreover, no interest was due on judicial costs, particularly those that had not yet been paid. They further noted that the legal fees for the appeal application constituted double billing as they had already been included in the taxed bill of costs.
103. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. The Court firstly notes that even assuming the Government’s expenses have not yet been paid, these expenses remain due. It however upholds the Government’s argument in respect of the fees incurred in connection with the appeal application. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 4,800 covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
104. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
5. Holds that, as far as the financial award to the applicants for pecuniary damage resulting from the violations found in the present case is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in part, namely in so far as it relates to the amount of rent payable for the relevant period;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which this judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Section the power to fix the same if need be;
6. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros), each, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 4,800 (four thousand eight hundred euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
7. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 November 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza Deputy Registrar President


APPENDIX
Dr Philip Saliba pro et noe v. Commissioner of Land et – Constitutional Application no. 640/1998 – Civil Court (First Hall)
Date of Adjournment Purpose
25.03.1998 First hearing. The defendants asked the court for more time to consider the legal and factual situation as raised in the applicant’s application. The case was adjourned to 30 April 1998.
30.04.1998 The parties requested that the case be adjourned. The case was adjourned to 24 July 1998.
24.07.1998 The court adjourned the case to 16 September 1998.
16.09.1998 The court noted that there was no possibility of amicable settlement in the case. The case was adjourned to 25 September 1998 for the applicants to produce their evidence. Architect Albert Fenech was nominated by the court to assist it.
25.09.1998 Oral testimony was given by OMISSIS. The court appointed Architect Fenech to carry out an on-site inspection of the property. The court adjourned the case to 9 November 1998.
09.11.1998 The court-appointed architect informed the court that he had encountered some problems. The case was adjourned to 8 January 1999 for filing of the architect’s report.
08.01.1999 The architect confirmed his report on oath. The case was adjourned to 18 March 1999 for examination of the report.
18.03.1999 The parties’ legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The case was adjourned to 9 April 1999.
09.04.1999 The applicants’ legal adviser asked the court to extend the nomination of the architect in order to establish the value of the property. The case was adjourned to 26 April 1999.
26.04.1999 The case was adjourned to 27 April 1999.
27.04.1999 The applicants did not file the request mentioned in the court record of 9 April 1999. The court observed that the applicants applied on 26 April 1999 for leave to file the request as an appendix to the application. The court acceded to the applicants’ request. The court adjourned the case to 25 June 1999.
17.06.1999 The applicants and their legal adviser did not attend the sitting. The case was adjourned to 8 October 1999.
08.10.1999 The case was adjourned to 16 November 1999.
16.11.1999 The case was adjourned to 3 December 1999 for the court to give a Decree following the request made by the applicants for a valuation of the property.
03.12.1999 The court gave its Decree. The applicants’ legal adviser did not attend the hearing. The case was adjourned to 21 January 2000.
21.01.2000 The applicants’ legal adviser informed the court that he intended to produce viva voce witnesses. The case was adjourned to 5 May 2000 for all evidence of the parties.
05.05.2000 OMISSIS gave evidence. The applicants’ legal adviser requested a long adjournment. The case was adjourned to 17 November 2000 for oral submissions.
17.11.2000 The applicants’ legal adviser requested an adjournment. The case was adjourned to 19 January 2001.
19.01.2001 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the sitting. The case was adjourned to 20 March 2001.
20.03.2001 The case was adjourned to 28 May 2001.
28.05.2001 The applicants’ legal adviser requested a long adjournment. The case was adjourned to 7 September 2001 for oral submissions.
07.09.2001 The parties requested a long adjournment. The court adjourned the case sine die.
20.02.2002 Application filed by the applicants requesting the court to resume the case.
25.02.2002 Court issued a Decree whereby the case was reappointed for 22 April 2002.
22.04.2002 The applicants’ legal adviser informed the court that one of the applicants had died pendente lite. The case was adjourned to 30 September 2002.
30.09.2002 The case was adjourned to 22 November 2002.
14.11.2002 The court was informed that the Legal adviser for the applicants was unable to attend the sitting and that he requested the Court to be allowed to make oral submissions. The case was adjourned for oral submissions to 14 January 2003.
14.01.2003 The case was adjourned to 15 April 2003.
15.04.2003 The applicants’ legal adviser asked the court for permission to file written submissions. The court gave the applicants until 31 July 2003 to file their written submissions and the defendants were given until 30 September 2003 to file their reply. The case was adjourned to 14 October 2003 for final submissions.
14.10.2003 The applicants’ legal adviser requested an extension of the deadline for filing written submissions. The case was adjourned to 13 January 2004.
13.01.2004 The applicants’ legal adviser again requested an extension of the deadline for filing written submissions. The case was adjourned to the 17th February 2004.
17.02.2004 The applicants’ legal adviser once again requested an extension of the deadline for filing written submissions. The case was adjourned to 17 March 2004.
17.03.2004 The applicants and their legal adviser did not attend the sitting. The case was adjourned to 8 June 2004.
08.06.2004 The applicants’ legal adviser requested an extension of the deadline for filing written submissions. The case was adjourned to 27 October 2004.
27.10.2004 The applicants’ legal adviser again requested an extension of the deadline for filing written submissions. The case was adjourned to 1 March 2005.
01.03.2005 The applicants’ legal adviser requested that the proceedings be stayed until the outcome of the case of Gera de Petri v. AG et (application number 537/96) pending before the Constitutional Court. The case was adjourned to 26 May 2005.
26.05.2005 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The court noted that the constitutional application no. 537/96 was still pending and adjourned the case to 1 November 2005.
01.11.2005 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The court noted that the constitutional application no. 537/96 was still pending and adjourned the case to 17 January 2006.
17.01.2006 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The court noted that the constitutional application no. 537/96 was still pending and adjourned the case to 6 April 2006.
06.04.2006 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The court noted that the constitutional application no. 537/96 was still pending and adjourned the case to 28 June 2006.
28.06.2006 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The court noted that the constitutional application no. 537/96 was still pending and adjourned the case to 2 November 2006.
02.11.2006 The parties and their legal advisers did not attend the hearing. The court noted that the constitutional application no. 537/96 was still pending and adjourned the case to 18 January 2007.
18.01.2007 The applicants and their legal adviser did not attend the hearing. The court gave the applicants until 20 March 2007 to file their written submissions and the defendants until 26 April 2007 to file their reply. The case was adjourned to 2 May 2007.
02.05.2007 The applicants requested an extension of the deadline for filing their written submissions. The case was adjourned to 12 July 2007.
22.05.2007 The applicants filed their written submissions.
12.07.2007 The Court gave the defendants until 12 September 2007 to file their replies to the submissions filed by the applicants. The case was adjourned to 9 October 2007.
09.10.2007 Oral submissions were heard. The case was adjourned to 10 January 2008 for judgment.
10.01.2008 Case adjourned to 12 February 2008 for judgment.
12.02.2008 Case adjourned to 26 February 2008 for judgment.
26.02.2008 Case adjourned to 9 October 2008 for judgment.
09.10.2008 Case adjourned to 16 October 2008 for judgment.
16.10.2008 Judgement was delivered.

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; danno Patrimoniale - riservato; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA SALIBA ED ALTRI C. MALTA
(Richiesta n. 20287/10)
SENTENZA
( meriti)
STRASBOURG
22 novembre 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nrll’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale


Nella causa Saliba ed Altri c. Malta,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente,
Päivi Hirvelä
Giorgio Nicolaou, Ledi Bianku Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić giudici,
David Scicluna giudice ad hoc, e Fatoş Aracı, Cancellieredi sezione Aggiunto
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 novembre 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 20287/10) contro la Repubblica del Malta depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con 18 cittadini maltesi, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 5 aprile 2010.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati col Dr OMISSIS ed il Dr OMISSIS, avvocati che praticano in Valletta. Il Governo maltese (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Dr Pietro Grech, Avvocato General.
3. I richiedenti addussero che le due prese successive della loro proprietà avevano corrisposto ad un'interferenza sproporzionata coi loro diritti come protetti dall0 Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e che gli atti Costituzionali avevano preso un irragionevolmente tempo lungo per essere deciso, contrari ad Articolo 6 § 1.
4. Il 17 dicembre 2010 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1).
5. Il Sig. De di V. Gaetano, il giudice eletto a riguardo del Malta, non era in grado di riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28 degli Articoli di Corte). Il Presidente della Camera nominò di conseguenza il Sig. David Scicluna per riunirsi come giudice ad hoc (Articolo 29 § 1(b)).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero in 1922, 1920 1962, 1958 1955, 1953 1935, 1933 1958, 1959 1968, 1964 1961, 1962 1966, 1957 1962 e 1959 rispettivamente. Il nono, decimo che dodicesimo e tredicesimo richiedenti vivono nel Regno Unito, l'undicesimo richiedente vive negli Stati Uniti e tutti gli altri richiedenti vivono in Malta.
A. Background della causa
7. I richiedenti o i loro antenati (in seguito “i richiedenti”) era proprietari di metà una quota indivisa di molte proprietà in Senglea, vale a dire cinque appartamenti sul pianterreno ed un ingresso adiacente che dà accesso ad un altro venti appartamenti sopra. Al tempo quando la proprietà fu acquisita, per il prezzo di 345 libbre genuino (approssimativamente 400 euro (“EUR”)), fu affittato ed occupò con le varie terze parti.
8. Questa proprietà fu danneggiata durante la Seconda Mondo Guerra ed il risarcimento di guerra-danno era dovuto ai proprietari sotto l'Ordinanza del Danno della Guerra.
9. Con una dichiarazione di 27 febbraio 1951 il Governo prese proprietà di questa proprietà sotto titolo di “proprietà ed uso” nella conformità con la Terra Acquisizione (gli Scopi di pubblica utilità) l'Ordinanza (vedere diritto nazionale attinente). Sotto questo titolo i proprietari furono pagati un'acquisizione annuale affittata di 88 lire maltesi (“MTL”) −verso EUR 205 per la proprietà intera. Questo affitto fu calcolato sul valore di noleggio dichiarato coi proprietari all'Ufficio della Valutazione della Terra.
10. Successivamente, senza richiedere beneplacito precedente dai proprietari e senza avere i piani della proprietà come stette in piedi, il Governo demolì la proprietà e costruì un set nuovo di appartamenti su piani completamente diversi, mentre usando parte della proprietà per allargare una strada. Il Governo notò che permesso per la demolizione non era necessario poiché loro avevano proprietà legale della proprietà. Al tempo fin dalla città di Senglea era stato totalmente bombardato ed era consistito di un palo di breccia, il Governo fu preso parte in una ristrutturazione intensiva ed esercizio di costruzione, mentre prendendo proprietà di proprietà e ricostruendo l'area con residenze per alloggio sociale. Nel fare questo i richiedenti addussero che il Governo aveva appropriato anche a loro il risarcimento di guerra-danno a causa di loro. Il Governo considerò che questa dichiarazione fosse non comprovata.
11. 24 settembre 1991 i proprietari scrissero al Commissario di Terre (“COL”) richiedendo il risarcimento per la loro proprietà. Loro suggerirono la somma di MTL 105,000-verso EUR 244,584. Ricevuta della loro richiesta fu accusata ma la rivendicazione rimase senza risposta.
12. Con una dichiarazione di 22 giugno 1993 il Governo acquisì la proprietà detta sotto il titolo di “tenuta pubblica” secondo la Terra Acquisizione (gli Scopi di pubblica utilità) l'Ordinanza (vedere diritto nazionale attinente). Sotto questo titolo i proprietari continuarono ad essere pagati EUR 205 per anno per la proprietà intera.
13. Nel frattempo, questa proprietà fu assegnata come alloggio a terze parti ed incluso un negozio.
14. I richiedenti indicarono che nel 1988 il Governo aveva dichiarato che non avrebbe stato ricorrendo più a prese sotto titoli di “proprietà ed uso” o “tenuta pubblica.” Durante dibattito politico, il Primo Ministro Aggiunto aveva, infatti si riferì a simile prese come un metodo nefando dell'acquisizione. Di venti anni passati il Governo aveva convertito effettivamente, prese sotto titolo di “proprietà ed uso” o “tenuta pubblica” a prese sotto “completamente l'acquisto.” Il secondo purché per una forma più favorevole del risarcimento, vale a dire il valore di mercato della proprietà al tempo di prendere. I richiedenti presentarono un numero di esempi che riflettono questa dichiarazione (per esempio, Avviso Legale N. 271 e 272 di 2010 prese precedenti che converte a completamente acquisti, e dichiarazione n. 578 31 agosto 1990 che sostituisce una dichiarazione di prendere sotto proprietà ed uso di alcuni mesi più primo con un completamente acquisto, azioni di reclamo seguenti coi proprietari. Nella causa seconda la proprietà era stata demolita anche ed era stata ricostruita ed era stato usando per alloggio sociale).
15. I richiedenti presentarono anche un rapporto competente che valuta la proprietà intera in Senglea ad EUR 950,000. Così, la loro quota come proprietari di metà una quota indivisa valeva EUR 475,000.
2. Procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Civile nella sua giurisdizione costituzionale
16. 13 marzo 1998 i richiedenti portarono procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali. Articolo 1 che invoca di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ed Articolo 14 loro richiesero che il costatazione di corte una violazione dei loro diritti come una conseguenza delle azioni presa col COL ed accordare il risarcimento adeguato. Dato il modo che la richiesta è stata presentata il Governo non supplicò la non-esaurimento in riguardo dell'insuccesso dei richiedenti per avviare procedimenti di fronte al Laboratorio.
17. La causa fu esposta in giù per ascolti 25 marzo 1998. 25 settembre 1998 l'architetto corte-nominato fu richiesto di condurre un'ispezione di su-luogo per determinare se la proprietà costruì col Governo fu costruito davvero sui richiedenti la proprietà di ' e che uso era stato rendendo del pianterreno. Il rapporto fu presentato 5 gennaio 1999; comunque, l'esperto corte-nominato non riuscì a stendere una stima del valore della proprietà in problema ed i richiedenti ' richiede per termini supplementari di riferimento per essere dato all'esperto fu respinto 16 dicembre 1999 sulla base che il valore della proprietà era irrilevante ai meriti della rivendicazione. 7 settembre 2001 la causa fu aggiornata successivamente, trattativa in corso riguardo alla possibilità di giungere ad una soluzione amichevole alla causa. Questo che ha fallito, i procedimenti continuarono 20 febbraio 2002 ai richiedenti la richiesta di '. 14 novembre 2002 i richiedenti richiesero la corte per fare osservazioni scritte. 1 marzo 2005 i richiedenti richiesero che la causa sia sospesa durante la determinazione di un'altra causa costituzionale che avrebbe potuto colpire i meriti della loro causa. L'udienza di osservazioni ricominciò in 22 maggio 2007. Il Governo registrato le loro osservazioni scritte su 12 settembre 2007 e la causa fu elencato per sentenza 9 ottobre 2007.
18. Con una sentenza di 16 ottobre 2008 la Corte Civile (Prima la Sala), agendo nella sua giurisdizione costituzionale, respinto le loro rivendicazioni. Contenne che, poiché i richiedenti ancora erano proprietari della proprietà detta, la presa sotto sia titoli non potevano essere considerati una privazione di proprietà ma un controllo dell'uso di simile proprietà. Questo controllo era stato necessario in prospettiva del fatto che la proprietà era stata rovinata nella guerra e che c'era stato un bisogno di offrire alloggio sociale di anni dopoguerra. Per le stesse ragioni, presumendo anche che la presa sotto titolo di tenuta pubblica era stata una privazione di proprietà, sarebbe stato nell'interesse pubblico. In riguardo dell'equilibrio equo richiesto, la corte osservò, che, quando lo Stato stava intraprendendo riforma economica o la giustizia sociale, meno rimborso era dovuto che il pieno valore di mercato. Mentre era vero che l'affitto di riconoscimento pagabile ai richiedenti non era alto e non c'erano prospettive per sé per essere aumentato negli anni futuri, era comparabile agli affitti applicabile sotto il regime di affitti controllato in vigore in riguardo di altre vecchie proprietà. Inoltre, al giorno d'oggi la causa i proprietari non erano stati costretti ad incorrere in spese per l'edificio degli appartamenti nuovi o per il loro mantenimento e quando la proprietà era stata acquistata originalmente coi proprietari gli antenati di ' già fu affittato a terze parti alle quali fecero domanda simile affitti regolati. In conseguenza, non poteva essere detto, che i richiedenti avevano sopportato un carico eccessivo. La corte fondò che la loro azione di reclamo relativa sotto la stessa disposizione in riguardo della demolizione non autorizzata non poteva essere esaminata ratione temporis.
19. Infine, come all'azione di reclamo riguardo alla differenza in trattamento come un risultato della presa sotto titolo di tenuta pubblica come opposto ad un completamente l'acquisto, la corte contenne che la scelta era specificamente disponibile al Governo. Secondo la politica in vigore, incassi sotto titoli di proprietà ed uso furono convertiti comunque, a completamente acquisti in cause dove le proprietà furono usate per fini commerciali. Altre proprietà, dove il Governo desiderò tenere controllo della proprietà espropriata, fu preso sotto titolo di tenuta pubblica. Mentre questa scelta lasciò spazio ad un grande margine della valutazione, i richiedenti avuti non provarono che le altre persone in una posizione analoga erano state trattate più favourably e non sembrò che la politica era stata fatta domanda arbitrariamente o in una maniera discriminatoria nei richiedenti la causa di '.
3. Atti costituzionali
20. Con una sentenza di 6 ottobre 2009 la Corte Costituzionale sostenne la sentenza di prima -istanza su ricorso.
21. Primariamente, notò che i richiedenti erano acquiescenti da un periodo di quaranta anni prima che loro mai sollecitarono qualsiasi azione dalle autorità o le corti attinenti. Sui meriti, confermò, che l'interferenza non corrispose ad una privazione poiché piuttosto separatamente dal trattenere il titolo di proprietà, i richiedenti avevano continuato a ricevere affitto in riguardo della proprietà detta ed avere sostenendo avviare procedimenti in riguardo di azioni di reclamo relativo alla proprietà. Tutti i diritti dei proprietari non erano stati estinti così.
22. Notò inoltre che la legalità dell'interferenza e l'interesse pubblico coinvolse non fu contestato. Effettivamente, la legge (sezione 12(3) della Terra Acquisizione (gli Scopi di pubblica utilità) l'Ordinanza, prima del suo emendamento) permise allo Stato di eseguire lavori su proprietà preso sotto proprietà ed usato senza qualsiasi la specifica limitazione. Inoltre, la proprietà che era stata demolita ed era stata ricostruita era stata presa in un stato danneggiato, e qualsiasi azioni di reclamo del diritto per guerra-danneggiare risarcimento rimasto non comprovato ed era irrilevante all'azione di reclamo principale in problema.
23. La decisione come a sotto che il titolo la proprietà potrebbe essere presa pelle all'interno del margine della valutazione dello Stato. Come all'equilibrio equo e l'importo attinente del risarcimento, mentre era vero che un affitto di EUR 205 era con gli standard di oggi basso per la proprietà in problema, il valore della proprietà doveva riflettere i valori applicabile nel 1951 e non 2009. Notò che i richiedenti non avevano contestato anche l'importo di affitto dovuto di fronte al Consiglio dell'Arbitrato della Terra (“il Laboratorio”) e che la loro acquiescenza aveva condotto ad una situazione dove anche se loro avevano voluto fare così, loro non potevano provare i confini della proprietà. Era anche comunque, vero che le autorità erano andate a vuoto nel loro dovere di redigere un rapporto come allo stato ed i confini della proprietà prima che loro lo demolirono e crearono piani nuovi per sé. A questo stadio era così, impossibile per determinare i confini effettivi della proprietà ed in questo stato dell'incertezza non era sorprendente che i richiedenti non avevano preso sulla procedura di fronte al Laboratorio. In qualsiasi l'evento, la corte era della prospettiva che l'azione di reclamo è stata mal-fondata manifestamente.
24. Come all'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 14, notò la testimonianza di testimone dal Settore di Terre all'effetto che erano accadute prese sotto acquisto assoluto, benché loro riferissero a proprietà commerciali generalmente; che c'era stato cause erano il Governo aveva agito differentemente e proprietà acquisita con completamente acquisto seguente una presa con titolo di proprietà ed uso; che non c'era nessuna politica dura che regolava quel tipo di presa era richiesto in ogni caso; e che a conoscenza del testimone non c’erano state nessuna specifica ragione politica o altra che motivasse tale azione. La corte concluse che il fatto che era stato stabilito che l'altra proprietà era stata presa con acquisto assoluto non era abbastanza per provare trattamento discriminatorio e non ci poteva essere perciò una violazione della disposizione detta.
25. La Corte Costituzionale criticò inoltre il ritardo dell'anni di dieci e mezza che la corte di prima -istanza aveva preso decidere sulla causa anche se una buona parte del ritardo era stata attribuibile ai richiedenti che, inter lalia, aveva preso l'anni di quattro e mezza per fare osservazioni.
4. Sviluppi dopo gli atti Costituzionali
26. Seguendo l'introduzione della richiesta con la Corte (aprile 2010), 3 giugno 2010 il Governo emise una dichiarazione che la proprietà era presa sotto titolo di acquisto assoluto. La proprietà fu valutata in termini di sezione 22 dell'Ordinanza ed il risarcimento offerti era che di EUR 168,417.43.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. l'Ordinanza sull’Acquisizione di Terre(Scopi di pubblica utilità)
27. La Sezione 5 dell’Ordinanza sull’ Acquisizione di Terre (Scopi di pubblica utilità) l'Ordinanza (“l'Ordinanza”), Capitolo 88 delle Leggi del Malta prevede tre metodi di acquisizione di proprietà privata da parte del Governo. Si legge come segue:
“L'autorità competente può acquisire qualsiasi terra richiese per qualsiasi lo scopo di pubblica utilità, uno -
(a) con l'acquisto assoluto al riguardo; o
(b) per la proprietà ed uso al riguardo per un tempo determinato, o durante simile tempo come le esigenze dello scopo di pubblica utilità richiederà; o
(c) su tenuta pubblica:
Purché che dopo che un'autorità competente ha acquisito qualsiasi terra per proprietà ed uso o su tenuta pubblica la conversione in tenuta pubblica o in proprietà assoluta dei termini sulla quale simile terra è contenuta sarà ritenuto sempre per essere un'acquisizione di terra richiesta per un scopo di pubblica utilità ed essere nell'interesse pubblico:
Previsto anche che, soggetto alle disposizioni di articoli 14, 15 e 16, un'autorità competente può acquisire in parte terra entro uno ed in parte con un altro o altri dei metodi in paragrafi (un), (b) e (il c):
Previsto inoltre che dove la terra sarà acquisita su conto e per l'uso di una terza parte per un fine connesso con o subordinato all'interesse pubblico o l'utilità, l'acquisizione può, in ogni causa, sia con l'acquisto assoluto della terra.”
28. Sezione 13 riguardo a letture di risarcimento, in finora come attinente, siccome segue:
“(1) l'importo del risarcimento per essere pagato per qualsiasi terra richiese con un'autorità competente può essere determinato a qualsiasi tempo con accordo fra l'autorità competente ed il proprietario, salvando le disposizioni contenute nel sub articolo (2).
(2) il risarcimento può nella causa dell'acquisizione di terra per proprietà provvisoria ed uso sia un affitto di acquisizione e nella causa dell'acquisizione di terra su tenuta pubblica sia un affitto di riconoscimento determinato in ambo i casi in conformità con le disposizioni attinenti contenute in articolo 27.”
29. L'Ordinanza prevede che il risarcimento in riguardo di acquisto assoluto è calcolato in conformità con l'applicabile “l'equo canone”, come concordato con le parti seguente l'offerta del Governo o come stabilito col Laboratorio. In riguardo di tenuta pubblica, sezione 27(13) dell'Ordinanza prevede siccome segue:
“Il risarcimento in riguardo dell'acquisizione di qualsiasi terra su tenuta pubblica sarà al riguardo uguale all'affitto di acquisizione imponibile in riguardo in conformità con le disposizioni contenute in sub articoli (2) a (12), incluso, di questo articolo, aumentò (un) entro quaranta per centum (40%) nella causa di un vecchio casamento urbano e (b) entro venti per centum (20%) nella causa di terra agricola.
30. Nella parte attinente, la sezione 19(1) e (5) si legge come segue:
(1) quando terra è stata acquisita con un'autorità competente per uso e proprietà durante simile tempo come le esigenze dello scopo di pubblica utilità richiederà, il proprietario può, dopo l'errore di dieci anni dalla data quando proprietà fu presa con l'autorità competente, faccia domanda al Consiglio per un ordine che la terra sia acquistata o acquisì su tenuta pubblica o cassò entro un periodo di un anno dalla data dell'ordine, e la terra o sarà cassata o sarà acquisita su tenuta pubblica o sarà acquistato sul risarcimento per essere determinato in conformità con le disposizioni di questa Ordinanza o di qualsiasi Ordinanza che corregge o sostituì per questa Ordinanza.
(5) tenuta pubblica può della sua natura sopporti per sempre, senza pregiudizio a qualsiasi il consolidamento con accordo reciproco o altrimenti secondo legge di che tenuta con la proprietà rimanente della terra; ed il riconoscimento affittò al riguardo pagabile in riguardo in ogni causa sia inalterabile, senza pregiudizio agli effetti di qualsiasi il consolidamento, totale o parziale. La proprietà rimanente di terra contenne su tenuta pubblica col diritto inerente per ricevere riconoscimento affittato, per tutti i fini di legge, sia ritenuto essere un diritto immobile con ragione dell'oggetto alla quale assegna e sarà trasferibile secondo legge alla scelta del proprietario, a volte di quel il diritto.
31. Così, mentre una presa sotto titolo di “proprietà ed uso” è proporsi per un periodo di determinate di tempo, una presa sotto titolo di “tenuta pubblica” è per un periodo indeterminato di tempo, possibilmente per sempre, e l'affitto di riconoscimento attinente è rimanere inalterato per la sua durata.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
32. I richiedenti si lamentarono che ambo le prese della loro proprietà avevano corrisposto ad un'interferenza sproporzionata coi loro diritti di proprietà, particolarmente nella luce dell'importo insignificante del risarcimento pagata l'interesse pubblico e macilento coinvolse ed il fatto che loro avevano perso il risarcimento dovuto per danno di guerra. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
33. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'eccezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
34. Il Governo contese che i richiedenti non avevano avviato procedimenti di fronte al Consiglio dell'Arbitrato della Terra per contestare l'importo di affitto loro stavano ricevendo. Seguì che loro non avevano esaurito via di ricorso nazionali.
35. I richiedenti presentarono che non c'era uso nel portare procedimenti di fronte al Laboratorio, poiché il secondo fu legato con la legge in risarcimento calcolatore, e la legge previde per importi ridicolamente bassi. Inoltre, loro avevano avviato procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali che non avevano dato luogo al rifiuto della loro azione di reclamo sulla base della non-esaurimento di via di ricorso ordinarie. Le giurisdizioni costituzionali avevano ammesso anche effettivamente, che poiché nessuno piani esisterono in merito a ciò che costituiva una proprietà dei richiedenti , simili procedimenti sarebbero stati complicati.
36. La Corte reitera che secondo Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, può trattare solamente con un problema dopo che tutte le via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite. Il fine di questo articolo è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere diritto le violazioni addotta contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni sono presentate alla Corte (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Selmouni c. la Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 74 il 1999-V di ECHR). Articolo che 35 § 1 è basato sull'assunzione, rifletteva in Articolo 13 (con cui ha un'affinità vicina), che c'è una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva disponibile in riguardo della violazione allegato dei diritti di Convenzione di un individuo (vedere Kud³a c. la Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 152 ECHR 2000-XI). Così l'azione di reclamo presentata alla Corte è dovuta essere resa alle corti nazionali ed appropriate, almeno in sostanza prima nella conformità coi requisiti formali di diritto nazionale ed all'interno dei tempo-limiti prescritti. Ciononostante, l'obbligo per esaurire solamente via di ricorso nazionali richiede che un richiedente si avvalga normale di via di ricorso che sono effettive, sufficiente ed accessibile in riguardo dei suoi danni di Convenzione (vedere Balogh c. l'Ungheria, n. 47940/99, § 30 20 luglio 2004). L'esistenza di simile via di ricorso non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicura in teoria ma anche in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia (vedere Mifsud c. la Francia (il dec.) [GC], n. 57220/00, ECHR 2002-VIII).
37. La Corte enfatizzerebbe che la richiesta dell'articolo dell'esaurimento deve costituire assegno dovuto il fatto che è fatto domanda nel contesto di sistema per la protezione di diritti umani che le Parti Contraenti sono state d'accordo ad esporre su. Di conseguenza, ha riconosciuto che Articolo 35 deve essere fatto domanda con del grado della flessibilità e senza il formalismo eccessivo. Ha riconosciuto inoltre che questo articolo è né assoluto né capace di essere fatto domanda automaticamente; nel fare una rassegna se è stato osservato è essenziale per avere riguardo ad alle particolari circostanze di ogni causa individuale (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. Turchia, 16 settembre 1996 § 69, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV e Sammut e Visto Investimenti c. il Malta (il dec.), n. 27023/03, 28 giugno 2005).
38. Al giorno d'oggi la causa i richiedenti avviarono procedimenti costituzionali di fronte alla Corte Civile che adduce una violazione del loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. Loro fecero appello inoltre alla Corte Costituzionale contro la sentenza della Corte Civile che respinge la loro rivendicazione. Siccome i richiedenti si erano lamentati di una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nella sua interezza, le corti nazionali esaminarono se tutti i requisiti di questa disposizione si erano stati attenuti con, notevolmente l'esistenza di un “equilibrio equo” e di una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti, lo scopo cercò di essere realizzato ed il riguardo dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. Effettivamente, mentre notò che procedimenti di fronte al Laboratorio non erano stati avviati le corti non respinsero la rivendicazione per la non-esaurimento di via di ricorso ordinarie. Avendo ammesso che l'affitto ricevette coi richiedenti era molto basso, loro conclusero ciononostante che l'azione di reclamo fu mal-fondata.
39. La Corte considera che, nel sollevare questa dichiarazione di fronte alle giurisdizioni costituzionali e nazionali che non respinsero la rivendicazione su motivi procedurali ma esaminarono la sostanza di sé, i richiedenti si avvalsero normale delle via di ricorso che erano accessibili a loro e quale relativo, in sostanza, ai fatti si lamentò di al livello europeo (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Fleri Soler e Camilleri c. il Malta, n. 35349/05, §§ 39-40 ECHR 2006-X; ed Amato Gauci c. il Malta, n. 47045/06, § 35 15 settembre 2009).
40. Segue che l'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere respinta.
2. Gli altri motivi per dichiarare l'azione di reclamo inammissibile
41. La Corte reitera che la sua giurisdizione di ratione temporis copre solamente il periodo dopo la ratifica della Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli con lo Stato rispondente. Dalla data di ratifica in avanti , tutti l'atti allegato di Stato ed omissioni devono adattare alla Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli e fatti susseguenti incorrono anche all'interno della giurisdizione della Corte dove sono soltanto proroghe di una situazione già esistente loro (vedere, per esempio, Yağcı e Sargın c. Turchia, 8 giugno 1995, § 40 Serie A n. 319-A, ed Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão ed Altri c. il Portogallo, N. 29813/96 e 30229/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-io). La Corte reitera che l’applicazione di legislazione che colpisce i diritti dei proprietari durante il corso di molti anni costituisce un'interferenza continua ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 210 ECHR 2006 -...).
42. La Corte nota che il problema sollevò con l'azione di reclamo presente è l'incassi successivo sotto regimi diversi e l'importo di affitto ricevuti coi richiedenti in tutto i periodi attinenti. Nota inoltre che non è stato contestato che simile misure costituirono un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' di proprietà. Segue che la Corte è ratione temporis competente per trattare particolarmente finora con l'azione di reclamo in come sé riferisce al periodo che segue 23 gennaio 1967, quando la Convenzione e Protocollo N.ro 1 entrò in vigore in riguardo del Malta.
43. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
44. I richiedenti presentarono che l'interferenza costituiva una privazione di proprietà siccome i richiedenti erano stati privati del controllo della proprietà. La demolizione e ricostruire della proprietà non era stato soggetto alla loro approvazione, e la costruzione nuova era stata basata su piani totalmente nuovi. Inoltre, la proprietà era stata contenuta sotto proprietà ed era usata da quaranta-due anni, nonostante che la legge previde che prendere sotto questo titolo era essere provvisorio. Inoltre, il Governo aveva appropriato il risarcimento di guerra-danno che era dovuto ai richiedenti pagamenti seguenti che loro avevano reso quale li rese eleggibile per sé.
45. In qualsiasi caso, i richiedenti contesero che il risarcimento ricevette con loro era irragionevole e sproporzionato. L'affitto di acquisizione fu collegato al valore di noleggio della proprietà prima della Seconda Mondo Guerra, fu fissato in tempo e non lasciò spazio ad aumenti che riflettono il costo di vivere e le fluttuazioni nel mercato, e non poteva riflettere perciò il vero valore della proprietà. Quando questo fu trasformato in riconoscimento affittato, era soggetto ad un aumento di 40%; la somma ancora rimasta molto basso come questo era di nuovo comunque, dipendente sull'affitto di acquisizione iniziale. Questa somma fu fissata ciononostante di nuovo, in tempo che sotto tenuta pubblica la proprietà fu presa permanentemente. Così, siccome passò tempo, l'affitto che loro hanno ricevuto era significativamente più inconseguente comparato con prezzi sul mercato aperto, l'essere di affitto stabilì decadi prima e non avendo qualsiasi prospettiva di un aumento futuro. Questi importi sarebbero considerati un compenso, particolarmente contro il fatto che il Governo stava ricevendo affitto dagli inquilini correnti, e che parte della proprietà era usata come un affari commerciali. I richiedenti considerarono inoltre che nella loro rivendicazione per il risarcimento loro erano ad un svantaggio poiché nessuno piano esistè mostrare che di che consisteva la loro proprietà.
46. Infine, loro notarono che il fatto che il Governo aveva, nel 2010, scelto di acquisire la proprietà sotto titolo di acquisto assoluto non poteva bastare correggere la situazione che loro avevano sopportato su anni numerosi. In particolare, loro notarono che il risarcimento che è offerto ancora una volta era improprio.
(b) Il Governo
47. Il Governo presentò che la presa sotto titolo di proprietà e d'uso e/o la tenuta pubblica costituiva un controllo dell'uso della proprietà poiché i richiedenti non erano stati spossessati dei loro diritti di proprietà.
48. Questa presa era stata eseguita nell'interesse pubblico. L'edificio era stato demolito ed era stato ricostruito per i fini di creare alloggio sociale, offrire alloggio per quelle persone che erano state lasciate senza come una conseguenza della guerra. Presumendo anche che un negozio era stato costruito anche sulla loro proprietà, una questione che non potevano provare i richiedenti poiché loro non potevano presentare piani delle delimitazioni della loro proprietà, il negozio notificò l'interesse della comunità circostante. Loro dissero che questo interesse pubblico si sostenne datare. Loro notarono inoltre che i richiedenti non avevano contestato lo scopo della presa di fronte alle corti nazionali realmente.
49. Il Governo presentò che l'interferenza non aveva imposto un carico individuale ed eccessivo sui richiedenti. Effettivamente i richiedenti non avevano avviato procedimenti di fronte al Laboratorio per ottenere un ordine che la terra sia acquisita col Governo con titolo di acquisto assoluto o dominio pubblico, o richiedendo che i locali siano cassati; né loro contestarono l'importo di affitto pagabile. Così qualsiasi carico subito era stato dovuto alla loro inerzia. Una volta la proprietà era stata presa finita sotto titolo di tenuta pubblica, l'affitto che loro hanno ricevuto era sorto entro 40%. Inoltre, questo calcolo era stato basato sui valori di noleggio dichiarati coi richiedenti, e questo era lo stesso affitto che avrebbe fatto domanda faceva essere affittato la proprietà ad inquilini privati. Il Governo notò che, al giorno d'oggi la causa, i richiedenti non avevano nessun obbligo per sostenere o riparare i locali. I locali erano stati ricostruiti completamente inoltre, alla spesa del Governo. Seguì che diversamente da nella causa di Hutten-Czapska (citò sopra), i richiedenti non rischiarono creazione una perdita sull'affitto della proprietà.
50. Il Governo considerò inoltre che poiché lo Stato era incorso nelle spese di ricostruire la proprietà, i proprietari non potevano recuperare il risarcimento per lavori che loro non si erano impegnati mai. Effettivamente, a norma di legge (il poi Articolo 11 (2) dell'Ordinanza), il Governo potrebbe portare fuori qualsiasi simile lavoro sulla terra che qualsiasi persona che ha un interesse senza restrizioni nella terra sarebbe concessa per fare con virtù di quel l'interesse. Il Governo presentò che approvazione precedente coi proprietari non fu richiesta perciò.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Norme applicabili nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
51. Come la Corte ha affermato in un numero di occasioni, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto fuori nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e materie sé alle certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono concessi, inter alia, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccato. Il secondo e terzi articoli concernono con le particolari istanze di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò nella luce del principio generale enunciata nel primo articolo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37 la Serie Un n. 98; Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 98 ECHR 2000-io; e Saliba c. il Malta, n. 4251/02, § 31 8 novembre 2005).
52. La Corte nota che da 1951 a 1993 la proprietà che fu demolita come presto come gli anni cinquanta fu presa sotto titolo di “proprietà ed uso.” Sotto questo titolo, la presa fu voluta dire essere provvisorio. Comunque, i richiedenti non riuscirono a richiedere la conclusione della misura o la sua conversione ad un completamente l'acquisto, come previsto per con legge. Così, la misura sotto questo titolo persistito per quaranta anni durante che il tempo i richiedenti non persero mai il loro diritto per vendere la proprietà ed il titolo di proprietà non fu trasferito mai a terze parti; infatti loro continuarono a ricevere affitto dal Governo nel suo riguardo. Benché nelle circostanze presenti la vendita fosse improbabile, sia perché piccola disposizione di interesse nell'acquisto di proprietà che non può essere usata, ed a causa del fatto che i confini non furono stabiliti chiaramente, la Corte non può accettare che la misura si lamentò di corrispose ad un'espropriazione de facto. Comunque, i richiedenti che il diritto di ' di proprietà è stato restretto severamente: loro non potevano esercitare il diritto di uso in termini di proprietà fisica come l'edificio fu occupato con terze parti. Così, questo costituì un mezzi di controllo Statale dell'uso di proprietà che dovrebbe essere esaminata sotto il secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
53. Come al secondo periodo, le restrizioni rimasero vale a dire dopo 1993 durante che la proprietà fu presa sotto titolo di tenuta pubblica, lo stesse come sopra. Comunque, la Corte osserva che tenuta pubblica implica che la proprietà è presa permanentemente. I richiedenti non furono restretti semplicemente di conseguenza, in o privarono temporaneamente del loro uso e godimento della proprietà (vedere, al contrario., Erkner e Hofauer c. l'Austria, 23 aprile 1987, § 74 la Serie Un n. 117, e Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982 la Serie Un n. 52). La Corte reitera che nell'assenza di un'espropriazione formale che è dire un trapasso di proprietà la Corte deve guardare dietro alle comparizioni e deve investigare le realtà della situazione si lamentarono di (l'ibid). Nella prospettiva della Corte, le misure prese con le autorità furono tirate sottoponendo i richiedenti la proprietà di ' ad un affitto continuato in favore di terze parti, con una prospettiva a prendendolo permanentemente infine da loro siccome fu confermato con la recente offerta (2010) prendere la proprietà con vuole dire di completamente acquisto. Perciò, la Corte considera che è possibile che l'interferenza sul secondo periodo andò oltre controllo di Stato dell'uso di proprietà, mentre inclina su che che potrebbe essere associato ad ad un'espropriazione de facto.
54. Ciononostante, la Corte nota che i principi applicabili sono simili, vale a dire che, oltre ad essendo legale, una privazione di proprietà o un'interferenza come il controllo di uso di proprietà deve soddisfare anche il requisito della proporzionalità.
55. Siccome ha affermato ripetutamente la Corte, un equilibrio equo deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, la ricerca per tale essere di equilibrio equo inerente nell'intero della Convenzione. L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardò sopporta un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, §§ 69-74, e Brumărescu c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 78 ECHR 1999-VII).
56. La Corte nota che in de di Gera Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq c.Malta (n. 26771/07, 5 aprile 2011) quale trattò con lo stesso sistema, la Corte, adottando l'approccio della Corte Costituzionale si concentrò anche il suo assesment sulla proporzionalità della misura.
(b) Se le autorità maltesi rispettarono il principio della legalità
57. Nella presente causa, non è stato contestato con le parti che le misure sono state eseguite in conformità con le disposizioni dell'Ordinanza. Le misure si lamentarono di, vale a dire le prese successive, era, perciò, “legale” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
(c) Se le autorità maltesi perseguirono uno “scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale”
58. Qualsiasi interferenza col godimento di un diritto o la libertà riconosciuta con la Convenzione deve perseguire un scopo legittimo. Il principio di un “equilibrio equo” inerente in Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 presuppone l'esistenza di un interesse generale della comunità (vedere Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 148 il 2004-V di ECHR).
59. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per apprezzare che in che è il “generale” o “pubblico” l'interesse. Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito con la Convenzione, è così per le autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure per essere fatto domanda nella sfera dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà. Qui, come negli altri campi ai quali prolungano le salvaguardie della Convenzione, le autorità nazionali godono di conseguenza un margine della valutazione.
60. La nozione di interesse “pubblico” o “generale” necessariamente è estesa. In particolare, sfere come alloggio della popolazione che società moderne considerano un primo bisogno sociale e quale ha un ruolo centrale nel welfare e politiche economiche degli Stati Contraenti, può mandare a chiamare della forma di regolamentazione con lo Stato spesso. In che decisioni di sfera come a se, ed in tal caso quando, può essere lasciato pienamente il giochi di vigori di mercato gratis o se dovrebbe essere soggetto a controllo di Stato, così come la scelta di misure per garantire le necessità di alloggio della comunità e del tempismo per la loro attuazione, necessariamente comporti considerazione di complesso problemi sociali, economici e politici (vedere Hutten-Czapska, citata sopra, §§ 165-66).
61. Trovando naturale che il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio, la Corte ha su molte occasioni dichiarate che rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura come a che in che è il “pubblico” o “generale” interessi a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia, [GC], n. 22774/93, § 49, 1999-V di ECHR e, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski citata sopra, § 149).
62. Nella presente causa, la Corte può accettare l'argomento del Governo che le misure che crearono alloggio sociale sono state tirate, offrire alloggio per quelle persone senza che erano state lasciate, come una conseguenza della guerra. Così, le misure avevano un scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale, come richiesto col secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1.
(d) Se le autorità maltesi hanno previsto un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della comunità ed il diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo di proprietà
63. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte nota in primo luogo che mentre il requisito di interesse pubblico è stato soddisfatto, è chiaro ciò che sarebbe stato giustificato anni fa, non sarà giustificato necessariamente oggi (vedere Amato Gauci, citata sopra, § 60). Nel suo esercizio di bilanciamento la Corte dovrà così, determinare se tale misura, al danno di proprietari ancora è giustificata e proporziona sessanta anni dopo la guerra.
64. La Corte nota che i richiedenti la proprietà di ' fu presa sotto titolo di proprietà ed usa nel 1951 e successivamente sotto titolo di tenuta pubblica nel 1993. Segue che per più di sei decadi i richiedenti non sono stati in grado rendere qualsiasi uso di proprietà loro. In tutto i sessanta anni i proprietari (i richiedenti la propria metà una quota indivisa) ha ricevuto un affitto di non più di EUR 205 per anno per una proprietà che consisteva, inter alia, di venticinque appartamenti. La Corte nota una discrepanza nei fatti siccome presentato con le parti: mentre sia parti concordano che la legge previde per un 40% aumento per riconoscimento affitti vis-á-vis a ciò che era stata l'acquisizione di affitti, i richiedenti affermarono che i proprietari avevano ricevuto EUR 205 per anno in affitto in tutto il periodo intero, senza addurre che dopo 1993 l'aumento non era stato fatto domanda a loro. Segue che l'affitto pagò da 1951-1993 era presumibilmente anche meno che EUR 205 per anno. Comunque, la Corte farà la sua valutazione sul locale che i proprietari ricevettero EUR 205 in affitto sempre, come confermato coi richiedenti.
65. Così, la Corte osserva che i proprietari ricevettero efficacemente la somma notevolmente bassa di EUR 0.68 per mese per ognuno dei venticinque appartamenti. Effettivamente, le giurisdizioni costituzionali loro asserirono che l'affitto “era con gli standard di oggi basso per la proprietà in problema.” La Corte nota che la legge non previde per qualsiasi aumento secondo il costo di vivere e gli altri fattori ma, come confermato con la Corte Costituzionale, doveva essere allacciato ai valori di noleggio di 1951. Questo fattore doveva essere visto certamente contro lo sfondo della situazione economica dello Stato oggi quale non può essere comparato che di una nazione dopoguerra. In questa luce, la Corte non può, ma trova che questo sistema potesse condurre a risultati irragionevoli. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il fatto che la proprietà fu ricostruita col Governo non è sufficiente per stabilire che la proprietà originale era indegna. Effettivamente, quando fu preso originalmente, i richiedenti che prima avevano pagato contributi verso questo finanziamento erano il risarcimento di guerra-danno dovuto che, al tempo, avrebbe abilitato o almeno avrebbe aiutato nella ricostruzione dei locali danneggiati, l'aveva rimasto nella loro proprietà. La Corte considera che l'importo di affitto ricevette coi proprietari è manifestamente sproporzionato al valore di mercato dell'edificio (siccome presentato coi richiedenti nelle loro rivendicazioni di soddisfazione eque). Il fatto che, siccome dibattuto col Governo, l'affitto ricevuto era in linea con le leggi di affitto applicabile sull'isola, non fa favore la causa del Governo. Effettivamente, la Corte ha su varie occasioni sostenute che la varia legislazione che riguarda affitti controllati in Malta era in violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Ghigo c. il Malta, n. 31122/05, §§ 69-70 26 settembre 2006; Edwards c. il Malta, n. 17647/04, §§ 78-79 24 ottobre 2006; Fleri Soler e Camilleri c. il Malta, n. 35349/05, §§ 79-80 ECHR 2006-X; ed Amato Gauci, citata sopra, § 62).
66. Anche se, siccome dibattuto col Governo, al giorno d'oggi la causa i richiedenti non furono resi per coprire i costi di mantenimento straordinario o riparano all'edificio, la Corte non può ma nota che la somma in questione-corrispondendo a meno che EUR 18 per mese per la proprietà intera-è estremamente basso e non può essere considerato proprio il risarcimento equo per l'uso di simile proprietà. La Corte non è convinta che gli interessi dei proprietari, “incluso il loro diritto per dedurre profitti dalla loro proprietà” (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citata sopra, § 239), è stato incontrato.
67. Nella presente causa, avendo riguardo ad ai richiedenti ' afferma dell'incertezza come a se loro mai recupererebbero la loro proprietà che è stata soggetto a regimi successivi (proprietà ed uso e successivamente tenuta pubblica) per sessanta anni, l'importo esiguo di affitto di acquisizione/riconoscimento ricevuto dai richiedenti in tutto questo periodo, ma particolarmente sulle più recenti decadi, l'aumento nello standard di vita in Malta su queste decadi ed il bisogno diminuito di garantire alloggio sociale comparati all'era dopoguerra, i costatazione di Corte che un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo è stato imposto sui richiedenti. I secondi furono costretti a sopportare la maggior parte dei sociali e costi finanziari di provvedere alloggio di alloggio a terze parti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska citata sopra, § 225, ed Amato Gauci, citata sopra, § 63; vedere anche il de di Gera Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, citata sopra, § 59). Segue che lo Stato maltese è andato a vuoto a prevedere l'equilibrio equo e richiesto fra gli interessi generali della comunità e la protezione dei richiedenti il diritto di ' di proprietà.
68. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
69. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre del fatto che gli atti Costituzionali presero un irragionevolmente tempo lungo per essere deciso. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 6 della Convenzione che, in finora come attinente, legge siccome segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
70. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'eccezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
71. Il Governo contese che l'azione di reclamo rese sotto Articolo 6 che le giurisdizioni costituzionali avevano preso un irragionevolmente tempo lungo per decidere la causa non era stato portato mai di fronte alle corti nazionali come i richiedenti non era riuscito ad avviare un set nuovo di procedimenti costituzionali in questo riguardo. Dibattendo che tale via di ricorso sarebbe effettiva, il Governo fece riferimento a giurisprudenzanazionale, vale a dire Lawrence Cuschieri v. the Honourable Prime Minister (6 April 1995), Perit Joseph Mallia v. the Honourable Prime Minister (15 March 1996), and The Honourable Judge Dr Anton Depasquale v. the Attorney General (19 settembre 2001), dove le giurisdizioni costituzionali avevano portato giurisdizione di azioni di reclamo contro la Corte Costituzionale in relazione all'equità di procedimenti sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Nella prima di queste cause, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne, che non poteva un priori esclude revisione di comportamento discutibile o azioni delle giurisdizioni costituzionali. Nel Perit Giuseppe la causa di Mallia, sia la corte di prima -istanza che esercita la sua giurisdizione costituzionale e la Corte Costituzionale su ricorso aveva sostenuto le rivendicazioni del richiedente ed aveva trovato una violazione di Articolo 6.
72. I richiedenti presentarono che avviando un set nuovo di procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali col rischio di loro che ancora una volta prende un impropriamente tempo lungo, insieme con le spese addizionali coinvolte sarebbe stato un ulteriore pregiudizio in cima alle violazioni che loro avevano subito per causa dello Stato.
73. Siccome menzionato sopra in paragrafo 36, nella conformità con Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, la Corte può trattare solamente con un problema dopo che tutte le via di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite. Il fine di questo articolo è riconoscere gli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolando o mettere diritto le violazioni addotta contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni sono presentate alla Corte (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Selmouni c. la Francia [GC], citata sopra, § 74). L'azione di reclamo presentata alla Corte prima è dovuta essere resa così, alle corti nazionali ed appropriate, almeno in sostanza nella conformità coi requisiti formali di diritto nazionale ed all'interno dei tempo-limiti prescritti (vedere Zarb Adami c. il Malta (il dec.), n. 17209/02, 24 maggio 2005). Comunque, l'articolo dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali costringe un richiedente ad avere ricorso normale a via di ricorso all'interno dell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale che è disponibile e sufficiente per riconoscere compensazione in riguardo delle violazioni addusse. L'esistenza delle via di ricorso in oggetto non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicuro in teoria ma in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia. Non c'è nessun obbligo per avere ricorso a via di ricorso che sono inadeguate o inefficaci (vedere Micallef c. il Malta [GC], n. 17056/06, § 55 ECHR 2009 -...). La velocità della procedura dell'azione riparatore può essere anche attinente a se è praticamente effettivo per i fini di Articolo 35 § 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, McFarlane c. l'Irlanda [GC], n. 31333/06, § 123 ECHR 2010 -...).
74. La Corte osserva che in Ferré Gisbert c. la Spagna (n. 39590/05, § 39 13 ottobre 2009), contenne che il risuoli via di ricorso disponibile contro una sentenza di Corte Costituzionale è un ricorso individuale di fronte alla Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione. In questa causa l'ordinamento giuridico spagnolo non permetteva, o in pratica o in legge, l'istituzione di un set nuovo di procedimenti costituzionali contro i procedimenti ed una definitivo sentenza della Corte Costituzionale. Tale limitazione è comune fra membro Stati che adottano via di ricorso di corte costituzionali per violazioni di diritti umani allegato (per esempio, Cipro, Repubblica ceca, Germania e la Polonia). Nell'ordinamento giuridico maltese i richiedenti potrebbero avere comunque, −sia in legge ed in pratica un set nuovo di procedimenti costituzionali che si lamentano del primo set di procedimenti costituzionali depositò. Come stabilito col Governo, simile cause non possono un priori sia dichiarato inammissibile.
75. In tale circostanza la Corte è chiamata su per esaminare se la via di ricorso costituzionale contro una sentenza di Corte Costituzionale potrebbe essere considerata accessibile ed effettivo, al giorno d'oggi la causa.
76. La Corte considera che, siccome attestato con una molteplicità di cause portata di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale maltese, non c'è nessuna ragione di dubitare che atti Costituzionali sono accessibili e che loro sono una via di ricorso capace di offrire compensazione per violazioni di diritti umani con vuole dire di sentenze vincolanti.
77. Comunque che che è di preoccupazione alla Corte è la lunghezza di un altro set di procedimenti costituzionali ad un stadio dove l'azione di reclamo iniziale di un richiedente sarebbe stata decisa conclusivamente possibilmente dopo molti anni della causa di fronte ai vari livelli delle corti nazionali, incluso le giurisdizioni costituzionali. La Corte nota che depositando una richiesta costituzionale comporta una raccomandazione alla prima Sala della Corte Civile e la possibilità di un ricorso alla Corte Costituzionale. La Corte già ha sostenuto che questa è una procedura ingombrante, specialmente fin da show di pratica che piacciono alla Corte Costituzionale è depositato naturalmente (vedere Sabeur Ali Dentro c. il Malta, n. 35892/97, § 40, 29 giugno 2000 e Kadem c. il Malta, n. 55263/00, § 53, 9 gennaio 2003 dove la Corte sostenne che i procedimenti attinenti invariabilmente sono più lungo che che come che qualificherebbe “veloce” per Articolo 5 § 4 fini). La lunghezza di questi procedimenti è aggravata inoltre col fatto che loro possono essere aggiornati dado sinusoidale pendente qualsiasi procedimenti riguardo alle azioni di reclamo effettive di fronte a questa Corte. In conseguenza, la Corte considera, che, anche se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale lascia spazio a tale azione di reclamo nuova per essere depositato, la lunghezza dei procedimenti detrae dalla loro efficacia (vedere McFarlane c. l'Irlanda [GC], citata sopra, § 123). Nota che nella causa presente i richiedenti erano stati comportati in procedimenti che durarono per undici anni di fronte alle giurisdizioni costituzionali.
78. Segue che, anche se nel diritto nazionale di ordinamento giuridico maltese prevede per una via di ricorso contro una definitivo sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, in prospettiva della specifica situazione della Corte Costituzionale nell'ordine legale e nazionale (vedere Ferré Gisbert, citata sopra, § 39) la Corte considera che in circostanze come quelli della causa presente non è una via di ricorso che è costretta ad essere esaurita.
79. L'eccezione del Governo che via di ricorso nazionali non sono state esaurite è respinta perciò.
80. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
81. I richiedenti presentarono che il Governo sia biasimare per un numero di aggiornamenti, ed un numero di aggiornamenti era stato costituito con la corte niente ragione evidente. Loro notarono che la Corte Costituzionale stessa aveva rampognato la Corte Civile (Prima Sala) per la lunghezza dei procedimenti di prima- istanza, notando che sotto nessuno circostanze devono una causa di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale prenda così lungo per essere deciso.
82. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti il comportamento di ' aveva contribuito al ritardo di fronte alle giurisdizioni costituzionali, e non che del Governo o le corti. Effettivamente i richiedenti avevano richiesto i vari aggiornamenti, loro non erano sembrati di fronte alla corte sempre ed aveva preso i richiedenti quattro anni per registrare osservazioni. Inoltre, era stata i richiedenti che avevano richiesto che i procedimenti siano sospesi durante la conseguenza di un'altra causa che secondo il Governo era irrilevante ai fatti della causa. Seguì che non c'era stata una violazione del principio di termine ragionevole.
83. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza di procedimenti deve essere valutata nella luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento al criterio seguente: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e le autorità attinenti e cosa era in pericolo per il richiedente nella controversia (vedere Bezzina Wettinger ed Altri c. il Malta, n. 15091/06, § 87 8 aprile 2008).
84. La Corte osserva che, come affermato con la Corte Costituzionale, i richiedenti causa di ' che trattò coi loro diritti di proprietà e può essere riguardata perciò come dell'importanza ai richiedenti, non era particolarmente complesso.
85. La Corte nota che i procedimenti cominciarono 13 marzo 1998, la sentenza di prima - istanza fu consegnata su 16 ottobre 2008 ed i procedimenti fu concluso su ricorso 6 ottobre 2009. I procedimenti costituzionali durarono così undici anni e sette mesi a due livelli di giurisdizione. Comunque, è chiaro che la croce del ritardo era il periodo dell'anni di dieci e mezza di fronte alla corte di prima - istanza.
86. La Corte nota (vedere appendice) che c'era almeno per prima quaranta aggiornamenti citano un esempio di che quindici furono richiesti coi richiedenti o a causa della loro assenza, particolarmente su un periodo di due anni quando loro richiesero proroghe per registrare le loro osservazioni. Comunque, prese la corte cinque aggiornamenti per consegnare sentenza, degli aggiornamenti non furono spiegati e sei aggiornamenti furono dati su una spanna di più di un anno ed una metà, durante la conseguenza di un'altra causa. In replica all'argomento del Governo come a se qualsiasi l'altra causa è potuta essere pertinente o non ai richiedenti la causa di ', la Corte considera che una volta la corte accordò gli aggiornamenti per questo fine, si presuppone che li trovò per essere attinente. In questo riguardo la Corte nota inoltre, che le corti rimangono responsabili per la condotta dei procedimenti di fronte a loro e dovrebbero pesare perciò i vantaggi degli aggiornamenti continuati durante la conseguenza di altre cause contro il requisito della prontezza (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, citata sopra, § 43).
87. Avendo esaminato tutto il materiale presentato a sé, ed avendo riguardo ad alla sua giurisprudenzasulla materia, la Corte considera, che benché un certo ritardo fosse davvero attribuibile ai richiedenti, mentre tenendo presente il nazionale corteggia la responsabilità di ' nella condotta di procedimenti, la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti era eccessiva e non riuscì ad incontrare il “il termine ragionevole” il requisito.
88. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
89. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la presa sotto titolo di “tenuta pubblica” come opposto a “completamente l'acquisto”, siccome era consueto, corrispose a contrario di discriminazione ad Articolo 14 che legge siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
90. I richiedenti presentarono che la loro proprietà non era stata presa sotto titolo di completamente acquisto siccome sarebbe dovuto essere fatto di nuovo anni, in linea con la pratica che fece domanda a situazioni simili. Anche se questo era stato dovuto ad un sistema sovraccaricato o letargo amministrativo (siccome traspirato durante procedimenti nazionali), loro considerarono che l'attesa aveva costituito trattamento discriminatorio.
91. Il Governo presentò che durante i procedimenti nazionali i richiedenti avuti non provarono che c'era stato qualsiasi proprietà analoga presa finito con completamente acquisto. Inoltre, loro non avevano specificato su che base che loro era stato discriminato presumibilmente. In qualsiasi la causa, determinato le circostanze della causa ed il bisogno di offrire alloggio sociale in un'era di guerra di posto qualsiasi la differenza in trattamento sarebbe stata giustificata obiettivamente.
92. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo ha collegato all'esaminato sopra e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
93. Avendo riguardo ad alla sentenza relativo ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. (vedere paragrafo 67 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario per esaminare se, in questa causa, è stata una violazione di Articolo 14 (vedere, per esempio, Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 103 ECHR 2000-XII; e Draon c. la Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, § 91 6 ottobre 2005).
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
94. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
95. I richiedenti chiesero EUR 712,500 in riguardo di danno patrimoniale: EUR 475,000 per la loro la metà del valore della proprietà (valutò ad EUR 950,000 secondo il rapporto di un architetto) ed EUR 237,500 in affitto sugli anni calcolarono a 50% della loro quota del valore della proprietà. Loro dissero inoltre EUR 100,000 in danno non-patrimoniale.
96. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non erano dovuti un prezzo globale che corrisponde al valore della proprietà, tale prezzo globale sarebbe solamente ora dovuto che una presa sotto completamente acquisto era in progresso. Come all'affitto, il Governo notò, che gli edifici che esistono oggi furono costruiti ed erano stati sostenendo col Governo. Inoltre, loro erano totalmente diversi dagli edifici che esisterono di fronte alla guerra. Così, i richiedenti le rivendicazioni di ' erano infondate. Effettivamente secondo una richiesta entro uno dei coproprietari che non sono un richiedente nei procedimenti presenti, traspirò che il valore di una quota mezzo indivisa nel 1983 era EUR 1,300. Così, secondo il Governo l'aumento di valore dato ai locali coi richiedenti che l'architetto di ' stava confondendo. Inoltre, il Governo considerò che i locali avevano avuto nessuno commerciale potenziale e che i proprietari possono in qualsiasi evento è stato legato con leggi di affitto controllate. Loro, perciò considerato che nessun danno patrimoniale era dovuto.
97. Come a danno non-patrimoniale il Governo considerò anche che nessuno era dovuto, e che in qualsiasi evento qualsiasi assegnazione della Corte non dovrebbe eccedere EUR 5,000 per essere diviso fra tutti i diciotto richiedenti.
98. La Corte nota che ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in finora come i richiedenti non sta ricevendo un importo adeguato di affitto in riguardo della loro proprietà che fu presa col Governo sotto vari titoli. La Corte respinge perciò i richiedenti che ' chiede per un prezzo globale che rappresenta il valore della proprietà. Comunque, la Corte dovrebbe procedere determinare il risarcimento al quale i richiedenti sono concessi in riguardo della perdita del godimento della loro proprietà del quale loro soffrono dal 1967, quando la Convenzione ed il protocollo attinente entrarono in vigore in riguardo del Malta, alla data della sentenza della Corte in questo riguardo poiché la Corte non si ha informato che questo regime ha finito seguente l'intenzione del Governo di prendere la proprietà con completamente acquisto. Simile risarcimento dovrebbe consistere in una somma che rappresenta un importo adeguato di affitto che i richiedenti avrebbero dovuto ricevere sugli anni. La Corte è della prospettiva che i richiedenti le osservazioni di ' in riguardo dell'affitto sono completamente speculative e non danno qualsiasi i dettagli come a valori di noleggio effettivi e realistici. Non si può considerare ragionevolmente perciò, che loro riflettano su una valutazione accettabile del valore di noleggio sul mercato gli anni. Comunque, il Governo non ha presentato qualsiasi stime corrette o i calcoli concreti come a valori di noleggio sugli anni.
99. Tenendo presente il sopra, la Corte considera che la questione del risarcimento per danno patrimoniale in finora come sé riferisce all'importo adeguato di affitto non è pronto per decisione. Che questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e la procedura susseguente fissò, mentre avendo dovuto riguardo ad a qualsiasi accordo che sarebbe giunto allo Stato rispondente ed i richiedenti (l'Articolo 75 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte).
100. Tenendo presente le violazioni fondò nella causa presente che la Corte assegna i richiedenti, EUR 3,000 ognuno in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
101. I richiedenti anche chiesti EUR 2,785.82 come esposti fuori nella nota spese tassata più interesse a 8% ed EUR 615 in parcelle legali (richiesta di ricorso) per i costi e spese incorse in di fronte alle corti nazionali ed EUR 2,102.68 per quegli incorsi in di fronte alla Corte.
102. Il Governo presentò che l'importo chiese per procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte era eccessivo, e considerato che EUR 1,500 sarebbero bastati. Come all'importo di costi e spese incorso in di fronte alle corti nazionali, il Governo notò, che nessuna prova che aveva provato era stata presentata che i costi dovuto al Governo era stato pagato. Inoltre, nessun interesse era dovuto su costi giudiziali, particolarmente quelli che non erano stati pagati ancora. Loro notarono inoltre che le parcelle legali per la richiesta di ricorso costituirono elencazione duplice siccome loro già erano stati inclusi nella nota spese tassata.
103. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. La Corte nota in primo luogo che presumendo anche le spese del Governo non è stato pagato ancora, queste spese rimangono quota. Sostiene l'argomento del Governo in riguardo delle parcelle incorso in collegamento con la richiesta di ricorso comunque. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo ai documenti nella suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare 4,800 costi di copertura la somma di EUR sotto tutti i capi.
C. Interesse di mora
104. La Corte considera appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;
5. Sostiene che, nella misura in cui è riguardata l'assegnazione finanziaria ai richiedenti per danno patrimoniale che è il risultato delle violazioni trovato nella causa presente, la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione e di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione in parte, vale a nella misura in cui ci si riferisce all'importo di affitto pagabile per il periodo attinente;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui questa sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Sezione il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza ;
6. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 3,000 (tre mila euro), ognuno, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 4,800 (quattro mila ottocento euro), congiuntamente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
7. Respinge il resto della richiesta per soddisfazione equa dei richiedenti.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 22 novembre 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente


APPENDICE
Il Dr Philip Saliba pro et noe c. Commissario di et di Terra-la Richiesta Costituzionale n. 640/1998-Corte Civile (Prima Sala)
Data di Aggiornamento Fine
25.03.1998 prima ascoltano. Gli imputati chiesti la corte più tempo per considerare il legale e situazione che riguarda i fatti come sollevati nella richiesta del richiedente. La causa fu aggiornata a 30 aprile 1998.
30.04.1998 che le parti hanno richiesto che la causa sia aggiornata. La causa fu aggiornata a 24 luglio 1998.
24.07.1998 la corte aggiornata la causa a 16 settembre 1998.
16.09.1998 che la corte ha notato che non c'era nessuna possibilità di accordo amichevole nella causa. La causa fu aggiornata a 25 settembre 1998 per i richiedenti per produrre la loro prova. Architetto Alberto Fenech fu nominato con la corte per assisterlo.
25.09.1998 testimonianza orale fu data da OMISSIS. La corte nominò Architetto Fenech per eseguire un'ispezione di su-luogo della proprietà. La corte aggiornata la causa a 9 novembre 1998.
09.11.1998 l'architetto corte-nominato informò la corte che lui aveva incontrato dei problemi. La causa fu aggiornata a 8 gennaio 1999 per registrare del rapporto dell'architetto.
08.01.1999 l'architetto confermò il suo rapporto su giuramento. La causa fu aggiornata a 18 marzo 1999 per esame del rapporto.
18.03.1999 le parti ' consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La causa fu aggiornata a 9 aprile 1999.
09.04.1999 il consulente legale dei richiedenti chiese alla corte di prolungare la nomina dell'architetto per stabilire il valore della proprietà. La causa fu aggiornata a 26 aprile 1999.
26.04.1999 che la causa è stata aggiornata a 27 aprile 1999.
27.04.1999 i richiedenti non registrarono la richiesta menzionata nel documento di corte di 9 aprile 1999. La corte osservò che i richiedenti fecero domanda 26 aprile 1999 per permesso per registrare la richiesta come un'appendice alla richiesta. La corte acconsentì ai richiedenti la richiesta di '. La corte aggiornata la causa a 25 giugno 1999.
17.06.1999 i richiedenti ed il loro consulente legale non frequentarono la seduta. La causa fu aggiornata a 8 ottobre 1999.
08.10.1999 che la causa è stata aggiornata a 16 novembre 1999.
16.11.1999 che la causa è stata aggiornata a 3 dicembre 1999 per la corte per dare un Decreto seguente la richiesta costituita coi richiedenti una valutazione della proprietà.
03.12.1999 la corte diede il suo Decreto. Il consulente legale dei richiedenti non frequentò l'udienza. La causa fu aggiornata a 21 gennaio 2000.
21.01.2000 il consulente legale dei richiedenti informò la corte che lui ha inteso di produrre testimoni di voce di viva. La causa fu aggiornata a 5 maggio 2000 per ogni prova delle parti.
05.05.2000 OMISSIS diede prova. Il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese un aggiornamento lungo. La causa fu aggiornata a 17 novembre 2000 per osservazioni orali.
17.11.2000 il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese un aggiornamento. La causa fu aggiornata a 19 gennaio 2001.
19.01.2001 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono la seduta. La causa fu aggiornata a 20 marzo 2001.
20.03.2001 che la causa è stata aggiornata a 28 maggio 2001.
28.05.2001 il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese un aggiornamento lungo. La causa fu aggiornata a 7 settembre 2001 per osservazioni orali.
07.09.2001 le parti richiesero un aggiornamento lungo. La corte aggiornata la causa sine die.
20.02.2002 richiesta registrata coi richiedenti che richiedono la corte per riprendere la causa.
25.02.2002 corte emise un Decreto da che cosa la causa fu rinominata per 22 aprile 2002.
22.04.2002 il consulente legale dei richiedenti informò la corte che uno dei richiedenti era morto pendente lite. La causa fu aggiornata a 30 settembre 2002.
30.09.2002 che la causa è stata aggiornata a 22 novembre 2002.
14.11.2002 che la corte è stata informata che il consulente Legale per i richiedenti non era capace di frequentare la seduta e che lui richiese la Corte per essere concessa per fare osservazioni orali. La causa fu aggiornata per osservazioni orali a 14 gennaio 2003.
14.01.2003 che la causa è stata aggiornata a 15 aprile 2003.
15.04.2003 i richiedenti ' che consulente legale ha chiesto permesso per registrare osservazioni scritte la corte. La corte diede i richiedenti finché 31 luglio 2003 per registrare le loro osservazioni scritte e gli imputati fu dato finché 30 settembre 2003 per registrare la loro replica. La causa fu aggiornata a 14 ottobre 2003 per definitivo osservazioni.
14.10.2003 il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese una proroga del termine massimo per registrare osservazioni scritte. La causa fu aggiornata a 13 gennaio 2004.
13.01.2004 il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese di nuovo una proroga del termine massimo per registrare osservazioni scritte. La causa fu aggiornata al 17 febbraio 2004.
17.02.2004 il consulente legale dei richiedenti ancora una volta richiese una proroga del termine massimo per registrare osservazioni scritte. La causa fu aggiornata a 17 marzo 2004.
17.03.2004 i richiedenti ed il loro consulente legale non frequentarono la seduta. La causa fu aggiornata a 8 giugno 2004.
08.06.2004 il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese una proroga del termine massimo per registrare osservazioni scritte. La causa fu aggiornata a 27 ottobre 2004.
27.10.2004 il consulente legale dei richiedenti richiese di nuovo una proroga del termine massimo per registrare osservazioni scritte. La causa fu aggiornata a 1 marzo 2005.
01.03.2005 il consulente legale dei richiedenti ha richiesto che i procedimenti siano sospesi sino alla conseguenza della causa del de di Gera Petri c. l'et di AG (numero 537/96 applicativo) pendente di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. La causa fu aggiornata a 26 maggio 2005.
26.05.2005 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte notò che la richiesta costituzionale n. 537/96 ancora erano pendenti ed aggiornarono la causa a 1 novembre 2005.
01.11.2005 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte notò che la richiesta costituzionale n. 537/96 ancora erano pendenti ed aggiornarono la causa a 17 gennaio 2006.
17.01.2006 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte notò che la richiesta costituzionale n. 537/96 ancora erano pendenti ed aggiornarono la causa a 6 aprile 2006.
06.04.2006 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte notò che la richiesta costituzionale n. 537/96 ancora erano pendenti ed aggiornarono la causa a 28 giugno 2006.
28.06.2006 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte notò che la richiesta costituzionale n. 537/96 ancora erano pendenti ed aggiornarono la causa a 2 novembre 2006.
02.11.2006 le parti ed i loro consulenti legali non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte notò che la richiesta costituzionale n. 537/96 ancora erano pendenti ed aggiornarono la causa a 18 gennaio 2007.
18.01.2007 i richiedenti ed il loro consulente legale non frequentarono l'udienza. La corte diede i richiedenti finché 20 marzo 2007 per registrare le loro osservazioni scritte e gli imputati finché 26 aprile 2007 per registrare la loro replica. La causa fu aggiornata a 2 maggio 2007.
02.05.2007 i richiedenti richiesero una proroga del termine massimo per registrare le loro osservazioni scritte. La causa fu aggiornata a 12 luglio 2007.
22.05.2007 i richiedenti registrarono le loro osservazioni scritte.
12.07.2007 la Corte diede gli imputati finché 12 settembre 2007 per registrare le loro repliche alle osservazioni registrò coi richiedenti. La causa fu aggiornata a 9 ottobre 2007.
09.10.2007 osservazioni orali furono ascoltate. La causa fu aggiornata a 10 gennaio 2008 per sentenza.
10.01.2008 causa aggiornata a 12 febbraio 2008 per sentenza.
12.02.2008 causa aggiornata a 26 febbraio 2008 per sentenza.
26.02.2008 causa aggiornata a 9 ottobre 2008 per sentenza.
09.10.2008 causa aggiornata a 16 ottobre 2008 per sentenza.
16.10.2008 giudizio fu consegnato.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.