Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VALKOV AND OTHERS v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 14, P1-1

NUMERO: 2033/04/2011
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 25/10/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion No violation of P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 14+P1-1
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF VALKOV AND OTHERS v. BULGARIA
(Applications nos. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04, 19490/04,
19495/04, 19497/04, 24729/04, 171/05 and 2041/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
25 October 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Valkov and Others v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Päivi Hirvelä,
George Nicolaou,
Nebojša Vučinić,
Vincent A. De Gaetano, judges,
Pavlina Panova, ad hoc judge,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 October 2011, delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in nine applications (nos. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04, 19490/04, 19495/04, 19497/04, 24729/04, 171/05 and 2041/05) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by nine Bulgarian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 6 January, 14 May, 29 June and 7 December 2004 respectively.
2. All applicants save for Mr A. were represented by Mr M. E.and Ms K. B., lawyers practising in Plovdiv. Mr A. was represented by Mr Ts. T., a lawyer practising in Montana. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms R. Nikolova, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that a statutory cap on their retirement pensions was in breach of their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and that they were victims of a two-fold discrimination, in breach of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1: firstly, in relation to those pensioners whose pensions fell below the cap, and secondly, in relation to certain high-ranking officials whose pensions were exempted from the cap.
4. On 10 November 2009 the Court (Fifth Section) decided to join the applications, declared them partly inadmissible, and decided to give the Government notice of the complaints concerning the pensions cap and the alleged discrimination. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the applications at the same time (Article 29 § 1 of the Convention).
5. Following the re-composition of the Court’s sections on 1 February 2011, the application was transferred to the Fourth Section.
6. On 13 April 2011 Zdravka Kalaydjieva, the judge elected in respect of the Republic of Bulgaria, withdrew from sitting in the case. On 15 April 2011 the President of the Fourth Section appointed Pavlina Panova as an ad hoc judge from the list of three persons whom Bulgaria had designated as eligible to serve as such judges (Article 26 § 4 of the Convention and Rule 29 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
7. The applicants are all pensioners who retired on various dates between 1979 and 2002. Whenever the nominal monthly amount of their pensions exceeded the maximum amount of pension specified until the end of 1999 in section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957 (see paragraph 27 below) and since the beginning of 2000 in paragraph 6 of the provisional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999 (see paragraphs 31-33 below), their pensions were capped.
8. In practice, that worked as follows. In individual decisions relating to each of the applicants, the National Social Security Institute (“the NSSI”) calculated their monthly pensions under the general rules laid down first in the Act and then in the Code, and then capped the pensions by reference to the above-mentioned provisions. Whenever the pensions were updated or recalculated, the same process was repeated.
A. Retired Air Force pilots
9. The following applicants are retired pilots from the Air Force. During their employment they received higher salaries than the average for the country.
10. Mr V., who was born in 1928, started receiving a retirement pension in April 1979. In that year, the competent pension authority set his monthly pension at 330.20 old Bulgarian levs (BGL). Mr V. did not provide information about the actual amount of his monthly pension between June 1992 and the end of 1999; it appears that its nominal amount at the end of 1999 was 327.40 new Bulgarian levs (BGN)1 (the equivalent of 167.40 euros (EUR)2), and that it was therefore affected by the cap under section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957 (see paragraphs 27 and 28 below). When the Social Security Code 1999 came into force on 1 January 2000, Mr V.’s pension was recalculated in accordance with the new rules. With effect from 27 April 2004, he was granted an additional invalidity pension, amounting to BGN 13.75 (EUR 7.03).
11. In summary, Mr V.’s monthly pension after 1 January 2000 was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
3 July 2000, rect’d 12 January 2001 1 January 2000 BGN 622.97
(EUR 318.52) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
5 June 2001 1 June 2001 BGN 685.27
(EUR 350.37) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 June 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 726.39
(EUR 371.40) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 771.43
(EUR 394.43) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 771.43
(EUR 394.43) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
19 May 2004 27 April 2004 BGN 785.18
(EUR 401.46) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
July 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 832.30
(EUR 425.55) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
19 May 2005 1 June 2005 BGN 891.46
(EUR 455.80) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
3 February 2006 1 January 2006 BGN 927.29
(EUR 474.12) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 July 2007 1 July 2007 BGN 1,020.02
(EUR 521.53) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 July 2008 1 July 2008 BGN 1,238.15
(EUR 633.06) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 April 2009 1 April 2009 BGN 1,541
(EUR 787.90) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
12. Mr G., who was born in 1954, started receiving a retirement pension in 1999. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
7 July 1999 1 December 1998 BGL 356,160 (EUR 182.10) BGL 103,950
(EUR 53.15)
7 July 1999 1 July 1999 BGL 400,170
(EUR 204.60) BGL 111,000
(EUR 56.75)
3 July 2000, rect’d 22 May 2002 1 January 2000 BGN 616.86
(EUR 315.40) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
22 May 2002 1 June 2001 BGN 678.55
(EUR 346.94) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
2 July 2001, rect’d 22 May 2002 1 July 2001 BGN 680.72
(EUR 348.05) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
22 May 2002 1 January 2002 BGN 680.72
(EUR 348.05) BGN 220
(EUR 112.48)
22 May 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 721.56
(EUR 368.93) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 June 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 779.07
(EUR 368.93) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 766.30
(EUR 391.80) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 766.30
(EUR 391.80) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 812.28
(EUR 415.31) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2005 1 June 2005 BGN 869.14
(EUR 444.38) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 March 2006 1 January 2006 BGN 903.91
(EUR 462.16) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 July 2007 1 July 2007 BGN 994.30
(EUR 508.38) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2007 1 October 2007 BGN 1,093.73
(EUR 559.22) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 July 2008 1 July 2008 BGN 1,206.93
(EUR 617.09) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2008 1 October 2008 BGN 1,368.52
(EUR 699.71) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
5 December 2008 27 November 2008 BGN 1,499.28
(EUR 766.57) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 April 2009 1 April 2009 BGN 1,649.39
(EUR 843.32) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
13. Mr Sodev, who was born in 1949, started receiving a retirement pension in 2001. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
13 August 2001 1 June 2001 BGN 915.61
(EUR 468.14) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 June 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 970.55
(EUR 496.23) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
12 February 2003 15 January 2003 BGN 999.56
(EUR 511.07) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 1,061.53
(EUR 542.75) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 1,061.53
(EUR 542.75) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 1,125.22
(EUR 575.32) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2005 1 June 2005 BGN 1,203.99
(EUR 615.59) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 March 2006 1 January 2006 BGN 1,252.15
(EUR 640.21) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
29 March 2006 14 March 2006 BGN 1,351.70
(EUR 691.11) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
7 March 2007 19 February 2007 BGN 1,366.22
(EUR 698.58) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 July 2007 1 July 2007 BGN 1,502.84
(EUR 768.39) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2007 1 October 2007 BGN 1,653.12
(EUR 845.23) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
19 March 2008 22 February 2008 BGN 1,670.72
(EUR 854.23) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 July 2008 1 July 2008 BGN 1,843.64
(EUR 942.64) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
26 March 2009 20 February 2009 BGN 2,049.34
(EUR 1,047.81) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 July 2009 1 July 2009 BGN 2,233.78
(EUR 1,142.11) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
14. Mr S., who was born in 1950, started receiving a retirement pension in 2002. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
12 September 2002 14 June 2002 BGN 871.32
(EUR 445.50) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.13)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 925.34
(EUR 473.12) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 925.34
(EUR 473.12) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 980.86
(EUR 501.51) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 June 2005 BGN 1,049.52
(EUR 536.61) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 January 2006 BGN 1,091.50
(EUR 558.08) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
n/a 1 January 2007 BGN 1,091.50
(EUR 558.08) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 July 2007 BGN 1,200.65
(EUR 613.88) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 October 2007 BGN 1,320.72
(EUR 675.27) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 July 2008 BGN 1,457.41
(EUR 745.16) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 April 2009 BGN 1,603.25
(EUR 819.73) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
n/a 1 July 2009 BGN 1,747.54
(EUR 893.50) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
15. Mr A., who was born in 1950, started receiving a retirement pension in 2002. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
3 September 2002 15 June 2002 BGN 699.69
(EUR 357.75) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 743.07
(EUR 379.93) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 743.07
(EUR 379.93) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 787.65
(EUR 402.72) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 June 2005 BGN 842.79
(EUR 430.91) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 January 2006 BGN 876.50
(EUR 448.15) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
n/a 1 July 2007 BGN 964.15
(EUR 492.96) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 October 2007 BGN 1,060.57
(EUR 542.26) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 July 2008 BGN 1,170.34
(EUR 598.39) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 October 2008 BGN 1,170.34
(EUR 598.39) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 April 2009 BGN 1,287.45
(EUR 658.26) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
n/a 1 July 2009 BGN 1,403.32
(EUR 717.51) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
B. Retired sappers
16. The following applicants were sappers from the Border Police Service. They also received higher salaries than the average for the country.
17. Mr G., who was born in 1944, started receiving a retirement pension in 2001. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
10 April 2002 27 November 2001 BGN 949.96
(EUR 485.71) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 June 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 1,006.96
(EUR 514.85) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 1,069.39
(EUR 546.77) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 1,069.39
(EUR 546.77) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 1,133.55
(EUR 579.57) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2005 1 June 2005 BGN 1,212.90
(EUR 620.15) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 March 2006 1 January 2006 BGN 1,261.42
(EUR 644.95) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 July 2007 1 July 2007 BGN 1,387.56
(EUR 709.45) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2007 1 October 2007 BGN 1,526.32
(EUR 780.40) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 July 2008 1 July 2008 BGN 1,684.29
(EUR 861.16) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
25 July 2008 17 July 2008 BGN 2,068.32
(EUR 1,057.52) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
27 February 2009 24 February 2009 BGN 2,100.36
(EUR 1,073.90) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 April 2009 1 April 2009 BGN 2,310.48
(EUR 1,181.33) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 July 2009 1 July 2009 BGN 2,518.42
(EUR 1,287.65) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
22 January 2010 20 January 2010 BGN 2,556.83
(EUR 1,307.29) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
18. Mr S., who was born in 1950, started receiving a retirement pension in 2000. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
11 August 2000 1 February 2000 BGN 772.74
(EUR 395.10) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
5 June 2001 1 June 2001 BGN 850.01
(EUR 434.60) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 June 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 901.01
(EUR 460.68) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 956.87
(EUR 489.24) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 956.87
(EUR 488.80) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 1,013.74
(EUR 518.32) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2005 1 June 2005 BGN 1,084.70
(EUR 554.60) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 March 2006 1 January 2006 BGN 1,128.09
(EUR 576.78) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 July 2007 1 July 2007 BGN 1,240.90
(EUR 634.46) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2007 1 October 2007 BGN 1,364.99
(EUR 697.91) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 July 2008 1 July 2008 BGN 1,506.27
(EUR 770.14) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2008 1 October 2008 BGN 1,707.96
(EUR 873.27) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 April 2009 1 April 2009 BGN 1,878.84
(EUR 960.64) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 July 2009 1 July 2009 BGN 2,047.94
(EUR 1,047.10) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
19. Mr Baev, who was born in 1954, started receiving a retirement pension in 2000. It was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
11 August 2000 1 March 2000 BGN 560.92
(EUR 286.79) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
5 June 2001 1 June 2001 BGN 617.01
(EUR 315.47) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 June 2002 1 June 2002 BGN 654.03
(EUR 334.40) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
3 June 2003 1 June 2003 BGN 694.58
(EUR 355.13) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
Amendment of paragraph 6 of 1 January 2004 1 January 2004 BGN 694.58
(EUR 355.13) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2004 1 June 2004 BGN 736.25
(EUR 376.44) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 June 2005 1 June 2005 BGN 787.79
(EUR 402.79) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 March 2006 1 January 2006 BGN 819.30
(EUR 418.90) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 July 2007 1 July 2007 BGN 901.23
(EUR 460.79) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2007 1 October 2007 BGN 991.35
(EUR 506.87) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 July 2008 1 July 2008 BGN 1,093.95
(EUR 559.33) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 October 2008 1 October 2008 BGN 1,240.43
(EUR 634.22) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 April 2009 1 April 2009 BGN 1,364.26
(EUR 697.53) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 July 2009 1 July 2009 BGN 1,487.04
(EUR 760.31) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
C. Mr A.
20. Mr At., who was born in 1935, did not specify what his employment had been; he merely stated that it had entailed “hard physical labour”. He started receiving a retirement pension in 1995. He did not provide information about the actual amount of his monthly pension between that time and the end of 1999; it appears that its nominal amount at the end of 1999 was BGN 285.71 (EUR 146.08), and that it was therefore affected by the cap under section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957 (see paragraphs 27 and 28 below). When the Social Security Code 1999 came into force on 1 January 2000, Mr A.’s pension was recalculated in accordance with the new rules.
21. In summary, Mr A.’s pension after 1 January 2000 was as follows:
Order of the
NSSI dated For the
period after Pension(s) under the general rules Capped amount of pension
n/a 1 January 2000 BGN 310.79
(EUR 158.91) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
n/a 1 June 2001 BGN 341.87
(EUR 174.80) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
n/a 1 June 2002 BGN 362.38
(EUR 185.28) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
n/a 1 June 2003 BGN 384.85
(EUR 196.77) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
n/a 1 June 2004 BGN 407.94
(EUR 208.58) n/a
n/a 1 June 2005 BGN 436.50
(EUR 223.18) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 January 2006 BGN 453.96
(EUR 232.11) n/a
n/a 1 July 2007 BGN 499.36
(EUR 255.32) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 October 2007 BGN 549.30
(EUR 280.85) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 July 2008 BGN 606.15
(EUR 309.92) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 October 2008 BGN 687.30
(EUR 351.41) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 April 2009 BGN 755.89
(EUR 386.48) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
n/a 1 July 2009 BGN 832.92
(EUR 425.87) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The 1991 Constitution
22. Article 6 § 2 of the 1991 Constitution provides as follows:
“All citizens shall be equal before the law. There shall be no restrictions of rights or privileges on grounds of race, nationality, ethnic identity, sex, origin, religion, education, opinions, political affiliations, or personal, social or property status.
23. Article 51 of the Constitution provides as follows:
“1. Citizens shall have the right to social security and social assistance.
2. Individuals who are temporarily unemployed shall be provided with social security under the conditions and procedures provided for by law.
3. Elderly people who are without relatives and who are unable to support themselves with their own assets, and individuals with physical or mental disabilities shall be under the special protection of the State and society.”
24. Article 57 § 1 of the Constitution stipulates that the citizens’ fundamental rights are irrevocable.
B. Caps on pensions
1. Under the Pensions Act 1957
25. Section 47(5) of the Pensions Act 1957, in force until February 1991, provided that a retired person could not receive a pension exceeding his or her highest monthly wage during the last ten years of his or her employment.
26. In January 1990 section 47b(2) of the Pensions Act 1957 was amended to provide that the amount of the one or more monthly pensions received could not exceed BGL 500. The cap also applied to pensions that had already been granted (paragraph 3 of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Act for the amendment of the Pensions Act).
27. Section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957, inserted in June 1992, capped the amount that could be paid to an individual as a result of his or her entitlement to one or more pensions at three times the amount of the social pension.
28. The amount of the social pension was set by the Council of Ministers pursuant to a proposal by the NSSI (sections 45a(4) and 46b(4) of the Pensions Act 1957). It was superseded by the social pension for old age under Article 89 of the Social Security Code 1999 (see paragraph 32 below). Its amount, and the corresponding capped pensions, were as follows:
Period Social pension Pensions cap
1 January – 31 March 1996 BGL 1,210 BGL 3,630
1 April – 30 June 1996 BGL 1,800 BGL 5,400
1 July – 31 September 1996 BGL 2,160 BGL 6,480
1 October 1996 – 30 April 1997 BGL 2,808 BGL 8,424
1 – 8 May 1997 BGL 14,040 BGL 42,120
9 May – 30 June 1997 BGL 16,300 BGL 48,900
1 July – 31 September 1997 BGL 27,000 BGL 81,000
1 October – 31 December 1997 BGL 28,900 BGL 86,700
1 January – 30 June 1998 BGL 30,350 BGL 91,050
1 July – 31 December 1998 BGL 33,000 BGL 99,000
1 January – 30 June 1999 BGL 34,650 BGL 103,950
1 July – 31 December 1999 BGL 37,000
(BGN 37) BGL 111,000
(BGN 111)
29. In December 1997 the Chief Prosecutor challenged section 47c before the Constitutional Court, arguing that it ran counter to Articles 51 § 1 and 57 § 1 of the Constitution (see paragraphs 23 and 24 above) and to Article 9 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. In a judgment of 15 July 1998 (реш. № 21 от 15 юли 1998 г. по к. д. № 18 от 1997 г., обн., ДВ, бр. 83 от 21 юли 1998 г.) the Constitutional Court rejected the challenge by seven votes to five. It held as follows:
“The provision [in issue], the new section 47c of the Pensions Act, was [inserted in 1992]. It introduced the impugned pensions cap based on the social pension. In turn, the social pension is set by the Council of Ministers on the basis of a proposal by the [NSSI] (section 45a(1)).
It should be noted, for the record, that even before section 47c was added the Pensions Act, which has been amended and supplemented many times, contained provisions that in one way or another set limits on the maximum amount [of pension]. Thus, section 47b(2), [added in 1990 and subsequently repealed], provided that the amount of one pension or the sum total of several pensions could not exceed [BGL] 500 per month. Another example is section 47(5) of the Pensions Act [as in force between 1967 and 1991].
Under the rule laid down in section 47c of the Pensions Act, a class of individuals receive the same amount of pension irrespective of the differences between their employment remunerations, their lengths of service or their social security contributions. While the amount of the pensions of most pensioners depends on those parameters, the amount of the pensions of the persons concerned [by the cap] does not. The question thus arises whether the resulting levelling makes the impugned rule unconstitutional.
The answer cannot be affirmative. The allegations that Articles 51 § 1 and 57 § 1 of the Constitution have been breached are groundless.
Why is that?
Article 51 § 1 of the Constitution proclaims the right to social security and social assistance. The right to a pension, being part of the right to social security, is comprised and enshrined in that provision. It is one of the citizens’ fundamental rights and is irrevocable.
However, the constitutional provision does not lay down the conditions under which that right arises and the way in which it is to be exercised. It follows that the framers of the Constitution have left those matters, which include the amount of the pension, to be regulated by statute. The legislature is entitled to determine the matter at its discretion, provided the concrete solution proposed does not run counter to the principles and requirements of the [Constitution]. The legislature did so by adopting section 47c of the Pensions Act.
Article 57 § 1 of the Constitution has not been breached either. That provision is entirely irrelevant, because the impugned section 47c of the Pensions Act does not concern a revocation of rights.
...
It is true that section 47c of the Pensions Act places citizens in two groups, based on the manner of calculating their pensions. For the first of those groups, the pension is based on certain [individual circumstances], whereas for the second the amount is the same for all.
That unequal situation is not a function of any of the statuses ‘set out in Article 6 § 2 of the Constitution in an exhaustive manner’ ... Therefore, the constitutional principle of equality of citizens before the law has not been breached.
It is in addition alleged that section 47c of the Pensions Act results in an injustice for those affected by it. That argument is likewise ill-founded. On the contrary, the provision results in justice. One could talk about injustice if it did not exist.
The cap set out in section 47c of the Pensions Act could be linked with the so-called minimum amount of pension. Not only is that minimum, guaranteed by law, not unconstitutional, but it is recommended by some conventions of the International Labour Organisation: for instance, Article 7 of Convention No. 35 on Old-Age Insurance (Industry, etc.), [1933]; Article 7 of Convention No. 38 on Invalidity Insurance (Agriculture), [1933]; Article 9 of Convention No. 39 on Survivors’ Insurance (Industry, etc.), [1933]. Those conventions allow the amount of pension to be a fixed sum, or a percentage of the remuneration taken into account for insurance purposes, or to vary with the amount of the contributions paid.
The existence of limits on the maximum or the minimum amount of pension, as well as their mutual dependence, are a result of the pension system operating in our country. It can be described, in financial terms, as a ‘pay-as-you-go’ system. Such a system requires a cap on the maximum amount of pension – it serves to guarantee the minimum amount of pension and to contribute to its growth. That function shows that the impugned provision is consistent with the requirements of social justice, as laid down in the Preamble to the [Constitution].
Those reasons lead [this court] to conclude that the current wording of section 47c of the Pensions Act does not run counter to any constitutional provision. The request must therefore be dismissed.
In those circumstances ..., there is no need to rule on the previous wording of the same provision.
At the same time, [this court] finds that the current constitutional arrangements do not rule out the impugned legislative solution being repealed in the future, but actually make it desirable in the context of the comprehensive reform of social security in this country. ...
The rule contained in [Article 9 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights] corresponds to that contained in Article 51 § 1 of the [Constitution]. [Article 5 § 1 of the Covenant] is likewise reflected in Article 57 § 1 of the [Constitution].
In those circumstances, and bearing in mind that section 47c of the Pensions Act is not unconstitutional and that the above-mentioned provisions of the [Covenant] have been reflected in the Constitution, [this court comes to the conclusion] that section 47c of the Pensions Act is not contrary to the Covenant provisions either.”
30. The five dissenting judges were of the view that the cap was contrary to the constitutional principle of justice because it disregarded the individual contribution of each person to the public good.
2. Under the Social Security Code 1999
31. Paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999, which came into force on 1 January 2000 and superseded the Pensions Act 1957, read as follows:
“Up to 31 December 2003 inclusively, the amount of the one or more pensions received ... shall not exceed four times the social pension for old age.”
32. The social pension for old age, which superseded the social pension under section 45a of the Pensions Act 1957 (see paragraph 28 above) is currently governed by Article 89 of the Code (repealed with effect from 1 January 2012). It is set by the Council of Ministers on the basis of a proposal by the NSSI and the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy (Article 89 § 2 of the Code). Its amount, and the corresponding amount of the pensions cap, were as follows:
Period Social pension Pensions cap
1 January 2000 – 31 May 2001 BGN 40 BGN 160 (EUR 81.81)
1 June 2001 – 31 May 2002 BGN 44 BGN 176 (EUR 89.99)
1 June 2002 – 31 May 2003 BGN 46.64 BGN 186.56 (EUR 95.39)
1 June 2003 – end of 2003 BGN 50 BGN 200 (EUR 102.26)
33. As an exception to that general rule, paragraph 6(6) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Code, in force between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2003, capped the pensions received by retired military personnel or personnel from certain other national security institutions at five times the social pension for old age. In a judgment of 23 February 2004 (реш. № 1579 от 23 февруари 2004 г. по адм. д. № 5004/2003 г., ВАС, І о.) the Supreme Administrative Court held that the exemption was strictly personal and did not apply to the heirs of the persons mentioned in paragraph 6(6).
34. On 23 December 2003, a few days before the date on which the cap was due to expire (see paragraph 31 above), Parliament amended paragraph 6(1) with effect from 1 January 2004 to read as follows:
“The maximum amount of the one or more pensions received, granted before 31 December 2009 ..., shall be equal to thirty-five per cent of the maximum income for social security purposes for each calendar year [see paragraph 54 below], [as] fixed by the annual State social security budget Act.”
It appears that the percentage was set at 35% because that is equivalent to the expected average pension replacement rate in Bulgaria (the ratio between a retiree’s preretirement income and his or her pension – see paragraph 48 below).
35. With effect from 1 January 2005, the basis for calculating the cap was changed to the maximum monthly income for social security purposes for the previous calendar year (see paragraph 54 below).
36. With effect from 1 January 2007, the date for recalculating the cap was moved from 1 January to 1 July. In 2009, the cap was exceptionally set at BGN 700 with effect from 1 April of that year (paragraph 22h(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Code).
37. Thus, during the period 2004-11 the cap was as follows:
Year Amount of the cap
2004 BGN 420 (EUR 214.74)
2005 BGN 420 (EUR 214.74)
2006 BGN 455 (EUR 232.64)
2007 BGN 490 (EUR 250.53)
2008 BGN 490 (EUR 250.53)
2009 BGN 700 (EUR 357.90)
2010 BGN 700 (EUR 357.90)
2011 BGN 700 (EUR 357.90)
38. With effect from 1 January 2010, the cap was extended to all pensions granted before 31 December 2011. The explanatory notes to the draft bill that the Government laid before Parliament related the content of the proposed amendment without further explanations.
39. With effect from 1 January 2011, the cap was extended to all pensions granted before 31 December 2013. The explanatory notes to the draft bill that the Government laid before Parliament said that the proposal was to abolish the cap in respect of pensions granted after 1 January 2014 and gradually to increase it in respect of pensions granted before that date.
40. The cap does not apply to individuals who have held the posts of President or Vice-President of the Republic of Bulgaria, Speaker of the National Assembly, Prime Minister, or judge in the Constitutional Court (paragraph 6(3) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Code). Nor does it apply to military invalids who have reached the general retirement age (paragraph 6(5) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Code). In a judgment of 2 October 2001 (реш. № 7218 от 2 октомври 2001 г. по адм. д. № 1127/2001 г., ВАС, I о.) the Supreme Administrative Court held that this exemption is strictly personal and does not apply to the heirs of the persons mentioned in paragraph 6(3).
41. In 2001 an individual whose pension had been capped in application of paragraph 6(1) sought judicial review of the NSSI’s decision in relation to his pension. In a final decision of 18 March 2002 (реш. № 2491 от 18 март 2002 г. по адм. д. № 6065/2001 г., ВАС, І о.) the Supreme Administrative Court dismissed his application, holding that the NSSI had properly applied the substantive law and that the courts were not competent to rule on the constitutionality of statutory provisions such as paragraph 6.
42. In December 2004 an association of pensioners affected by the cap asked the Chief Prosecutor to refer paragraph 6(1) to the Constitutional Court. In a letter of 10 February 2005 the Chief Prosecutor’s Office informed the association that the Chief Prosecutor had turned down the request because he considered that the pensions cap did not fall foul of the Constitution.
43. In February 2008 a pensioner affected by the cap asked the Ombudsman of the Republic of Bulgaria to refer paragraph 6 to the Constitutional Court. In July 2008 the Ombudsman refused, saying that the cap appeared reasonable, and that in any event the matter had been settled with the Constitutional Court’s judgment of 15 July 1998 (see paragraph 29 above) and could not be revisited.
44. In 2009 another individual whose pension had been reduced from BGN 995.29 to BGN 700 in application of paragraph 6 sought judicial review of the NSSI’s decision in relation to his pension. In a judgment of 9 December 2009 (реш. № 96 от 9 декември 2009 г. по адм. д. № 5932/2009 г., САС, І о., 14 състав) the Sofia Administrative Court dismissed the application. The litigant appealed on points of law, asserting, inter alia, that the cap was contrary to the Constitution and to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. He requested the Supreme Administrative Court to stay the proceedings and refer the constitutionality of paragraphs 6(1) and 22h(1) of the Code (see paragraphs 34 and 36 above) to the Constitutional Court.
45. On 7 August 2010 (опр. от 7 август 2010 г. по хода на адм. д. № 1407/2010 г., ВАС, VІ о.) the Supreme Administrative Court acceded to the referral request, stayed the proceedings and referred to the Constitutional Court the question whether the impugned provisions were compatible with the Constitution, Article 14 of the Convention, and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
46. In a decision of 10 February 2011 (опр. № 1 от 10 февруари 2011 г. по к. д. № 18/2010 г.) the Constitutional Court, over the dissent of one judge, refused to take the matter up for consideration. It held that, in so far as it concerned the compatibility of the pensions cap with the Constitution, the subject matter of the case was essentially the same as that of the case that it had decided in 1998 (see paragraph 29 above). It was immaterial that the two cases concerned different legal provisions. The court went on to hold, in relation to the alleged incompatibility of the cap with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, that under the Constitution the Supreme Administrative Court was not competent to refer to it the alleged incompatibility of statutory provisions with international treaties.
47. In view of that decision, on 28 February 2011 (опр. от 28 февруари 2011 г. по хода на адм. д. № 1407/2010 г., ВАС, VІ о.) the Supreme Administrative Court decided to resume the proceedings. It heard the case on 21 April 2011. The litigant argued, inter alia, that paragraph 6(1) was in breach of Bulgaria’s international obligations and that it was still open to the court to rule on that issue. The prosecutor who took part in the proceedings ex officio argued, inter alia, that the pensions cap did not run counter to the Constitution or to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
48. In a final judgment of 7 July 2011 (реш. № 10139 от 7 юли 2011 г. по адм. д. № 1407/2010 г., ВАС, VІ о.) the Supreme Administrative Court upheld the lower court’s decision and thus the NSSI’s decision to cap the litigant’s pension. It held that the NSSI had correctly applied the statutory rules, which required it to apply a ceiling to the pension. That ceiling was set at 35% of the maximum income for social security purposes (see paragraph 54 below) because that was the average pension replacement rate in Bulgaria. The previous version of the cap had been upheld by the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 29 above) and could therefore not be regarded as unconstitutional. Nor did it run counter to any international treaties to which Bulgaria was party, or to European Union law.
C. General rules on the amounts and funding of retirement pensions
1. Under the Pensions Act 1957 and related legislation
49. Between 1957 and the end of 1999, the pension system in Bulgaria was a monopillar system; the Pensions Act 1957 made provision for just one tier of retirement pension (sections 2-11). Until 1995, the pension fund’s budget was part of the general State budget (Article 170 of the Labour Code 1951). After that, the pension scheme continued to be based on an unfunded, pay-as-you-go model, but the pension fund was separated from the State budget and its management was entrusted to the newly created NSSI (sections 1-13 of the Social Security Fund Act 1995). Before March 1996, social security contributions were charged only to employers, not employees, and employers were barred from deducting those contributions from the remuneration paid to employees (Article 148 of the Labour Code 1951, as worded from its adoption in 1951 until the beginning of March 1996). In March 1996 contributions began to be charged, in specified proportions, to both employers and employees (Articles 147, 147a and 148 of the Labour Code 1951, as amended with effect from 1 March 1996).
50. An individual became entitled to a retirement pension after a specified number of years of contributions (as a general rule, twenty-five years for men and twenty years for women – section 2(1)(c) of the Pensions Act 1957; there were more favourable conditions for certain categories of work – section 2(1)(a) and (b)). The pension age was sixty years for men and fifty-five years for women (ibid.). However, the age requirement did not apply to military personnel, police, and some other categories of civil servants, who could, in addition, retire after a shorter period of contributions (twenty years – sections 6(1) and 7(1) of the Act). Air Force pilots could retire after ten years of service (section 6(2) of the Act). As a rule, the amount of an individual’s retirement pension was calculated as a percentage of the average gross monthly earnings for three years picked by the pensioner out of his or her last fifteen years of service (section 11(1) of the Pensions Act 1957, as in force between 1967 and 1996). In 1996, that basis was changed to three years of the pensioner’s choice until 1 January 1997, plus the entire period of service after that.
51. Pensions were not subject to taxation (section 2(1)(c) of the Income Tax Act 1950).
2. Under the Social Security Code 1999
52. The Social Security Code 1999 came into force on 1 January 2000 and brought about significant changes in the retirement pension model. It makes provision for a multipillar pension system, with three tiers of general retirement pension. The first-tier, or basic, pension scheme is mandatory, public, and defined-benefit. It is based on an unfunded, pay-as-you-go model (Articles 21 and 22 of the Code), and consists of public pension funds managed by the NSSI. The general fund’s main sources of financing are social security contributions and subsidies from the State budget (Article 21 of the Code). Contributions are charged to both employers and employees, in a specified proportion, with the exception of judges, prosecutors, investigators, civil servants, police, national security agents, and military personnel, whose contributions are fully covered by the State budget (Article 6 §§ 3 and 5 of the Code). The part of the contributions payable by employers cannot be deducted from remunerations under any form (Article 6 § 12 of the Code). The amount of the annual State subsidy to the fund is fixed in the annual State social security budget Act (Article 21 § 4 (b) of the Code). Apart from retirement pensions, the fund is used to pay out survivor’s and disability pensions, as well as certain health-related benefits (Article 22 of the Code). The second-tier scheme is also mandatory. It applies to all individuals born on or after 1 January 1960, and is a funded defined-contribution scheme, with contributions fixed by law and going into funds consisting of individual accounts and managed by private companies subject to special regulation (Articles 120a-123i and 124-203 of the Code). The second-tier scheme is open only to individuals born on or after the above-mentioned date because at the time when it started operating (1 January 2002) they were aged forty-two years or less and could thus be expected to make contributions for a longer period of time and build up the funds on which the scheme relies (Средкова, К., Осигурително право, 3 издание, Сиби, 2008, стр. 216; Мръчков, В., Осигурително право, 5 издание, Сиби, 2010, стр. 380 и 389). The third-tier scheme is voluntary and open to all persons above the age of sixteen. It is also a funded defined-contribution scheme, with contributions going into funds consisting of individual accounts and managed by private companies subject to special regulation. However, unlike the second-tier scheme, the amount of the contributions is not fixed by law but freely decided upon by the persons concerned (Articles 120a-123i, 209-59 and 317-43 of the Code).3
53. An individual becomes entitled to a retirement pension after a specified number of years of contributions (currently thirty-seven for men and thirty-four for women, set gradually to rise to forty and thirty-seven years, respectively – Article 68 §§ 1 and 2 of the Code). The pension age is currently sixty-three years for men and sixty years for women, set gradually to rise to sixty-five and sixty-three years, respectively (Article 68 § 1 of the Code). However, the age requirement does not apply to military personnel, police, and some other categories of civil servants, who can, in addition, retire after a shorter period of contributions (Article 69 of the Code). Air Force pilots can retire after fifteen years of service (Article 69 § 3, subsequently § 4, of the Code). The amount of the basic, or first-tier, retirement pension is calculated in the manner laid down in Articles 70 and 70a of the Code. It is a function of the length of service (“осигурителен стаж”) and the average monthly income for social security purposes (“средномесечен осигурителен доход”), multiplied by an individual coefficient. The coefficient is based on the ratio between the retiree’s monthly earnings and the average monthly salary (for the period before 1 January 1997) and the average monthly income for social security purposes (for the period after 1 January 1997). For the period before 1 January 1997, the calculation is based on the retiree’s monthly earnings during three consecutive years of his or her choice out of the last fifteen years of service. For the period after 1 January 1997, the calculation is based on the retiree’s monthly earnings during the entire period of service between that date and the date of retirement.
54. The monthly income for social security purposes (“осигурителен доход”) is used as the basis for calculating not only pensions and welfare benefits, but also social security contributions. It has a lower and an upper limit. The upper limit serves to cap the amount of the monthly social security contributions. In 2000-01, that limit was ten times the minimum monthly salary4 (Article 9 § 2 of the Code, as worded until 31 December 2001). Since 2002, it has been fixed in monetary terms in the annual State social security budget Act (Article 6 § 2 (1) of the Code, as worded after 1 January 2002). In 2002 it was BGN 850 (section 8(4) of the State social security budget Act for 2002). In 2003 it became BGN 1,000 (section 8(5) of the State social security budget Act for 2003). In 2004 it became BGN 1,200 (section 8(5) of the State social security budget Act for 2004). In 2005 it became BGN 1,300 (section 8(5) of the social security budget Act for 2005). In 2006 and 2007 it became BGN 1,400 (section 8(5) of the social security budget Acts for 2006 and 2007). In 2008-11 it became BGN 2,000 (section 8(5) (later (4)) of the State social security budget Acts for 2008-11).
55. Pensions received under the first- and second-tier schemes are not subject to taxation (section 12(1)(2) of the Physical Persons Income Taxation Act 1997, superseded on 1 January 2007 by section 13(1)(6) of the Physical Persons Income Tax Act 2006).
D. The Protection Against Discrimination Act 2003
1. General prohibition of discrimination
56. Section 4 of the Protection Against Discrimination Act 2003, which came into force on 1 January 2004, prohibits any direct or indirect discrimination on the basis of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, human genome, citizenship, origin, religion or belief, education, convictions, political affiliation, personal or social status, disability, age, sexual orientation, marital status, property status, or on any other grounds established by law or by an international treaty to which Bulgaria is party.
2. Commission for Protection Against Discrimination
57. The authority responsible for ensuring compliance with the Act and with other statutes containing equal-treatment provisions is the Commission for Protection Against Discrimination (section 40).
58. Section 47 empowers the Commission to, inter alia, make recommendations for the enactment, repeal or amendment of statutes and regulations (subsection 8).
59. In a decision of 17 September 2009 (реш. № 163 от 17 септември 2009 г. по пр. № 56/2008 г.), given in proceedings brought by a number of individuals affected by the pensions cap under paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999 (see paragraphs 31-39 above), the Commission found that the cap amounted to indirect discrimination on the basis of property status and was in breach of the principle of equal treatment of the pensioners affected by it. In the view of the Commission, those who had had higher salaries and had accordingly paid higher pension contributions, and had done so for a longer period of time, were just as entitled to the full amount of their pensions as those who did not fall into that group. The Commission went on to note that paragraph 6(1), as amended in 2004, envisaged that pensioners whose pensions were granted from 1 January 2010 onwards would not face a cap on their pension. That difference in treatment lacked an objective justification and was also in breach of the principle of equal treatment. In view of those considerations, the Commission recommended to Parliament to repeal paragraph 6(1).
60. On the other hand, the Commission found that paragraph 6(5) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Code (see paragraph 40 above) did not amount to discriminatory treatment under the Act, because it was necessary and objectively justified in view of the special status of the persons to whom it provided an advantage and of the restrictions that those persons faced in carrying out their public duties.
61. In a decision of 18 May 2010 (реш. № 117 от 18 май 2010 г. по пр. № 122/2009 г.) the Commission again found that the existence of a cap on pensions granted before a certain date (at that time, the end of 2011 – see paragraph 38 above) and the lack of such a cap on pensions granted after that date lacked an objective justification and amounted to indirect discrimination. The Commission recommended to the Council of Ministers to table a bill in Parliament for the amendment of paragraph 6(1).
3. Liability for acts of discrimination
62. Under section 71(1) of the Act, a person who considers that his or her right to equal treatment stemming from the Act or from other statutes has been violated can bring a claim, seeking declaratory or injunctive relief or an award of damages.
63. Under section 73 of the Act, a person who considers that an administrative decision has breached his or her right to equal treatment stemming from the Act or from other statutes can seek judicial review of the decision.
64. Under section 74(1) of the Act, a person who has obtained a favourable ruling by the Commission for Protection Against Discrimination and seeks compensation for damage suffered as a result of the violation of his or her right to equal treatment stemming from the Act or from other statutes can bring a tort claim against the persons or authorities that have caused the damage. If the damage stems from unlawful decisions, actions or omissions of State authorities or officials, the claim must be brought under the State Responsibility for Damage Act 1988 (section 74(2)).
III. RELEVANT STATISTICAL INFORMATION
65. According to information published by the NSSI and the National Statistical Institute, the overall number of pensioners in Bulgaria, the number of pensioners affected by the pensions cap, and the annual amount of money “saved” by the NSSI’s budget as a result of the cap were as follows:
Year Overall number
of pensioners Number of pensioners
with capped pensions Annual “savings”
1999 n/a 201,786 BGN 70,411,978
2000 n/a 140,413 BGN 105,130,340
2001 2,372,268 156,344 BGN 128,338151
2002 2,349,045 162,508 BGN 142,604,831
2003 2,343,896 164,536 BGN 154,964,256
2004 2,320,444 15,929 BGN 19,091,520
2005 2,301,669 23,519 BGN 29,030,701
2006 2,271,192 21,088 BGN 27,240,041
2007 2,233,697 37,182 BGN 56,264,707
2008 2,200,595 73,175 BGN 85,676,442
2009 2,189,131 42,615 BGN 94,173,582
2010 2,194,274 46,540 n/a
IV. RELEVANT COMPARATIVE MATERIAL
66. The World Bank and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (“OECD”) have published comparative studies of the pension systems of various countries, including a number of Contracting States. Among them are Pensions Panorama: Retirement-Income Systems in 53 Countries, The World Bank (2007), and Pensions at a Glance 2011: Retirement-income Systems in OECD and G20 Countries, OECD (2011), OECD Publishing. The first study found, inter alia, that most high-income OECD countries do not require high earners to make pension contributions on their entire earnings. Usually, a limit is set on the earnings used to calculate both contribution liability and pension benefits. The study also found that the average ceiling on public (first-tier) pensions in sixteen high-income OECD countries is 190% of average economy-wide earnings. The overall (first- and second-tier) pension ceiling for seventeen high-income OECD countries averages 275% of average earnings (pp. 13-18). The second study also noted that most OECD countries have set a limit on the earnings used to calculate both contribution liabilities and pension benefits, and that the average ceiling on public pensions for twenty-one countries is 185% of average economy-wide earnings, excluding four countries that have no ceiling on public pensions (p. 110).
67. Based on a detailed cross-country analysis of pension entitlements, the first study came to the conclusion that “different countries’ pension systems strike very different balances between the goals of adequacy – guaranteeing that all older people meet a minimum standard of living – and insurance – ensuring a certain standard of living in retirement relative to that when working”. For instance, OECD counties could be divided in four groups. The first comprised those (including Denmark and Ireland) in which there was little or no link between pensions and preretirement earnings. The second consisted of those (including Belgium, Iceland, and the United Kingdom) in which that link was weak. The third group (including France, Norway, Portugal, and Switzerland) lay toward the middle. The countries in the fourth group (including Austria, Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden) had a very strong link between pensions and preretirement earnings. The same divisions could be observed in Eastern Europe, where Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania and Turkey had a weaker link between pensions and preretirement earnings, and Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Poland and the Slovak Republic had a stronger one (pp. 31-45).
68. The second study calculated, inter alia, pension entitlements in OECD countries and several other major economies (pp. 115-43). As part of that exercise, it measured the progressivity of the mandatory parts of the countries’ pension systems, or, in other words, the link between pensions and preretirement earnings. The results showed that some countries, such as Ireland and the United Kingdom, have highly progressive systems (in which the link between preretirement incomes and pensions is very weak), whereas others, such as Finland, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal and the Slovak Republic, have almost entirely proportional systems (in which the link between preretirement incomes and pensions is very strong) and therefore limited progressivity. The study said that “[a] high score [on the progressivity index] is not necessarily ‘better’ than a low score or vice versa. Countries with a high score simply have different objectives than countries with a low score.” (pp. 136-37).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
69. The applicants complained that the cap on their retirement pensions was in breach of their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which provides as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
70. The Government submitted that if they considered that their pensions had been set by the NSSI at variance with their statutory entitlement, the applicants could have sought judicial review of the NSSI’s decisions concerning their individual pensions. In addition they could have petitioned the competent authorities to request the Constitutional Court to review the constitutionality of paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999.
71. The applicants submitted that in proceedings for judicial review of individual decisions of the NSSI the courts could not scrutinise statutes as such. According to the Supreme Administrative Court’s established case-law, only the Constitutional Court was competent to rule on their constitutionality. The Government had not pointed to any examples where the Bulgarian courts had set aside a decision of the NSSI capping a pension by reference to paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999. Furthermore, under Bulgarian law private persons could not bring proceedings before the Constitutional Court. When two non-governmental organisations had asked the Ombudsman to refer paragraph 6(1) to the Constitutional Court, the Ombudsman had refused, saying that the matter had already been resolved by that court in 1998.
72. Concerning the first limb of the Government’s objection, the Court observes that the cap on pensions currently flows directly from the express wording of paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999; until 31 December 1999 it was based on the express wording of section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957 (see paragraphs 27, 31 and 34 above). It was not disputed that in its decisions fixing the pension of each of the applicants the NSSI, which had no discretion in the matter, applied those provisions correctly. In that regard, the present cases are no different from the two cases from 2001 and 2010 in which the Supreme Administrative Court dismissed applications for judicial review of pension-capping decisions of the NSSI, holding that those decisions were lawful (see paragraphs 41 and 48 above). It follows that applications for judicial review of the NSSI’s decisions were not an effective remedy that the applicants had to use (see, mutatis mutandis, Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 42 in limine, ECHR 1999-V; Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice v. Slovakia, no. 74258/01, § 86, 27 November 2007; and Ognyan Asenov v. Bulgaria, no. 38157/04, § 32, 17 February 2011).
73. The second limb of the objection does not stand up to examination either. In Bulgaria, there is no possibility for private persons themselves to bring proceedings before the Constitutional Court. The Court has, in line with its earlier case-law on that point (see Brozicek v. Italy, 19 December 1989, § 34, Series A no. 167; Padovani v. Italy, 26 February 1993, § 20, Series A no. 257-B; Spadea and Scalabrino v. Italy, 28 September 1995, § 24, Series A no. 315-B; and Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 42 in fine), already held that the possibility to request the bodies or the officials entitled to bring such proceedings to do so is not an effective remedy for the purposes of Articles 13 or 35 § 1 of the Convention, because the persons concerned cannot directly compel the institution of proceedings before the Constitutional Court, whereas under this Court’s settled case-law a remedy can be considered effective only if the applicant is able to initiate the procedure directly (see Petkov and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 77568/01, 178/02 and 505/02, § 82, ECHR 2009-..., with further references). The Court reaffirmed that ruling in Nozharova v. Bulgaria ((dec.), nos. 44096/05 et al., 25 August 2009). It sees no reason to deviate from it in the present case, in which several such requests were turned down (see paragraphs 42 and 43 above). The fact that in August 2010 the Supreme Administrative Court acceded to a request to refer the pensions cap to the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 44 and 45 above) does not alter that position, because the referral was a result of the exercise of that court’s discretionary power in that respect. In any event, the Constitutional Court refused to accept the matter for examination, noting that it had already ruled on the constitutionality of the cap in 1998 and that the Supreme Administrative Court was not competent to refer to it the alleged incompatibility of statutory provisions with international treaties (see paragraph 46 above).
74. The Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must therefore be rejected.
75. The Court further finds that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention or inadmissible on any other grounds. Any issues having to do with its compatibility ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention are more appropriately addressed at the merits stage (see, mutatis mutandis, Maggio and Others v. Italy, nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08, § 36, 31 May 2011). The complaint must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
76. The Government submitted that the cap on the maximum amount of pension had been prompted by financial considerations. Such a cap had existed under different forms ever since the adoption of the Pensions Act 1957. Pensions in Bulgaria were based on the principle of social solidarity, which required that all those who reached a certain age be provided with a pension, but also that the personal input of each individual be taken into account in fixing its amount. A pension ceiling was not a uniquely Bulgarian occurrence, but existed in a number of countries, such as Germany, without being regarded as infringing the principles of social justice or equal treatment. Moreover, it could not be overlooked that the Social Security Code 1999 had made provision for a second-tier pension, based on individual contributions, in respect of persons born on or after 1 January 1960. It was also noteworthy that recently the maximum amount of pension had been increased to BGN 700.
77. The Government agreed that social security rights fell within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, but pointed out that that provision did not guarantee a particular amount of pension, and did not require States to choose a particular social security model. Even if it was theoretically possible to pay the applicants the full nominal amount of their pensions, there existed a number of factors that would make that difficult to achieve in practice. The population was getting older and the ratio between pensioners and persons in active employment was deteriorating. If the authorities opted to pay the full amount of pension, even if it exceeded the cap, it could result in a shortfall of funds to pay the pensions of others who had contributed less to the funding of the pension system. That could lead to a breach of the principle of equal treatment, which guaranteed a minimum revenue for each pensioner. All the more so in the midst of a severe economic and demographic crisis. The applicants could not maintain that they had had a legitimate expectation that they would receive the full amount of their pensions after 31 December 2003, because it was impossible to predict how the legislation would evolve in the future. Legislation was a product of social developments, which were rapidly changing. It was for the applicants to show that the cap on their pensions had caused them to suffer an individual and excessive burden.
78. In the Government’s view, the capping of pensions to 35% of the maximum monthly income for social security purposes was in the public interest. The pension system in Bulgaria was based on a pay-as-you-go model, and the legislature’s intent was to guarantee a minimum amount of pension and the potential for it to increase. The existence of a pensions ceiling went hand in hand with the existence of a maximum income for social security purposes. It was intended to guarantee social justice, and was necessary for the sound financial management of the pension system. The Constitutional Court had made those points in its 1998 decision.
79. The applicants submitted that they had had a legitimate expectation that they would receive the full amount of their pensions, based on the contributions they had been required to make throughout their employment. After the entry into force of paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999, they had expected that the cap on the maximum amount of pension would be lifted on 31 December 2003 and that from that date on they would receive the full amount of their pensions. The ensuing postponement of the lifting of the cap had accordingly amounted to an interference with their possessions.
80. The applicants did not dispute that that interference was lawful, but argued that it lacked a reasonable foundation. It was true that the Constitutional Court had held that the introduction of a pensions cap was a matter for the legislature’s discretion. However, the 2004 draft bill for the amendment of the Social Security Code 1999, which had permanently capped the pensions of all pensioners whose rights had accrued before 31 December 2009, had not been accompanied by any explanatory notes or by any debate in Parliament. The same went for the 2009 amendments to the Code. The assertions that the pensions ceiling was tied to the minimum amount of pension, helped to maintain it, and furthered social justice were not true. Even if it could be accepted that such a cap had been warranted to help the poorest pensioners scrape through the profound social and economic changes of the 1990s, it could not be maintained forever.
81. The real reasons for maintaining the cap could be gleaned from a number of interviews and public statements by officials, such as the director of the NSSI and several successive ministers of Labour and Social Policy. They were the perception that the public would not tolerate very high pensions and that the pension model existing under the Pensions Act 1957 had suffered from a number of defects. Neither of those reasons was a reasonable basis for the cap. The first was based on entirely populist considerations, which were moreover out of line with modern social attitudes. It was telling that a number of domestic institutions and organisations, plus five constitutional judges, were opposed to the cap. In that connection, it was also worth noting that the authorities were not doing enough to collect the social security contributions payable by those in active employment. The second reason was also unavailing. The applicants, like everyone else, had been bound by the provisions of the Pensions Act 1957 governing the basis for calculating the amount of social security contributions and retirement pensions.
82. Even if it could be accepted that the pensions cap pursued a legitimate aim, it was disproportionate, because, while failing to produce considerable savings for the pension system, it affected a very small minority of pensioners (about 2%) by significantly reducing the amount of their pensions. In that connection, sight should not be lost of the nature of the applicants’ employment, which had entailed higher levels of responsibility, privation, stress and risk, and hence higher remuneration. In addition, when permanently capping the applicants’ pensions with effect from 1 January 2004, the State had not offered them any form of compensation.
83. In their additional observations, the Government submitted that in as much as Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 did not guarantee a particular amount of pension the applicants’ complaint was incompatible ratione materiae. It was in the legislature’s discretion to choose a particular social security model. Faced with demographic and financial difficulties, Bulgaria had opted to limit the maximum amount of the first-tier pension. However, it had made provision for a voluntary third-tier pension, and there was no indication that the applicants had tried to avail themselves of that opportunity. It was also important to point out that the cap on their pensions had been increased several times, and that those of them who had served in the armed forces had not themselves paid pension contributions and had retired under very favourable conditions. The requisite fair balance had not therefore been upset to their detriment.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
84. The principles which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are equally relevant when it comes to pensions (see Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 77, 18 February 2009, and, more recently, Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, 7 July 2011). Thus, that provision does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see, among other authorities, Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70; Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II; and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, among other authorities, Müller v. Austria, no. 5849/72, Commission’s report of 1 October 1975, Decisions and Reports (DR) 3, p. 25; T. v. Sweden, no. 10671/83, Commission decision of 4 March 1985, DR 42, p. 229; Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Kuna v. Germany (dec.), no. 52449/99, ECHR 2001-V (extracts); Lenz v. Germany (dec.), no. 40862/98, ECHR 2001-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX; Apostolakis v. Greece, no. 39574/07, § 36, 22 October 2009; Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 57, 8 December 2009; Poulain v. France (dec.), no. 52273/08, 8 February 2011; and Maggio and Others, cited above, § 55). However, where a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a pension – whether or not conditional on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation has to be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 64, ECHR 2010-...). The reduction or the discontinuance of a pension may therefore constitute interference with possessions that needs to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40; Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 57).
85. In the instant case, the applicants’ pensions were first calculated in line with the general rules of the Pensions Act 1957 and subsequently of the Social Security Code 1999 (in the cases of those applicants who retired after 1 January 2000, solely the latter). Because the amounts produced by those calculations were, in the case of each applicant, above the pensions cap set out in section 47c of the Act and later in paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Code, their pensions were trimmed to the level allowed by the cap (see paragraphs 7, 8, 10-15, 17-19, 21, 27 and 31 above). The cap may thus be regarded either as a provision limiting the amount of pension after it has been calculated under the general rules, and thus amounting to an interference with a “possession” of the applicants, or as part of the overall set of statutory rules governing the manner in which the amount of pension should be calculated, and thus amounting to a rule preventing the applicants from having any “possession” in relation to the surplus.
86. It should in addition be noted that when it first came into force on 1 January 2000 paragraph 6(1) set a temporal limitation on the pensions cap – 31 December 2003 (see paragraph 31 above). That limitation was removed with the December 2003 amendment, with the result that the cap became permanently applicable to all pensions granted before a certain date: initially 31 December 2009 and, following further amendments, 31 December 2011 and then 31 December 2013 (see paragraphs 34, 38 and 39 above). From this vantage point, it could be argued that, regardless of the position before or after, between 1 January 2000 and 23 December 2003 the applicants could be regarded as having harboured a legitimate expectation that the cap on their pensions would come to an end on 31 December 2003, and that the legislative amendment which took that expectation away amounted in its own right to an interference with their “possessions” (see, mutatis mutandis, Maurice v. France [GC], no. 11810/03, §§ 67-71 and 79, ECHR 2005-IX; Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, §§ 70-72, 6 October 2005; and Hasani v. Croatia (dec.), no. 20844/09, 30 September 2010).
87. However, the Court does not consider it necessary to take a firm stance on those points, because it considers that there has been no breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for the reasons that follow (see Maggio and Others, cited above, § 59). It will therefore proceed on the assumption that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable and that the pensions cap, in all its forms, can be regarded as an interference with the applicants’ rights under that provision.
(b) Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
88. The Court does not consider that the cap amounted to a “deprivation of possessions” within the meaning of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It is rather to be regarded as an interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, within the meaning of the first sentence of the first paragraph (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, § 40, and Wieczorek, § 61, both cited above).
89. It was not in dispute between the parties that the interference was lawful in terms of both domestic and Convention law. The Court, noting that it was based on the unambiguous wording of section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957 and subsequently paragraph 6(1) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999, provisions whose constitutionality was upheld by the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 29 and 46 above), sees no reason to hold otherwise.
90. It remains to be established whether the interference served a legitimate public interest and was reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised.
91. According to the Court’s case-law, the national authorities, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the Convention system, it is thus for those authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. Moreover, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws concerning pensions or welfare benefits involves consideration of various economic and social issues. The margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing such policies should therefore be a wide one, and its judgment as to what is “in the public interest” should be respected unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation. However, any interference must also be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised. In other words, a “fair balance” must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. That balance will be lacking where the person concerned has to bear an individual and excessive burden (see Wieczorek, cited above, §§ 59-60, with further references). In that regard, it would also be important to verify whether an applicant’s right to derive benefits from the social security scheme in question has been infringed in a manner resulting in the impairment of the essence of his pension rights (see Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V; Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 39 in fine; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 57 in fine). On the other hand, it must not be overlooked that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not restrict a State’s freedom to choose the type or amount of benefits that it provides under a social security scheme (see Stec and Others, cited above § 54; Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 65731/01, § 53, ECHR 2006-VI; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 66 in limine).
92. In the instant case, the applicants called into question the purpose of the cap, saying that it was not, as contended by the Government, based on considerations having to do with the financial viability of the pension system. It was rather a result of the perceptions that the public would not tolerate very high pensions and that the Pensions Act 1957 had made possible retirement on overly generous terms. The Court, for its part, notes that the cap obviously results in savings for the pension system (see the statistics quoted in paragraph 65 above). However, it does not find it necessary to determine whether those savings are indeed necessary to ensure the system’s financial viability. It observes that in upholding the cap the Constitutional Court took the view that it was based on the “requirements of social justice” (see paragraph 29 above). Even assuming that the applicants’ assertions as to the real purpose of the cap are correct, the Court does not consider that it was illegitimate for the Bulgarian legislature to have regard to social considerations, or that its judgment in that respect was manifestly without reasonable foundation. The pension systems of different countries vary in the relative emphasis that they place on redistributive vis-à-vis insurance elements. Comparative studies by the World Bank and the OECD show that while some Contracting States attach more importance to providing the same or very similar pension replacement rates to all workers, with a strong link between pensions and preretirement earnings, in others the accent is on pension adequacy, with little or no connection between pensions and preretirement earnings (see paragraphs 67 and 68 above). That is primarily a matter that falls to be decided by the national authorities, which have direct democratic legitimation and are better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions. According to the Court’s case-law, in matters of general policy, on which opinions within a democratic society may reasonably differ widely, the determination of the domestic policymaker should be given special weight (see Hatton and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 36022/97, § 97, ECHR 2003-VIII). The Court is therefore satisfied that the cap pursued a legitimate aim in the public interest.
93. This, however, does not entirely settle the issue. It must also be established whether there was a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised.
94. On this point, the Court starts by noting that the redistributive function of the pension system can be achieved in various ways, such as putting in place progressive benefit-calculation formulae, imposing ceilings on pension entitlements, or taxing high pensions. In Bulgaria, the legislature has chosen to exempt first- and second-tier pensions from taxation (see paragraphs 51 and 55 above), but has imposed a cap on the maximum amount of pension under the first tier. The Court is unable to find that this is in itself a disproportionate measure. It has in a number of cases accepted the possibility of reductions in social security entitlements (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 45; Hoogendijk v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 58641/00, 6 January 2005; Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI; and Wieczorek, cited above, § 67). It has even countenanced pension caps similar to the one at issue (see Blanco Callejas v. Spain (dec.), no. 64100/00, 18 June 2002, and Buchheit and Meinberg v. Germany (dec.), nos. 51466/99 and 70130/01, 2 February 2006). So has the former Commission (see Beging v. Germany, no. 15376/89, decision of the Commission of 27 May 1991, unreported, and Kuhlmann v. Germany, no. 21519/93, Commission decision of 30 June 1993, unreported). The above-mentioned comparative studies by the World Bank and the OECD show that ceilings on public pensions are far from being a uniquely Bulgarian phenomenon (see paragraph 66 above). In the present case, there are several factors that inform the Court’s assessment.
95. First, the applicants’ principal argument against the cap was that, unlike modern-day workers, in respect of whom there exists a ceiling on pensionable earnings (see paragraph 54 above), they were bound to pay contributions on the full amount of their relatively high salaries; they were therefore entitled to pensions commensurate with those contributions. However, that argument does not stand up to examination. In the first place, it cannot be overlooked that until 1996, contributions were payable solely by employers, who were barred from deducting them from employees’ remunerations; that continues to be the case for military personnel, civil servants, and some other categories of State employees (see paragraphs 49 and 52 above). More importantly, the argument misconceives the relationship between social security contributions and first-tier pensions in Bulgaria. Unlike the second- and the third-tier schemes, where contributions are directly linked to the expected benefit returns (see paragraph 52 above), first-tier contributions did not and still do not have an exclusive link to retirement pensions. That is due to the unfunded, pay-as-you-go character of the first pillar of the Bulgarian pension system, both under the Pension Act 1957 and under the Social Security Code 1999 (see paragraphs 49 and 53 above). That makes it impossible to regard the payment of higher social security contributions as a sufficient ground for entitlement to matching pension benefits (see, mutatis mutandis, Carson and Others, § 84, and Müller, at p. 31, §§ 29-30, both cited above). Indeed, in the cases of some of the applicants – and of others in a similar situation – the bulk of those contributions was paid under a different economic regime, when the pension fund was an inseparable part of the general State budget (see paragraph 49 above), and at a time when the real value of the Bulgarian lev and the general framework of the Bulgarian economy were very different from what they are today.
96. Secondly, the Court cannot lose sight of the fact that the pensions cap was put in place and, more importantly, maintained at a time when the Bulgarian pension system was undergoing a comprehensive reform, as part of the country’s transition from a wholly State-owned and centrally planned economy to private property and a market economy (see, mutatis mutandis, Credit Bank and Others v. Bulgaria (dec.), no. 40064/98, 30 April 2002, and Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99, 48380/99, 51362/99, 53367/99, 60036/00, 73465/01 and 194/02, § 166, 15 March 2007). In view of the changes in the manner of calculating the amounts of social security contributions and retirement pensions – in particular, the introduction of a ceiling on pensionable earnings (see paragraph 54 above) – the first tier of that pension system can be regarded as moving towards a global levelling of the amount of benefits provided. It is apparent that the new pension model in Bulgaria envisages the provision of higher retirement incomes through the second- and third-tier pension schemes, which, unlike the first-tier scheme, are funded, defined-contribution schemes (see paragraphs 52 and 53 above). In that context, the cap, as well as its extensions until the end of 2009, and then the end of 2011 and of 2013 (see paragraphs 34, 38 and 39 above), can be seen as a transitional measure accompanying the overall transformation of the pension system. The Court has in the past recognised that Contracting States have a wide margin of appreciation when passing laws in the context of a change of political and economic regime (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 113, ECHR 2005-VI, with further references). It is true that the applicants, all of whom were born before 1 January 1960, are not eligible to be affiliated to the second-tier scheme (see paragraph 52 above) and cannot therefore top up their pension earnings in that way. However, the Court cannot attach decisive importance to that, because that scheme is a funded, defined-contribution one, with individual accounts; the amount of benefits it can provide is directly dependent on the amount and duration of the contributions of those affiliated to it. It is understandable that such a scheme should be open only to those who will be able to accumulate sufficient funds to finance their pensions.
97. Thirdly, particular emphasis needs to be placed on the fact that the applicants were obliged to endure a reasonable and commensurate reduction rather than a total loss of their pension entitlements. Indeed, they did not suffer an actual decrease in the monthly payments they received, but simply did not see the announced lifting of the pensions cap materialise – it appears that since retirement they have never received the uncapped amount of their pensions. Moreover, the cap, while sometimes – but not always – resulting in considerable reductions of the nominal amount of their monthly pensions, did not totally divest the applicants of their only means of subsistence. The applicants are, in the nature of things, the top earners among the more than two million persons in Bulgaria who are currently in receipt of a retirement pension. They can therefore hardly be regarded as being made to bear an excessive and disproportionate burden, or as having suffered an impairment of the essence of their pension rights (see, mutatis mutandis, M.V. and U-M.S. v. Finland (dec.), no. 43189/98, 28 January 2003; Saarinen v. Finland (dec.), no. 69136/01, 28 January 2003; Banfield v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 6223/04, ECHR 2005-XI; Laloyaux v. Belgium (dec.), no. 73511/01, 9 March 2006; and Wieczorek, § 71; Hasani; and Maggio and Others, § 62, all cited above; and contrast Kjartan Ásmundsson, §§ 43-45, and Apostolakis, §§ 39-42, both cited above).
98. Fourthly, it cannot be overlooked that public pension schemes are based on the principle of solidarity between contributors and beneficiaries (see Ackermann and Fuhrmann v. Germany (dec.), no. 71477/01, 8 September 2005). Just like other social security schemes, they are an expression of a society’s solidarity with its vulnerable members (see Goudswaard-Van der Lans, and Wieczorek, § 64, both cited above), and cannot be likened to private insurance schemes (see Müller, cited above, at p. 32, § 31). Indeed, as already noted (see paragraph 92 above), the pension systems of different countries vary in the relative emphasis that they place on redistributive vis-à-vis insurance elements.
99. Lastly, it cannot be overlooked that the amount of the cap and the manner in which it is calculated have evolved over the years. Initially, the maximum pension was tied to the social pension, not being able to exceed it by more than three times (see paragraph 27 above). In 2000, that ceiling was raised to four times the social pension for old age (see paragraph 31 above). In 2003, the cap was tied to the ceiling on pensionable earnings and the average estimated pension replacement rate (see paragraph 34 above). It has thus been gradually increased throughout the years, with the result that, as a general trend, considerably fewer pensioners are affected by it (see paragraphs 28, 32, 37 and 65 above).
100. In view of those considerations, the Court concludes that the impugned cap on the maximum amount of pension falls within Bulgaria’s margin of appreciation in regulating its social security policy.
101. There has therefore been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
102. The applicants also complained under Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that they were victims of a two-fold discrimination: firstly, in relation to those pensioners whose pensions fell below the cap and who thus remained unaffected by it, and secondly, in relation to the high-ranking officials whose pensions were exempted from the cap by virtue of paragraph 6(3) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999 (see paragraph 40 above).
103. Article 14 of the Convention provides as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
A. Admissibility
104. The Government pointed out that only Mr A., and none of the other applicants, had brought proceedings before the Commission for Protection Against Discrimination, at the close of which the Commission had recommended to Parliament to repeal the offending statutory provisions. The Government secondly argued that the applicants could have brought a claim under section 71(1) of the Protection Against Discrimination Act and obtained an award of damages.
105. The applicants observed that the Commission’s recommendation was not binding for Parliament. Even if Parliament chose to act on it and repeal the impugned provisions, that would not provide the applicants with any redress in respect of past losses. As for the possibility to bring a claim under the Protection Against Discrimination Act, it had to be borne in mind that under section 74(2), where the alleged damage was a result of actions or omissions of State bodies, those concerned had to bring proceedings under the State Responsibility for Damage Act, which did not envisage the liability of Parliament. It was therefore not possible to pursue such a claim with success.
106. Concerning the proceedings before the Commission for Protection Against Discrimination, the Court notes that that Commission cannot compel Parliament to repeal or amend legislation. It can – and in fact did – only make recommendations in that regard (see paragraphs 58, 59 and 61 above and, mutatis mutandis, Hobbs v. the United Kingdom, no. 63684/00, 18 June 2002; Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 40, ECHR 2008-...; and A, B and C v. Ireland [GC], no. 25579/05, § 150, 16 December 2010). The Government have not cited any examples of steps having been taken to amend statutory provisions as a result of recommendations by the Commission (contrast Burden, cited above, § 41). Therefore, in as much as the alleged breach stemmed directly from the wording of the provision concerned – paragraph 6(1) and (3) of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999 – the proceedings before the Commission cannot be regarded as an effective remedy.
107. As for the second limb of the Government’s objection, the Court again notes that the alleged discrimination stemmed from the express wording of statutory provisions. In those circumstances, and having regard to the fact that under Bulgarian law one of the prerequisites for successfully pursuing a tort claim is to establish the wrongfulness of the conduct causing the damage (see Zlínsat, spol. s r.o. v. Bulgaria, no. 57785/00, §§ 50 and 56, 15 June 2006), the Court is not persuaded that such a claim would have had any prospect of success. Moreover, the Government have not specified the defendant to such a claim, or cited any decisions of the Bulgarian courts showing its practicability in that context.
108. The Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must therefore be rejected.
109. The Court further finds that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention or inadmissible on any other grounds. Any issues having to do with its compatibility ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention are more appropriately addressed at the merits stage. The complaint must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
110. The Government submitted that the exemption of persons who have held high office from the pensions cap did not amount to discrimination, for the reasons set out in the decision of the Commission for Protection Against Discrimination of 17 September 2009 (see paragraph 60 above). In any event, that exemption did not directly affect the applicants because they would not benefit from its cancellation. The different treatment accorded to persons who have held high office was justified by the nature of their duties, which were closely related to the country’s government. Only persons who had held one of a small number of very high posts were exempted from the cap; all of them had been barred by law from taking up additional employment. Nor could it be said that the cap was discriminatory vis-à-vis other pensioners whose pensions fell below it.
111. The applicants submitted that they were being treated differently both from pensioners who had had lower salaries and whose pensions thus fell below the cap, and from the high officials to whose pensions the cap did not apply. That difference in treatment concerned rights protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and could therefore be examined under Article 14. There were no grounds to treat the applicants differently from pensioners whose pensions fell below the cap, for the same reasons as those set out in relation to the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. That differential treatment did not pursue a legitimate aim. However, even if it were to be accepted that the money saved as a result of the cap could be used to make payments to other pensioners, the effects of the measure were disproportionate. The interference with the applicants’ pension rights, which had become permanent, was quite serious, because they received only a fraction of their full pensions; at the same time, capping the pensions of only 2% of all pensioners could not have a significant effect on the pensions of others. In 2009 those arguments had led the Commission for Protection Against Discrimination to find that the cap amounted to indirect discrimination. Lastly, the applicants submitted that it was not justified to treat them differently from persons who had held high office. Like them the applicants had been subjected to restrictions regarding the taking up of new employment.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Applicability of Article 14 of the Convention
112. Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. However, its application does not necessarily presuppose the violation of one of the substantive rights guaranteed by the Convention. The prohibition of discrimination in Article 14 thus extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and its Protocols require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Article of the Convention, for which the State has voluntarily decided to provide. It is necessary but also sufficient for the facts of the case to fall “within the ambit” of one or more of the Convention Articles (see Carson and Others, § 63, and Stummer, § 81, both cited above).
113. In line with its approach under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone (see paragraph 87 above), the Court does not consider it necessary to determine whether the facts of the case fall within the ambit of that provision. Even assuming that they do, and that Article 14 is thus applicable, the Court finds that there has been no violation of that provision for the reasons that follow.
(b) Alleged discrimination vis-à-vis pensioners whose pensions fall below the cap and are thus not affected by it
114. As to the applicants’ first head of complaint – that they are being treated differently from pensioners who had lower salaries and whose pensions thus now fall below the cap – the Court considers that it was inevitable that the contested legislation, being designed to cap pensions in excess of a certain sum, should affect pensioners who fell within that particular category rather than all others. The aim pursued by the legislation has been held by the Court to be a legitimate one in the public interest (see paragraph 92 above). According to the applicants, however, that is not sufficient to justify the distinction since the pensions cap has a disproportionate and serious impact on them. This amounts in substance to the same grievance, albeit seen from another angle, as that which has been examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Although that complaint could equally be argued in terms of indirect discrimination, the Court sees no cause for arriving at a different conclusion in relation to Article 14 of the Convention: having regard to its margin of appreciation, the Bulgarian legislature did not transgress the principle of proportionality.
(c) Alleged discrimination vis-à-vis individuals who have held high office
115. Only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14. However, the list set out in Article 14 is illustrative and not exhaustive, as is shown by the words “any ground such as” (in French “notamment”) (see, among other authorities, Carson and Others, cited above, §§ 61 and 70). The words “other status” (and a fortiori the French “toute autre situation”) have been given a wide meaning so as to include, in certain circumstances, military rank (see Engel and Others v. the Netherlands, 8 June 1976, § 72, Series A no. 22), or being a former KGB officer (see Sidabras and Džiautas v. Lithuania, nos. 55480/00 and 59330/00, §§ 53-62, ECHR 2004-VIII). The holding, or otherwise, of high office can likewise be regarded as “other status” for the purposes of Article 14.
116. However, for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (see Burden, § 60, and Carson and Others, §§ 61 and 83, both cited above). In other words, the requirement to demonstrate an analogous position does not require that the comparator groups be identical. An applicant must demonstrate that, having regard to the particular nature of his or her complaint, he or she was in a relevantly similar situation to others treated differently (see Clift v. the United Kingdom, no. 7205/07, § 66, 13 July 2010).
117. It must therefore be determined whether the applicants have been able to demonstrate that, for pension purposes, they are in a relevantly similar situation to retirees who have held high office. The applicants’ main argument in support of their assertion that they are in such a situation was in essence that it was impossible to draw a valid distinction, for pension purposes, between the character of the respective employments of the two groups. However, the Court is not prepared to draw conclusions based on the nature of the undoubtedly demanding and important tasks performed by the applicants and the tasks of the holders of the high-ranking posts in issue: the President or Vice-President of the Republic of Bulgaria, the Speaker of the National Assembly, the Prime Minister, and the judges in the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 40 above). It is not for an international court to make pronouncements on such matters; those are policy judgments which are in principle reserved for the national authorities, which have direct democratic legitimation and are better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions (see, mutatis mutandis, Hatton and Others, cited above, § 97). It should be noted in that connection that both the Court and the former Commission have on a number of occasions countenanced the differences that some Contracting States draw, for pension purposes, between civil servants and private employees (see X v. Austria, no. 7624/76, Commission decision of 6 July 1977, DR 19, p. 100, at p. 106; K. v. Germany, no. 11203/84, Commission decision of 5 May 1986, unreported; Hesse-Anger and Anger v. Germany (dec.), no. 45835/99, 17 May 2001; Matheis v. Germany (dec.), no. 73711/01, 1 February 2005; and Ackermann and Fuhrmann, cited above). The Court and the former Commission have also acknowledged, albeit in different contexts, the differences between other professions, such as lawyers in private practice and judicial and parajudicial professions (see Van der Mussele, cited above, § 46), lawyers and chartered public accountants (see Liebscher and Others v. Austria, no. 25170/94, Commission decision of 12 April 1996, unreported), and engineers and other liberal professions (see Allesch and Others v. Austria, no. 18168/91, Commission decision of 1 December 1993, unreported).
(d) Conclusion
118. In view of the foregoing considerations, the Court concludes that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the remainder of the applications admissible;
2. Holds by six votes to one that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 25 October 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Panova is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
T.L.E.


PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE PANOVA
I agree with the majority that the pensions cap is a measure that is provided for by law and pursues a legitimate aim. However, in my view the protracted restriction of the applicants’ right to receive the full amount of their pensions is not proportionate to the aim sought to be attained and thus not necessary in a democratic society.
First, I fully agree that each State is in the best position to determine how to allocate its budget and in particular how to organise and allocate its social security budget. In that sense, a State has a wide margin of appreciation to determine the measures that it has to take at any given time to achieve its legitimate aim – in the case at hand, a reorganisation of the social security budget at a time when the Bulgarian economy was undergoing a transition and when the pension system was being reorganised. In 1989 Bulgaria entered a period of transition from a centralised socialist economy to a market economy. However, that process cannot be endless and unlimited in time – twenty-two years have now elapsed since 1989 – and cannot perpetually serve to justify limitations on citizens’ social rights. Whilst until the end of the 1990s, when section 47c of the Pensions Act 1957 was in force, it could be considered that the State had the right to achieve its legitimate aim by capping pensions in order to organise the pensions budget, after that the restriction obviously started to become disproportionate because it affected citizens’ rights for too long and therefore in an excessive manner.
Secondly, the measure impugned by the applicants, consisting of a cap on their pensions, was introduced with paragraph 6 of the transitional and concluding provisions of the Social Security Code 1999 and has been in effect from the beginning of 2000 to the present day. It is by nature a rule limited in time. It provides for a time-limit for the capping of pensions, but that time-limit is constantly being postponed. It has thus far been extended on three occasions: once until the end of 2009, a second time until the end of 2011, and most recently until the end of 2013. There is no guarantee that at the end of 2013, when the cap is currently due to expire, the provisional measure will not be extended again. Thus, the recommendation made by the Constitutional Court in judgment no. 21 of 1998, that it would be desirable for the impugned legislative solution to be repealed in the future, has for thirteen years not been heeded, in spite of the changed social and economic circumstances. The continued existence of that measure, originally envisaged as a provisional one, creates legal uncertainty for the applicants and for others in a similar situation. That makes the measure – the pensions cap – disproportionate in relation to the attainment of its otherwise legitimate aim.
Thirdly, it is true that the applicants’ pension contributions were being made on their behalf by the State, but that cannot serve as grounds for the conclusion reached by the majority in paragraph 95 of the judgment, namely that the State can freely modify the amount of the pensions that are due to the applicants. The State has made and continues to make pension contributions for civil servants. The applicants are not the only group of individuals who were not paying their pension contributions themselves. However, they have exercised professions entailing a very high risk for their life and physical integrity, and that has been recompensed with higher remunerations and thus with higher pension contributions paid into the social security budget. Even though the pension system in Bulgaria is organised on a pay-as-you-go basis, the applicants’ pension contributions financed the pensions of those who were in retirement back then. The reorganisation of the pension system has to take into account the legitimate expectations of citizens in relation to their retirement. The purpose of social security is to provide for risks resulting from the attainment of an age after which those concerned are no longer expected to be able to work. In the applicants’ case, that risk, in view of the nature of their jobs, was markedly higher. Moreover, one cannot overlook the fact that because of the higher salaries that they were receiving while employed the applicants were paying higher taxes, which also went into the State’s budget.
Fourthly, the applicants, who are entitled to social security in the form of pensions but not to a particular amount of pension, nonetheless had a legitimate expectation that their pensions would be determined in the same way as all other pensions in the country and would thus correspond to a foreseeable amount. The applicants’ problem is that their pensions were set in amounts determined in decisions of the National Social Security Institute. However, they have never received those amounts as a result of a provisional restriction imposed by the legislature that has thus far been maintained for eleven years. This is not about amounts that were taken in equal proportions from all those entitled to a pension, but about amounts that are by law due and not being paid as a result of a provisional restriction. It has not been disputed that the applicants are among those who have for a number of years exercised heavy and risk-laden professions, which was probably the reason for their not unjustified, and indeed statute-based, expectation that they would be entitled to higher pensions. If those individuals had been aware that in spite of their high pension contributions they would never be able to receive the full amount of their pensions, they probably would not have exercised those professions for very long, in order to preserve their health.
Lastly, I do not agree with the conclusion in paragraph 97 of the judgment that the applicants do not have to endure a considerable and actual decrease in their pension benefits because they have always been affected by some sort of pension ceiling and because they remain among the highest-paid pensioners. The facts of the case show that they receive two or three times less than the full amount of their pensions. The maximum amount of their pensions is approximately five times higher than the minimum (social) pension in Bulgaria – BGN 136 (equivalent to EUR 69.54) – which is received by people who have reached retirement age but have never worked. In view of the nature of the applicants’ professions, such a difference is disproportionate and unjust. The legitimate aim – social justice – cannot be attained if there is no justice for the individual. The issue here is not deprivation of an increase in the amount of the pension, but deprivation of the basic amount of the pension. In addition, it should not be overlooked that the measure affecting the applicants also affects a considerable proportion of pensioners in the country – approximately one-fiftieth of them. It is true that since 2000 in Bulgaria there have been two other tiers of pension: a mandatory second tier for those born after 1 January 1960, and a voluntary third tier consisting of private pension funds. However, neither of those schemes is relevant for or available to the applicants, because they had already retired by the time the schemes came into existence. They therefore have no means of securing a higher pension amount. That makes the pensions cap even more disproportionate to the aim pursued.
For all these reasons I believe that the Bulgarian authorities have infringed the right of the applicants to receive their real amounts of their pensions and that this constitutes a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
1. Under the currency revalorisation of 5 July 1999, one new Bulgarian lev (BGN) equals 1,000 old Bulgarian levs (BGL).

2. Since 1998 the exchange rate between the euro and the Bulgarian lev has been fixed by law (section 29(2) of the Bulgarian National Bank Act 1997, and decision no. 223 of the Bulgarian National Bank of 31 December 1998). EUR 1 is equal to BGN 1.95583 (BGL 1,955.83).

3. Between 1998 and 2003 the third-tier scheme was governed by the Additional Voluntary Pension Insurance Act 1998. In 2003 the relevant provisions were incorporated into the Social Security Code 1999.

4. In January 2000 the minimum monthly salary was BGN 67. Between February and September 2000, it was BGN 75. Between October 2000 and March 2001, it was BGN 79. Between April and September 2001, it was BGN 85. From October 2001 until the end of that year, it was BGN 100. Thus, the maximum income for social security purposes during those periods was respectively BGN 670, BGN 750, BGN 790, BGN 850, and BGN 1,000.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Nessuna violazione di P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA VALKOV ED ALTRI C. BULGARIA
(Richieste N. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04 19490/04,
19495/04 19497/04, 24729/04 171/05 e 2041/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
25 ottobre 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Valkov ed Altri c. Bulgaria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente
Lech Garlicki, Päivi Hirvelä Giorgio Nicolaou, Nebojša Vučinić Vincenzo A. De Gaetano, giudici,
Pavlina Panova ad giudice di hoc, e Lorenzo Early, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato il 4 ottobre 2011, consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da nove richieste (N. 2033/04, 19125/04, 19475/04 19490/04, 19495/04 19497/04, 24729/04 171/05 e 2041/05) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata con la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) con nove cittadini bulgari, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 6 gennaio, 14 maggio, 29 giugno e 7 dicembre 2004 rispettivamente.
2. Tutti i richiedenti salvano per il Sig. A. fu rappresentato col Sig. M. E.and il Sig.ra K. B., avvocati che praticano in Plovdiv. Il Sig. A. fu rappresentato col Sig. Ts. T., un avvocato che pratica in Montana. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato col loro Agente, il Sig.ra R. Nikolova, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che una copertura legale sul loro pensionamento assegna una pensione ad era in violazione dei loro diritti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, e che loro erano vittime di una discriminazione di due-piega, in violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1: in primo luogo, in relazione a quelli pensionati le cui pensioni abbatterono sotto la copertura, ed in secondo luogo, in relazione ai certi ufficiali di alto-classificazione le cui pensioni furono esentate dalla copertura.
4. 10 novembre 2009 la Corte (quinta Sezione) decise di congiungere le richieste, li dichiarò parzialmente inammissibile, e decise di dare l'avviso Statale delle azioni di reclamo riguardo alla copertura di pensioni e la discriminazione allegato. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo (l'Articolo 29 § 1 della Convenzione).
5. Seguendo la re-composizione delle sezioni della Corte 1 febbraio 2011, la richiesta fu trasferita alla quarta Sezione.
6. Sul 2011 Zdravka Kalaydjieva di 13 aprile, il giudice elesse in riguardo della Repubblica della Bulgaria, ritirò dal riunirsi nella causa. 15 aprile 2011 il Presidente della quarta Sezione nominò Pavlina Panova come un ad giudice di hoc dal ruolo di tre persone che Bulgaria aveva designato come eleggibile notificare come simile giudici (l'Articolo 26 § 4 della Convenzione e Decide 29 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
7. I richiedenti sono tutti i pensionati che andarono in pensione su varie date fra il 1979 ed il 2002. Ogni qualvolta l'importo mensile e nominale delle loro pensioni ecceduto l'importo di massimo di pensione specificato sino alla fine di 1999 in sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisce 1957 (vedere paragrafo 27 sotto) e fin dall'inizio di 2000 in paragrafo 6 dei provvisori e disposizioni finali del Social Security 1999 Programmano (vedere divide in paragrafi 31-33 sotto), le loro pensioni erano coperte.
8. In pratica che ha funzionato siccome segue. In decisioni individuali relativo ad ognuno dei richiedenti, il Social Security Istituto Nazionale (“il NSSI”) calcolò le loro pensioni mensili sotto gli articoli generali posati in giù primo nell'Atto e poi nel Codice, e poi le pensioni copertecon riferimento alle disposizioni summenzionate. Ogni qualvolta le pensioni furono aggiornate o ricalcolarono, la stessa elaborazione fu ripetuta.
A. Piloti in pensione dell’ Aeronautica militare
9. I richiedenti seguenti sono andati in pensione piloti dall'Aeronautica militare. Durante il loro lavoro loro ricevettero salari più alti che la media per il paese.
10. Il Sig. V. che nacque nel 1928 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento ad aprile 1979. In che anno, l'autorità di pensione competente espose la sua pensione mensile a 330.20 vecchi levs bulgari (BGL). Il Sig. V. non offrì informazioni dell'importo effettivo della sua pensione mensile fra giugno 1992 e la fine di 1999; sembra che il suo importo nominale alla fine di 1999 era 327.40 levs bulgaro nuovo (BGN)1 (l'equivalente di 167.40 euros (EUR)2), e che fu colpito perciò con la copertura sotto sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisca 1957 (vedere divide in paragrafi 27 e 28 sotto). Quando il Social Security che Codice 1999 è entrato in vigore 1 gennaio 2000, il Sig. V. ' che pensione di s è stata ricalcolata in conformità con gli articoli nuovi. Con effetto da 27 aprile 2004, lui fu accordato una pensione di invalidamento supplementare, mentre corrispondendo a BGN 13.75 (EUR 7.03).
11. In riassunto, il Sig. V. ' s pensione mensile dopo 1 gennaio 2000 era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
3 luglio 2000, rect 12 gennaio 2001 1 gennaio 2000 BGN 622.97
(EUR 318.52) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
5 giugno 2001 1 giugno 2001 BGN 685.27
(EUR 350.37) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 giugno 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 726.39
(EUR 371.40) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 771.43
(EUR 394.43) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 771.43
(EUR 394.43) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
19 maggio 2004 27 aprile 2004 BGN 785.18
(EUR 401.46) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
Luglio 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 832.30
(EUR 425.55) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
19 maggio 2005 1 giugno 2005 BGN 891.46
(EUR 455.80) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
3 febbraio 2006 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 927.29
(EUR 474.12) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 luglio 2007 1 luglio 2007 BGN 1,020.02
(EUR 521.53) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 luglio 2008 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,238.15
(EUR 633.06) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 aprile 2009 1 aprile 2009 BGN 1,541
(EUR 787.90) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
12. Il Sig. G. che nacque nel 1954 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 1999. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
7 luglio 1999 1 dicembre 1998 BGL 356,160 (EUR 182.10) BGL 103,950
(EUR 53.15)
7 luglio 1999 1 luglio 1999 BGL 400,170
(EUR 204.60) BGL 111,000
(EUR 56.75)
3 luglio 2000, rect 22 maggio 2002 1 gennaio 2000 BGN 616.86
(EUR 315.40) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
22 maggio 2002 1 giugno 2001 BGN 678.55
(EUR 346.94) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
2 luglio 2001, rect 22 maggio 2002 1 luglio 2001 BGN 680.72
(EUR 348.05) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
22 maggio 2002 1 gennaio 2002 BGN 680.72
(EUR 348.05) BGN 220
(EUR 112.48)
22 maggio 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 721.56
(EUR 368.93) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 giugno 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 779.07
(EUR 368.93) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 766.30
(EUR 391.80) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 766.30
(EUR 391.80) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 812.28
(EUR 415.31) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2005 1 giugno 2005 BGN 869.14
(EUR 444.38) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 marzo 2006 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 903.91
(EUR 462.16) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 luglio 2007 1 luglio 2007 BGN 994.30
(EUR 508.38) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2007 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 1,093.73
(EUR 559.22) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 luglio 2008 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,206.93
(EUR 617.09) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2008 1 ottobre 2008 BGN 1,368.52
(EUR 699.71) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
5 dicembre 2008 27 novembre 2008 BGN 1,499.28
(EUR 766.57) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 aprile 2009 1 aprile 2009 BGN 1,649.39
(EUR 843.32) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
13. Il Sig. Sodev che nacque nel 1949 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 2001. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
13 agosto 2001 1 giugno 2001 BGN 915.61
(EUR 468.14) BGN 176
(EUR 89.99)
3 giugno 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 970.55
(EUR 496.23) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
12 febbraio 2003 15 gennaio 2003 BGN 999.56
(EUR 511.07) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 1,061.53
(EUR 542.75) BGN 250
(EUR 127.82)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 1,061.53
(EUR 542.75) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 1,125.22
(EUR 575.32) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2005 1 giugno 2005 BGN 1,203.99
(EUR 615.59) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 marzo 2006 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 1,252.15
(EUR 640.21) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
29 marzo 2006 14 marzo 2006 BGN 1,351.70
(EUR 691.11) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
7 marzo 2007 19 febbraio 2007 BGN 1,366.22
(EUR 698.58) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 luglio 2007 1 luglio 2007 BGN 1,502.84
(EUR 768.39) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2007 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 1,653.12
(EUR 845.23) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
19 marzo 2008 22 febbraio 2008 BGN 1,670.72
(EUR 854.23) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 luglio 2008 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,843.64
(EUR 942.64) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
26 marzo 2009 20 febbraio 2009 BGN 2,049.34
(EUR 1,047.81) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 luglio 2009 1 luglio 2009 BGN 2,233.78
(EUR 1,142.11) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
14. Il Sig. S. che nacque nel 1950 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 2002. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
12 settembre 2002 14 giugno 2002 BGN 871.32
(EUR 445.50) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.13)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 925.34
(EUR 473.12) BGN 250(EUR 127.82)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 925.34
(EUR 473.12) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 980.86
(EUR 501.51) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 giugno 2005 BGN 1,049.52
(EUR 536.61) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 1,091.50
(EUR 558.08) BGN 455(EUR 232.64)
n/a 1 gennaio 2007 BGN 1,091.50
(EUR 558.08) BGN 490(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 luglio 2007 BGN 1,200.65
(EUR 613.88) BGN 490(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 1,320.72
(EUR 675.27) BGN 490(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,457.41
(EUR 745.16) BGN 490(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 aprile 2009 BGN 1,603.25
(EUR 819.73) BGN 700(EUR 357.90)
n/a 1 luglio 2009 BGN 1,747.54
(EUR 893.50) BGN 700(EUR 357.90)
15. Il Sig. A. che nacque nel 1950 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 2002. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
3 settembre 2002 15 giugno 2002 BGN 699.69
(EUR 357.75) BGN 233.20
(EUR 119.23)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 743.07
(EUR 379.93) BGN 250(EUR 127.82)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 743.07
(EUR 379.93) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 787.65
(EUR 402.72) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 giugno 2005 BGN 842.79
(EUR 430.91) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 876.50
(EUR 448.15) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
n/a 1 luglio 2007 BGN 964.15
(EUR 492.96) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 1,060.57
(EUR 542.26) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,170.34
(EUR 598.39) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 ottobre 2008 BGN 1,170.34
(EUR 598.39) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 aprile 2009 BGN 1,287.45
(EUR 658.26) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
n/a 1 luglio 2009 BGN 1,403.32
(EUR 717.51) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
B. Zappatori in pensione
16. I richiedenti seguenti erano zappatori del Servizio della Polizia del Confine. Loro ricevettero anche salari più alti che la media per il paese.
17. Il Sig. G. che nacque nel 1944 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 2001. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
10 aprile 2002 27 novembre 2001 BGN 949.96
(EUR 485.71) BGN 176(EUR 89.99)
3 giugno 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 1,006.96
(EUR 514.85) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 1,069.39
(EUR 546.77) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 1,069.39
(EUR 546.77) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 1,133.55
(EUR 579.57) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2005 1 giugno 2005 BGN 1,212.90
(EUR 620.15) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 marzo 2006 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 1,261.42
(EUR 644.95) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 luglio 2007 1 luglio 2007 BGN 1,387.56
(EUR 709.45) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2007 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 1,526.32
(EUR 780.40) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 luglio 2008 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,684.29
(EUR 861.16) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
25 luglio 2008 17 luglio 2008 BGN 2,068.32
(EUR 1,057.52) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
27 febbraio 2009 24 febbraio 2009 BGN 2,100.36
(EUR 1,073.90) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 aprile 2009 1 aprile 2009 BGN 2,310.48
(EUR 1,181.33) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 luglio 2009 1 luglio 2009 BGN 2,518.42
(EUR 1,287.65) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
22 gennaio 2010 20 gennaio 2010 BGN 2,556.83
(EUR 1,307.29) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
18. Il Sig. S. che nacque nel 1950 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 2000. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
11 agosto 2000 1 febbraio 2000 BGN 772.74
(EUR 395.10) BGN 160(EUR 81.81)
5 giugno 2001 1 giugno 2001 BGN 850.01
(EUR 434.60) BGN 176(EUR 89.99)
3 giugno 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 901.01
(EUR 460.68) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 956.87
(EUR 489.24) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 956.87
(EUR 488.80) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 1,013.74
(EUR 518.32) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2005 1 giugno 2005 BGN 1,084.70
(EUR 554.60) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 marzo 2006 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 1,128.09
(EUR 576.78) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 luglio 2007 1 luglio 2007 BGN 1,240.90
(EUR 634.46) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2007 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 1,364.99
(EUR 697.91) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 luglio 2008 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,506.27
(EUR 770.14) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2008 1 ottobre 2008 BGN 1,707.96
(EUR 873.27) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 aprile 2009 1 aprile 2009 BGN 1,878.84
(EUR 960.64) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 luglio 2009 1 luglio 2009 BGN 2,047.94
(EUR 1,047.10) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
19. Il Sig. Baev che nacque nel 1954 cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 2000. Era siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
11 agosto 2000 1 marzo 2000 BGN 560.92
(EUR 286.79) BGN 160(EUR 81.81)
5 giugno 2001 1 giugno 2001 BGN 617.01
(EUR 315.47) BGN 176(EUR 89.99)
3 giugno 2002 1 giugno 2002 BGN 654.03
(EUR 334.40) BGN 186.56
(EUR 95.39)
3 giugno 2003 1 giugno 2003 BGN 694.58
(EUR 355.13) BGN 200
(EUR 102.26)
Emendamento di paragrafo 6 di 1 gennaio 2004 1 gennaio 2004 BGN 694.58
(EUR 355.13) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2004 1 giugno 2004 BGN 736.25
(EUR 376.44) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 giugno 2005 1 giugno 2005 BGN 787.79
(EUR 402.79) BGN 420(EUR 214.74)
1 marzo 2006 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 819.30
(EUR 418.90) BGN 455
(EUR 232.64)
2 luglio 2007 1 luglio 2007 BGN 901.23
(EUR 460.79) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2007 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 991.35
(EUR 506.87) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 luglio 2008 1 luglio 2008 BGN 1,093.95
(EUR 559.33) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 ottobre 2008 1 ottobre 2008 BGN 1,240.43
(EUR 634.22) BGN 490
(EUR 250.53)
1 aprile 2009 1 aprile 2009 BGN 1,364.26
(EUR 697.53) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
1 luglio 2009 1 luglio 2009 BGN 1,487.04
(EUR 760.31) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
C. il Sig. A.
20. Sig. A. che nacque nel 1935 non specificai quale era stato il suo lavoro; lui affermò soltanto che aveva comportato “duro fisico lavori.” Lui cominciò a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento nel 1995. Lui non offrì informazioni dell'importo effettivo della sua pensione mensile fra che tempo e la fine di 1999; sembra che il suo importo nominale alla fine di 1999 era BGN 285.71 (EUR 146.08), e che fu colpito perciò con la copertura sotto sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisca 1957 (vedere divide in paragrafi 27 e 28 sotto). Quando il Social Security che Codice 1999 è entrato in vigore 1 gennaio 2000, il Sig. A. ' che pensione di s è stata ricalcolata in conformità con gli articoli nuovi.
21. In riassunto, il Sig. A. che ' s assegnano una pensione a dopo 1 gennaio 2000 era, siccome segue:
Ordine del
NSSI datato Per il
periodo dopo Pensioni sotto gli articoli generali Importo coperto di pensione
n/a 1 gennaio 2000 BGN 310.79
(EUR 158.91) BGN 160
(EUR 81.81)
n/a 1 giugno 2001 BGN 341.87
(EUR 174.80) BGN 176(EUR 89.99)
n/a 1 giugno 2002 BGN 362.38
(EUR 185.28) BGN 186.56(EUR 95.39)
n/a 1 giugno 2003 BGN 384.85
(EUR 196.77) BGN 200(EUR 102.26)
n/a 1 giugno 2004 BGN 407.94
(EUR 208.58) n/a
n/a 1 giugno 2005 BGN 436.50
(EUR 223.18) BGN 420
(EUR 214.74)
n/a 1 gennaio 2006 BGN 453.96
(EUR 232.11) n/a
n/a 1 luglio 2007 BGN 499.36
(EUR 255.32) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 ottobre 2007 BGN 549.30
(EUR 280.85) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 luglio 2008 BGN 606.15
(EUR 309.92) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 ottobre 2008 BGN 687.30
(EUR 351.41) BGN 490.00
(EUR 250.53)
n/a 1 aprile 2009 BGN 755.89
(EUR 386.48) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
n/a 1 luglio 2009 BGN 832.92
(EUR 425.87) BGN 700
(EUR 357.90)
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. La Costituzione del 1991
22. Articolo che 6 § 2 della Costituzione del 1991 offre siccome segue:
“Tutti i cittadini saranno uguali di fronte alla legge. Non ci saranno nessuno restrizioni di diritti o diritti sui motivi di razza, la nazionalità, identità etnica sesso, origine religione, istruzione opinioni, affiliazioni politiche o personale, sociale o status di proprietà.
23. Articolo 51 della Costituzione prevede siccome segue:
“1. Cittadini avranno il diritto alla previdenza sociale ed assistenza sociale.
2. Ad individui che sono temporaneamente inutilizzati saranno forniti la previdenza sociale sotto le condizioni e procedure previste per con legge.
3. Persone anziane che sono senza parenti e che non sono capace di sostenersi con loro propri beni, ed individui con invalidità fisiche o mentali saranno sotto la protezione speciale dello Stato e società.”
24. Articolo che 57 § 1 della Costituzione conviene che i cittadini i diritti essenziali di ' sono irrevocabili.
B. Coperture. su pensioni
1. Sotto le Pensioni 1957 Agiscono
25. Sezione 47(5) delle Pensioni 1957 Agiscono, in vigore sino a febbraio 1991, purché che una persona pensionata non potesse ricevere una pensione che eccede suo o lei salario mensile e più alto durante gli ultimi dieci anni di suo o il suo lavoro.
26. A gennaio 1990 sezione 47b(2) delle Pensioni 1957 Agiscono fu corretto per prevedere che l'importo di quell'o pensioni più mensili ricevuto non potesse eccedere BGL 500. La copertura fece domanda anche a pensioni che già erano state accordate (paragrafo 3 dei di transizione e disposizioni finali dell'Atto per l'emendamento delle Pensioni Agisce).
27. Sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisce 1957, inserì a giugno 1992, capped l'importo del quale potrebbe essere pagato ad un individuo come un risultato suo o il suo diritto ad uno o più pensioni a tre volte l'importo della pensione sociale.
28. L'importo della pensione sociale fu esposto col Consiglio di Ministri facendo seguito ad una proposta del NSSI (sezioni 45a(4) e 46b(4) delle Pensioni 1957 Agiscono). Fu sostituito con la pensione sociale per la maturità sotto Articolo 89 del Social Security Programmi 1999 (vedere paragrafo 32 sotto). Il suo importo, e le corrispondenti pensioni coperte, era come segue:
Periodo Pensione sociale Copertura di pensioni
1 gennaio-31 marzo 1996 BGL 1,210 BGL 3,630
1 aprile-30 giugno 1996 BGL 1,800 BGL 5,400
1 luglio-31 settembre 1996 BGL 2,160 BGL 6,480
1 ottobre 1996-30 aprile 1997 BGL 2,808 BGL 8,424
1-8 maggio 1997 BGL 14,040 BGL 42,120
9 maggio-30 giugno 1997 BGL 16,300 BGL 48,900
1 luglio-31 settembre 1997 BGL 27,000 BGL 81,000
1 ottobre-31 dicembre 1997 BGL 28,900 BGL 86,700
1 gennaio-30 giugno 1998 BGL 30,350 BGL 91,050
1 luglio-31 dicembre 1998 BGL 33,000 BGL 99,000
1 gennaio-30 giugno 1999 BGL 34,650 BGL 103,950
1 luglio-31 dicembre 1999 BGL 37,000
(BGN 37) BGL 111,000
(BGN 111)
29. A dicembre 1997 l'Accusatore Principale impugnò sezione 47c di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, mentre dibattendo che corse cassa ad Articoli 51 § 1 e 57 § 1 della Costituzione (vedere divide in paragrafi 23 e 24 sopra) ed ad Articolo 9 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Economici, Sociali e Culturali. In una sentenza di 15 luglio 1998 (il реш. № 21 от 15 юли 1998 г. по к. д. № 18 от 1997 г., обн., ДВ, бр. 83 от 21 юли 1998 г.) la Corte Costituzionale respinse la richiesta con sette voti a cinque. Contenne siccome segue:
“La disposizione [in problema], la sezione 47c nuova delle Pensioni Agisce, era [inserì nel 1992]. Introdusse la copertura di pensioni contestata basata sulla pensione sociale. A turno, la pensione sociale è esposta col Consiglio di Ministri sulla base di una proposta col [NSSI] (sezione 45a(1)).
Dovrebbe essere notato, per il documento che anche prima che sezione 47c è stato aggiunto che le Pensioni Agiscono che è stato corretto e è stato completato molte volte, disposizioni contenute che in un modo o un altro set limita sul massimo corrisponda [di pensione]. Così, sezione 47b(2), [aggiunse nel 1990 e successivamente abrogò], purché che l'importo di una pensione o la somma somma di molte pensioni non poteva eccedere [BGL] 500 per mese. Un altro esempio è sezione 47(5) delle Pensioni Agisca [come in vigore fra il 1967 ed il 1991].
Sotto l'articolo posato in giù in sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisca, una classe di individui riceve lo stesso importo di pensione irrispettoso delle differenze fra le loro rimunerazioni di lavoro, le loro lunghezze di servizio o i loro contributi di previdenza sociale. Mentre l'importo delle pensioni di più pensionati dipende da quelli parametri, l'importo delle pensioni delle persone riguardò [con la copertura] non fa. La questione sorge così se il livellamento risultante fa l'articolo contestato incostituzionale.
La risposta non può essere affermativa. Le dichiarazioni che gli Articoli 51 § che 1 e 57 § 1 della Costituzione sono stati violati sono infondati.
Perché è quel?
Articolo 51 § 1 della Costituzione proclama il diritto alla previdenza sociale ed assistenza sociale. Il diritto ad una pensione, mentre essendo parte del diritto alla previdenza sociale, è comprised e custodì in quel la disposizione. È uno dei cittadini i diritti essenziali di ' e è irrevocabile.
Comunque, la disposizione costituzionale non posa in giù le condizioni sotto che che diritto sorge ed il modo dove sarà esercitato. Segue che gli artefici della Costituzione hanno lasciato quelle questioni che includono l'importo della pensione per essere regolati con statuto. La legislatura è concessa per determinare la questione alla sua discrezione, purché la soluzione concreta proposta non funziona cassa ai principi e requisiti del [la Costituzione]. La legislatura faceva così con adottando sezione 47c del Pensioni Atto.
Articolo 57 § 1 della Costituzione non è stato violato uno. Che disposizione è completamente irrilevante, perché la sezione 47c contestata del Pensioni Atto non concerne una revoca di diritti.
...
È vero che sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisce mette cittadini in due gruppi, basato sulla maniera di calcolare le loro pensioni. Per il primo di quelli gruppi, la pensione è basata su certo [circostanze individuali], mentre per il secondo l'importo è lo stesso per tutti.
Che situazione disuguale non è una funzione di qualsiasi degli status ‘espose fuori in Articolo 6 § 2 della Costituzione in una maniera esauriente '... Perciò, il principio costituzionale dell'uguaglianza di cittadini di fronte alla legge non è stato violato.
È in oltre allegato che sezione 47c del Pensioni Atto dà luogo ad un'ingiustizia per quelli colpiti con sé. Che argomento è mal-fondato similmente. Sul contrario, la disposizione dà luogo a giustizia. Uno potrebbe parlare dell'ingiustizia se non esistesse.
La copertura esposta fuori in sezione 47c del Pensioni Atto potrebbe essere collegata col così definito minimo importo di pensione. Non solo è che minimo, garantì con legge, non incostituzionale ma è raccomandato con delle convenzioni dell'Internazionale Operi Organizzazione: per istanza, Articolo 7 di Convenzione N.ro 35 su Vecchio-età Assicurazione (l'Industria, ecc.), [1933]; Articolo 7 di Convenzione N.ro 38 su Assicurazione di Invalidamento (Agricoltura), [1933]; Articolo 9 di Convenzione N.ro 39 su Superstiti Assicurazione di ' (l'Industria, ecc.), [1933]. Quelle convenzioni permettono all'importo di pensione di essere una somma fissa, o una percentuale della rimunerazione presa in considerazione per fini di assicurazione, o variare con l'importo dei contributi pagò.
L'esistenza di limiti sul massimo o il minimo importo di pensione, così come la loro dipendenza reciproca, è un risultato del sistema di pensione che opera nel nostro paese. Può essere descritto, in termini finanziari, siccome un ‘pagare-come-tu-va il sistema di '. Tale sistema richiede una copertura sull'importo di massimo di pensione-notifica garantire il minimo importo di pensione e contribuire alla sua crescita. Che show di funzione che la disposizione contestata è coerente coi requisiti della giustizia sociale, siccome posato in giù nel Preambolo al [la Costituzione].
Quelle ragioni conducono [questa corte] concludere che l'enunciazione corrente di sezione 47c del Pensioni Atto non funziona cassa a qualsiasi disposizione costituzionale. La richiesta deve essere respinta perciò.
In quelle circostanze..., non c'è nessun bisogno di decidere sull'enunciazione precedente della stessa disposizione.
Allo stesso tempo, [questa corte] costatazione che le disposizioni costituzionali e correnti non decidono fuori la soluzione legislativa e contestata che è abrogata nel futuro, ma davvero lo fa desiderabile nel contesto della riforma comprensiva della previdenza sociale in questo paese. ...
L'articolo contenne in [Articolo 9 dell'Alleanza Internazionale su Diritti Economici, Sociali e Culturali] corrisponde a quel contenne in Articolo 51 § 1 del [la Costituzione]. [L'Articolo 5 § 1 dell'Alleanza] è riflesso similmente in Articolo 57 § 1 del [la Costituzione].
In quelle circostanze, e tenendo presente che sezione 47c del Pensioni Atto non è incostituzionale e che le disposizioni summenzionate del [l'Alleanza] è stato riflesso nella Costituzione, [questa corte viene alla conclusione] che sezione 47c del Pensioni Atto non è contraria all'Alleanza approvvigiona uno.”
30. I cinque giudici che dissentono erano della prospettiva che la copertura era contraria al principio costituzionale della giustizia perché trascurò il contributo individuale di ogni persona al pubblico buono.
2. Sotto il Codice della Previdenza Sociale del 1999
31. Divida in paragrafi 6(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Programma di Previdenza Sociale 1999 che entrarono in vigore 1 gennaio 2000 e sostituirono le Pensioni Agiscono 1957, legga siccome segue:
“Su a 31 dicembre 2003 l'importo di quell'o più pensioni ricevette complessivamente,... non eccederà quattro volte la pensione sociale per la maturità.”
32. La pensione sociale per la maturità che sostituì la pensione sociale sotto sezione 45a delle Pensioni Agisce 1957 (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra) è governato attualmente con Articolo 89 del Codice (abrogò con effetto da 1 gennaio 2012). È esposto col Consiglio di Ministri sulla base di una proposta col NSSI ed il Ministero di Lavori e Politica Sociale (l'Articolo 89 § 2 del Codice). Il suo importo, e l'importo corrispondente della copertura di pensioni, era siccome segue:
Periodo Pensione sociale Copertura di pensioni
1 gennaio 2000-31 maggio 2001 BGN 40 BGN 160 (EUR 81.81)
1 giugno 2001-31 maggio 2002 BGN 44 BGN 176 (EUR 89.99)
1 giugno 2002-31 maggio 2003 BGN 46.64 BGN 186.56 (EUR 95.39)
1 giugno 2003-fine di 2003 BGN 50 BGN 200 (EUR 102.26)
33. Come un'eccezione a quell'articolo generale, divida in paragrafi 6(6) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Codice, in vigore fra il 2002 e 31 dicembre 2003 di 1 gennaio il capped le pensioni ricevute con personale militare e pensionato o personale dalle certe altre istituzioni di sicurezza di cittadino a cinque volte la pensione sociale per la maturità. In una sentenza di 23 febbraio 2004 (il реш. № 1579 от 23 февруари 2004 г. по адм. д. № 5004/2003 г., ВАС, І о.) la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne che l'esenzione era severamente personale e non fece domanda agli eredi delle persone menzionati in paragrafo 6(6).
34. 23 dicembre 2003, alcuni giorni prima della data sui quali la copertura era dovuta per scadere (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra), Parlamento corresse paragrafo 6(1) con effetto da 1 gennaio 2004 per leggere siccome segue:
“L'importo di massimo di quell'o più pensioni ricevette, accordò prima 31 dicembre 2009..., sarà uguale a trenta-cinque per cento del reddito di massimo per fini di previdenza sociale per ogni anno solare [vedere paragrafo 54 sotto], [come] fissò con l'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statale ed annuale.”
Sembra che la percentuale fu esposta a 35% perché quel è equivalente all'aspettato tasso di sostituzione di pensione medio in Bulgaria (il rapporto fra il reddito di preretirement di un retiree e suo o la sua pensione-vedere paragrafo 48 sotto).
35. La base per calcolare la copertura fu cambiata al massimo reddito mensile per fini di previdenza sociale per l'anno solare precedente con effetto da 1 gennaio 2005, (vedere paragrafo 54 sotto).
36. Con effetto da 1 gennaio 2007, la data per ricalcolare la copertura si fu trasferita da 1 gennaio a 1 luglio. La copertura fu esposta insolitamente a BGN 700 con effetto da 1 aprile di nel 2009, che anno (paragrafo 22h(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Codice).
37. Durante il periodo 2004-11 la copertura era così, siccome segue:
Anno Importo della copertura
2004 BGN 420 (EUR 214.74)
2005 BGN 420 (EUR 214.74)
2006 BGN 455 (EUR 232.64)
2007 BGN 490 (EUR 250.53)
2008 BGN 490 (EUR 250.53)
2009 BGN 700 (EUR 357.90)
2010 BGN 700 (EUR 357.90)
2011 BGN 700 (EUR 357.90)
38. Con effetto da 1 gennaio 2010, la copertura fu prolungata a tutte le pensioni accordate di fronte a 31 dicembre 2011. L'esplicativo nota alla bozza conto che il Governo ha posato prima che Parlamento riferì il contenuto dell'emendamento proposto senza gli ulteriori chiarimenti.
39. Con effetto da 1 gennaio 2011, la copertura fu prolungata a tutte le pensioni accordate di fronte a 31 dicembre 2013. L'esplicativo nota alla bozza conto che il Governo ha posato prima che disse Parlamento che la proposta era abolire la copertura in riguardo di pensioni accordato dopo 1 gennaio 2014 e gradualmente aumentarlo in riguardo di pensioni accordò prima quel la data.
40. La copertura non fa domanda ad individui che hanno contenuto i posti di Presidente o Vicepresidente della Repubblica della Bulgaria, Oratore della Riunione Nazionale, il Primo Ministro, o giudice nella Corte Costituzionale (paragrafo 6(3) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Codice). Né fa domanda a militare rende invalido chi sono giunti all'età di pensionamento generale (paragrafo 6(5) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Codice). In una sentenza di 2 ottobre 2001 (il реш. № 7218 от 2 октомври 2001 г. по адм. д. № 1127/2001 г., ВАС, io о.) la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne che questa esenzione è severamente personale e non fa domanda agli eredi delle persone menzionati in paragrafo 6(3).
41. Nel 2001 un individuo la cui pensione era stata capped nella richiesta di paragrafo 6(1) chiese controllo giurisdizionale della decisione del NSSI in relazione alla sua pensione. In una definitivo decisione di 18 marzo 2002 (il реш. № 2491 от 18 март 2002 г. по адм. д. № 6065/2001 г., ВАС, І о.) la Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse la sua richiesta, mentre sostenendo che il NSSI in modo appropriato aveva fatto domanda il diritto sostanziale e che le corti non erano competenti per decidere sulla costituzionalità di disposizioni legali come paragrafo 6.
42. A dicembre 2004 un'associazione di pensionati colpita con la copertura chiese all'Accusatore Principale di assegnare paragrafo 6(1) alla Corte Costituzionale. In una lettera di 10 febbraio 2005 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Principale informò l'associazione che l'Accusatore Principale aveva rifiutato la richiesta perché lui considerò che la copertura di pensioni non incorse urto della Costituzione.
43. A febbraio 2008 un pensionato colpito con la copertura chiese al Difensore civile della Repubblica della Bulgaria di riferirsi paragrafo 6 alla Corte Costituzionale. A luglio 2008 il Difensore civile rifiutò, mentre dicendo che la copertura sembrò ragionevole, e che in qualsiasi l'evento la questione era stata stabilita con la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale di 15 luglio 1998 (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra) e non poteva essere rivisitato.
44. Nel 2009 un altro individuale la cui pensione era stata ridotta da BGN 995.29 a BGN 700 nella richiesta di paragrafo 6 controllo giurisdizionale chiesto della decisione del NSSI in relazione alla sua pensione. In una sentenza di 9 dicembre 2009 (il реш. № 96 от 9 декември 2009 г. по адм. д. № 5932/2009 г., САС, І о., 14 състав) la Corte amministrativa di Sofia respinse la richiesta. Il contendente piacque su questioni di diritto, mentre asserendo, inter l'alia, che la copertura era contraria alla Costituzione ed ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Lui richiese la Corte amministrativa Suprema per sospendere i procedimenti ed assegnare la costituzionalità di paragrafi 6(1) e 22h(1) del Codice (vedere divide in paragrafi 34 e 36 sopra) alla Corte Costituzionale.
45. 7 agosto 2010 (il опр. от 7 август 2010 г. по хода на адм. д. № 1407/2010 г., ВАС, V² о.) la Corte amministrativa Suprema acconsentì alla richiesta di raccomandazione, sospese i procedimenti e si riferì alla Corte Costituzionale la questione se le disposizioni contestate erano compatibili con la Costituzione, Articolo 14 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
46. In una decisione di 10 febbraio 2011 (il опр. № 1 от 10 февруари 2011 г. по к. д. № 18/2010 г.) la Corte Costituzionale, sul dissenso di un giudice rifiutò di prendere la questione su per la considerazione. Contenne che, in finora come sé riguardava la compatibilità della copertura di pensioni con la Costituzione, l'argomento della causa essenzialmente era lo stesso come che della causa che aveva deciso nel 1998 (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). Era immateriale che le due cause concernerono disposizioni legali e diverse. La corte seguì a sostenere, in relazione all'incompatibilità allegato della copertura con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, che sotto la Costituzione la Corte amministrativa Suprema non era competente per riferirsi a sé l'incompatibilità allegato di disposizioni legali con trattati internazionali.
47. In prospettiva di che decisione, 28 febbraio 2011 (il опр. от 28 февруари 2011 г. по хода на адм. д. № 1407/2010 г., ВАС, V² о.) la Corte amministrativa Suprema decise di riprendere i procedimenti. Ascoltò la causa 21 aprile 2011. Il contendente dibattè, inter alia che divide in paragrafi 6(1) era in violazione degli obblighi internazionali di Bulgaria e che ancora era aperto alla corte per decidere su quel il problema. L'accusatore che prese parte nei procedimenti ex officio dibatterono, inter alia che la copertura di pensioni non ha funzionato cassa alla Costituzione o ad Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
48. In una definitivo sentenza di 7 luglio 2011 (il реш. № 10139 от 7 юли 2011 г. по адм. д. № 1407/2010 г., ВАС, V² о.) la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne la decisione della corte più bassa e così la decisione del NSSI a copertura la pensione del contendente. Contenne che il NSSI aveva fatto domanda correttamente gli articoli legali che lo costrinsero a fare domanda un soffitto alla pensione. Che soffitto fu esposto a 35% del reddito di massimo per fini di previdenza sociale (vedere paragrafo 54 sotto) perché quel era il tasso di sostituzione di pensione medio in Bulgaria. La versione precedente della copertura era stata sostenuta con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra) e non poteva essere riguardato perciò come incostituzionale. Né corse cassa a qualsiasi trattati internazionali ai quali Bulgaria era parte, o a legge di Unione europea.
C. Regole generali sugli importi e procurando di pensioni di pensionamento
1. Sotto le Pensioni 1957 e legislazione relativa Agiscono
49. Fra 1957 e la fine di 1999, il sistema di pensione in Bulgaria era un sistema di monopillar; le Pensioni Agiscono 1957 disposizione resa per solo uno fila di pensione di pensionamento (sezioni 2-11). Sino a 1995, il bilancio del fondo pensioni era parte del bilancio Statale e generale (Articolo 170 dell'Operi Codice 1951). Dopo ciò, lo schema di pensione continuò ad essere basato su modello non fondato di modello pay-as-you-go, ma il fondo pensioni fu separato dal bilancio Statale e la sua gestione fu affidata al NSSI di recente creato (sezioni 1-13 del Social Security Fondo Atto 1995). Di fronte a marzo 1996, contributi di previdenza sociale furono accusati solamente a datori di lavoro, non gli impiegati e datori di lavoro furono sbarrati dal dedurre quelli contributi dalla rimunerazione pagò ad impiegati (Articolo 148 dell'Operi Codice 1951, siccome messo in parole dalla sua adozione nel 1951 sino all'inizio di marzo 1996). A marzo 1996 contributi cominciarono ad essere accusati, in proporzioni specificate a datori di lavoro ed impiegati, (Articoli 147, 147a e 148 dell'Operi Codice 1951, corretto con effetto da 1 marzo 1996).
50. Un individuo fu concesso ad una pensione di pensionamento dopo un numero specificato di anni di contributi (come un articolo generale, venticinqui anni per uomini e venti anni per donne-sezione 2(1)(c) delle Pensioni 1957 Agiscono; c'erano condizioni più favorevoli per certe categorie di lavoro-sezione 2(1)(a) e (b)). L'età di pensione era sessanta anni per uomini e cinquanta-cinque anni per donne (l'ibid.). Comunque, il requisito di età non fece domanda a personale militare, polizia, e delle altre categorie di servitori civili che potevano in oltre, vada in pensione dopo un periodo più breve di contributi (venti anni-sezioni 6(1) e 7(1) dell'Atto). Piloti di Aeronautica militare potrebbero andare in pensione dopo dieci anni di servizio (sezione 6(2) dell'Atto). Come un articolo, l'importo della pensione di pensionamento di un individuo fu calcolato come una percentuale della media guadagni mensili e lordi per tre anni scelti col pensionato fuori di suo o lei scorsi quindici anni di servizio (sezione 11(1) delle Pensioni 1957 Agiscono, come in vigore fra il 1967 ed il 1996). Nel 1996, che base fu cambiata a tre anni della scelta del pensionato sino a 1 gennaio 1997, più il periodo intero di servizio dopo ciò.
51. Pensioni non erano soggetto a tassazione (sezione 2(1)(c) dell'Imposta sul reddito Atto 1950).
2. Sotto il Social Security Codice 1999
52. Il Social Security Codice 1999 entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2000 e provocò cambi significativi nel pensionamento assegni una pensione a modello. Costituisce disposizione un sistema di pensione multipillar, con tre file di pensione di pensionamento generale. Lo schema di pensione prima - fila, o di base, è obbligatorio, pubblico, e la definito-beneficio. È basato su non fondato, pay-as-you-go (gli Articoli 21 e 22 del Codice), e consiste di fondi pensioni pubblici maneggiati col NSSI. Le fonti principali del finanziamento generale di finanziare sono contributi di previdenza sociale e sussidi dal bilancio Statale (Articolo 21 del Codice). Contributi sono accusati a datori di lavoro ed impiegati, in una proporzione specificata, con l'eccezione di giudici, accusatori, investigatori, servitori civili, polizia, agenti di sicurezza nazionali, e personale militare i cui contributi sono coperti pienamente col bilancio Statale (l'Articolo 6 §§ 3 e 5 del Codice). La parte dei contributi pagabile con datori di lavoro non può essere dedotto da rimunerazioni sotto qualsiasi la forma (l'Articolo 6 § 12 del Codice). L'importo del sussidio Statale ed annuale al finanziamento è fissato nell'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statale ed annuale (l'Articolo 21 § 4 (b) del Codice). Separatamente da pensioni di pensionamento, il finanziamento è usato per pagare superstite e l'invalidità assegna una pensione a, così come i certi benefici salute-relativi (Articolo 22 del Codice). Lo schema di secondo-fila è anche obbligatorio. Fa domanda a tutti gli individui nati su o dopo 1 gennaio 1960, e è un schema di definito-contributo consolidato, con contributi fissati con legge ed andando in finanziamenti che consistono di conti individuali e maneggiò con società private soggetto a regolamentazione speciale (gli Articoli 120a-123i e 124-203 del Codice). Lo schema di secondo-fila è solamente aperto ad individui nati su o dopo la data summenzionata perché al tempo quando cominciò ad operare (1 gennaio 2002) loro furono invecchiati quaranta-due anni o meno e potrebbe essere aspettatosi così di costituire contributi un periodo più lungo di tempo e sviluppare i finanziamenti sui quali si appella lo schema (Средкова, К., право di Осигурително, 3 издание, Сиби, 2008, стр. 216; Мръчков, В., право di Осигурително, 5 издание, Сиби, 2010, стр. 380 и 389). Lo schema di terzo-fila è volontario ed apre a tutte le persone sopra dell'età di sedici. È anche un schema di definito-contributo consolidato, con contributi che vanno in finanziamenti che consistono di conti individuali e maneggiò con società private soggetto a regolamentazione speciale. Diversamente da schema di secondo-fila, l'importo dei contributi non è fissato comunque, con legge ma decise liberamente su con le persone riguardate (Articoli 120a-123i, 209-59 e 317-43 del Codice).3
53. Un individuo è concesso ad una pensione di pensionamento dopo un numero specificato di anni di contributi (attualmente trenta-sette per uomini e trenta-quattro per donne, gradualmente esponga sorgere a quaranta e trenta-sette anni, rispettivamente -l'Articolo 68 §§ 1 e 2 del Codice). L'età di pensione è attualmente sessanta-tre anni per uomini e sessanta anni per donne, gradualmente esposte sorgere a sessanta-cinque e sessanta-tre anni rispettivamente (l'Articolo 68 § 1 del Codice). Comunque, il requisito di età non fa domanda a personale militare, polizia, e delle altre categorie di servitori civili che possono in oltre, vada in pensione dopo un periodo più breve di contributi (Articolo 69 del Codice). Piloti di Aeronautica militare possono andare in pensione dopo quindici anni di servizio (l'Articolo 69 § 3, successivamente § 4 del Codice). L'importo del di base, o primo-fila, pensione di pensionamento è calcolata nella maniera posata in giù in Articoli 70 e 70a del Codice. È una funzione della lunghezza di servizio (“осигурителен стаж”) ed il reddito mensile e medio per fini di previdenza sociale (“доход di осигурителен di средномесечен”), moltiplicò con un coefficiente individuale. Il coefficiente è basato sul rapporto fra i guadagni mensili dei pensionati ed il salario mensile medio (per il periodo di fronte a 1 gennaio 1997) ed il reddito mensile e medio per fini di previdenza sociale (per il periodo dopo 1 gennaio 1997). Per il periodo di fronte a 1 gennaio 1997, il calcolo è basato sui guadagni mensili dei retiree durante tre anni consecutivi di suo o la sua scelta fuori degli ultimi quindici anni di servizio. Per il periodo dopo 1 gennaio 1997, il calcolo è basato sui guadagni mensili dei retiree durante il periodo intero di servizio fra che data e la data di pensionamento.
54. Il reddito mensile per fini di previdenza sociale (“осигурителен доход”) è usato come la base per non solo calcolare pensioni e welfare trae profitto, ma anche contributi di previdenza sociale. Ha un più basso ed un limite superiore. Il limite superiore notifica a copertura l'importo dei contributi di previdenza sociale mensili. Nel 2000-01, che limite era dieci volte il minimo salary4 mensile (l'Articolo 9 § 2 del Codice, siccome messo in parole sino a 31 dicembre 2001). Fin da 2002, è stato fissato in termini valutari nell'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statale ed annuale (l'Articolo 6 § 2 (1) del Codice, siccome messo in parole dopo 1 gennaio 2002). Nel 2002 era BGN 850 (sezione 8(4) dell'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statale per 2002). Nel 2003 divenne BGN 1,000 (sezione 8(5) dell'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statale per 2003). Nel 2004 divenne BGN 1,200 (sezione 8(5) dell'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statale per 2004). Nel 2005 divenne BGN 1,300 (sezione 8(5) dell'Atto del bilancio della previdenza sociale per 2005). Nel 2006 e 2007 divenne BGN 1,400 (sezione 8(5) degli Atti del bilancio della previdenza sociale per 2006 e 2007). Nel 2008-11 divenne BGN 2,000 (sezione 8(5) (più tardi (4)) degli Atti del bilancio della previdenza sociale Statali per 2008-11).
55. Pensioni ricevettero sotto il primo - e schemi di secondo-fila non sono soggetto a tassazione (sezione 12(1)(2) della Tassazione del Reddito delle Persone Fisica Atto 1997, sostituì 1 gennaio 2007 con sezione 13(1)(6) della Persone Imposta sul reddito Fisica Atto 2006).
D. Atto del 2003 sulla Protezione Contro la Discriminazione
1. Proibizione Generale della discriminazione
56. Sezione 4 della Protezione Contro la Discriminazione Atto 2003 che entrò in vigore 1 gennaio 2004 proibisce qualsiasi la discriminazione diretta o indiretta sulla base di genere, razza, la nazionalità, etnia, genoma umano, cittadinanza, origine, religione o credenza, istruzione, le condanne, affiliazione politica personale o posizione sociale, invalidità età, orientamento sessuale status maritale, status di proprietà o su qualsiasi altri motivi stabiliti con legge o con un trattato internazionale al quale Bulgaria è parte.
2. Commissione per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione
57. L'autorità responsabile per assicurare ottemperanza con l'Atto e con gli altri statuti che contengono disposizioni di uguale-trattamento la Commissione è per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione (sezione 40).
58. Sezione 47 conferisce poteri la Commissione a, inter l'alia, costituisca raccomandazioni la promulgazione, l'abrogazione o emendamento di statuti e regolamentazioni (sottosezione 8).
59. In una decisione di 17 settembre 2009 (il реш. № 163 от 17 септември 2009 г. пр di по. № 56/2008 г.), determinato in procedimenti portati con un numero di individui colpito con la copertura di pensioni sotto paragrafo 6(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Social Security 1999 Programmano (vedere divide in paragrafi 31-39 sopra), la Commissione fondò che la copertura corrispose alla discriminazione indiretta sulla base di status di proprietà ed era in violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza di trattamento dei pensionati colpita con sé. Nella prospettiva della Commissione, quelli che avevano avuto salari più alti ed avevano pagato di conseguenza contributi di pensione più alti, ed aveva fatto così per un periodo più lungo di tempo, era nel momento in cui concesso al pieno importo delle loro pensioni come quegli in che non incorsero quel il gruppo. La Commissione seguì a notare che paragrafo 6(1), corretto nel 2004, previde che pensionati le cui pensioni furono accordate dal 2010 onwards di 1 gennaio non avrebbero affrontato una copertura sulla loro pensione. Che alla differenza in trattamento mancò una giustificazione obiettiva ed era anche in violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza di trattamento. In prospettiva di quelle considerazioni, la Commissione raccomandò a Parlamento per abrogare paragrafo 6(1).
60. D'altra parte la Commissione fondò che paragrafo 6(5) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Codice (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra) non corrisponda a trattamento discriminatorio sotto l'Atto, perché era necessario ed obiettivamente giustificò in prospettiva dello status speciale delle persone a chi offrì un vantaggio e delle restrizioni che quelle persone hanno affrontato nell'eseguire i loro doveri pubblici.
61. In una decisione di 18 maggio 2010 (il реш. № 117 от 18 май 2010 г. пр di по. № 122/2009 г.) la Commissione fondò di nuovo che l'esistenza di una copertura su pensioni accordate di fronte ad una certa data (a che tempo, la fine di 2011-vedere paragrafo 38 sopra) e la mancanza di tale copertura su pensioni accordate dopo che a data mancò una giustificazione obiettiva e corrispose alla discriminazione indiretta. La Commissione raccomandò al Consiglio di Ministri per proporre un conto in Parlamento per l'emendamento di paragrafo 6(1).
3. La responsabilità per atti della discriminazione
62. Sotto sezione 71(1) dell'Atto, una persona che considera che suo o il suo diritto ad uguaglianza di trattamento che scaturisce dall'Atto o dagli altri statuti è stato violato può portare una rivendicazione, mentre chiedendo dichiaratorio o ingiuntivo assistenziale o un risarcimento danni.
63. Sotto sezione 73 dell'Atto, una persona che considera che una decisione amministrativa ha violato suo o il suo diritto ad uguaglianza di trattamento che scaturisce dall'Atto o dagli altri statuti controllo giurisdizionale della decisione può chiedere.
64. Sotto sezione 74(1) dell'Atto, una persona che ha ottenuto una direttiva favorevole con la Commissione per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione e ha chiesto il risarcimento per danno subì come un risultato della violazione di suo o il suo diritto ad uguaglianza di trattamento che scaturisce dall'Atto o dagli altri statuti una rivendicazione di illecito civile può portare contro le persone o autorità che hanno provocato il danno. Se il danno scaturisce da decisioni illegali, azioni od omissioni di autorità Statali o ufficiali, la rivendicazione deve essere portata sotto la Responsabilità Statale per Danno Atto 1988 (sezione 74(2)).
III. INFORMAZIONI STATISTICHE ED ATTINENTI
65. Secondo informazioni pubblicate col NSSI e l'Istituto Statistico e Nazionale, il numero complessivo di pensionati in Bulgaria il numero di pensionati colpito con la copertura di pensioni, e l'importo annuale di soldi “salvò” col bilancio del NSSI come un risultato della copertura era siccome segue:
Anno Numero complessivo
di pensionati Numero di pensionati
con pensioni di copertura Annuale “i risparmi”
1999 n/a 201,786 BGN 70,411,978
2000 n/a 140,413 BGN 105,130,340
2001 2,372,268 156,344 BGN 128,338151
2002 2,349,045 162,508 BGN 142,604,831
2003 2,343,896 164,536 BGN 154,964,256
2004 2,320,444 15,929 BGN 19,091,520
2005 2,301,669 23,519 BGN 29,030,701
2006 2,271,192 21,088 BGN 27,240,041
2007 2,233,697 37,182 BGN 56,264,707
2008 2,200,595 73,175 BGN 85,676,442
2009 2,189,131 42,615 BGN 94,173,582
2010 2,194,274 46,540 n/a
IV. MATERIALE COMPARATIVO ED ATTINENTE
66. La Mondo Banca e l'Organizzazione per Cooperazione Economica e Sviluppo (“OECD”) ha pubblicato studi comparativi dei sistemi di pensione di vari paesi, incluso un numero degli Stati Contraenti. Fra loro è Pensioni Panorama: Pensionamento-reddito Sistemi in 53 Paesi, La Mondo Banca (2007), e Pensioni ad un Sguardo 2011: Pensionamento-reddito Sistemi in OECD e Paesi di G20, OECD (2011), OECD Pubblicando. Il primo studio fondò, inter l'alia che la maggior parte di alto-reddito i paesi di OECD non costringono lavoratori alti a fare contributi di pensione sui loro guadagni interi. Di solito, un limite è esposto sui guadagni calcolava responsabilità di contributo e benefici di pensione. Lo studio fondò anche che il soffitto medio su pubblico (la primo-fila) pensioni in sedici alto-reddito i paesi di OECD sono 190% di guadagni economia-ampi e medi. L'indice (prima - e secondo-fila) soffitto di pensione per diciassette alto-reddito i paesi di OECD fanno la media di 275% di guadagni medi (il pp. 13-18). Il secondo studio notò anche che la maggior parte di paesi di OECD ha esposto un limite sui guadagni calcolava responsabilità di contributo e benefici di pensione, e che il soffitto medio su pensioni pubbliche per ventuno paesi è 185% di guadagni economia-ampi e medi, mentre escludendo quattro paesi che non hanno soffitto su pensioni pubbliche (p. 110).
67. Basato su un'analisi attraverso la campagna e particolareggiata di diritti di pensione, il primo studio venne alla conclusione che “paesi diversi che ' assegna una pensione a sistemi prevedono equilibri molto diversi fra le mete dell'adeguatezza-garantendo che tutte le più vecchie persone soddisfano un minimo standard di vita -ed assicurazione-assicurando un certo standard di vita in pensionamento relativo a che quando lavorando.” Per istanza, le contee di OECD potrebbero essere divise in quattro gruppi. Il primo comprendeva quelli (incluso Danimarca e l'Irlanda) in cui c'era poco o nessun collegamento fra pensioni e guadagni prima della pensione. Il secondo consisteva di quelli (incluso Belgio, Islanda, ed il Regno Unito) in cui questo collegamento era debole. Il terzo gruppo (incluso Francia, Norvegia, Portogallo, e la Svizzera) disposizione verso il medio. I paesi nel quarto gruppo (incluso Austria, Finlandia, Germania, Grecia, Italia, Lussemburgo, i Paesi Bassi, Spagna, e la Svezia) aveva un collegamento molto forte fra pensioni e guadagni prima della pensione. Le stesse divisioni potrebbero essere osservate in Europa Orientale, dove Bulgaria, Croazia, la Repubblica ceca, Lituania e Turchia avevano un collegamento più debole fra pensioni e guadagni prima della pensione, ed Estonia, Ungheria, Lettonia, Polonia e la Repubblica slovacca avevano un più forte (il pp. 31-45).
68. Il secondo studio calcolò, inter l'alia, diritti di pensione in paesi di OECD e molte altre economie notevoli (il pp. 115-43). Come parte di che esercizio, misurò la progressività delle parti obbligatorie degli schemi di pensione dei paesi , o, in altre parole, il collegamento fra pensioni e guadagni prima della pensione. I risultati mostrarono che dei paesi, come Irlanda ed il Regno Unito hanno sistemi estremamente progressivi (in che il collegamento fra redditi prima della pensione e pensioni sono molto deboli), mentre altri, come Finlandia, Grecia, Ungheria, Italia, i Paesi Bassi, Polonia, Portogallo e la Repubblica slovacca hanno sistemi quasi completamente proporzionali (in che il collegamento fra redditi prima della pensione e pensioni sono molto forti) e perciò progressività limitata. Lo studio disse che “[un] risultato alto [sull'indice di progressività] non è necessariamente ‘migliore ' che un risultato basso o viceversa. Paesi con un risultato alto hanno semplicemente obiettivi diversi che paesi con un risultato basso.” (il pp. 136-37).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
69. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la copertura sulle loro pensioni era in violazione dei loro diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che prevede come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
70. Il Governo presentò che se loro avessero considerato che le loro pensioni erano state stabilite dal NSSI a variazione col loro diritto legale, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto chiedere il controllo giurisdizionale delle decisioni del NSSI riguardante le loro pensioni individuali. Inoltre loro avrebbero potuto chiedere alle autorità competenti per richiedere alla Corte Costituzionale di revisionare la costituzionalità del paragrafo 6(1) dei provvedimenti di transizione e finali del Programma di Previdenza Sociale del 1999.
71. I richiedenti presentarono che in procedimenti per il controllo giurisdizionale di decisioni individuali del NSSI le corti non potevano scrutare gli statuti come tali. Secondo la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte amministrativa Suprema, solamente la Corte Costituzionale era competente per decidere sulla loro costituzionalità. Il Governo non aveva messo in evidenza nessun esempio dove le corti bulgare avevano accantonato una decisione del NSSI di coprire una pensione con riferimento al paragrafo 6(1) dei provvedimenti di transizione e finali del Programma di Previdenza Sociale del 1999. Sotto la legge bulgara le persone private non potevano introdurre inoltre, procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. Quando due organizzazioni non-governative avevano chiesto al Difensore civile di far riferimento al paragrafo 6(1) alla Corte Costituzionale, il Difensore civile aveva rifiutato, dicendo che la questione era già stata risolta da qulla corte nel 1998.
72. Riguardo al primo margine dell'eccezione del Governo, la Corte osserva, che la copertura sulle pensioni fluisce attualmente direttamente dall'enunciazione espressa dal paragrafo 6(1) dei provvedimenti di transizione e finali del Programma di Previdenza Sociale del 1999; sino al 31 dicembre 1999 era basata sull'enunciazione espressa dalla sezione 47c dell0Atto sulle Pensioni del 1957 (vedere paragrafi 27, 31 e 34 sopra). Non si contestava che nelle sue decisioni che fissavano la pensione di ognuno dei richiedenti il NSSI, che non aveva discrezione nella questione, aveva applicato quelle disposizioni correttamente. A questo riguardo, le cause presenti non sono diverse dalle due cause dal 2001 al 2010 nelle quali la Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse le richieste per controllo giurisdizionale di decisioni di copertura di pensioni del NSSI, sostenendo che quelle decisioni erano legali (vedere paragrafi 41 e 48 sopra). Ne segue che le richieste per il controllo giurisdizionale delle decisioni del NSSI non erano una via di ricorso effettiva che i richiedenti dovevano usare (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Immobiliare Saffi c. Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 42 in limine ECHR 1999-V; Urbárska Obec Trenčianske Biskupice c. Slovacchia, n. 74258/01, § 86 27 novembre 2007; ed Ognyan Asenov c. Bulgaria, n. 38157/04, § 32 del 17 febbraio 2011).
73. Il secondo margine dell'eccezione non richiede un esame. In Bulgaria, non c’è possibilità per le persone private stesse di introdurre procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. La Corte ha, in linea con la sua precedente giurisprudenza su questo punto (vedere Brozicek c. Italia, 19 dicembre 1989, § 34 Serie A n. 167; Padovani c. Italia, 26 febbraio 1993, § 20 Serie A n. 257-B; Spadea e Scalabrino c. Italia, 28 settembre 1995, § 24 Serie A n. 315-B; ed Immobiliare Saffi, citata sopra, § 42 in fine), già sostenuto che la possibilità di richiedere ai corpi o agli ufficiali abilitati ad introdurre simile procedimenti per fare così non è una via di ricorso effettiva ai fini degli Articoli 13 o 35 § 1 della Convenzione, perché le persone riguardate non possono obbligare direttamente l'istituzione ad introdurre procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, mentre sotto la giurisprudenza fissa di questa Corte una via di ricorso può essere considerata solamente effettiva se il richiedente è in grado iniziare direttamente la procedura (vedere Petkov ed Altri c. Bulgaria, N. 77568/01, 178/02 e 505/02, § 82 ECHR 2009 -..., con gli ulteriori riferimenti). La Corte riaffermò il giudizio in Nozharova c. Bulgaria ((dec.), N. 44096/05 et al., 25 agosto 2009). Non vede nessuna ragione di deviare da questo nella causa presente in cui molte richieste simili furono rifiutate (vedere paragrafi 42 e 43 sopra). Il fatto che nell’ agosto 2010 la Corte amministrativa Suprema acconsentì ad una richiesta per far riferimento alla copertura di pensioni alla Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafi 44 e 45 sopra) non altera questa posizione, perché la raccomandazione era un risultato dell'esercizio di questo potere discrezionale di corte a quel riguardo. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte Costituzionale rifiutò di accettare la questione per l’ esame, notando che aveva già deciso sulla costituzionalità della copertura nel 1998 e che la Corte amministrativa Suprema non era competente per attribuirgli l'incompatibilità addotta delle disposizioni legali con trattati internazionali (vedere paragrafo 46 sopra).
74. L'eccezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere perciò respinta.
75. La Corte costata ulteriormente che l'azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione o inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Qualsiasi problema che devono fare col suo materiae di ratione di compatibilità con le disposizioni della Convenzione sono rivolti più propriamente ai meriti insceni (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Maggio ed Altri c. l'Italia, N. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08 54486/08 e 56001/08, § 36 31 maggio 2011). L'azione di reclamo deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
76. Il Governo presentò che la copertura sull'importo di massimo di pensione era stata incitata con considerazioni finanziarie. Tale copertura era esistita sotto sin da allora forme diverse l'adozione delle Pensioni Agisca 1957. Pensioni in Bulgaria furono basate sul principio di solidarietà sociale che richiese che tutti quelli che giunsero ad una certa età siano offerti con una pensione, ma anche che il contributo personale di ogni individuo sia preso in considerazione nel fissare il suo importo. Un soffitto di pensione non era un unicamente avvenimento bulgaro, ma esistè in un numero di paesi, come la Germania senza essere riguardato siccome infrangendo i principi della giustizia sociale o l'uguaglianza di trattamento. Inoltre, non poteva essere trascurato che il Social Security che Codice 1999 aveva costituito una pensione di secondo-fila disposizione, basato su contributi individuali, in riguardo di persone nato su o dopo 1 gennaio 1960. Era anche notevole che recentemente l'importo di massimo di pensione era stato aumentato a BGN 700.
77. Il Governo concordò che diritti di previdenza sociale incorsero all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, ma indicò che che disposizione non garantì un particolare importo di pensione, e non costrinse Stati a scegliere un particolare modello di previdenza sociale. Anche se era teoreticamente possibile pagare i richiedenti il pieno importo nominale delle loro pensioni, là esistè un numero di fattori che renderebbero che difficile da realizzare in pratica. La popolazione stava diventando più vecchia ed il rapporto fra pensionati e persone in lavoro attivo stava deteriorando. Se le autorità optassero di pagare il pieno importo di pensione, anche se eccedeva la copertura, potrebbe dare luogo ad un ammanco di finanziamenti per pagare le pensioni di altri che avevano contribuito meno al consolidamento del sistema di pensione. Quel potrebbe condurre ad una violazione del principio di uguaglianza di trattamento che garantì un minimo ufficio imposte per ogni pensionato. Tutti il più così nel mezzo di una crisi economica e demografica grave. I richiedenti non potevano sostenere che loro avevano avuto un'aspettativa legittima che loro riceverebbero il pieno importo di pensioni loro dopo 31 dicembre 2003, perché era impossibile per predire come la legislazione evolverebbe nel futuro. Legislazione era un prodotto di sviluppi sociali che stavano cambiando rapidamente. Era per i richiedenti per mostrare che la copertura sulle loro pensioni li aveva causati per soffrire di un carico individuale ed eccessivo.
78. Nella prospettiva del Governo, la ricopertura di pensioni a 35% del massimo reddito mensile per fini di previdenza sociale era nell'interesse pubblico. Il sistema di pensione in Bulgaria fu basato su un modello as-you-go, e l'intenzione della legislatura era garantire un minimo importo di pensione ed il potenziale per sé per aumentare. L'esistenza di un soffitto di pensioni andò di pari passo con l'esistenza di un reddito di massimo per fini di previdenza sociale. Fu inteso di garantire la giustizia sociale, ed era necessario per il suono gestione finanziaria del sistema di pensione. La Corte Costituzionale aveva fatto quelli punti nella sua decisione del 1998.
79. I richiedenti presentarono che loro avevano avuto un'aspettativa legittima che loro avrebbero ricevuto il pieno importo delle loro pensioni, basato sui contributi loro erano stati costretti a rendere in tutto il loro lavoro. Dopo l'entrata in vigore di paragrafo 6(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Social Security 1999 Programmano, loro si erano aspettati che la copertura sull'importo di massimo di pensione sarebbe stata tolta 31 dicembre 2003 e che da che data su loro riceverebbe il pieno importo delle loro pensioni. La proroga che consegue del sollevamento della copertura aveva corrisposto di conseguenza ad un'interferenza con le loro proprietà.
80. I richiedenti non contestarono cio che interferenza era legale, ma dibatté che sé mancò un fondamento ragionevole. Era vero che la Corte Costituzionale aveva sostenuto che l'introduzione di una copertura di pensioni era una questione per la discrezione della legislatura. Comunque, la bozza del 2004 conto per l'emendamento del Social Security Codice 1999 che aveva permanentemente capped le pensioni di tutti i pensionati i cui diritti avevano accumulato prima 31 dicembre 2009 non era stato accompagnato con qualsiasi esplicativo nota o con qualsiasi dibatte in Parlamento. Gli stessi andarono per i 2009 emendamenti al Codice. Le asserzioni che il soffitto di pensioni è stato allacciato al minimo importo di pensione, aiutate a mantenerlo e furthered la giustizia sociale non sia vera. Anche se potrebbe essere accettato che tale copertura era stata garantita per aiutare i pensionati più poveri a raschiare per i cambi sociali ed economici profondi degli anni novanta, non poteva essere sostenuto per sempre.
81. Le vere ragioni per mantenere la copertura potrebbero essere spigolate da un numero di colloqui e dichiarazioni pubbliche con ufficiali, come il direttore dei NSSI e molti ministri successivi di Lavori e Politica Sociale. Loro erano la percezione che il pubblico non avrebbe tollerato pensioni molto alte e che il modello di pensione che esiste sotto le Pensioni Agisce 1957 avevano patito un numero di difetti. Nessuna di quelle ragioni era una base ragionevole per la copertura. Il primo fu basato su completamente considerazioni populiste che erano inoltre fuori di linea con atteggiamenti sociali e moderni. Stava dicendo che un numero di istituzioni nazionali ed organizzazioni, più cinque giudici costituzionali, fu opposto alla copertura. In che il collegamento, valeva anche che le autorità non stavano facendo abbastanza per raccogliere i contributi di previdenza sociale pagabile con quegli in lavoro attivo. La seconda ragione era anche inefficace. I richiedenti, come ognuno altro, era stato legato con le disposizioni delle Pensioni Agisca 1957 governando la base per calcolare l'importo di contributi di previdenza sociale e pensioni di pensionamento.
82. Anche se potrebbe essere accettato che la copertura di pensioni intraprese un scopo legittimo, era sproporzionato, perché, mentre non riuscendo a produrre risparmi considerevoli per il sistema di pensione, colpì una minoranza molto piccola di pensionati (approssimativamente 2%) con riducendo significativamente l'importo delle loro pensioni. In che il collegamento, vista non dovrebbe essere persa della natura dei richiedenti lavoro di ' che aveva comportato livelli più alti della responsabilità, privazione, stress e rischio e da adesso rimunerazione più alta. In oltre, quando permanentemente la ricopertura i richiedenti che ' assegna una pensione a con effetto da 1 gennaio 2004, lo Stato non li aveva offerti qualsiasi forma del risarcimento.
83. Nelle loro osservazioni supplementari, il Governo presentò, che in tanto quanto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantì un particolare importo di pensione i richiedenti l'azione di reclamo di ' era ratione materiae incompatibile. Era nella discrezione della legislatura per scegliere un particolare modello di previdenza sociale. Affrontato con difficoltà demografiche e finanziarie, Bulgaria aveva optato di limitare l'importo di massimo della pensione di primo-fila. Comunque, aveva costituito disposizione una pensione di terzo-fila volontaria, e non c'era nessuna indicazione che i richiedenti avevano tentato di giovarsi a di quel l'opportunità. Era anche importante per indicare che la copertura sulle loro pensioni era aumentata molte volte, e che quelli di loro che avevano notificato nelle forze armate non si avevano contributi di pensione pagati ed erano andati in pensione le condizioni molto favorevoli sotto. L'equilibrio equo e richiesto non era stato sconvolto perciò al loro danno.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
84. I principi che si applicano in cause sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo generalmente N.ro 1 è ugualmente attinente quando viene a pensioni (vedere Andrejeva c. la Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 77, 18 febbraio 2009 e, più recentemente, Stummer c. l'Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 82 7 luglio 2011). Così, che disposizione non garantisce il diritto per acquisire proprietà (vedere, fra le altre autorità, il der di Van Mussele c. il Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 la Serie Un n. 70; Slivenko c. la Lettonia (il dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II; e Kopecký c. la Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Né garantisce, come così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Müller c. l'Austria, n. 5849/72, il rapporto di Commissione di 1 ottobre 1975, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 3, p. 25; T. c. la Svezia, n. 10671/83, decisione di Commissione di 4 marzo 1985, DR 42, p. 229; Jankoviæ c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X; Kuna c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 52449/99, il 2001-V di ECHR (gli estratti); Lenz c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 40862/98, ECHR 2001-X; Kjartan Ásmundsson c. l'Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004-IX; Apostolakis c. la Grecia, n. 39574/07, § 36 22 ottobre 2009; Wieczorek c. la Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 57 8 dicembre 2009; Poulain c. la Francia (dec.), n. 52273/08, 8 febbraio 2011; e Maggio ed Altri, citato sopra, § 55). Comunque, dove un Stato Contraente ha in legislazione di vigore che prevede di pieno diritto per il pagamento di una pensione-se o non condizionale sul pagamento precedente di contributi-che legislazione doveva essere considerata generando un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Carson ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 64 ECHR 2010 -...). La riduzione o la cessazione di una pensione può costituire perciò interferenza con proprietà che hanno bisogno di essere giustificate (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citato sopra, § 40; Rasmussen c. la Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 28 aprile 2009; e Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 57).
85. Nella causa presente, i richiedenti che le pensioni di ' sono state calcolate in linea con gli articoli generali delle Pensioni prima Agiscono 1957 e successivamente del Social Security Codice 1999 (nelle cause di quelli richiedenti che andarono in pensione dopo 1 gennaio 2000, solamente il secondo). Perché gli importi produssero con quelli calcoli era, nella causa di ogni richiedente, sopra del set di copertura di pensioni fuori in sezione 47c dell'Atto e più tardi in paragrafo 6(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Codice, le loro pensioni furono aggiustate al livello concesso con la copertura (vedere divide in paragrafi 7, 8, 10-15 17-19, 21 27 e 31 sopra). La copertura può essere considerata così o una disposizione che limita l'importo di pensione dopo che è stato calcolato sotto gli articoli generali, e corrispondendo così ad un'interferenza con un “la proprietà” dei richiedenti, o come parte del set complessivo di articoli legali che governano la maniera nella quale dovrebbe essere calcolato l'importo di pensione, e corrispondendo così ad un articolo che impedisce ai richiedenti dell'avere qualsiasi “la proprietà” in relazione all'eccedenza.
86. Deve in oltre sia notato che quando entrò in vigore sul 2000 paragrafo 6(1 di 1 gennaio prima) esponga una limitazione temporale sulla copertura di pensioni-31 dicembre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). Che limitazione fu rimossa col dicembre 2003 emendamento, col risultato che la copertura divenne permanentemente applicabile a tutte le pensioni accordò di fronte ad una certa data: inizialmente 31 dicembre 2009 e, seguendo gli ulteriori emendamenti, 31 dicembre 2011 e poi 31 dicembre 2013 (vedere divide in paragrafi 34, 38 e 39 sopra). Da questo punto di vantaggio, potrebbe essere dibattuto, che, nonostante la posizione di fronte ad o dopo, fra il 2000 e 23 dicembre 2003 di 1 gennaio i richiedenti potrebbero essere considerati avendo maturato un'aspettativa legittima che la copertura sulle loro pensioni finirebbe 31 dicembre 2003, e che l'emendamento legislativo che prese che l'aspettativa corrispose via nel suo proprio diritto ad un'interferenza con loro “le proprietà” (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Maurizio c. la Francia [GC], n. 11810/03, §§ 67-71 e 79, ECHR 2005-IX; Draon c. la Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, §§ 70-72 6 ottobre 2005; e Hasani c. Croatia (il dec.), n. 20844/09, 30 settembre 2010).
87. Comunque, la Corte non lo considera necessario prendere una posizione fissa su quelli punti, perché considera che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per le ragioni che seguono (vedere Maggio ed Altri, citato sopra, § 59). Procederà perciò sull'assunzione che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile e che la copertura di pensioni, in tutte le sue forme può essere considerata un'interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' sotto quel la disposizione.
(b) Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
88. La Corte non considera che la copertura corrispose un “la privazione di proprietà” all'interno del significato della seconda frase del primo paragrafo di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Alquanto sarà considerato un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà, all'interno del significato della prima frase del primo paragrafo (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, § 40, e Wieczorek, § 61 sia citò sopra).
89. Non era in controversia fra le parti che l'interferenza era legale in termini di sia nazionale e legge di Convenzione. La Corte, notando che fu basato sull'enunciazione non ambigua di sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisca 1957 e successivamente divida in paragrafi 6(1) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Social Security 1999 Programmano, disposizioni la cui costituzionalità fu sostenuta con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 29 e 46 sopra), non vede nessuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti.
90. Rimane essere stabilito se l'interferenza notificò un interesse pubblico e legittimo ed era ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso.
91. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, le autorità nazionali, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e le sue necessità sono meglio in principio messo che il giudice internazionale per decidere che che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di Convenzione, è così per quelle autorità per fare la valutazione iniziale come all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è esteso. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi riguardo a pensioni o benefici di welfare comportano considerazione di vari problemi economici e sociali. Il margine della valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare simile politiche dovrebbe essere perciò un ampio, e la sua sentenza come a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” dovrebbe essere rispettato a meno che che sentenza è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole. Comunque qualsiasi interferenza deve essere anche ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo cercò di essere compreso. Nelle altre parole, un “equilibrio equo” deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. Che equilibrio mancherà dove la persona riguardata deve sopportare un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere Wieczorek, citato sopra, §§ 59-60, con gli ulteriori riferimenti). In che riguardo a, sarebbe anche importante per verificare se il diritto di un richiedente per dedurre benefici dallo schema di previdenza sociale in oggetto è stato infranto in una maniera che dà luogo al danneggiamento dell'essenza dei suoi diritti di pensione (vedere Domalewski c. la Polonia (il dec.), n. 34610/97, il 1999-V di ECHR; Kjartan Ásmundsson, citato sopra, § 39 in multa; e Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 57 in multa). D'altra parte non deve essere trascurato che Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non restringe la libertà di un Stato per scegliere il tipo o importo di benefici che offre sotto un schema di previdenza sociale (vedere Stec ed Altri, § 54 sopra e citato; Stec ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 65731/01, § 53 ECHR 2006-VI; e Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 66 in limine).
92. Nella causa presente, i richiedenti chiamarono in questione il fine della copertura, mentre dicendo che non era, siccome conteso col Governo, basato su considerazioni che devono fare con l'autosufficienza finanziaria del sistema di pensione. Era piuttosto un risultato delle percezioni che il pubblico non avrebbe tollerato pensioni molto alte e che le Pensioni Agiscono 1957 avevano fatto il possibile pensionamento su termini eccessivamente generosi. La Corte, per la sua parte nota che la copertura dà luogo evidentemente a risparmi per il sistema di pensione (vedere le statistiche citate in paragrafo 65 sopra). Comunque, non lo trova necessario determinare se quelli risparmi sono davvero necessari per assicurare l'autosufficienza finanziaria del sistema. Osserva che nel sostenere la copertura la Corte Costituzionale la prospettiva sulla quale è stato basato prese il “requisiti della giustizia sociale” (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). Presumendo anche che i richiedenti le asserzioni di ' come al vero fine della copertura ha ragione, la Corte non considera che era illegittimo per la legislatura bulgara per avere riguardo ad alle considerazioni sociali, o che la sua sentenza in che riguardo era manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole. I sistemi di pensione di paesi diversi variano nell'enfasi relativa che loro mettono su redistributive vis-à-vis assicurazione elementi. Studi comparativi con la Mondo Banca e lo show di OECD che mentre alcuni Stati Contraenti danno più importanza ad offrendo gli stessi o tassi di sostituzione di pensione molto simili a tutti i lavoratori, con un collegamento forte fra pensioni e guadagni di prepensionamento in altri l'accento è su adeguatezza di pensione, con piccolo o nessun collegamento fra pensioni e guadagni di prepensionamento (vedere divide in paragrafi 67 e 68 sopra). Quel è primariamente una questione che incorre essere decisa con le autorità nazionali che hanno legittimazione democratica e diretta e sono messe meglio che una corte internazionale per valutare necessità locali e le condizioni. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, nelle questioni di politica generale sulle quali opinioni all'interno di una società democratica possono differire ragionevolmente estesamente la determinazione del policymaker nazionale dovrebbe essere data peso speciale (vedere Hatton ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 36022/97, § 97 ECHR 2003-VIII). La Corte si soddisfa perciò che la copertura intraprese un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico.
93. Questo non stabilisce completamente comunque, il problema. Deve essere stabilito anche se c'era una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo cercò di essere compreso.
94. Su questo punto, la Corte comincia con notare che i redistributive funzionano del sistema di pensione può essere realizzato nei vari modi, come fissando in posto formulae della beneficio-calcolo progressivo soffitti imponenti su diritti di pensione, o tassando pensioni alte. In Bulgaria, la legislatura ha scelto di prima esentare - e secondo-fila assegna una pensione a da tassazione (vedere divide in paragrafi 51 e 55 sopra), ma ha imposto una copertura sull'importo di massimo di pensione sotto la prima fila. La Corte è incapace a costatazione che questa è in se stesso una misura sproporzionata. Ha in un numero di cause accettato la possibilità di riduzioni in diritti di previdenza sociale (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citato sopra, § 45; Hoogendijk c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 58641/00, 6 gennaio 2005; il der di Goudswaard-Van Lans c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI; e Wieczorek, citato sopra, § 67). Ha approvato anche coperture di pensione simile a quell'in questione (vedere Blanco Callejas c. la Spagna (il dec.), n. 64100/00, 18 giugno 2002, e Buchheit e Meinberg c. la Germania (il dec.), N. 51466/99 e 70130/01, 2 febbraio 2006). Quindi ha la Commissione precedente (vedere Beging c. la Germania, n. 15376/89, decisione della Commissione di 27 maggio 1991, non segnalato e Kuhlmann c. la Germania, n. 21519/93, decisione di Commissione di 30 giugno 1993 non segnalato). Gli studi comparativi e summenzionati della Mondo Banca e gli OECD mostrano che soffitti su pensioni pubbliche sono lontano dall'essere un unicamente fenomeno bulgaro (vedere paragrafo 66 sopra). Al giorno d'oggi la causa, ci sono molti fattori che informano la valutazione della Corte.
95. Prima, i richiedenti ' argomento principale contro la copertura era che, diversamente da lavoratori di moderno-giorno, in riguardo di chi là esiste un soffitto su guadagni pensionabili (vedere paragrafo 54 sopra), loro furono legati per pagare contributi sul pieno importo di loro relativamente salari alti; loro furono concessi perciò a pensioni commisurato con quelli contributi. Comunque, che argomento non fa fronte ad esame. Nel primo posto, non può essere trascurato, che fino a 1996, contributi erano solamente pagabili con datori di lavoro che furono sbarrati dal dedurli da impiegati le rimunerazioni di '; quel continua ad essere la causa per personale militare, servitori civili, e delle altre categorie di impiegati Statali (vedere divide in paragrafi 49 e 52 sopra). Più importante, l'argomento giudica male la relazione fra contributi di previdenza sociale e prima- fila assegna una pensione ad in Bulgaria. Diversamente da secondo - e gli schemi di terza-fila, dove contributi sono collegati direttamente all'aspettato beneficio ritorna (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra), contributi di prima-fila non facevano ed ancora non hanno un collegamento esclusivo a pensioni di pensionamento. Ciò è dovuto al non fondato carattere as-you-go del primo pilastro del sistema di pensione bulgaro, sia sotto la Pensione Atto 1957 e sotto il Social Security Codice 1999 (vedere divide in paragrafi 49 e 53 sopra). Quel lo fa impossibile a riguardo al pagamento di contributi di previdenza sociale più alti come una base sufficiente per diritto a benefici di pensione intonati (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Carson ed Altri, § 84, e Müller, a p. 31, §§ 29-30 sia citò sopra). Effettivamente, nelle cause di alcuni dei richiedenti-e di altri in una situazione simile-la massa di quelli contributi fu pagata sotto un regime economico e diverso, quando il fondo pensioni era una parte inseparabile del bilancio Statale e generale (vedere paragrafo 49 sopra), ed ad un tempo quando il vero valore del lev bulgaro e la struttura generale dell'economia bulgara sia molto diverso da che che loro sono oggi.
96. In secondo luogo, la Corte non può perdere vista del fatto che la copertura di pensioni fu fissata in posto e, più importante, sostenne ad un tempo quando il sistema di pensione bulgaro stava subendo una riforma comprensiva, come parte della transizione del paese da un completamente Statale e progettò in posizione centrale economia a proprietà privata ed un'economia di mercato (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Credito Banca ed Altri c. la Bulgaria (il dec.), n. 40064/98, 30 aprile 2002, e Velikovi ed Altri c. la Bulgaria, N. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99 48380/99, 51362/99 53367/99, 60036/00 73465/01 e 194/02, § 166 15 marzo 2007). In prospettiva dei cambi nella maniera di calcolare gli importi di contributi di previdenza sociale e pensionamento assegna una pensione a-in particolare, l'introduzione di un soffitto su guadagni pensionabili (vedere paragrafo 54 sopra)-la prima fila di che sistema di pensione che si muove verso un livellamento globale dell'importo di benefici può essere considerato previde. È evidente che il modello di pensione nuovo in Bulgaria prevede la disposizione di redditi di pensionamento più alti per il secondo - e schemi di pensione di terzo-fila che, diversamente da schema di primo-fila, è procurato, schemi di definito-contributo (vedere divide in paragrafi 52 e 53 sopra). In che contesto, la copertura così come le sue proroghe sino alla fine di 2009, e poi la fine di 2011 e di 2013 (vedere divide in paragrafi 34, 38 e 39 sopra), può essere considerato una misura di transizione che accompagna la trasformazione complessiva del sistema di pensione. La Corte ha nel passato riconosciuto che Stati Contraenti hanno un margine ampio della valutazione quando leggi passeggere nel contesto di un cambio di regime politico ed economico (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01 § 113, ECHR 2005-VI con gli ulteriori riferimenti). È vero che i richiedenti, tutto di chi nacquero prima 1 gennaio 1960, non è eleggibile per essere affiliato allo schema di secondo-fila (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra) e non può superare perciò sui loro guadagni di pensione in così. Comunque, la Corte non può dare l'importanza decisiva a che, perché che schema è un consolidato, definito-contributo uno, con conti individuali; l'importo di benefici che può offrire è direttamente dipendente sull'importo e la durata dei contributi di quegli affiliate a sé. È comprensibile che tale schema dovrebbe essere solamente aperto a quelli che saranno in grado accumulare finanziamenti sufficienti per finanziare le loro pensioni.
97. La particolare enfasi ha bisogno di in terzo luogo, essere messa sul fatto che i richiedenti fossero obbligati per sopportare una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata piuttosto che una perdita totale dei loro diritti di pensione. Effettivamente, loro non soffrirono di un calo effettivo nei pagamenti mensili che loro hanno ricevuto, ma semplicemente non vide il sollevamento annunciato della copertura di pensioni materializzarsi-sembra che fin da pensionamento loro non hanno ricevuto mai gli uncapped corrispondono delle loro pensioni. Inoltre, la copertura, mentre qualche volta-ma non sempre-dando luogo a riduzioni considerevoli dell'importo nominale delle loro pensioni mensili, non spossessi totalmente i richiedenti di loro solo vuole dire di esistenza. I richiedenti sono, nella natura di cose, i lavoratori di cima fra le più di due milione di persone in Bulgaria che è attualmente in ricevuta di una pensione di pensionamento. Loro che sono resi per sopportare un carico eccessivo e sproporzionato possono essere considerati perciò appena, o siccome avendo sofferto di un danneggiamento dell'essenza dei loro diritti di pensione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, M.V. ed U-M.S. c. la Finlandia (il dec.), n. 43189/98, 28 gennaio 2003; Saarinen c. la Finlandia (il dec.), n. 69136/01, 28 gennaio 2003; Banfield c. il Regno Unito (il dec.), n. 6223/04, ECHR 2005-XI; Laloyaux c. il Belgio (il dec.), n. 73511/01, 9 marzo 2006; e Wieczorek, § 71; Hasani; e Maggio ed Altri, § 62 tutti citarono sopra; e contrasto Kjartan Ásmundsson, §§ 43-45, ed Apostolakis, §§ 39-42, sia citò sopra).
98. Fourthly, non si può trascurare che schemi di pensione pubblici sono basati sul principio della solidarietà fra sottoscrittori e beneficiari (vedere Ackermann e Fuhrmann c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 71477/01, 8 settembre 2005). Equo piaccia gli altri schemi di previdenza sociale, loro sono un'espressione della solidarietà di una società coi suoi membri vulnerabile (vedere il der di Goudswaard-Van Lans, e Wieczorek, § 64 sia citò sopra), e non può essere comparato a piani assicurativo privati (vedere Müller, citato sopra, a p. 32, § 31). Effettivamente, come già notato (vedere paragrafo 92 sopra), i sistemi di pensione di paesi diversi variano nell'enfasi relativa che loro mettono su redistributive vis-à-vis assicurazione elementi.
99. Infine, non si può trascurare che l'importo della copertura e la maniera nel quale è calcolato ha evoluto sugli anni. Inizialmente, la pensione di massimo fu allacciata alla pensione sociale, mentre non essendo in grado eccederlo con più di tre volte (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). Nel 2000, che soffitto fu sollevato a quattro volte la pensione sociale per la maturità (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). Nel 2003, la copertura fu allacciata al soffitto su guadagni pensionabili e la media valutò tasso di sostituzione di pensione (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). È stato aumentato così gradualmente in tutto gli anni, col risultato che, come un trend generale, meno pensionati sono colpiti notevolmente con sé (vedere divide in paragrafi 28, 32 37 e 65 sopra).
100. In prospettiva di quelle considerazioni, la Corte conclude, che la copertura contestata sull'importo di massimo di pensione incorre all'interno del margine della Bulgaria della valutazione nel regolare la sua politica di previdenza sociale.
101. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE LETTA IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
102. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche sotto Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che loro erano vittime di una doppia discriminazione: in primo luogo, in relazione a quelli pensionati le cui pensioni abbatterono sotto la copertura e che così rimase non soggetto ad influssi con sé, ed in secondo luogo, in relazione agli ufficiali di alto-classificazione le cui pensioni furono esentate dalla copertura con virtù di paragrafo 6(3) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Social Security 1999 Programmano (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra).
103. Articolo 14 della Convenzione prevede siccome segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
A. Ammissibilità
104. Il Governo indicò che solamente Sig. A., e nessuno degli altri richiedenti, aveva portato procedimenti di fronte alla Commissione per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione, alla chiusura di che la Commissione aveva raccomandato a Parlamento per abrogare le disposizioni legali ed offensive. Il Governo dibatté in secondo luogo che i richiedenti avessero potuto portare una rivendicazione sotto sezione 71(1) della Protezione Contro Atto di Discriminazione ed ottenne un risarcimento danni.
105. I richiedenti osservarono che la raccomandazione della Commissione non stava legando per Parlamento. Anche se Parlamento scelse di agire su sé ed abrogare le disposizioni contestate che non offrirebbero i richiedenti con qualsiasi compensa in riguardo di perdite passate. Come per la possibilità di portare una rivendicazione sotto la Protezione Contro Atto di Discriminazione, doveva essere tenuto presente che sotto sezione 74(2), dove era un risultato di azioni od omissioni di corpi Statali il danno allegato, quelli riguardarono dovuto per portare procedimenti sotto la Responsabilità Statale per Danno Atto che non previde la responsabilità di Parlamento. Non era perciò possibile intraprendere tale rivendicazione con successo.
106. Riguardo ai procedimenti di fronte alla Commissione per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione, la Corte nota, che questa Commissione non può obbligare Parlamento ad abrogare o correggere legislazione. Può- ed infatti faceva-solamente faccia raccomandazioni in che riguardo a (vedere divide in paragrafi 58, 59 e 61 sopra e, mutatis mutandis, Hobbs c. il Regno Unito, n. 63684/00, 18 giugno 2002; il Carico c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 40 ECHR 2008 -...; ed Un, B e C c. l'Irlanda [GC], n. 25579/05, § 150 16 dicembre 2010). Il Governo non ha citato qualsiasi esempi di passi stati stati presi correggere disposizioni legali come un risultato di raccomandazioni con la Commissione (contrasto Carico, citato sopra, § 41). Perciò, in tanto quanto la violazione allegato scaturita direttamente dall'enunciazione della disposizione riguardata-paragrafo 6(1) e (3) dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Programma di Previdenza Sociale del 1999 -i procedimenti di fronte alla Commissione non possono essere considerati una via di ricorso effettiva.
107. Come per il secondo margine dell'eccezione del Governo, la Corte nota di nuovo, che la discriminazione allegato scaturì dall'enunciazione espressa di disposizioni legali. In quelle circostanze, ed avendo riguardo ad al fatto che sotto legge uno bulgara dei requisiti indispensabile per intraprendere con successo una rivendicazione di illecito civile è stabilire l'ingiustizia della condotta che provoca il danno (vedere Zlínsat, spol. s r.o. c. la Bulgaria, n. 57785/00, §§ 50 e 56, 15 giugno 2006), la Corte non si persuade che tale rivendicazione avrebbe avuto qualsiasi prospettiva del successo. Inoltre, il Governo non ha specificato l'imputato a tale rivendicazione, o citò qualsiasi decisioni dell'esposizione di corti bulgara la sua praticabilità in quel il contesto.
108. L'eccezione del Governo della non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta perciò.
109. La Corte gli ulteriori costatazione che l'azione di reclamo non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 (un) della Convenzione o inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Qualsiasi problemi che devono fare con la sua compatibilità materiae ratione con le disposizioni della Convenzione sono rivolti più propriamente allo stadio di meriti. L'azione di reclamo deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
110. Il Governo presentò che l'esenzione di persone che hanno sostenuto ufficio alto dalla copertura di pensioni non corrispose alla discriminazione, per le ragioni esposte fuori nella decisione della Commissione per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione di 17 settembre 2009 (vedere paragrafo 60 sopra). In qualsiasi l'evento, che esenzione non colpì direttamente i richiedenti perché loro non trarrebbero profitto dal suo annullamento. Il trattamento diverso concesso a persone che hanno sostenuto ufficio alto fu giustificato con la natura dei loro doveri che furono riferiti da vicino al governo del paese. Solamente persone che avevano sostenuto uno di un piccolo numero di posti molto alti furono esentate dalla copertura; tutti di loro erano stati sbarrati con legge dal prendere su lavoro supplementare. Né si potrebbe dire che la copertura era vis-à-vis discriminatoria gli altri pensionati le cui pensioni l'abbatterono sotto.
111. I richiedenti presentarono che loro erano trattati differentemente sia da pensionati che avevano avuto salari più bassi e di chi assegna una pensione a così abbatta sotto la copertura, e dagli ufficiali alti a cui pensioni che la copertura non ha fatto domanda. Che la differenza in trattamento riguardava diritti protegguti sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, e potrebbe essere esaminato perciò sotto Articolo 14. Non c'erano nessuno motivi per trattare differentemente i richiedenti da pensionati le cui pensioni abbatterono sotto la copertura, per le stesse ragioni come quegli esposti fuori in relazione all'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Che trattamento differenziale non intraprese un scopo legittimo. Comunque, anche se sarebbe accettato che i soldi salvò come un risultato della copertura potrebbe essere usato per fare pagamenti agli altri pensionati, gli effetti della misura erano sproporzionati. L'interferenza coi richiedenti ' assegna una pensione a diritti che erano divenuti permanenti era piuttosto serio, perché loro ricevettero solamente una frazione delle loro piene pensioni; allo stesso tempo, ricopertura le pensioni di solamente 2% di tutti i pensionati non potevano avere un effetto significativo sulle pensioni di altri. Nel 2009 quegli argomenti avevano condotto la Commissione per Protezione Contro la Discriminazione a trovare che la copertura corrispose alla discriminazione indiretta. Infine, i richiedenti presentarono che non fu giustificato per trattarli differentemente da persone che avevano sostenuto ufficio alto. Come loro i richiedenti erano stati sottoposti a restrizioni riguardo alla presa su di lavoro nuovo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) l'Applicabilità di Articolo 14 della Convenzione
112. Articolo 14 complementi le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione ed i Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione a “il godimento dei diritti e le libertà” salvaguardò con quelle disposizioni. La sua richiesta non presuppone necessariamente comunque, la violazione di uno dei diritti effettivi garantita con la Convenzione. La proibizione della discriminazione in Articolo 14 prolunga così oltre il godimento dei diritti e le libertà che la Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli costringono ogni Stato a garantire. Fa domanda anche a quelli diritti supplementari, mentre incorrendo all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi Articolo della Convenzione per il quale lo Stato ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere. È necessario ma anche sufficiente per i fatti della causa per incorrere “all'interno dell'ambito” di uno o più dei Convenzione Articoli (vedere Carson ed Altri, § 63, e Stummer, § 81, sia citò sopra).
113. In linea col suo approccio sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo (vedere paragrafo 87 sopra), la Corte non lo considera necessario determinare se i fatti della causa incorrono all'interno dell'ambito di quel la disposizione. Presumendo anche che loro fanno, e che Articolo 14 è così applicabile, i costatazione di Corte di che non c'è stata violazione che approvvigiona per le ragioni che seguono.
(b) Discriminazione addotta vis-à-vis ai pensionati le cui pensioni incorrono sotto la copertura e non ne sono così colpite
114. In merito al primo capo dell’azione di reclamo dei richiedenti -che loro sono trattati differentemente da pensionati che avevano salari più bassi e di chi assegna una pensione a così ora incorra sotto la copertura-la Corte considera che era inevitabile che la legislazione contestata, mentre essendo disegnato a pensioni di copertura in eccesso di una certa somma, dovrebbe colpire pensionati entro che incorsero che particolare categoria piuttosto che tutti altri. Lo scopo perseguito con la legislazione è stato contenuto con la Corte per essere un legittimo nell'interesse pubblico (vedere paragrafo 92 sopra). Secondo i richiedenti, comunque quel non è sufficiente per giustificare la distinzione poiché la copertura di pensioni ha un impatto sproporzionato e serio su loro. Questo corrisponde in sostanza allo stesso danno, benché visto da un altro angolare, come che quale è stato esaminato sotto Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Benché che azione di reclamo potrebbe essere dibattuta ugualmente in termini della discriminazione indiretta, la Corte non vede causa per arrivare ad una conclusione diversa in relazione ad Articolo 14 della Convenzione: avendo riguardo ad al suo margine della valutazione, la legislatura bulgara non trasgredì il principio della proporzionalità.
(c) Discriminazione addotta vis-à-vis agli individui che hanno avuto alte cariche
115. Solamente differenze in trattamento basato su una caratteristica identificabile, o “lo status”, è capace di corrispondere alla discriminazione all'interno del significato di Articolo 14. Comunque, il ruolo esposto fuori in Articolo 14 è illustrativo e non esauriente, siccome è mostrato con le parole “qualsiasi la base come” (in francese “il notamment”) (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Carson ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 61 e 70). Le parole “l'altro status” (ed un fortiori i francesi “situazione di autre di toute”) è stato dato un significato ampio così come includere, nelle certe circostanze fila militare (vedere Engel ed Altri c. i Paesi Bassi, 8 giugno 1976, § 72 la Serie Un n. 22), o essendo un ufficiale di KGB precedente (vedere Sidabras e Džiautas c. la Lituania, N. 55480/00 e 59330/00, §§ 53-62 ECHR 2004-VIII). La partecipazione azionaria, o altrimenti, di ufficio alto può essere riguardato similmente come “l'altro status” per i fini di Articolo 14.
116. Comunque, per un problema per derivare Articolo 14 sotto ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in analogo, o in modo pertinente simile, situazioni (vedere Carico, § 60, e Carson ed Altri, §§ 61 e 83, sia citò sopra). Nelle altre parole, il requisito per dimostrare una posizione analoga non richiede, che i gruppi di comparatore siano identici. Un richiedente deve dimostrare che, avendo riguardo ad alla particolare natura di suo o la sua azione di reclamo, lui o lei era in un modo pertinente situazione simile ad altri trattati differentemente (vedere Clift c. il Regno Unito, n. 7205/07, § 66 13 luglio 2010).
117. Deve essere determinato perciò se i richiedenti sono stati in grado dimostrare che, per fini di pensione, loro sono in un modo pertinente situazione simile a retirees che ha contenuto ufficio alto. I richiedenti ' argomento principale in appoggio della loro asserzione che loro sono in tale situazione era in essenza che era impossibile per disegnare una distinzione valida, per fini di pensione, fra il carattere dei rispettivi lavori dei due gruppi. Comunque, la Corte non è preparata per disegnare conclusioni basate sulla natura degli indubbiamente esigenti e gli importanti compiti compiuta coi richiedenti ed i compiti dei possessori dei posti di alto-classificazione in problema: il Presidente o Vicepresidente della Repubblica della Bulgaria, l'Oratore della Riunione Nazionale, il Primo Ministro, ed i giudici nella Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra). Non è per una corte internazionale per fare dichiarazioni su simile questioni; quelle sono sentenze di politica che sono in principio riservate per le autorità nazionali che hanno legittimazione democratica e diretta e sono messe meglio che una corte internazionale per valutare necessità locali e le condizioni (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hatton ed Altri, citato sopra, § 97). Dovrebbe essere notato in che il collegamento che sia la Corte e la Commissione precedente hanno su un numero di occasioni approvato le differenze che dello strattone di Stati Contraente, per fini di pensione fra servitori civili ed impiegati privati (vedere X c. l'Austria, n. 7624/76, decisione di Commissione di 6 luglio 1977, DR 19, p. 100, a p. 106; K. c. la Germania, n. 11203/84, decisione di Commissione di 5 maggio 1986 non segnalato; la Hesse-rabbia e Rabbia c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 45835/99, 17 maggio 2001; Matheis c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 73711/01, 1 febbraio 2005; ed Ackermann e Fuhrmann, citato sopra). La Corte e la Commissione precedente hanno ammesso anche, benché in contesti diversi, le differenze fra le altre professioni, come avvocati in pratica privata e giudiziale e professioni paragiudiziarie (vedere il der di Van Mussele, citato sopra, § 46), avvocati e noleggiò ragionieri pubblici (vedere Liebscher ed Altri c. l'Austria, n. 25170/94, decisione di Commissione di 12 aprile 1996 non segnalato), ed ingegneri e le altre professioni liberali (vedere Allesch ed Altri c. l'Austria, n. 18168/91, decisione di Commissione di 1 dicembre 1993 non segnalato).
(d) la Conclusione
118. In prospettiva delle considerazioni precedenti, la Corte conclude, che c'è stata nessuna violazione di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letta in concomitanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità il resto delle richieste ammissibile;
2. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 25 ottobre 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Articlo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione separata del Giudice Panova è annessa a questa sentenza.
N.B.
T.L.E.


OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENTE DEL GIUDICE PANOVA
Io convengo con la maggioranza che la copertura di pensioni è una misura che è prevista per con legge ed intraprende un scopo legittimo. Comunque, nella mia prospettiva la restrizione prolungata dei richiedenti il diritto di ' per ricevere il pieno importo delle loro pensioni non è proporzionato allo scopo cercò di essere raggiunto e così non necessario in una società democratica.
Io concordo pienamente prima, che ogni Stato è nella migliore posizione per determinare come assegnare il suo bilancio ed in particolare come organizzare ed assegnare il suo bilancio di previdenza sociale. In che senso, un Stato ha un margine ampio della valutazione per determinare le misure che deve prendere a qualsiasi tempo determinato per realizzare il suo scopo legittimo nella causa a mano, un riorganizzazione della previdenza sociale imposta un bilancio ad un tempo quando l'economia bulgara stava subendo una transizione e quando il sistema di pensione era riorganizzato. Nel 1989 Bulgaria digitò un periodo di transizione da un'economia socialista e centralizzata ad un'economia di mercato. Comunque, che elaborazione non può essere senza fine ed illimitata in tempo -ventidue anni ora passano dal 1989-e non può notificare giustificare limitazioni su cittadini ' diritti sociali perpetuamente. Mentre sino alla fine degli anni novanta, quando sezione 47c delle Pensioni Agisce 1957 era in vigore, potrebbe essere considerato che lo Stato aveva diritto a realizzare il suo scopo legittimo con ricopertura assegna una pensione a per organizzare le pensioni imposti un bilancio, dopo che la restrizione avviò evidentemente divenire sproporzionata perché colpì cittadini i diritti di ' per troppo lungo e perciò in una maniera eccessiva.
In secondo luogo, la misura contestata coi richiedenti, mentre consistendo di una copertura sulle loro pensioni, fu introdotto con paragrafo 6 dei di transizione e disposizioni finali del Social Security Programmi 1999 e è stato in effetto dall'inizio di 2000 al giorno presente. È con natura che un articolo ha limitato in tempo. Prevede per un tempo-limite per la ricopertura di pensioni, ma che tempo-limite continuamente è posticipato. È stato prolungato così lontano su tre occasioni: una volta sino alla fine di 2009, una seconda volta sino alla fine di 2011, e più recentemente sino alla fine di 2013. Non c'è garanzia che alla fine di 2013, quando la copertura è attualmente a causa di scada, la misura provvisoria non sarà prolungata di nuovo. Così, la raccomandazione resa con la Corte Costituzionale in sentenza n. 21 di 1998, che sarebbe desiderabile per la soluzione legislativa e contestata per essere abrogato nel futuro, ha per tredici anni non stato tenuto conto di, nonostante le circostanze sociali ed economiche cambiate. L'esistenza continuata di che misura, originalmente previde come un provvisorio, crea l'incertezza legale per i richiedenti e per altri in una situazione simile. Quel fa la misura-la copertura di pensioni-sproporzionato in relazione al conseguimento di suo altrimenti scopo legittimo.
In terzo luogo, è vero che i richiedenti che ' assegna una pensione a che contributi erano resi sul loro conto con lo Stato, ma quel non può notificare come motivi per la conclusione giunta alla maggioranza in paragrafo 95 della sentenza, vale a dire che lo Stato può cambiare liberamente l'importo delle pensioni che sono dovute ai richiedenti. Lo Stato ha reso e ha continuato a costituire contributi di pensione servitori civili. I richiedenti non sono il gruppo solo di individui che non stavano pagando i loro contributi di pensione loro. Comunque, loro hanno esercitato professioni che comportano un rischio molto alto per la loro vita e l'integrità fisica, e quel è stato ricompensato con rimunerazioni più alte e così con contributi di pensione più alti pagati nel bilancio di previdenza sociale. Anche se il sistema di pensione in Bulgaria è organizzato su base as-you-.go, i contributi di pensione dei richiedenti finanziarono le pensioni di quelli che ritornavano poi in pensionamento. Il riorganizzazione del sistema di pensione deve prendere in considerazione le aspettative legittime di cittadini in relazione al loro pensionamento. Il fine della previdenza sociale è prevedere per rischi che sono il risultato del conseguimento di un'età dopo il quale quelli riguardarono si è aspettato più di essere in grado a lavoro. Nei richiedenti causa di ' che rischio, in prospettiva della natura dei loro lavori era marcatamente più alto. Inoltre, uno non può trascurare il fatto che a causa dei salari più alti che loro stavano ricevendo mentre impiegato i richiedenti stavano pagando tasse più alte che anche andarono nel bilancio dello Stato.
Quarto, i richiedenti che sono concessi alla previdenza sociale nella forma di pensioni ma non ad un particolare importo di pensione, nondimeno aveva un'aspettativa legittima che le loro pensioni sarebbero determinate nello stesso modo come tutte le altre pensioni nel paese e corrisponderebbero così ad un importo prevedibile. I richiedenti che il problema di ' è che le loro pensioni furono esposte in importi determinati in decisioni del Social Security Istituto Nazionale. Loro non hanno ricevuto mai comunque, quegli importi come un risultato di una restrizione provvisoria imposto con la legislatura che è sostenuta così lontano da undici anni. Questo non è di importi che sono stati presi in proporzioni uguali da tutti quelli concessi ad una pensione, ma di importi che sono con legge dovuto e non essendo pagato come un risultato di una restrizione provvisoria. Non si ha contestato che i richiedenti sono fra quelli che hanno per un numero di anni esercitato cattivo e professioni rischio-cariche per le quali probabilmente erano la ragione loro non ingiustificato, e davvero statuto-basato, aspettativa che loro sarebbero concessi a pensioni più alte. Se quegli individui fossero stati consapevoli che nonostante i loro contributi di pensione alti loro non sarebbero mai in grado ricevere il pieno importo delle loro pensioni, loro non avrebbero esercitato probabilmente quelle professioni per molto lungo per preservare la loro salute.
Infine, io non concordo con la conclusione in paragrafo 97 della sentenza che i richiedenti non devono sopportare un calo considerevole ed effettivo nella loro pensione trae profitto perché loro sono stati colpiti con del genere di soffitto di pensione sempre e perché loro rimangono fra i pensionati alto-pagati. I fatti dello show di causa che loro ricevono due o tre volte meno che il pieno importo delle loro pensioni. L'importo di massimo delle loro pensioni è approssimativamente cinque volte più alto del minimo (sociale) pensione in Bulgaria -BGN 136 (equivalente ad EUR 69.54)-quale è ricevuto con persone che sono giunte ad età di pensionamento ma non hanno lavorato mai. In prospettiva della natura dei richiedenti le professioni di ', tale differenza è sproporzionata ed ingiusta. Lo scopo legittimo- la giustizia sociale- non può essere raggiunto se non c'è giustizia per l'individuo. Il problema qui non è privazione di un aumento nell'importo della pensione, ma la privazione dell'importo di base della pensione. In oltre, non si dovrebbe trascurare che la misura che colpisce anche i richiedenti colpisce una proporzione considerevole di pensionati nel paese-approssimativamente un cinquantesimo di loro. È vero che dal 2000 in Bulgaria sono due altre file di pensione: una seconda fila obbligatoria per quelli nato dopo 1 gennaio 1960, ed una terza fila volontaria che consiste di fondi pensioni privati. Comunque, nessuno di quelli schemi è attinente per o disponibile ai richiedenti, perché loro già erano andati in pensione col tempo gli schemi entrarono in esistenza. Loro non hanno perciò nessuno mezzi di garantire un importo di pensione più alto. Quel fa anche la copertura di pensioni più sproporzionato allo scopo perseguito.
Per tutte queste ragioni che io credo che le autorità bulgare hanno infranto il diritto dei richiedenti per ricevere i loro veri importi delle loro pensioni e che questo costituisce una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
1. Sotto il rivalorizzazione della valuta di 5 luglio 1999, un lev bulgaro nuovo (BGN) uguaglia 1,000 vecchi levs bulgari (BGL).

2. Fin da 1998 il cambio fra l'euro ed il lev bulgaro è stato fissato con legge (sezione 29(2) della Banca Nazionale bulgara Atto 1997, e decisione n. 223 della Banca Nazionale bulgara di 31 dicembre 1998). EUR 1 è uguale a BGN 1.95583 (BGL 1,955.83).

3. Fra il 1998 ed il 2003 lo schema di terzo-fila fu governato con la Pensione Assicurazione Volontaria e Supplementare Atto 1998. Nel 2003 le disposizioni attinenti furono incorporate nel Social Security Codice 1999.

4. A gennaio 2000 il minimo salario mensile era BGN 67. Fra febbraio e settembre 2000, era BGN 75. Fra ottobre 2000 e marzo 2001, era BGN 79. Fra aprile e settembre 2001, era BGN 85. Da ottobre 2001 sino alla fine di che anno, era BGN 100. Il reddito di massimo per fini di previdenza sociale durante quelli periodi era rispettivamente così, BGN 670, BGN 750, BGN 790, BGN 850, e BGN 1,000.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.