Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF IWASZKIEWICZ v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 30614/06/2011
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 26/07/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No violation of P1-1
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF IWASZKIEWICZ v. POLAND
(Application no. 30614/06)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
26 July 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Iwaszkiewicz v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 5 July 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 30614/06) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Polish nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 19 July 2006.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by Mr Z. K., a lawyer practising in Zduńska Wola. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicants alleged that the decisions given in their case breached their right to a fair hearing and their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
4. On 4 December 2009 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1947 and 1987 respectively and live in Zapolice.
6. In 1990 the first applicant’s husband and the second applicant’s father, Mr OMISSIS, born in 1929, was granted a retirement pension under a regular retirement pension scheme and on the strength of premiums which he had been paying into the centralised social insurance fund. In 1997 he requested the Zduńska Wola Social Insurance Authority (Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych) to grant him a disability pension, together with so-called “veteran status” (“uprawnienia kombatanckie” - see paragraphs 17 to 21 below) since from 1940 to 1946 he had been imprisoned, together with his parents, in a labour camp in Siberia in the Soviet Union. Subsequently, Mr OMISSIS underwent a medical examination.
7. On 17 December 1997 the Zduńska Wola Social Insurance Authority conferred veteran status on the applicant which entitled him to a veteran’s disability pension. It found, on the basis of the results of his medical examination, that his ill-health had been caused by his deportation and imprisonment by the Soviet authorities in the 1940s.
8. Apparently in 2001 and 2002 doubts arose as to the accuracy of certain medical examinations, on the basis of which social insurance benefits had been granted by the Zduńska Wola Social Insurance Authority. By a letter of 24 October 2002 the Sieradz Regional Prosecutor requested that Authority to review, under section 114 of the Law of 17 December 1998 on retirement and disability pensions (ustawa o emeryturach i rentach z systemu ubezpieczeń społecznych - see paragraph 22 below), the final decisions issued in 115 disability pension cases. The request referred to a pending investigation in the case of a certain J.S. and other doctors who had been assessing claimants’ health for the purposes of social insurance proceedings. The prosecutor submitted that it was highly likely that in those cases serious irregularities concerning the assessment of the claimants’ eligibility for social insurance benefits had occurred. The list of cases attached to that request included Mr OMISSIS’s case. No allegation was ever made that the 1997 decision had been obtained by Mr OMISSIS in a fraudulent manner.
9. In December 2002 Mr OMISSIS was invited to undergo a fresh medical examination. After that examination the Zduńska Wola Social Insurance Authority, by a decision of 5 March 2003, withdrew his veteran’s disability pension, referring to the doctors’ conclusions. They found that there had been no causal link between his deportation by the Soviet authorities and the health problems from which he suffered. From that date onwards his status was again covered by the regular social insurance scheme and he was entitled to an ordinary disability pension.
He appealed against that decision to the Łódź Regional Court.
10. During the ensuing judicial proceedings, Mr OMISSIS was examined on 10 June 2003 by a cardiologist and on 24 June 2003 by a psychiatrist. According to their opinions, he suffered from numerous serious ailments and he was completely unable to work. However, they concurred that his ailments had been caused by his age and not by his earlier deportation and imprisonment.
11. On 27 November 2003 Mr OMISSIS died. The applicants joined the proceedings as his legal successors under the provisions of domestic law which expressly allowed them to seek payment of his pension covering the period from the date of the contested decision until the plaintiff’s death, and which gave them locus standi in the proceedings (see paragraph 26 below). The applicants sought payment of Mr OMISSIS’s veteran’s disability pension from 5 March 2003 until his death on 27 November 2003 and challenged the decision divesting him of his veteran’s status and of his veteran’s disability pension.
12. On 6 August 2004 the Łódź Regional Court dismissed their appeal against the decision of 5 March 2003. The court had regard to the medical experts’ opinions and findings. It held that in the absence of a causal link between Mr OMISSIS’s deportation in the 1940s and his medical condition in 2002, he did not meet the requirements for veteran’s status laid down in section 12 (3) of the Law of 24 January 1991 on Veterans and Victims of War and Post-War Persecutions (Ustawa o kombatantach oraz niektórych osobach będących ofiarami represji wojennych i okresu powojennego - the (“the 1991 Law,” see paragraph 18 below).
13. The applicants appealed. They submitted that the first-instance judgment was in breach of the applicable laws, in that the court had wrongly and illogically accepted that a medical assessment finding a causal link between the claimant’s health and his or her suffering in the past, on the strength of which veteran’s status and a veteran’s disability pension had been granted, could later be reversed. The existence of a causal link was not something that could reasonably change over time.
14. Furthermore, Mr OMISSIS had considerably aged between 1997 and 2002 and his health had seriously deteriorated throughout that time. The medical examination carried out in 2002 could not therefore assess the link between the deportation and his health at the time when he applied for veteran’s status, the existence of such a link being decisive for entitlement to that status to arise. The applicants argued that there was no legal basis on which to challenge the medical assessment made during the examination of Mr OMISSIS’s original request for a veteran’s pension in 1997, as this pension had been granted by way of a final decision of the Social Insurance Authority. The contested decision of 5 March 2003 had also violated the principle that acquired rights should not be taken away.
15. On 10 May 2005 the Łódź Court of Appeal dismissed the applicants’ appeal, sharing the conclusions of the lower court.
16. On 28 March 2006 the Supreme Court refused to entertain the applicants’ cassation appeal. On 10 April 2006 the applicants requested the court to serve on them the written grounds for that refusal, to no avail.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Constitution
17. Article 2 of the Constitution of Poland, which entered into force on 17 October 1997, reads:
“The Republic of Poland shall be a democratic State ruled by law and implementing the principles of social justice.”
B. Veteran status of persons deported to the Soviet Union during the Second World War and afterwards
18. Under the provisions of the Law of 24 January 1991 on Veterans and Victims of War and Post-War Persecutions (Ustawa o kombatantach oraz niektórych osobach będących ofiarami represji wojennych i okresu powojennego - “the 1991 Law”), veterans are entitled to privileged status in comparison with other employees or retired persons. This status includes, for example, a lower age of retirement and various financial benefits paid in addition to the normal pension calculated in accordance with the rules of the general social insurance system. In particular, an especially favourable method for calculating periods of employment is used in respect of veterans.
19. At the time when the applicant was divested of his “veteran status”, a retired veteran was, inter alia, entitled to a “veteran’s benefit” equal to 10% of the average monthly salary in the public sector; a fare discount of 50% on travel by municipal transport, rail and public long-distance buses; a special allowance covering 50% of such household expenses as electricity, gas and heating; and a discount of 50% on motor-vehicle insurance.
20. Section 4 (3) (b) of the 1991 Law provides that its provisions also apply to persons who have been subjected to forced deportation to the Soviet Union during the Second World War and afterwards.
21. Under section 12 (1) of the 1991 Law, veterans who have acquired the status of war or military invalids (that is to say, who have been declared unfit for work and whose ailments have been caused by, inter alia, deportation in conditions provided for by section 4 (3) (b) of the 1991 Law) are entitled to receive benefits defined in the 1974 Law on War and Military Invalids (ustawa o zaopatrzeniu inwalidów wojennych lub wojskowych – “the 1974 Law”) including, in particular, veteran’s disability pension (renta inwalidy wojennego). Pursuant to section 12 (2) of the 1991 Law, certain family members, including widows and widowers aged over fifty, those who are invalids themselves and those who raise children under sixteen years of age, and also certain categories of children, are entitled to certain benefits provided for by the 1974 Law. In particular, the 1974 Law provides that they are entitled to family benefit (renta rodzinna). At the material time, if there were two family members eligible for that benefit, it was to be paid to them in the amount of 80% of a basic amount of 1,175 Polish złotys (PLN).
22. Under section 26 of the 1991 Law, a person divested of veteran’s status retains an entitlement to his or her pension calculated under the rules applicable to the general social insurance scheme.
C. Limitations on the reopening of proceedings concerning final decisions on social insurance benefits
23. Section 114 of the Law of 17 December 1998 on retirement and disability pensions paid from the Social Insurance Fund (ustawa o emeryturach i rentach z systemu ubezpieczeń społecznych – “the 1998 Law”), applicable from 1 January 1999 until 1 July 2004, read:
“The right to benefits or the amount of benefits will be reassessed upon application by the person concerned, or ex officio, if, after the validation of the decision concerning benefits, new evidence is submitted or circumstances which had existed before issuing the decision and which have an impact on the right to benefits or on their amount are discovered.”
24. The Katowice Court of Appeal, in a judgment of 30 May 2001 (II AUa 2508/00), held that the provisions of the social insurance legislation, in particular section 114 of the 1998 Law, allowed for the reopening of proceedings terminated by a final decision awarding a benefit only where new evidence or circumstances pre-existing prior to that decision came to light after that decision had become final.
25. The same court, in a judgment of 10 July 2003 (III AUa 1512/03), held that the legal impossibility of applying section 114 in situations where benefits had been awarded, despite the eligibility conditions not having been satisfied, would have been tantamount to endorsing decisions issued in manifest breach of substantive law.
26. The Supreme Court held on 8 July 2005 (I UK 11/05) that in the context of social insurance proceedings the principle of res judicata operated differently than in the context of judicial decisions in civil cases, in a manner which limited its practical significance. Judicial decisions given in such proceedings established legal relationships between the insured person and the insurance system on the basis of the situation existing when such decisions were given. New developments, relevant to the question of compliance with the eligibility requirements, could justify changes in these legal relationships.
D. Status of next-of-kin in proceedings concerning social insurance benefits after a claimant’s death
27. The Law of 13 October 1998 on the social insurance system (Ustawa o systemie ubezpieczeń społecznych), in its section 136, provides that if a person entitled to receive social insurance benefits provided for by that law dies, the benefits due until the date of his or her death are to be paid to his or her spouse and children living in the same household.
28. It further provides that the affected spouse and children have a right to participate in the proceedings concerning eligibility for social insurance benefits if the claimant died whilst they are pending.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
29. The applicants complained that their respective husband and father had been divested of his veteran’s disability pension. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
30. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ arguments
31. The applicants submitted that the impugned decisions had breached Mr OMISSIS and their own rights guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that his entitlement to his veteran’s disability pension had been discontinued. This breached the principle that acquired rights should not be taken away.
32. The applicants argued that their legal predecessor had been deprived of the rights originating in a final decision of the Social Security Board which granted him the veteran’s status. This reversal had been effected not because any circumstances had come to light, pre-existing that decision, given in 1997, which might have justified the taking away of his special rights. It had been done merely because the authorities found it expedient to re-examine the issue of the causal link between his health and his deportation to the Soviet labour camp. The applicants submitted that the 1997 decision had been final and should therefore have remained intact. Furthermore, the existence of the causal link was of an objective character. If it was found to exist in 1997, there were no reasonable grounds on which to consider that it had ceased to exist in 2002, when the applicant was examined by the doctors again and when his condition had considerably deteriorated since 1997.
33. The Government argued that in the Polish legal system the principle of a citizen’s confidence in the State was based on the principle of legal certainty enshrined, according to the case-law of the Constitutional Court, in Article 2 of the Constitution. The principle of legal certainty presupposed that legal rules had to be clear and precise so as to make it possible for citizens to understand what their rights and obligations were and to foresee the legal consequences of their conduct. They had to have certainty that the legislature would not change the existing regulations in an arbitrary manner. However, legal security and certainty were not absolute values.
34. Under the case-law of the Polish courts, the principle of legal certainty did not apply with the same force to decisions given by the Social Insurance Authority as to final judicial decisions. The final character of the former had been described by some courts as “relative validity”. Furthermore, section 114 of the Law on retirement and disability pensions (see paragraph 23 above) allowed for final decisions conferring social insurance entitlements to be verified, in proceedings instituted by the authorities of their own motion, in certain narrowly defined situations. Such re-examination could, in some instances, be to the benefit of persons who had been wrongly refused certain entitlements.
35. In the present case the medical condition of the applicants’ respective husband and father had been reassessed at the request of the prosecuting authorities, with reference being made to certain decisions that had been obtained in a fraudulent manner. Neither the recipient of the pension nor the applicants had challenged this request.
36. Under the Polish system, claimants seeking the payment of social insurance benefits had to meet the applicable conditions. The Court had accepted in its case-law that in certain circumstances social insurance benefits could be reduced. It was therefore permissible to take measures in order to reassess the medical condition of persons in receipt of disability pensions, provided that such reassessment was in conformity with the law and attended by sufficient procedural guarantees. In the applicants’ case the decision of the Social Insurance Authority had been reviewed by the courts. There was no indication that any procedural irregularities had occurred during these proceedings.
37. The Government submitted that the judgments of the domestic courts given in the applicants’ case were based on well-established and extensive case-law. The courts had conducted an extensive examination of the evidence in the case and had explained in detail their decisions to uphold the assessment of the Social Insurance Authority. It was not the task of the Court to take the place of the domestic courts, as it was in the first place for them to interpret domestic law (Tejedor García v. Spain, 16 December 1997, § 31, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VIII). Accordingly, the interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions complained of in the present case was prescribed by law.
38. They further submitted that it was natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one and that the Court should respect the legislature’s judgment as to what was “in the public interest” unless that judgment was manifestly without reasonable foundation (they referred to mutatis mutandis, The former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 87, ECHR 2000-XII).
39. In the present case the interference complained of had the aim of protecting the financial stability of the social insurance system and ensuring that it was not threatened by subsidising pensions that were not legitimate or that had been obtained as a result of errors, negligence or other irregular situations. If as a result of such errors, committed by the social insurance authorities, a person was allowed to continue receiving benefits to which he or she was not eligible as a matter of law, that person could not validly invoke the rule of citizens’ confidence in the State referred to above (see paragraph 32 above). The protection of acquired rights did not include rights acquired in an unfair manner.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
40. The Court first reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains three distinct rules. They have been described as follows (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98, and also Belvedere Alberghiera S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 31524/96, § 51, ECHR 2000-VI):
“The first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest ... The three rules are not, however, ‘distinct’ in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule.”
41. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention does not guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX, and Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X). Where an individual has an assertable right under domestic law to a contributory social insurance pension, such a benefit should be regarded as a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, ECHR 2005-X). Where the amount of a benefit is reduced or discontinued, this may constitute an interference with possessions which requires justification (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40, and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009).
42. An essential condition for an interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful. The rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
43. A lawful interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see, among many other authorities, Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 52). The notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws concerning social insurance benefits will commonly involve consideration of economic and social issues. The Court finds it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one and will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, mutatis mutandis, The former King of Greece and Others, cited above, § 87 and Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 59, 8 December 2009).
44. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81-94, ECHR 2005-VI). Consequently, an interference must achieve a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The requisite fair balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52).
(b) Application of the above principles in the present case
45. In the present case Mr OMISSIS was entitled, on the basis of the decision of the Social Insurance Authority given on 17 December 1997, to a veteran’s disability pension, with special privileges attached to it. Pursuant to the decision of the same Authority given on 5 March 2003, he was divested of that status and of the benefits linked thereto. After Mr OMISSIS’s death on 27 November 2003, the applicants were entitled as a matter of law to pursue the proceedings on their own behalf and to seek payment of the pension due for the period between the date of the contested decision and his death.
46. The Court further notes that the outcome of the proceedings referred to above had a bearing on the applicants’ own situation as it was decisive for the existence of their own claim to benefits due to families of persons who had acquired the status of war invalids within the meaning of the 1974 Law on War and Military Invalids and the 1991 Law on Veterans and Victims of War (see paragraph 22 above). It follows that in the circumstances of the case considered as a whole, the Court finds that the applicants may be regarded as having a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
As a result of the decisions complained of the applicants were divested of their social insurance entitlements. Hence, the decisions given in the judicial proceedings, taken together, amounted to an interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Wieczorek v. Poland, cited above, § 61).
47. The Court must next determine whether the interference was lawful. The measure complained of was based on section 114 of the 1998 Law, which at the relevant time provided that the right to benefits awarded by final decisions could in certain circumstances be reassessed by the authorities of their own motion (see paragraph 23 above). The Court, in deference to the findings of the domestic courts, has already accepted that the reopening of proceedings on the basis of that provision, following the discovery of the welfare authority’s own mistake in its original assessment of the eligibility for a benefit, was provided for by law (see Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, §§ 55-56, 15 September 2009). It sees no grounds on which to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
48. The Court must next determine whether the interference pursued a legitimate aim, that is, whether it was “in the public interest”. The Court considers that its aim was to protect the financial stability of the social insurance system and to ensure that it was not threatened by the subsidising of pensions of recipients who had acquired them on the basis of superficial, erroneous or fraudulently obtained medical assessments (see Moskal v. Poland, cited above, §§ 61-63 and Wieczorek v. Poland, cited above, § 63).
49. Lastly, the Court is called upon to ascertain whether the interference imposed an excessive individual burden on the applicants. In considering whether this is the case, the Court must have regard to the particular context in which the issue arises in the present case, namely that of a social security scheme. Such schemes are an expression of a society’s solidarity with its vulnerable members (see Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI). The Court’s approach to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 should reflect the reality of the way in which welfare provision is currently organised within the member States of the Council of Europe. It is clear that within those States, and within most individual States, there exists a wide range of social security benefits designed to confer entitlements which arise as of right. Benefits are funded in a large variety of ways: some are paid for by contributions to a specific fund; some depend on a claimant’s contribution record; many are paid for out of general taxation on the basis of a statutorily defined status. In the modern, democratic State, many individuals are, for all or part of their lives, completely dependent for survival on social security and welfare benefits. Many domestic legal systems recognise that such individuals require a degree of certainty and security, and provide for benefits to be paid - subject to the fulfilment of the conditions of eligibility – as of right (see Stec and Others, cited above). Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 places no restriction on the Contracting Parties’ freedom to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under social security schemes (see Stec and Others, cited above).
50. The Court observes that entitlement to a veteran’s disability pension is based essentially on the claimant’s inability to continue paid employment on the grounds of ill-health caused by his or her imprisonment or persecution in the past by the communist, Soviet or Nazi authorities in conditions defined in the 1991 Law (see paragraph 21 above). It is paid from a single social insurance fund financed by various compulsory contributions from employees and employers and managed by the Social Insurance Authority. It operates on a n cui basis. Having regard to the fact that that fund is based on the principle of solidarity, the Court cannot accept that such a pension should at all times remain unaltered once it has been granted by way of a final decision given by the Social Insurance Authority.
51. There is no authority in the Court’s case-law for so categorical a statement; in actual fact, the Court has accepted the possibility of reductions in social security entitlements in certain circumstances (see, as a recent authority, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 45, with further case-law references; see also Hoogendijk v. the Netherlands, (dec.), no. 58641/00, 6 January 2005; Wieczorek v. Poland, cited above, § 67; and Rasmussen v. Poland, cited above, § 71). It is permissible for States to take measures to reassess the medical condition of persons receiving disability pensions with a view to verifying whether they continue to meet the relevant eligibility requirements, provided that such reassessment is in conformity with the law and attended by sufficient procedural guarantees. Indeed, had entitlements to disability pensions been maintained regardless of recipients’ eligibility, it would have been unfair on persons contributing to the social insurance system, in particular those denied benefits as they did not meet the relevant requirements. In more general terms, it would also sanction an improper allocation of public funds, in disregard of the objectives that disability pensions were intended to meet and in breach of the principle of solidarity.
52. The Court notes that the applicants’ respective husband and father was found in 1997 to meet the legal requirements for veteran status on the basis of his general medical condition, and was declared to satisfy the conditions required for disability status. It was also established at that time that his condition had been caused by his six-year period of imprisonment in a Soviet labour camp. Subsequently, in 2002, he was examined again because the Social Insurance Authority had been informed by the local prosecutors that investigations had given rise to suspicions that certain medical certificates issued in the region serving as the basis for the acquisition of disability pensions had been issued fraudulently. Mr OMISSIS’s condition was consequently re-examined. It was found, contrary to the original medical assessment, that there had been no causal link between his imprisonment in the 1940s by the Soviet authorities and his medical condition.
53. The Court does not consider that such a decision aimed at the re-examination of persons who had been examined in the past for the purposes of granting social insurance benefits, by doctors in respect of whom there was a suspicion of a lack of diligence was arbitrary or otherwise unreasonable. It notes that the prosecuting authorities expressed suspicions of large-scale fraud in the context of the investigation into many cases decided by the Zduńska Wola Social Insurance Authority. Hence, the decision to re-assess certain benefits cannot be said to be without a reasonable foundation.
54. The Court further notes that the veteran’s disability pension was not granted to the applicant by a final judicial decision, but by a decision given by the Social Insurance Authority. The Court has already held that the principle of legal certainty applies to a final legal situation, irrespective of whether it was brought about by a judicial act or an administrative act or, as in the instant case, a social insurance decision which, on the face of it, is final in its effects (see Moskal v. Poland, cited above, § 82). However, in its assessment of the case the Court cannot overlook the position of the Polish Supreme Court, which held that in the context of social insurance proceedings, the principle of res judicata operated differently from in the context of final judicial decisions in civil cases. The Court considers this position to be compatible with the character and purposes of social insurance proceedings and substantive law, which is intended to be sufficiently flexible to address genuine needs of insured persons, needs which can evolve and change over time.
55. The Court is furthermore of the view that it would upset any fair balance if, having discovered their mistake, the authorities were precluded from ever redressing its effects and were required to perpetuate the error by continuing to pay a pension which had been granted on the basis of erroneous grounds.
56. The Court further observes that the Social Insurance Authority invited Mr OMISSIS to undergo a fresh medical examination for the purpose of re-assessment of his situation (see paragraph 9 above). Subsequently, in the context of judicial proceedings he was examined by two doctors (see paragraph 10 above). Hence, in the present case the challenged decision to take away his veteran’s status was not based merely on a new assessment of the evidence accompanying the original application for a pension, but on updated medical evidence taken specifically for the purposes of the re-examination of the applicant’s entitlement to the veteran’s status.
57. Furthermore, in the present case it has not been argued or shown that the applicants’ means of subsistence were at stake. The circumstances of the case therefore fundamentally differ from those examined by the Court in another case against Poland where the applicant was, as a result of the discontinuance of her benefit, faced practically from one day to the next with the total loss of her early retirement pension, which constituted her sole source of income (compare and contrast Moskal, cited above, § 74). In the present case it has not been argued, let alone shown, that the amounts and benefits concerned in the proceedings were the applicants’ sole source of income. Moreover, the Court attaches importance to the fact that the social insurance benefits enjoyed by Mr OMISSIS originated from a privileged status which has been, and still is, perceived as a special honour (see Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V and Skórkiewicz v. Poland (dec.), no. 39860/98, 1 June 1999). Hence, it cannot be said that in the circumstances of this case the applicants were totally divested of their only means of subsistence (compare and contrast Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 44, and the case-law cited therein).
58. The Court considers that in its assessment of the proportionality of the interference complained of it cannot be overlooked that the applicants were not the original recipients of the veteran’s pension.
59. The Court further notes that the social insurance authorities, when delivering their decision of 5 March 2003, divested Mr OMISSIS of his veteran status, but held that from that date on he was entitled to an ordinary disability pension. Thus, in so far as the applicants complained about his situation resulting from this decision, at no time was he left without provision from the social insurance system (compare and contrast Moskal, cited above, § 75, where the applicant’s right to a new benefit was recognised only after three years). Nor was it argued that the applicants themselves were, as a result of the contested decisions, left without provision.
60. The Court observes that at no time was Mr OMISSIS obliged to pay back any amounts which he had received prior to the date when he was found to no longer meet the applicable legal requirements. Nor were the applicants required to pay back any amounts which their respective late husband and father had received (see Chroust v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 4295/03, 20 November 2006). Moreover, the domestic law did not create any assumption that persons who had been found, after a certain lapse of time, not to satisfy the requirements for veteran’s disability pension had in fact acquired such by acting fraudulently or in a manner open to criticism, despite the fact that the prosecuting authorities had instituted an investigation in respect of charges of bribery concerning certain doctors working for the Social Insurance Authority. Nor was such a suggestion made in the proceedings in relation to the applicants themselves, or to their respective late husband and father.
61. The Court observes that the decisions of the Social Insurance Authority were subject to judicial review before the special social insurance courts at two levels, attended by full procedural guarantees. There is no indication that during the proceedings Mr OMISSIS or the applicants themselves were unable to present their arguments to the courts.
62. Having regard to the circumstances of the case seen as a whole, the Court concludes that a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individuals’ fundamental rights and that the burden on the applicants was neither disproportionate nor excessive.
63. There has therefore been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
64. The applicants also complained that the ex-officio re-opening of the social security proceedings, which had resulted in the quashing of the final decision granting their legal predecessor a right to a pension, was in breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
65. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention reads, as relevant, as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
66. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
67. The Government submitted that the legal character of decisions delivered by the Social Insurance Authority had been analysed in detail by the Polish courts. The Supreme Court had held that the principle of res judicata in the sphere of social insurance had a special quality (see paragraph 26 above).
68. Consequently, the Government argued, the social insurance authorities had to have the possibility of challenging final decisions, provided by section 114 of the 1998 Law (see paragraph 23 above). This provision carefully circumscribed the situations in which the re-examination of previously issued decisions would be possible. Hence, the margin of appreciation of the administrative authorities in regard to the reopening of proceedings aimed at the verification of certain decisions was limited in two ways: firstly, by the existence of provisions which offered very limited scope for the reopening of proceedings, and secondly, by the fact that an appeal to a court was available to the concerned parties.
69. The Court is of the opinion that this complaint is essentially a restatement of the complaint examined above under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
70. Having regard to its finding in relation to that provision, in particular that it was open to the authorities to reassess Mr OMISSIS’s entitlement to a veteran’s pension and that such reassessment was not precluded by the principle of legal certainty (see paragraphs 53-59 above), the Court considers that the applicants’ complaint under Article 6 § 1 does not require a separate examination on the merits.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
71. Lastly, the applicants complained under Article 3 of the Convention that Mr OMISSIS, had been subjected to inhuman treatment since the domestic authorities had deprived him of his veteran’s pension. They further complained that the domestic courts had delivered a decision concerning another person in a comparable situation, whose special rights under the veteran status provisions, by contrast, had ultimately been upheld. The applicants complained under Article 13 of the Convention that they had been deprived of an effective remedy in that the domestic courts had dismissed all their appeals. They further complained under Article 2 of Protocol No. 1 that the courts had infringed the second applicant’s right to education by depriving her of an additional source of income.
72. In the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols.
73. It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the decisions pertaining to Mr OMISSIS’s veteran’s disability status admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 6 § 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 26 July 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione di P1-1
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA IWASZKIEWICZ C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 30614/06)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
26 luglio 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Iwaszkiewicz c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dwi Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki, Ljiljana Mijović, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato 5 luglio 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 30614/06) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini polacchi, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), il 19 luglio 2006.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stato accordato il patrocinio gratuito furono rappresentati dal Sig. Z. K., un avvocato che pratica a Zduńska Wola. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. I richiedenti addussero che le decisioni date nella loro causa violarono il loro diritto ad un'udienza corretta ed il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
4. Il 4 dicembre 2009 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1947 e 1987 e vivono a Zapolice.
6. Nel 1990 al marito della prima richiedente ed il padre del secondo richiedente, il Sig. OMISSIS nato nel 1929, fu accordata una pensione di pensionamento sotto uno schema di pensione di pensionamento regolare e sulla forza di premi che lui stava pagando nel finanziamento di previdenza sociale centralizzato. Nel 1997 lui richiese all’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale di Zduńska Wola (Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych) di accordargli una pensione di invalidità, insieme con il così definito “status di veterano” (“uprawnienia kombatanckie” - vedere paragrafi 17 a 21 sotto) poiché dal 1940 al 1946 egli era imprigionato, insieme coi suoi genitori, in un campo di lavori forzati in Siberia nell'Unione sovietica. Successivamente, il Sig. OMISSIS subì un esame medico.
7. Il 17 dicembre 1997 l’ Autorità di Previdenza Sociale di Zduńska Wola conferì lo status di veterano al richiedente dandogli un titolo alla pensione di invalidità di veterano. Trovò, sulla base dei risultati del suo esame medico che il suo cattivo stato salute era stato causato dalla sua deportazione e dalla reclusione da parte delle autorità sovietiche negli anni quaranta.
8. Apparentemente nel 2001 e 2002 sorsero dubbi in merito all'accuratezza di certi esami medici, sulla base della quale i benefici di previdenza sociali erano stati accordati dall’ Autorità di Previdenza Sociale di Zduńska Wola. Con una lettera del 24 ottobre 2002 il Procuratore Regionale di Sieradz ha richiesto che questa Autorità facesse una riesame, sotto la sezione 114 della Legge del 17 dicembre 1998 sulle pensioni di pensionamento e d’invalidità (ustawa o emeryturach i rentach z systemu ubezpieczeń społecznych - vedere paragrafo 22 sotto), delle decisioni definitive emesse in 115 cause di pensione di invalidità. La richiesta faceva riferimento ad un'indagine pendente nella causa di un certo J.S. e di altri dottori che stavano valutando la salute dei rivendicatori ai fini di procedimenti di previdenza sociale. Il procuratore presentò che era estremamente probabile che in quelle cause si erano verificate delle irregolarità serie riguardo alla valutazione dell'eleggibilità dei rivendicatori ai benefici di previdenza sociali. La lista delle cause allegata a questa richiesta includeva la causa del Sig. OMISSS. Non fu mai fatta nessuna dichiarazione che la decisione del 1997 era stata ottenuta dal Sig. OMISSIS in modo fraudolento.
9. Nel dicembre 2002 il Sig. OMISSIS fu invitato a sottoporsi ad un nuovo esame medico. Dopo questo esame l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale di Zduńska Wola, con una decisione del 5 marzo 2003 ritirò la pensione di invalidità del suo veterano, riferendosi alle conclusioni dei dottori le conclusioni. Loro trovarono che non c'era stato collegamento causale fra la sua deportazione da parte delle autorità sovietiche ed i problemi di salute che subì. Da questo momento in poi il suo status fu coperto di nuovo dal piano assicurativo sociale regolare e gli fu concessa una pensione di invalidità ordinaria.
Lui fece appello contro questa decisione presso la Corte Regionale di Ł ódź.
10. Durante i procedimenti successivi giudiziali, il Sig. OMISSIS fu esaminato il 10 giugno 2003 da un cardiologo e il 24 giugno 2003 da uno psichiatra. Secondo le loro opinioni, lui soffriva di numerose indisposizioni gravi ed era completamente incapace di lavorare. Comunque, loro concordarono che le sue indisposizioni erano state causate dalla sua età e non dalla sua precedente deportazione e reclusione.
11. Il 27 novembre 2003 il Sig. OMISSIS morì. I richiedenti si unirono ai procedimenti come suoi successori legali sotto le disposizioni del diritto nazionale che permetteva loro espressamente di chiedere il pagamento della sua pensione che copriva il periodo dalla data della decisione contestata sino alla morte del querelante, e che dava loro locus standi nei procedimenti (vedere paragrafo 26 sotto). I richiedenti chiesero il pagamento della pensione di invalidità di veterano del Sig. OMISSIS dal 5 marzo 2003 sino alla sua morte il 27 novembre 2003 ed impugnarono la decisione che lo spossessava del suo status di veterano e della sua pensione di invalidità di veterano.
12. Il 6 agosto 2004 la Corte Regionale di Ł ódź respinse il loro ricorso contro la decisione del 5 marzo 2003. La corte aveva avuto riguardo delle opinioni e costatazioni degli esperti medici. Sostenne che in assenza di un collegamento causale fra la deportazione del Sig. OMISSIS negli anni quaranta e la sua condizione medica nel 2002, lui non soddisfaceva i requisiti per lo status di veterano stabiliti nella sezione 12 (3) della Legge del 24 gennaio 1991 sui Veterani e le Vittime di Guerra e di Persecuzioni Dopoguerra (Ustawa o kombatantach oraz niektórych osobach będących ofiarami represji wojennych powojennego di okresu dei - the (“la Legge del 1991,” vedere paragrafo 18 sotto).
13. I richiedenti fecero appello. Loro presentarono che la sentenza di prima - istanza era in violazione delle leggi applicabili, in quanto la corte aveva accettato erroneamente ed illogicamente che una valutazione medica che trova un collegamento causale fra la salute del rivendicatore e la sua sofferenza del passato, sulla base di cui lo status di veterano e la pensione di invalidità di veterano era stata accordata, avrebbe potuto essere revocata più tardi. L'esistenza di un collegamento causale non era qualche cosa che avrebbe potuto cambiare ragionevolmente col tempo.
14. Il Sig. OMISSIS era invecchiato notevolmente inoltre, fra il 1997 e il 2002 e la sua salute si era seriamente deteriorata in tutto quel tempo. L'esame medico eseguito nel 2002 non poteva valutare perciò il collegamento fra la deportazione e la sua salute al tempo in cui lui fece domanda per lo status di veterano, l'esistenza di tale collegamento essendo decisivo per far insorgere il diritto a quello status. I richiedenti dibatterono che non c'era nessuna base legale sulla quale impugnare la valutazione medica fatta durante l'esame della richiesta originale del Sig. OMISSIS della pensione di veterano nel 1997, siccome questa pensione era stata accordata tramite una decisione definitiva dell' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. La decisione contestata del 5 marzo 2003 aveva violato anche il principio per cui i diritti acquisiti non dovrebbero essere portati via.
15. Il 10 maggio 2005 la Corte d'appellodi Ł ódź respinse il ricorso dei richiedenti, condividendo le conclusioni della corte inferiore.
16. Il 28 marzo 2006 la Corte Suprema rifiutò di accogliere il ricorso in cassazione dei richiedenti. Il 10 aprile 2006 i richiedenti richiesero alla corte di notificare loro per iscritto per questo rifiuto, inutilmente.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. La Costituzione
17. L’Articolo 2 della Costituzione della Polonia che entrò in vigore il 17 ottobre 1997 recita:
“La Repubblica della Polonia sarà uno Stato democratico governato dalla legge ed implementando i principi della giustizia sociale.”
B. Status di Veterano delle persone deportate in Unione sovietica durante la Seconda Mondo Guerra e dopo
18. Sotto le disposizioni della legge del 24 gennaio 1991 sui Veterani e le Vittime di Guerra e delle Persecuzioni Dopoguerra (Ustawa o kombatantach oraz niektórych osobach będących ofiarami represji wojennych i okresu powojennego - “la Legge del 1991”),ai veterani viene concesso uno status privilegiato rispetto agli altri impiegati o persone pensionate. Questo status include, per esempio, un'età più bassa di pensionamento ed i vari benefici finanziari pagati oltre alla pensione normale calcolata in conformità con le norme del sistema generale di previdenza sociale . In particolare, un metodo particolarmente favorevole per calcolare i periodi di lavoro viene usato a riguardo dei veterani.
19. Al tempo in cui il richiedente fu spossessato di suo “status di veterano”, ad un veterano pensionato veniva, inter alia, concesso un “beneficio di veterano” uguale al 10% del salario mensile medio nel settore pubblico; un sconto di tariffa del 50% sui viaggi con trasporto municipale, ferrovia e autobus pubblici interurbani; una gratifica extra pari al 50% di spese di famiglia come l’elettricità, la benzina e il riscaldamento; ed un sconto del 50% sull’assicurazione dei veicoli a motore.
20. La Sezione 4 (3) (b) della Legge del 1991 prevede che le sue disposizioni si applicano anche a persone che sono state sottoposte alla deportazione forzata in Unione sovietica durante la Seconda Mondo Guerra e dopo.
21. Sotto la sezione 12 (1) della Legge del 1991, ai veterani che hanno acquisito lo status di invalidi di guerra o militari (cioè dire che è stato dichiarato disadatto per il lavoro e le cui indisposizioni sono state causate , inter alia, dalla deportazione in condizioni previste dalla sezione 4 (3) (b) della Legge del 1991) viene permesso di ricevere benefici definiti nella Legge del 1974 sugli Invalidi di Guerra e Militare (l'ustawa o zaopatrzeniu inwalidów wojennych lub wojskowych-“la Legge del 1974”) incluso, in particolare, la pensione di invalidità di veterano (wojennego di inwalidy di renta). Facendo seguito alla sezione 12 (2) della Legge del 1991, a certi membri di famiglia, incluso vedove e vedovi dai cinquanta anni in su, quelli che sono invalidi loro stessi e quelli che allevano figli sotto sedici anni, ed anche certe categorie di figli, vengono concessi certi benefici previsti dalla Legge del 1974. In particolare, la Legge del 1974 prevede che venga concesso loro il beneficio di famiglia (renta rodzinna). Al tempo attinente, se c'erano due membri di famiglia eleggibili per questo beneficio, sarebbe stato pagato loro nell'importo dell’ 80% di un importo di base di 1,175 złoty polacchi (PLN).
22. Sotto la sezione 26 della Legge del 1991, una persona spossessata dello status di veterano mantiene un diritto alla sua pensione calcolò sotto le norme applicabili al piano generale di previdenza sociale.
C. Limitazioni sulla riapertura di procedimenti che concernono decisioni definitive su benefici di previdenza sociali
23. La Sezione 114 della Legge del 17 dicembre 1998 sul pensionamento e le pensioni di invalidità pagate dal Fondo di Previdenza Sociale (l'ustawa o emeryturach i rentach z systemu ubezpieczeń społecznych-“la Legge del 1998”), applicabile dal 1 gennaio 1999 sino al 1 luglio 2004, recita:
“Il diritto a benefici o l'importo dei benefici sarà rivalutato su richiesta della persona riguardata, o ex officio, se, dopo la convalidazione della decisione riguardo ai benefici, viene presentata una nuova prova, o se vengono scoperte delle circostanze che erano esistite prima di emettere la decisione e che hanno un impatto sul diritto al benefici o sul loro importo.”
24. La Corte d'appello di Katowice, in una sentenza del 30 maggio 2001 (II AUa 2508/00), sostenne che le disposizioni della legislazione di previdenza sociale, in particolare la sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 lasciavano spazio alla riapertura di procedimenti terminati con una decisione definitiva che assegnava un beneficio solamente dove una prova nuova o delle circostanze preesistenti prima di questa decisione sono venute alla luce dopo che la decisione era divenuta definitiva.
25. La stessa corte, in una sentenza del 10 luglio 2003 (III AUa 1512/03), sostenne che l'impossibilità legale di applicare la sezione 114 in situazioni dove i benefici erano stati assegnati, nonostante le condizioni di eleggibilità non fossero state soddisfatte, sarebbe stata uguale a girare le decisioni emesse in manifesta violazione del diritto sostanziale.
26. La Corte Suprema sostenne l’8 luglio 2005 (I Regno Unito 11/05) che nel contesto di procedimenti di previdenza sociale il principio di res judicata operava differentemente che nel contesto di decisioni giudiziali in giudizi civili, in una maniera che limitava il suo significato pratico. Decisioni giudiziali date in simili procedimenti stabilivano relazioni legali fra la persona assicurata ed il sistema di previdenza sulla base della situazione che esisteva quando simili decisioni furono date. Nuovi sviluppi, attinenti alla questione di ottemperanza coi requisiti di eleggibilità, potrebbero giustificare cambi in queste relazioni legali.
D. Status erede in procedimenti riguardo a benefici di previdenza sociali dopo la morte di un rivendicatore
27. La Legge del 13 ottobre 1998 sul sistema di previdenza sociale (Ustawa o systemie ubezpieczeñ społecznych), nella sua sezione 136, prevede che se una persona a cui è concesso di ricevere benefici di previdenza sociali previsti da questa legge muore, i benefici dovuti sino alla data della sua morte sarà pagata alla sua o al suo consorte e ai figli che vivono nella stessa famiglia.
28. Prevede inoltre che il consorte colpito e figli hanno diritto a partecipare ai procedimenti riguardo all'eleggibilità per i benefici della previdenza sociale se il rivendicatore morisse mentre loro sono pendenti.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DRLL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
29. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro rispettivo marito e padre era stato spossessato della sua pensione di invalidità di veterano. Loro si appellarono all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
30. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
31. I richiedenti presentarono che le decisioni contestate avevano violato i loro diritti e quelli del Sig. OMISSIS garantiti dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in quanto il suo diritto alla pensione di invalidità di veterano era stato terminato. Questo violò il principio per cui i diritti acquisiti non dovrebbe essere portati via.
32. I richiedenti dibatterono che il loro legittimo predecessore era stato privato dei diritti che nascono da una decisione definitiva del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale che gli accordò lo status di veterano. Questa inversione non era stata effettuata perché qualche circostanza era venuta alla luce, preesistendo questa decisione, resa nel 1997, il che avrebbero giustificato la presa dei suoi diritti speciali. Era stato fatta soltanto perché le autorità trovarono conveniente riesaminare il problema del collegamento causale fra la sua salute e la sua deportazione al campo sovietico di lavori forzati. I richiedenti presentarono che la decisione del 1997 era definitiva e avrebbe dovuta rimanere perciò intatta. Inoltre, l'esistenza del collegamento causale era di carattere obiettivo. Fu trovata esistere nel 1997, non c'erano motivi ragionevoli per considerare che sarebbe cessata di esistere nel 2002, quando il richiedente fu esaminato di nuovo dai dottori e quando la sua condizione si stava deteriorando notevolmente dal 1997.
33. Il Governo dibatté che nell'ordinamento giuridico polacco il principio della fiducia di un cittadino nello Stato era basata sul principio della certezza legale custodita, secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale, nell’ Articolo 2 della Costituzione. Il principio della certezza legale presupponeva che le norme legali dovevano essere chiare e precise così da rendere possibile ai cittadini di capire quali erano i loro diritti ed obblighi e prevedere le conseguenze legali della loro condotta. Loro dovevano avere la certezza che la legislatura non avrebbe cambiato le regolamentazioni esistenti in modo arbitrario. Comunque, la sicurezza legale e la certezza non erano valori assoluti.
34. Sotto la giurisprudenza delle corti polacche, il principio della certezza legale non si applicava con la stessa forza a decisioni date dall’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale come a decisioni giudiziali definitive. Il carattere definitivo del precedente era stato descritto dalle corti come “validità relativa.” Inoltre, la sezione 114 della Legge sulle pensioni di pensionamento e d’invalidità (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra) lasciava spazio affinché delle decisioni definitive che conferivano diritti di previdenza sociali venissero verificate, in procedimenti avviati dalle autorità di loro propria istanza in certe situazioni attentamente definite. Simile riesame poteva, in dei casi, essere a beneficio di persone a cui erano stati rifiutati erroneamente certi diritti.
35. Nella presente causa la condizione medica del rispettivo marito e padre dei richiedenti era stata rivalutata su richiesta delle autorità perseguenti , con facendo riferimento a certe decisioni che erano state ottenute in modo fraudolento. Né il destinatario della pensione né i richiedenti avevano impugnato questa richiesta.
36. Sotto il sistema polacco, i rivendicatori che chiedono il pagamento di benefici di previdenza sociali dovevano soddisfare le condizioni applicabili. La Corte aveva accettato nella sua giurisprudenza che in certe circostanze dei benefici di previdenza sociali avrebbero potuto essere ridotti. Era perciò lecito prendere delle misure per revisionare la condizione medica di persone che ricevevano pensioni di invalidità, purché simile rivalutazione fosse in conformità alla legge ed abbinata a sufficienti garanzie procedurali . Nella causa dei richiedenti la decisione dell' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale era stata riesaminata dalle corti. Non c'era indicazione che qualsiasi irregolarità procedurale si fosse verificata durante questi procedimenti.
37. Il Governo presentò che le sentenze delle corti nazionali date nella causa dei richiedenti erano basate sulla sull’ampia giurisprudenza ben consolidata. Le corti avevano condotto un esame esteso delle prove nella causa ed avevano spiegato in dettaglio le loro decisioni per sostenere la valutazione dell' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. Non era il compito della Corte subentrarvi, siccome spettava loro al primo posto interpretare il diritto nazionale (Tejedor García c. Spagna, 16 dicembre 1997, § 31 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VIII). Di conseguenza, l'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà di cui ci si lamenta nella presente causa era prescritto dalla legge.
38. Presentò inoltre che era naturale che il margine di valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche doveva essere ampio e che la Corte doveva rispettare la sentenza della legislatura siccome era “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che questa sentenza non fosse stata manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (fece riferimento a mutatis mutandis, Il Re precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 87 ECHR 2000-XII).
39. Nella presente causa l'interferenza di cui ci si lamenta aveva lo scopo di proteggere la stabilità finanziaria del sistema di previdenza sociale e garantire che non venisse minacciato da pensioni di sussidio che non erano legittime o che erano state ottenute come risultato di errori, di negligenza o altre situazioni irregolari. Se come risultato di simile errori, commessi dalle autorità di previdenza sociale ad una persona veniva permesso di continuare ricevere benefici ai quali lui non aveva diritto come una questione di legge, questa persona non avrebbe potuto invocare validamente la norma della “fiducia dei cittadini” nello Stato a cui si fa riferimento sopra (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra). La protezione edi diritti acquisiti non includeva i diritti acquisiti in una maniera ingiusta.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) principi generali
40. La Corte prima reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 contiene tre articoli distinti. Sono stati descritti come segue (vedere James ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37 Serie A n. 98, ed anche Belvedere Alberghiera S.r.l. c. Italia, n. 31524/96, § 51 ECHR 2000-VI):
“Il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti è concesso, fra le altre cose, il controllo dell'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale... Comunque, i tre articoli non sono ‘' distinti nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari casi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo.”
41. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non garantisce, così come tale nessun diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson c. Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX, e Janković c. Croatia (dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X). Dove un individuo ha un diritto rivendicabile sotto il diritto nazionale ad una pensione di previdenza sociale e contributiva, tale beneficio dovrebbe essere considerato un interesse di proprietà riservato che rientra all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito (dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, ECHR 2005-X). Dove l'importo di un beneficio è ridotto o è cessato, questo può costituire un'interferenza con la proprietà che richiede una giustificazione (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 40, e Rasmussen c. Polonia, n.38886/05, § 71 del 28 aprile 2009).
42. Una condizione essenziale perché un'interferenza dia ritenuto compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale. La preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
43. Un'interferenza legale da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà si può giustificare solamente se serve un interesse pubblico legittimo (o generale). A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio collocate meglio del giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta così alle autorità nazionali fare la valutazione iniziale in merito all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione di misure di garanzia pubbliche che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito (dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 52). La nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è ampia. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi riguardo a benefici di previdenza sociale comporterà comunemente considerazione dei problemi economici e sociali. La Corte trova naturale che il margine di valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio e rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura in merito a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che questa sentenza sia manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Il Re precedente di Grecia ed Altri citata sopra, § 87 e Wieczorek c. Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 59 dell’ 8 dicembre 2009).
44. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che qualsiasi interferenza sia ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo che si cerca di perseguire (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81-94 ECHR 2005-VI). Di conseguenza, un'interferenza deve realizzare un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. L'equilibrio equo richiesto non sarà colpito dove la persona riguardata sopporta un carico individuale ed eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 la Serie Un n. 52).
(b) Applicazione dei principi sopra nella causa presente
45. Nella presente causa al Sig. OMISSIS è stato concesso, sulla base della decisione dell' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale del 17 dicembre 1997, la pensione di invalidità di veterano, con i diritti speciali abbinati a questa. Facendo seguito alla decisione della stessa Autorità del 5 marzo 2003, lui fu spossessato di questo status e dei benefici collegati. Dopo la morte del Sig. OMISSIS il 27 novembre 2003,a i richiedenti fu concesso come una questione di legge di proseguire i procedimenti per loro proprio conto e chiedere il pagamento della pensione dovuta per il periodo fra la data della decisione contestata e la sua morte.
46. La Corte nota inoltre che il risultato dei procedimenti a cui si fa riferimento sopra aveva una portata sulla situazione dei richiedenti siccome era decisivo per l'esistenza della loro propria rivendicazione ai benefici dovuti a famiglie di persone che avevano acquisito lo status di invalidi di guerra all'interno del significato della Legge del 1974 sugli Invalidi di Guerra e Militari e la Legge del 1991 sui Veterani e le Vittime di Guerra (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). Ne segue che nelle circostanze della causa considerate nell'insieme, la Corte trova, che i richiedenti possono essere riguardati come aventi un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Come risultato delle decisioni di cui ci si lamentano i richiedenti furono spossessati dei loro diritti di previdenza sociali. Quindi, le decisioni date nei procedimenti giudiziali, prese insieme corrispose ad un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere Wieczorek c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 61).
47. La Corte deve in seguito determinare se l'interferenza era legale. La misura di cui ci si lamenta era basato sulla sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 che al tempo attinente prevedeva che il diritto a benefici assegnati con decisioni definitive poteva in certe circostanze essere riesaminato dalle autorità di loro propria istanza (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra). La Corte, a riguardo delle sentenze delle corti nazionali ha già accettato che la riapertura di procedimenti sulla base di questa disposizione, in seguito la scoperta del proprio errore dell'autorità di welfare nella sua valutazione originale dell'eleggibilità per un beneficio, era prevista dalla legge (vedere Moskal c. Polonia, n. 10373/05, §§ 55-56 del 15 settembre 2009). Non vede motivi per cui giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa.
48. La Corte deve determinare in seguito se l'interferenza intraprese uno scopo legittimo cioè se era “nell'interesse pubblico.” La Corte considera che il suo scopo era proteggere la stabilità finanziaria del sistema di previdenza sociale ed assicurare che non fosse minacciato da pensioni di sussidio di destinatari che li avevano acquisiti sulla base di valutazioni mediche superficiali ed erronee o ottenute in modo fraudolento (vedere Moskal c. Polonia, citata sopra, §§ 61-63 e Wieczorek c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 63).
49. Infine, la Corte è chiamata ad accertare se l'interferenza ha imposto un carico individuale eccessivo sui richiedenti. Nel considerare se questo è il caso, la Corte deve avere riguardo al particolare contesto nel quale il problema sorge nella presente causa, vale a dire quelle di uno schema di previdenza sociale. Simili schemi sono un'espressione della solidarietà di una società verso i suoi membri vulnerabile (vedere Goudswaard-Van der Lans c. Paesi Bassi (dec.), n. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI). L'approccio della Corte all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 dovrebbe riflettere la realtà del modo in cui la disposizione di welfare è organizzata attualmente all'interno degli Stati membro del Consiglio dell'Europa. È chiaro che all'interno di quegli Stati, ed all'interno di più Stati individuali, esiste una serie ampia di benefici di previdenza sociale progettati per conferire dei diritti che sorgono di pieno diritto. I benefici sono procurati in una grande varietà di modi: alcuni sono pagati per con contributi ad un specifico finanziamento; alcuni dipendono dal documento di contributo di un rivendicatore; molti sono pagati per tassazione generale sulla base di uno status statutariamente definito. Nello Stato moderno e democratico, molti individui sono, per tutta o in parte delle loro vite, completamente dipendenti per sopravvivenza dalla previdenza sociale e dai benefici di welfare. Molti ordinamenti giuridici nazionali riconoscono che simili individui richiedono un grado di certezza e di sicurezza, e prevedono che benefici vengano pagati - soggetti all'adempimento delle condizioni dell'eleggibilità-di pieno diritto (vedere Stec ed Altri, citata sopra). L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non pone nessuna restrizione sulla libertà dei Contraenti di scegliere il tipo o l’ importo dei benefici da prevedere sotto schemi di previdenza sociale (vedere Stec ed Altri, citata sopra).
50. La Corte osserva che diritto alla pensione di invalidità di un veterano è essenzialmente basato sull'incapacità del rivendicatore di continuare il lavoro retribuito per motivi di cattiva salute causati dalla sua reclusione o persecuzione nel passato dalle autorità comuniste sovietiche o da quelle naziste in condizioni definite nella Legge del 1991 (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra). È pagato da un solo finanziamento di previdenza sociale finanziato dai vari contributi obbligatori da impiegati e datori di lavoro e gestito dall' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. Opera su base del pagamento delle tasse mediante trattenute sulla retribuzione. Avendo riguardo ad al fatto che questo finanziamento è basato sul principio della solidarietà, la Corte non può accettare che tale pensione dovrebbe rimanere sempre inalterata una volta che è stata accordata tramite una decisione definitiva dato dall' Autorità Previdenza Sociale.
51. Non c'è autorità nella giurisprudenza della Corte per una così categorica dichiarazione; nei fatti attuali, la Corte ha accettato la possibilità di riduzioni dei diritti di previdenza sociale in certe circostanze (vedere, come una recente autorità, Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 45, con ulteriori riferimenti di giurisprudenza; vedre anche Hoogendijk c. Paesi Bassi, (dec.), n. 58641/00, 6 gennaio 2005; Wieczorek c. Polonia, citato sopra, § 67; e Rasmussen c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 71). È lecito per gli Stati prendere delle misure per riesaminare la condizione medica di persone riceventi pensioni di invalidità nella prospettiva di verificare se loro continuano a soddisfare i requisiti di eleggibilità attinenti, purché simile rivalutazione sia in conformità con la legge ed abbinata a garanzie procedurali sufficienti. Effettivamente, se diritti alle pensioni di invalidità fossero stati sostenuti nonostante l'eleggibilità dei destinatari , sarebbe stato ingiusto per le persone che contribuiscono al sistema di previdenza sociale, in particolare a coloro i cui benefici vengono negati siccome loro non soddisfacevano i requisiti attinenti. In termini più generali, sanzionerebbe anche un'allocazione impropria di finanziamenti pubblici a discapito degli obiettivi per cui le pensioni di invalidità sono state intese di incontrare ed in violazione del principio della solidarietà.
52. La Corte nota che il rispettivo marito e padre dei richiedenti fu trovato nel 1997 a soddisfare i requisiti giuridici per lo status di veterano sulla base della sua condizione medica generale, e fu dichiarato di soddisfare le condizioni richieste per lo status di invalidità. Fu stabilito anche a quel tempo che la sua condizione era stata causata dal suo periodo di sei anni di reclusione in un campo di lavori forzati sovietico. Successivamente nel 2002, lui fu esaminato di nuovo, perché l' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale era stata informata dai procuratori locali che le indagini avevano generato sospetti che i certi certificati medici emessi nella regione che servivano come base per l'acquisizione di pensioni di invalidità erano stati emessi dolosamente. La condizione del Sig. OMISSIS fu riesaminata di conseguenza. Fu trovato, contrariamente alla valutazione medica originale che non c'era stato collegamento causale fra la sua reclusione negli anni quaranta da parte delle autorità sovietiche e la sua condizione medica.
53. La Corte non considera che tale decisione era tesa al riesame di persone che erano state esaminate in passato al fine di accordare i benefici di previdenza sociale, da dottori a riguardo dei quali un sospetto di una mancanza di diligenza era arbitraria o altrimenti irragionevole. Nota che le autorità che perseguono espressero sospetti di frode di grande potenza nel contesto dell'indagine in molte cause decise dall’Autorità di Previdenza di Zduńska Wola. Quindi, non si può dire che la decisione di re-valutare certi benefici sia senza un fondamento ragionevole.
54. La Corte nota inoltre che la pensione di invalidità del veterano non fu accordata al richiedente con una decisione giudiziale definitiva, ma con una decisione data dall' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. La Corte ha già sostenuto che il principio della certezza legale si applica ad una situazione legale definitiva, a prescindere se fu provocata da un atto giudiziale o da atto amministrativo o, come nella presente causa, da una decisione di previdenza sociale che, nella facciata, è definitiva nei suoi effetti (vedere Moskal c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 82). Nella sua valutazione della causa la Corte non può trascurare comunque, la posizione della Corte Suprema polacca che sostenne che nel contesto di procedimenti di previdenza sociali, il principio di res judicata operava differentemente che nel contesto di decisioni giudiziali definitive in giudizi civili. La Corte considera questa posizione compatibile col carattere e i fini di procedimenti di previdenza sociali e di diritto sostanziale che s’intende siano sufficientemente flessibili da rivolgersi alle necessità genuine di persone assicurate, necessità che possono evolvere e possono cambiare col tempo.
55. La Corte è inoltre della prospettiva che sconvolgerebbe qualsiasi equilibrio equo se, avendo scoperto il loro errore, alle autorità fosse mai precluso dal compensare i suoi effetti e fossero costrette a perpetuare l'errore continuando a pagare una pensione che era stata accordata sulla base di motivi erronei.
56. La Corte osserva inoltre che l' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale invitò il Sig. OMISSIS a subire un nuovo esame medico al fine di rivalutare la sua situazione (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Nel contesto di procedimenti giudiziali lui fu esaminato successivamente, da due dottori (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra). Quindi, nella presente causa la decisione impugnata di portare via il suo status di veterano non fu basata soltanto su una nuova valutazione delle prove che accompagnavano la richiesta originale per una pensione, ma su prove mediche ed aggiornate specificamente fatte al fine del riesame del diritto del richiedente allo status di veterano.
57. Inoltre, nella presente causa non è stato dibattuto o mostrato che i mezzi di sussistenza dei richiedenti erano in pericolo. Le circostanze della causa perciò fondamentalmente differiscono da quelle esaminate dalla Corte in un'altra causa contro la Polonia dove era il richiedente, come risultato della cessazione del suo beneficio, affrontò praticamente da un giorno all’altro la perdita totale della sua prima pensione di pensionamento che costituiva la sola fonte di reddito (confronta e contrasta Moskal, citata sopra, § 74). Nella presente causa non è stato dibattuto, nemmeno dimostrato, che gli importi e i benefici considerati nei procedimenti erano il solo reddito dei richiedenti. Inoltre, la Corte dà'importanza al fatto che i benefici di previdenza sociali goduti dal Sig. OMISSIS nacquero da uno status privilegiato che sono stati, ed ancora sono, percepiti come onori speciali (vedere Domalewski c. Polonia (dec.), n. 34610/97, il 1999-V di ECHR e Skórkiewicz c. Polonia (dec.), n. 39860/98, 1 giugno 1999). Quindi, non si può dire che nelle circostanze di questa causa i richiedenti erano totalmente spossessati dei loro mezzi di sussistenza (confronta e contrasta Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 44, e la giurisprudenza citata in essa).
58. La Corte considera che nella sua valutazione della proporzionalità dell'interferenza di cui ci si lamenta non si può trascurare che i richiedenti non erano i destinatari originali della pensione del veterano.
59. La Corte nota inoltre che l’ autorità di previdenza sociali, consegnando la loro decisione del 5 marzo 2003, spossessò il Sig. OMISSIS del suo status di veterano, ma sostenne che da questa data gli veniva concessa una pensione di invalidità ordinaria. Così, nella misura in cui i richiedenti si lamentavano della sua situazione che è il risultato di questa decisione, in nessun tempo lui è stato lasciato senza disposizione dal sistema di previdenza sociale (confronta e contrasta Moskal, citata sopra, § 75, dove il diritto del richiedente ad un nuovo beneficio fu riconosciuto solamente dopo tre anni). Né si dibatté che i richiedenti stessi furono, come risultato delle decisioni contestate, lasciati senza disposizione.
60. La Corte osserva che in nessun tempo il Sig. OMISSIS fu obbligato a pagare di nuovo qualsiasi importo che lui aveva ricevuto prima della data in cui lui non fu più trovato soddisfare i requisiti giuridici applicabili. Né i richiedenti furono costretti a pagare di nuovo qualsiasi importo che il loro rispettivo defunto marito e padre aveva ricevuto (vedere Chroust c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 4295/03, 20 novembre 2006). Inoltre, il diritto nazionale non creò nessun suggerimento che le persone che erano state trovate, dopo un certo decorso di tempo a non soddisfare più i requisiti per la pensione di invalidità di veterano avevano difatti acquisito simili diritti agendo dolosamente o in una maniera aperta alla critica, nonostante il fatto che le autorità perseguenti avevano avviato un'indagine a riguardo di accuse di corruzione concernenti certi dottori che lavoravano per l' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. Né tale suggerimento fu fatto nei procedimenti in relazione ai richiedenti stessi, o al loro rispettivo defunto marito e padre.
61. La Corte osserva che le decisioni dell' Autorità della Previdenza Sociale erano soggette a controllo giurisdizionale di fronte alle corti speciali di previdenza sociale a due livelli, frequentate con le piene garanzie procedurali. Non c'è indicazione che durante i procedimenti il Sig. OMISSIS o i richiedenti stessi fossero stati incapaci di presentare i loro argomenti alle corti.
62. Avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa viste nell'insieme, la Corte conclude, che un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali degli individui e che il carico sui richiedenti non era né sproporzionato né eccessivo.
63. Non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
64. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche che la riapertura ex-officio dei procedimenti di previdenza sociale che aveva dato luogo all’ annullamento della decisione definitiva che accordava al loro legale predecessore un diritto ad una pensione era in violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
65. L’Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione recita, nella parte attinente, ciò che segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ….”
66. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
67. Il Governo presentò che il carattere legale delle decisioni consegnate dall' Autorità di Previdenza Sociale era stato analizzato in dettaglio dalle corti polacche. La Corte Suprema aveva sostenuto che il principio di res judicata nella sfera della previdenza sociale aveva una qualità speciale (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra).
68. Di conseguenza, il Governo dibatté, le autorità di previdenza sociali dovevano avere la possibilità di impugnare decisioni definitive, previste dalla sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra). Questa disposizione circoscrisse attentamente le situazioni in cui il riesame di decisioni precedentemente emesse sarebbe stato possibile. Quindi, il margine di valutazione delle autorità amministrative a riguardo della riapertura di procedimenti tesa alla verifica di certe decisioni fu limitato in due modi: in primo luogo, con l'esistenza di disposizioni che fornivano una sfera molto limitata per la riapertura di procedimenti, ed in secondo luogo, col fatto che un ricorso ad una corte era disponibile alle parti interessate.
69. La Corte è dell'opinione che essenzialmente questa azione di reclamo è una riaffermazione dell'azione di reclamo esaminata sopra sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
70. Avendo riguardo al suo giudizio in relazione a quella disposizione, in particolare che era aperto alle autorità riesaminare il diritto del Sig. OMISSIS alla pensione di veterano e che simile rivalutazione non era preclusa dal principio della certezza legale (vedere paragrafi 53-59 sopra), la Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 non richiede un esame separato sui meriti.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
71. I richiedenti si lamentarono infine sotto l’Articolo 3 della Convenzione che il Sig. OMISSIS, era stato sottoposto a trattamento inumano poiché le autorità nazionali l'avevano spogliato della pensione di veterano. Loro si lamentarono inoltre che le corti nazionali avevano consegnato una decisione riguardante un'altra persona in una situazione comparabile i cui diritti speciali sotto lo status di veterano, per contro, erano stati alla fine sostenuti. I richiedenti si lamentarono sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione di essere stati privati di una via di ricorso effettiva in quanto le corti nazionali avevano respinto tutti i loro ricorsi. Loro si lamentarono inoltre sotto l’Articolo 2 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che le corti avevano infranto il diritto del secondo richiedente all’ istruzione con spogliandolo di una fonte di reddito supplementare.
72. Alla luce di tutto il materiale in suo possesso, e nella misura in cui le questioni di cu ci si lamenta sono all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte costata che non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di violazione dei diritti e delle libertà esposti nella Convenzione o nei suoi Protocolli.
73. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo alle decisioni che riguardano lo status di invalidità di veterano del Sig. OMISSIS ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 26 luglio 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.