Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SNEERSONE AND KAMPANELLA v. ITALY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 08

NUMERO: 14737/09/2011
STATO: Italia
DATA: 12/07/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of Art. 8; No violation of Art. 8 ; Remainder inadmissible ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF Å NEERSONE AND KAMPANELLA v. ITALY
(Application no. 14737/09)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
12 July 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Å neersone and Kampanella v. Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Dragoljub Popović,
Giorgio Malinverni,
András Sajó,
Guido Raimondi,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 21 June 2011,
Delivers the following judgment:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 14737/09) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Latvian nationals, OMISSIS and her son OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 9 March 2009.
2. The applicants were represented by Ms OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Rīga. The Italian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs E. Spatafora, the Agent of the Government.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the Italian Government had violated their right to respect for their family guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention. They furthermore pointed out that the first applicant’s absence from the hearing of the Rome Youth Court had rendered the decision-making process in the Italian courts unfair.
4. On 26 November 2009 the President of the Chamber to which the case had been allocated decided to give notice to the Italian Government of the part of the application concerning the procedural fairness of the proceedings in Italy, as well as the alleged interference with the right to respect for the applicants’ family life.
5. The parties replied in writing to each other’s observations. In addition, third-party comments were received from the Latvian Government, which had exercised its right to intervene (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b)). The parties replied to those comments (Rule 44 § 6).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1973 and 2002 respectively and live in RÄ«ga.
A. Events prior to the applicants’ departure from Italy
7. In 2002 M. was born to the first applicant in Italy. His father was an Italian national, who was never married to the first applicant but who has never disputed his paternity of M.. In 2003 M.’s parents separated and the applicants moved to a separate residence in Cerveteri, Italy. The applicants allege that ever since M.’s birth he has in practice been in the exclusive care of his mother, and his father’s participation in his upbringing has been minimal.
8. At the request of the first applicant, on 20 September 2004 the Rome Youth Court (Tribunale per i minorenni di Roma) granted custody of M. to his mother because the ongoing conflict between the parents made joint custody unfeasible. However, the court held that the father had a right to have his son stay at his home on specified days of the week and also whenever the first applicant was travelling outside Rome for a length of time exceeding one week or outside Italy for any length of time. The decision came into force on the day it was adopted.
9. M.’s father appealed against that decision, requesting that joint custody be granted or that he be granted sole custody and that the first applicant be forbidden to take the child abroad or to change her place of residence without the father’s prior approval. The Youth Section of the Rome Court of Appeal (Corte d’appello di Roma. Sezione per i minorenni) rejected his request in a decision of 1 March 2005, noting, inter alia, that the child was developing well and that it was impossible to ensure his development by granting sole custody to the father. Furthermore, it was noted that the father’s concern that the first applicant might move to Latvia and take their son with her was unfounded because a judge in a guardianship hearing (giudice tutelare, “the guardianship judge”) had previously refused to issue a passport to M. and also because his mother had strictly adhered to the ruling of the first-instance court and had left the child in his father’s care when travelling to Latvia.
10. On 24 June 2005 the guardianship judge granted an authorisation to issue a passport to M.. On 11 July 2005 M.’s father appealed against that decision. On 14 November 2005 the Rome Youth Court rejected M.’s father’s appeal, because there was no evidence that the first applicant was planning to leave Italy with the child.
11. On 3 February 2006 the Court (Tribunale) of Civitavecchia ruled that M.’s father had to make child support payments. The decision noted, inter alia, that the father had previously avoided financially supporting his son. M.’s father failed to make the ordered payments and on 8 April 2006 the first applicant lodged a complaint about this with the Italian police.
B. The applicants’ departure and the subsequent proceedings in Italy
12. It appears that because of M.’s father’s failure to financially support the applicants their only income was money which the first applicant’s mother was sending from Latvia. However, in December of 2005 the first applicant’s mother informed her that she was no longer able to provide financial support. According to the applicants it was for that reason that they had no other choice but to return to Latvia in April of 2006. The applicants indicate that they subsequently continued to return to Italy for brief periods of time. According to the Italian Government, they have never been back.
13. On 7 February 2006 M. was granted Latvian citizenship, since it was established that his mother’s permanent residence at the time of his birth had been in Latvia. Subsequently, the first applicant registered M.’s permanent residence in an apartment in Rīga belonging to her.
14. On an unspecified date M.’s father requested the Rome Youth Court to grant him interim sole custody of M. and to order his return to Italy.
15. On 5 June 2006 that court issued a decision in which it upheld the father’s request. The decision noted that the first applicant’s actions had been harmful to the child. The court further held that it did not have jurisdiction to order the child’s return to Italy but indicated that M. had to reside with his father. The decision finally provided that a hearing would be held on 25 October 2006 and that M.’s father had an obligation to inform the first applicant of the court’s decision before 20 September 2006.
16. The applicants submit that the first applicant was not informed of the hearing that had been scheduled, nor did she receive a summons to it. The applicants further submit that M.’s father had never requested full custody, but instead had asked the court to re-establish his rights of contact with the child and to order his return to Italy. The first applicant alleges that she only learned about the adopted decision in March of 2007.
C. The Hague Convention proceedings in Latvia
17. On 16 January 2007 (by what appears to be a clerical error the document is dated 16 January 2006) the Italian Ministry of Justice, in its capacity as the Central Authority under Article 6 of the Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (“the Hague Convention”), issued a request for M. to be returned to Italy.
18. After receiving the request, the Latvian Ministry of Child and Family Matters (Bērnu un ģimenes lietu ministrija), which is the Latvian Central Authority within the meaning of the Hague Convention, initiated civil proceedings against the first applicant in accordance with Article 7 of the Hague Convention. The Rīga City Vidzeme District Court, which had been allocated the case, requested the Rīga City Orphans’ Court (Rīgas bāriņtiesa) to evaluate the applicants’ residence and to issue an opinion concerning the possibility of returning M. to his father in Italy. After visiting the applicants’ residence, by a decision of 20 March 2007 the Orphans’ Court established that the child’s living conditions were beneficial for his growth and development. It further noted that M. had adjusted to living in his mother’s residence and that she was ensuring his full physical and intellectual development. Accordingly, the Orphans’ Court concluded that the child’s return to Italy would not be compatible with his best interests.
19. That conclusion was also supported by the findings of a psychologist, whose opinion had been requested by the applicants’ lawyer. In a report dated 30 March 2007 the psychologist concluded that severance of contact between M. and his mother was not to be allowed, in that it could negatively affect the child’s development and could even create neurotic problems and illnesses.
20. By a letter of 6 April 2007, the Italian Central Authority attested to the Latvian Central Authority that if any of the circumstances mentioned in Article 13 (b) of the Hague Convention arose Italy would be able to activate a wide-ranging child protection network which could ensure that M. and his father received psychological help.
21. On 11 April 2007 the Rīga City Vidzeme District Court issued a decision by which it refused the father’s request to return M. to Italy. That court based its decision on the Hague Convention and Council Regulation (EC) No. 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003 concerning jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in matrimonial matters and matters of parental responsibility (“the Regulation”). The court held that the removal of M. had been wrongful within the meaning of the Hague Convention and the Regulation, since it had been carried out without his father’s permission. It was further noted that it was not expedient to hear M.’s own opinion, since he was four years old at the time and was unable to form an opinion about which of his parents he should live with.
22. The court considered it necessary to assess whether the circumstances provided for in Article 13 (b) of the Hague Convention existed. Its conclusion was that those circumstances existed. It noted the ties between M. and his mother and the fact that he had settled well in Latvia and considered that his continued residence in Latvia was essential for his development. The Vidzeme District Court found that the provisions of Article 11 (4) of the Regulation had not been fulfilled, because it was financially impossible for the first applicant to follow M. to Italy if he were returned there. Furthermore, the guarantees provided for by Italy could not ensure that the child would not suffer psychologically and that his mental health would not be prejudiced. Accordingly the court applied Article 13 (b) of the Hague Convention and refused the father’s request.
23. On 24 May 2007 the Rīga Regional Court adopted a final decision, by which it rejected the father’s appeal against the decision of the Vidzeme District Court. In substance the Regional Court agreed with the conclusions of the first-instance court, adding that the guarantees offered by the Italian Central Authority concerning the protection available to M. after his potential return to Italy were too vague and non-specific. It was also mentioned that M.’s father had made no effort to establish contact with his son ever since the applicants’ departure from Italy.
24. On 4 June 2007 the first applicant requested the Rīga City Vidzeme District Court to grant her sole custody of M.. On 8 January 2008 the Rīga Custody Court issued an opinion in which it concluded that granting sole custody of M. to his mother was in his best interests. The Custody Court indicated among other considerations the fact that M.’s father had not seen his son since 2006.
D. Proceedings based on the Regulation
25. On 7 August 2007 M.’s father lodged a request with the Rome Youth Court, which was based on Article 11 (4), (7) and (8) of the Regulation, to issue an immediately executable decision ordering M.’s return to Italy.
26. On 11 December 2007 the first applicant submitted her observations to that court, in which she acknowledged that she had left Italy because of an ongoing conflict with M.’s father and because of her difficult financial situation. She noted that M.’s father had never travelled to see his son in Latvia; however, she stated that the applicants were always available to come to Italy to meet M.’s father during school holidays. In conclusion, she requested that the court order child support payments in the amount of 700 euros (EUR) per month.
27. In the context of separate proceedings, on 11 January 2008 the Civitavecchia Court made a judgment concerning the first applicant’s request for child support payments and ordered M.’s father to pay the first applicant EUR 4,800 plus interest, starting from 14 October 2004.
28. By a decision of 21 April 2008 the Rome Youth Court upheld the father’s request. It considered that the only role left to it by Article 11 (4) of the Regulation was to verify whether adequate arrangements had been made to secure the protection of the child from any identified risks within the meaning of Article 13 (b) of the Hague Convention after his or her return. After considering the first applicant’s submissions, the court noted that the father had proposed that M. would stay with him, while the first applicant would be authorised to use a house in Aranova for periods of fifteen to thirty consecutive days during the first year and subsequently for one summer month every other year (the first applicant would have to cover her own travel expenses and one half of the rent of the house in Aranova), during which time M. would be staying with his mother, while the father would retain the right to visit him on a daily basis. M. would be enrolled in a kindergarten which he had attended before his removal from Italy. He would also attend a swimming pool he had used before his departure from Italy. The father furthermore undertook to ensure that the child would receive adequate psychological help and would attend Russian-language classes for Russian children. The court considered such an arrangement adequate to fulfil the requirements of the Regulation and ordered an immediate execution of its decision to return M. to Italy and to have him reside with his father. The court also pointed out that it would be preferable if the first applicant accompanied M. on his way to Italy but, should that prove to be impossible, his return would be arranged by the Italian embassy in Latvia. Due to the urgent nature of the case, the decision was pronounced to be immediately executable.
29. On 18 June 2008 (in what appears to be a clerical error, the date indicated in the document is 18 June 2009) the first applicant lodged a request with the Youth Court to suspend the execution of its decision. She argued that M. had not been heard by the tribunal and that the Youth Court had not taken into consideration the arguments which the Latvian courts had used in their decisions when applying Article 13 of the Hague Convention.
30. On 20 June 2008 the first applicant lodged an appeal against the decision of the Rome Youth Court of 21 April 2008. In her appeal she requested that the execution of that decision be suspended; that the appeal court hear M.; that there be an order that she retain sole custody of M.; and that M.’s father be ordered to pay EUR 700 per month in child support payments.
31. On 22 July 2008 the Rome Youth Court adopted a decision in which it rejected the first applicant’s request to suspend the execution of the decision of 21 April. That court considered that it was not appropriate to question the child, taking into account his young age and the level of maturity. Furthermore, it considered that Article 42 of the Regulation did not oblige it to hear the parties in person. It remarked that all of the decisions taken by the Latvian courts had been duly taken into consideration. Finally, the court upheld the father’s request to issue a return certificate in accordance with Articles 40, 42 and 47 of the Regulation. The certificate was issued on 29 July 2008.
32. On 14 August 2008 the Italian Central Authority sent a letter to the Latvian Central Authority, forwarding the Youth Court’s decision of 22 July 2008 and inviting it to advise the Italian side on “the initiatives that will be taken in order to enforce the return order made by the Youth Court in Rome”.
33. On 27 August 2008 a psychologist issued another report on M.’s psychological state. The report concluded that the child had developed certain psychological problems in connection with his father’s request to return him to Italy. It further reiterated the conclusion from the earlier report, that M. had strong emotional ties with his mother, the severance of which was impermissible.
34. On 10 September 2008 the first applicant received information from the Latvian Central Authority about the request made by the Italian Central Authority. The first applicant was informed that Latvia had an obligation to enforce the 21 April 2008 decision of the Rome Youth Court.
35. On 13 February 2009 the first applicant submitted a request to the Rīga City Vidzeme District Court, requesting it to indicate interim measures and not to allow M.’s return to Italy “until he himself agrees to return to his father in Italy”. Further, she requested the court to require the Rome Court of Appeal and the Rome Youth Court to surrender their competence to the Vidzeme District Court, since that court had already, on 4 June 2007, been allocated a still pending case concerning the granting of sole custody of M. to his mother, and also because the child’s permanent residence was in Latvia.
36. On 18 February 2009 the Vidzeme District Court adopted a decision in which it decided not to proceed with the first applicant’s request concerning the question of M.’s custody, since it considered that the first applicant’s appeal against the Rome Youth Court’s decision of 21 April 2008, which was pending at the time before the Rome Court of Appeal, concerned the same subject matter, with the same parties involved.
37. On 21 April 2009 the Rome Court of Appeal adopted a decision concerning the first applicant’s appeal against the Rome Youth Court’s decision of 21 April 2008. The appeal court first of all observed that pursuant to Article 11 (8) of the Regulation (see below, paragraph 45) it had jurisdiction to decide the question of the child’s return to Italy. It then went on to observe that the first-instance court had correctly implemented the procedure set out in Article 11 (7) of the Regulation (see below, paragraph 45), as attested by the reasoned opinion of the European Commission (see below, paragraphs 39-45). The court continued by observing that the decision to grant M.’s father sole custody had been motivated by the first applicant’s behaviour when she had chosen to take the child to Latvia and by the father’s undertaking to take care of the child in Italy. The Court of Appeal therefore upheld the decision of the Rome Youth Court and ordered that after the child’s return to Italy he be enrolled in a primary school.
38. On 10 July 2009 the bailiff of the Rīga Regional Court charged with the execution of the Rome Youth Court decision of 21 April 2008 invited M.’s father to provide assistance in the execution of that decision by re-establishing contact with his son. It appears that M.’s father has not responded to that request in any way.
E. Proceedings in the European Commission
39. On 15 October 2008 the Republic of Latvia brought an action against Italy before the European Commission in application of Article 227 of the Treaty Establishing the European Community. Latvia alleged, in particular, that the above-described proceedings in Italy (the decision adopted on 21 April 2008 and the issuing of the return certificate in July 2008) did not conform to the Regulation, in that neither of the applicants had been heard by the Rome Youth Court on 21 April 2008, and also that the Rome Youth Court had ignored the decisions of 11 April 2007 of the RÄ«ga City Vidzeme District Court and of 24 May 2007 of the RÄ«ga Regional Court.
40. On 15 January 2009 the Commission issued a reasoned opinion. It held that Italy had violated neither the Regulation nor the “general principles of the Community law”. In so far as is relevant to the case before the Court, the Commission held as follows.
41. At the outset it reiterated that, given the particular circumstances of the case, where Latvia was disputing the legality of the actions of an Italian authority with a judicial function, the scope of the Commission’s review was very limited. The Commission could only review matters of procedure, not substance, and it had to respect the decisions made by the Italian courts in the exercise of their discretionary powers.
42. Concerning the argument of the Republic of Latvia that the decision of 21 April 2008 had been adopted without attempting to obtain M.’s opinion, the Commission stressed that it followed from the Regulation, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (“the UN Convention”), the Hague Convention and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union that hearing a child’s opinion with regard to questions concerning that child was a fundamental principle. However, that principle was not absolute. What had to be taken into account was the level of the child’s development. That level was not and could not be defined in any international instruments, therefore the national authorities retained wide discretion in such questions. The Commission held that the Italian Central Authority had used that discretion and indicated in the certificate of return that it had not been necessary for the Italian courts to hear M.. Therefore, none of the international instruments that had been invoked by Latvia had been breached.
43. Latvia further criticised the fact that the decision of 21 April 2008 had been adopted without duly taking into account the position of the first applicant, and that the decision had been adopted without hearing either of the parties, including the first applicant, who was neither informed of the time of the forthcoming hearing nor invited to take part in it. The Commission noted that the decision of 21 April 2008 had been adopted in written proceedings, without hearing oral submissions of either of the parties, which was fully in conformity with the applicable Italian procedural legislation. The Commission interpreted Article 42 (2) (b) of the Regulation (see below, paragraph 51) in the light of the Court’s case-law (referring in particular to Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, 27 October 1993, § 32, Series A no. 274), and considered that the use of written proceedings was permissible as long as the principle of equality of arms was observed. The Commission observed that the first applicant had been given an opportunity to submit written observations on equal grounds with M.’s father and thus neither the Regulation nor the UN Convention had been violated.
44. Lastly, Latvia criticised the decision of 21 April 2008 and the related return certificate for ignoring the Latvian authorities’ reasons for refusing to order M.’s return to Italy. The Commission indicated that its role was not to analyse the substance of the Italian authorities’ decisions – it was limited to appraising the compliance with the procedure which led to the adoption of those decisions with the procedural requirements of the Regulation. Nothing in the Regulation forbade the Italian authorities to come to a conclusion that was opposite to the one reached by the Latvian authorities. Quite to the contrary, the Commission considered that the Regulation gave the country of the child’s residence prior to the abduction “the final say” in ordering the return, even if his or her new country of residence had declined to order the return. In this regard the Commission noted that the Rīga Regional Court, when adopting the decision of 24 May 2007 (see above, paragraph 23), had referred to the Law of Civil Procedure, section 64419 (6) (2) of which permits refusal to return a child if the child is well settled in Latvia and his or her return is not in his or her interests. The Commission questioned the Latvian court’s alleged failure to invoke the “much more binding” Article 13 of the Hague Convention, which in their opinion demonstrated that the Latvian courts had devoted attention to M.’s situation in Latvia instead of the potential consequences of his return to Italy. In short, the Commission had “not discovered any indications” that life in Italy together with his father would expose M. to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place him in an intolerable situation. What is more, the Commission considered that the Rome Youth Court in its decision of 21 April 2008 had directly addressed the Rīga Regional Court’s concerns that the measures envisaged for M.’s protection upon his return to Italy were too vague – the Italian court had set out specific obligations on the father which would allow for balanced development of the child and for him to have contact with both parents.
45. In conclusion the Commission conceded that the decision of 21 April 2008 did not contain a detailed analysis of either the arguments of the first applicant or of those of M.’s father. However, it considered that the Regulation did not require such an analysis. Therefore, the exact procedure to be followed in that respect was left to the national courts’ discretion. Taking that into account, it was found that neither Latvia nor the Commission could dispute the particular formulation of the Italian court’s decision.
II. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW
46. The Hague Convention, which has been ratified by Latvia and Italy, provides, in so far as relevant, as follows.
Article 3
“The removal or the retention of a child is to be considered wrongful where –
a) it is in breach of rights of custody attributed to a person, an institution or any other body, either jointly or alone, under the law of the State in which the child was habitually resident immediately before the removal or retention; and
b) at the time of removal or retention those rights were actually exercised, either jointly or alone, or would have been so exercised but for the removal or retention.
The rights of custody mentioned in sub-paragraph a) above, may arise in particular by operation of law or by reason of a judicial or administrative decision, or by reason of an agreement having legal effect under the law of that State.”
Article 4
“The Convention shall apply to any child who was habitually resident in a Contracting State immediately before any breach of custody or access rights. The Convention shall cease to apply when the child attains the age of 16 years.”
Article 6
“A Contracting State shall designate a Central Authority to discharge the duties which are imposed by the Convention upon such authorities. [..]”
Article 7
“Central Authorities shall co-operate with each other and promote co-operation amongst the competent authorities in their respective State to secure the prompt return of children and to achieve the other objects of this Convention.
In particular, either directly or through any intermediary, they shall take all appropriate measures –
[..]
f) to initiate or facilitate the institution of judicial or administrative proceedings with a view to obtaining the return of the child and, in a proper case, to make arrangements for organizing or securing the effective exercise of rights of access; [..]”
Article 11
“The judicial or administrative authorities of Contracting States shall act expeditiously in proceedings for the return of children.
If the judicial or administrative authority concerned has not reached a decision within six weeks from the date of commencement of the proceedings, the applicant or the Central Authority of the requested State, on its own initiative or if asked by the Central Authority of the requesting State, shall have the right to request a statement of the reasons for the delay. If a reply is received by the Central Authority of the requested State, that Authority shall transmit the reply to the Central Authority of the requesting State, or to the applicant, as the case may be.”
Article 12
“Where a child has been wrongfully removed or retained in terms of Article 3 and, at the date of the commencement of the proceedings before the judicial or administrative authority of the Contracting State where the child is, a period of less than one year has elapsed from the date of the wrongful removal or retention, the authority concerned shall order the return of the child forthwith.
The judicial or administrative authority, even where the proceedings have been commenced after the expiration of the period of one year referred to in the preceding paragraph, shall also order the return of the child, unless it is demonstrated that the child is now settled in its new environment.
Where the judicial or administrative authority in the requested State has reason to believe that the child has been taken to another State, it may stay the proceedings or dismiss the application for the return of the child.”
Article 13
“Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding Article, the judicial or administrative authority of the requested State is not bound to order the return of the child if the person, institution or other body which opposes its return establishes that –
a) the person, institution or other body having the care of the person of the child was not actually exercising the custody rights at the time of removal or retention, or had consented to or subsequently acquiesced in the removal or retention; or
b) there is a grave risk that his or her return would expose the child to physical or psychological harm or otherwise place the child in an intolerable situation.
The judicial or administrative authority may also refuse to order the return of the child if it finds that the child objects to being returned and has attained an age and degree of maturity at which it is appropriate to take account of its views.
In considering the circumstances referred to in this Article, the judicial and administrative authorities shall take into account the information relating to the social background of the child provided by the Central Authority or other competent authority of the child’s habitual residence.”
Article 20
“The return of the child under the provisions of Article 12 may be refused if this would not be permitted by the fundamental principles of the requested State relating to the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms.”
47. Paragraph 17 of the preamble of the Regulation explains its scope, in so far as it is relevant to this case, as follows:
“In cases of wrongful removal or retention of a child, the return of the child should be obtained without delay, and to this end the Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 would continue to apply as complemented by the provisions of this Regulation, in particular Article 11. The courts of the Member State to or in which the child has been wrongfully removed or retained should be able to oppose his or her return in specific, duly justified cases. However, such a decision could be replaced by a subsequent decision by the court of the Member State of habitual residence of the child prior to the wrongful removal or retention. Should that judgment entail the return of the child, the return should take place without any special procedure being required for recognition and enforcement of that judgment in the Member State to or in which the child has been removed or retained.”
48. With regard to jurisdiction in cases of child abduction, the Regulation, in Article 10, provides, in so far as is relevant, as follows:
“In case of wrongful removal or retention of the child, the courts of the Member State where the child was habitually resident immediately before the wrongful removal or retention shall retain their jurisdiction until the child has acquired a habitual residence in another Member State and:
...
(b) the child has resided in that other Member State for a period of at least one year after the person, institution or other body having rights of custody has had or should have had knowledge of the whereabouts of the child and the child is settled in his or her new environment and at least one of the following conditions is met:
(i) within one year after the holder of rights of custody has had or should have had knowledge of the whereabouts of the child, no request for return has been lodged before the competent authorities of the Member State where the child has been removed or is being retained;
...
(iv) a judgment on custody that does not entail the return of the child has been issued by the courts of the Member State where the child was habitually resident immediately before the wrongful removal or retention.”
49. Article 11, which is specifically singled out in the preamble, provides as follows:
“1. Where a person, institution or other body having rights of custody applies to the competent authorities in a Member State to deliver a judgment on the basis of the Hague Convention [..], in order to obtain the return of a child that has been wrongfully removed or retained in a Member State other than the Member State where the child was habitually resident immediately before the wrongful removal or retention, paragraphs 2 to 8 shall apply.
2. When applying Articles 12 and 13 of the 1980 Hague Convention, it shall be ensured that the child is given the opportunity to be heard during the proceedings unless this appears inappropriate having regard to his or her age or degree of maturity.
3. A court to which an application for return of a child is made as mentioned in paragraph 1 shall act expeditiously in proceedings on the application, using the most expeditious procedures available in national law.
Without prejudice to the first subparagraph, the court shall, except where exceptional circumstances make this impossible, issue its judgment no later than six weeks after the application is lodged.
4. A court cannot refuse to return a child on the basis of Article 13 (b) of the [..] Hague Convention if it is established that adequate arrangements have been made to secure the protection of the child after his or her return.
5. A court cannot refuse to return a child unless the person who requested the return of the child has been given an opportunity to be heard.
[..]
7. Unless the courts in the Member State where the child was habitually resident immediately before the wrongful removal or retention have already been seized by one of the parties, the court or central authority that receives [a copy of an order on non-return pursuant to Article 13 of the Hague Convention and of the documents relevant to that order] must notify it to the parties and invite them to make submissions to the court, in accordance with national law, within three months of the date of notification so that the court can examine the question of custody of the child. [..]
8. Notwithstanding a judgment of non-return pursuant to Article 13 of the [..] Hague Convention, any subsequent judgment which requires the return of the child issued by a court having jurisdiction under this Regulation shall be enforceable in accordance with Section 4 of Chapter III below in order to secure the return of the child.”
50. Pursuant to Article 40 (1) (b) of the Regulation, its Section 4 applies to “the return of a child entailed by a judgment given pursuant to Article 11 (8)”
51. Article 42 in Section 4 provides the following:
“1. The return of a child referred to in Article 40 (1) (b) entailed by an enforceable judgment given in a Member State shall be recognised and enforceable in another Member State without the need for a declaration of enforceability and without any possibility of opposing its recognition if the judgment has been certified in the Member State of origin in accordance with paragraph 2.
Even if national law does not provide for enforceability by operation of law, notwithstanding any appeal, of a judgment requiring the return of the child mentioned in Article 11 (b) (8), the court of origin may declare the judgment enforceable.
2. The judge of origin who delivered the judgment referred to in Article 40 (1) (b) shall issue the certificate referred to in paragraph 1 only if:
(a) the child was given an opportunity to be heard, unless a hearing was considered inappropriate having regard to his or her age or degree of maturity;
(b) the parties were given an opportunity to be heard; and
(c) the court has taken into account in issuing its judgment the reasons for and evidence underlying the order issued pursuant to Article 13 of the 1980 Hague Convention. [..]”
52. As concerns the enforcement of judgments requiring the return of a child, Article 47 of the Regulation provides the following:
“1. The enforcement procedure is governed by the law of the Member State of enforcement.
2. Any judgment delivered by a court of another Member Stat and [..] certified in accordance with [..] Article 42 (1) shall be enforced in the Member State of enforcement in the same conditions as if it had been delivered in that Member State.
In particular, a judgment which has been certified according to [..] Article 42 (1) cannot be enforced if it is irreconcilable with a subsequent enforceable judgment.”
53. Lastly, Articles 60 and 62 of the Regulation provide that the Regulation “shall take precedence” over the Hague Convention “in so far as [it concerns] matters governed by this Regulation” and that the Hague Convention continues “to produce effects between the Member States which are party thereto”.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
54. The applicants complain under Article 8 of the Convention that the Italian courts’ decisions ordering M.’s return to Italy were contrary to his best interests as well as in violation of international and Latvian law.
55. The applicants also complain under Article 6 of the Convention about the procedural fairness of decision-making in Italian courts. In particular, they are critical of the fact that the first applicant was not present at the hearing of the Rome Youth Court.
56. The applicants’ complaints concerning the procedure followed by the Italian courts were communicated to the Government under Article 8 of the Convention, which, whilst it contains no explicit procedural requirements, requires that the decision-making process leading to measures of interference must be fair and such as to afford due respect to the interests safeguarded by that Article (see, inter alia, Iosub Caras v. Romania, no. 7198/04, § 41, 27 July 2006, and Moretti and Benedetti v. Italy, no. 16318/07, § 27, ECHR 2010-... (extracts)).
57. In so far as is relevant, Article 8 of the Convention provides as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his ... family life... .
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
A. Admissibility
1. Compatibility ratione personae
58. The Italian Government argued that the application, in so far as it related to the second applicant, was incompatible ratione personae with the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention. In that regard the Italian Government argued that the present case essentially concerned a conflict between the second applicant’s two parents, and since both parents in principle have a right to respect for family life together with their son, allowing only one of the parents (in this case the mother) to represent the child’s interests before the Court would disrupt this parental equality. The Government furthermore referred to Moretti and Benedetti, (cited above, § 32), and S.D., D.P. and A.T. v. the United Kingdom (no. 23715/94, Commission decision of 20 May 1996, unreported) and indicated the possibility that a conflict of interests might exist, in particular considering that on 5 June 2006 the Rome Youth Court had granted interim sole custody to M.’s father (see paragraph 15 above).
59. The applicants argued that what was at stake were the interests of the child, the second applicant, as opposed to the interests of his father. Given the paramount importance of the interests of the child, there was no other choice than to have him as a party to the case before the Court.
60. The Latvian Government disagreed with the objection of the Italian Government. They referred to the Court’s statement in Iosub Caras, (cited above, § 21) that
“minors can apply to the Court even, or indeed especially, if they are represented by a parent who is in conflict with the authorities and criticises their decisions and conduct as not being consistent with the rights guaranteed by the Convention. In such cases, the standing as the natural parent suffices to afford him or her the necessary power to apply to the Court on the child’s behalf, too, in order to protect the child’s interests.”
They furthermore indicated that, since the proceedings in Italy had concerned an order to separate the first and second applicants, it was clear that what was being criticised were decisions inconsistent with Article 8 of the Convention (a reference was made to Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland [GC], no. 41615/07, § 90, ECHR 2010-..., and Iosub Caras, cited above, § 29).
61. The Court observes in the first place that both of the cases referred to by the Italian Government referred to the representation of a child not by their natural parent but instead by individuals not related to the children in question. However, even in such circumstances the Commission and the Court were careful to point out that a restrictive or technical approach in the area of representation of children before the Court was to be avoided. The Court cannot but agree with the Latvian Government that the facts in the present case are more reminiscent of those of the above-cited Iosub Caras and Neulinger and Shuruk. The Court does not see any reason to depart from the line of reasoning used in those cases. Therefore, the Italian Government’s argument concerning the incompatibility ratione personae must be rejected.
2. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
62. The Italian Government noted that when the applicants first applied to the Court the first applicant’s appeal against the decision of the Rome Youth Court of 21 April 2008 were still pending. It was only adjudicated upon on 28 September 2009. Therefore, the application had to be declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies pursuant to Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
63. The applicants stated that they had a right to submit an application to the Court without waiting for the final adjudication in the Italian courts from the moment when the first applicant learned that Italy had officially requested the Latvian authorities to ensure M.’s return to Italy, since such a request was of a self-executing nature and was not subject to any additional review by the Latvian authorities.
64. The Latvian Government agreed with the applicants that, once the non-appealable certificate of return had been issued pursuant to Article 42 (1) of the Regulation, the applicants did not have an obligation to wait for the completion of adjudication in the Italian courts before petitioning the Court.
65. In response to the applicants and the Latvian Government the Italian Government emphasised that the concepts of “an enforceable judgment” within the meaning of Article 42 of the Regulation, and of a “final decision” within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, were not to be confused. The Italian Government pointed out in particular that the Regulation specifically stated that a certificate of return may be issued on the basis of a judgment which has not yet become final.
66. The Court observes that it is not in dispute between the parties that the adjudication in the Italian courts has now been completed. In other words, the Italian State has been afforded the opportunity of preventing or redressing the violation alleged against them (see Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 74, ECHR 1999-V). The Court has previously held that in principle applicants are obliged to make a diligent effort to exhaust the domestic remedies before submitting an application to the Court. However, it has been deemed acceptable if the final stage of the exhaustion of the domestic remedies takes place after the application has been submitted but before the Court decides on its admissibility (see, for example, Yakup Köse v. Turkey (dec.), no. 50177/99, 2 May 2006). The Court thus dismisses the respondent Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
3. Compliance with the six-month rule
67. In the alternative, the respondent Government pointed out that if the Court were to consider the Rome Youth Court decision of 21 April 2008 to be the final one, the application would be inadmissible according to Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention for failure to comply with the six-month rule.
68. The applicants pointed out that it was only on 10 September 2008 that the first applicant had learned that a return certificate had been issued (see above, paragraph 34), which was therefore the date to be taken into account for calculating the six-month period within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
69. In response to the applicants’ argument, the respondent Government submitted that the applicants could not allege that they only became aware of the decision of 21 April 2008 after the return certificate had been communicated to them, since their lawyer in Italy had actively contested the decision of 21 April 2008. Since the applicant’s representative in Italy had lodged an appeal against the above-mentioned decision on 20 June 2008, that date was the latest one from which to start counting the six-month period for complaining to the Court.
70. The Latvian Government pointed out that the measure that directly interfered with the applicants’ family life was the return certificate, which the applicants received on 10 September 2008. Therefore, the time-limit for lodging an application with the Court started to run on that date. In the alternative, the Latvian Government argued that since the applicants were complaining about “a consistent policy adopted by the Italian authorities in dealing with their case”, their complaints in effect concerned a continuing situation.
71. The Court notes that the respondent Government correctly observed that at the time the applicants lodged their application with the Court (on 9 March 2009), the proceedings were still pending before the Italian courts and were completed only on 21 April 2009 (see above, paragraph 37). Against that background, the Court dismisses the Italian Government’s argument concerning the alleged non-compliance with the six-month rule.
4. Conclusion
72. The Court dismisses the respondent Government’s arguments concerning alleged incompatibility ratione personae, failure to exhaust the domestic remedies and failure to comply with the six-month rule. The Court furthermore considers, in the light of the parties’ submissions, that the applicants’ complaints raise serious issues of fact and law under the Convention, the determination of which requires an examination of the merits. The Court concludes therefore that these complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. No other ground for declaring these complaints inadmissible has been established. The applicants’ complaints of interference by the Italian authorities in their family life and of the procedural unfairness of the decision-making process in the Italian courts must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions by the parties
(a) The applicants
73. The applicants emphasised that there existed very close emotional links between them. M.’s father had not developed any emotional link with the child because they had seen each other very rarely, even when the applicants still resided in Italy. Furthermore, M. and his father did not have a common language. According to the applicants, the first applicant has issued repeated invitations to M.’s father to visit his son in Rīga. He has not responded to those invitations, which is just one of the many facts that had not been taken into account by the Italian courts. Against that background the applicants pointed out that if M. were to be separated from his mother it would threaten his development and mental health. In this regard the applicants submitted that M. was receiving systematic assistance from a psychologist in order to overcome the stress, anxiety and fear caused by the prospects of his separation from his mother and his being sent to Italy.
74. The applicants further submitted that when the Italian courts adopted decisions diametrically opposite to those adopted by the Latvian courts, they did not observe the principle of mutual trust between courts. The allegedly inadequately reasoned decisions adopted by the Italian courts furthermore did not take into account the available information concerning M.’s living arrangements in Latvia.
75. According to the applicants, the arrangements for the first applicant’s visits with her son envisaged by the Italian courts were utterly inadequate, in particular taking into account the fact that she did not have the financial means to reside in Italy, where she was virtually unemployable since she did not speak any Italian. Furthermore, the “safety measures” suggested by the Italian authorities and accepted by the Italian courts did not guarantee the child’s physical and psychological safety and were in direct contradiction with the psychologist’s conclusions relied on by the Latvian courts. The applicants further pointed out that the Italian courts had failed to examine or to have examined the proposed residence of the child in Italy. According to the information available to the applicants, the building located at the address mentioned by the Italian courts contained offices. Lastly, the applicants criticised the Italian courts’ failure to request and to take into account any information concerning M.’s father’s income and property in order to assess whether he was capable of raising the child.
(b) The respondent Government
76. The Italian Government submitted that there had been no interference with the first applicant’s rights under Article 8, since she herself was the one who had interfered with M.’s father’s right to family life (in this respect a reference was made to Gnahoré v. France, no. 40031/98, § 59, ECHR 2000-IX), and therefore could not argue that an interference arose as a result of the Italian authorities’ legitimate but as yet unsuccessful attempt to re-establish the previously existing situation, which had been in full conformity with the law. In other words, the parent whose actions had been contrary to the law (the respondent Government observed that there was no dispute between the parties that M.’s removal from Italy had been wrongful) was not to be allowed to benefit from those actions. In any case, the Italian authorities had envisioned the possibility for the applicants’ meetings after M.’s return to Italy. The respondent Government furthermore submitted that even if any interference with the applicants’ rights had taken place, it had been in accordance with the law, namely, Article 11 of the Regulation, and it had also been necessary to eliminate the consequences of M.’s unlawful removal from Italy. In other words, the aim of the interference had been the protection of the rights and freedoms of the child.
77. As concerns the question of whether ordering M.’s return was “necessary in a democratic society”, the respondent Government submitted that the Italian authorities had duly taken into account and weighed the best interests of the child. The Italian Government considered that the applicants’ argument that M. and his father could not communicate because of a language barrier was not appropriate as regards an eight-year-old child who has spent a large portion of his life in Italy, where he should not encounter any particular difficulties, in particular considering that both Latvia and Italy were member states of the European Union. To substantiate the argument that the alleged interference with the applicants’ family life had been “necessary”, the respondent Government once again referred to the guarantees offered by the Italian authorities (see above, paragraph 28). Lastly, they considered that the specific arrangements to be made in respect of M. fell within Italy’s margin of appreciation.
78. The respondent Government furthermore referred to the object and purpose of the Hague Convention within the meaning of Article 31 (1) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, which, according to the Court’s judgment Maumousseau and Washington v. France (no. 39388/05, § 69, ECHR 2007-XIII), was the deterrence of the proliferation of international child abductions. That goal could be achieved by avoiding the consolidation of de facto situations brought about by wrongful removals of children. For that purpose the status quo ante had to be restored as quickly as possible. As to the applicability in the present case of the exception to the general obligation to return a wrongfully removed child that is contained in Article 13 (b) of the Hague Convention, the respondent Government analysed three possible justifications for non-return: firstly, the argument that M. had settled in Latvia and adapted to life there and that his best interests required his continued residence with his mother; secondly, the allegation that the father had not had any contact with the child; and, thirdly, that because of the length of the Italian procedures the return of M. to Italy and the restoration of the status quo ante was no longer possible.
79. Regarding the question of M.’s continued residence with his mother, the respondent Government underlined the first applicant’s refusal to act in accordance with the decisions of the Italian courts. As to M.’s father’s willingness to care for his son, the respondent Government pointed out that apart from short-lived disputes concerning child support payments, the father had always showed willingness to enjoy a stable family life with his son in Italy. The Government also underlined that the father was not an alcoholic, a drug addict or otherwise unfit to raise a child. Lastly, concerning the effect of the length of proceedings, the respondent Government emphasised that the Italian courts had dealt with the case in only ten months; therefore, the Italian authorities could not be held responsible for the length of time that M. had spent away from his father.
80. In so far as the procedural fairness of the decision-making in the Italian courts was concerned, the respondent Government fully endorsed the findings of the European Commission (see above, paragraphs 39-45). More specifically, they pointed out that the proceedings in the Italian courts had been fair and both parties had been given an opportunity to make submissions to those courts, irrespective of the fact that the submissions had been made in writing. Furthermore, the first applicant had been represented by counsel.
81. The respondent Government sought to differentiate the facts forming the background to the recent Grand Chamber judgment Neulinger and Shuruk v. Switzerland (cited above, § 139) from the facts of the present case in that the former concerned the motivation for a refusal to return a child to the country of origin, while the present case concerned proceedings in the country of origin, and its purpose was not to justify the actions of the Latvian authorities.
(c) The third-party Government
82. The Latvian Government relied on Neulinger and Shuruk and criticised the Italian authorities’ failure to conduct an in-depth examination of the entire family situation of the applicants and M.’s father. It was alleged that the Italian courts had failed to take into account the fact that the first applicant was and always had been M.’s primary caregiver. M.’s father had had only random contact with his son even while the applicants were still residing in Italy. Furthermore, M.’s father had not made any attempt to contact his son during the more than four years that the applicants had been living in Latvia. In addition, it was pointed out that M. had lived in Latvia much longer than he had resided in Italy. Lastly, the Italian courts had not assessed M.’s father’s capacity to raise a child on his own and had not considered alternative solutions for ensuring their mutual contact (in this regard the Latvian Government referred to Deak v. Romania and the United Kingdom, no. 19055/05, § 69, 3 June 2008).
83. Concerning the procedural fairness of the decision-making in the Italian courts, the Latvian Government submitted that it was incorrect to rely on Articles 23 (b) and 42 (2) (a) of the Regulation in isolation, since those provisions had to be interpreted in harmony with the relevant rules of international law, namely the UN Convention and Article 8 of the Convention. This contextual interpretation clearly led to the conclusion that the applicants’ procedural rights had been disregarded by the Italian courts.
2. Assessment of the Court
84. The Court will deal separately with the applicant’s complaint about the order for M.’s return, and the complaint that the first applicant was not present at the hearing of the Rome Youth Court on 21 April 2008.
(a) General principles
85. In Neulinger and Shuruk (cited above, §§ 131-140, with further references) the Court articulated and crystallised a number of principles which have emerged from its case-law on the issue of the international abduction of children, as follows.
(i) The Convention cannot be interpreted in a vacuum, but, in accordance with Article 31 § 3 (c) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (1969), account is to be taken of any relevant rules of international law applicable to the Contracting Parties (see Streletz, Kessler and Krenz v. Germany [GC], nos. 34044/96, 35532/97 and 44801/98, § 90, ECHR 2001-II).
(ii) The positive obligations that Article 8 of the Convention imposes on States with respect to reuniting parents with their children must therefore be interpreted in the light of the UN Convention and the Hague Convention (see Maire v. Portugal, no. 48206/99, § 72, ECHR 2003-VII, and Ignaccolo-Zenide v. Romania, no. 31679/96, § 95, ECHR 2000-I).
(iii) The Court is competent to review the procedure followed by the domestic courts, in particular to ascertain whether those courts, in applying and interpreting the provisions of the Hague Convention, have secured the guarantees of the Convention and especially those of Article 8 (see, to that effect, Bianchi v. Switzerland, no. 7548/04, § 92, 22 June 2006, and Carlson v. Switzerland, no. 49492/06, § 73, 6 November 2008).
(iv) In this area the decisive issue is whether a fair balance between the competing interests at stake – those of the child, of the two parents, and of public order – has been struck, within the margin of appreciation afforded to States in such matters (see Maumousseau and Washington, cited above, § 62), bearing in mind, however, that the child’s best interests must be the primary consideration (see, to that effect, Gnahoré, cited above, § 59).
(v) “The child’s interests” are primarily considered to be the following two: to have his or her ties with his or her family maintained, unless it is proved that such ties are undesirable, and to be allowed to develop in a sound environment (see, among many other authorities, Elsholz v. Germany [GC], no. 25735/94, § 50, ECHR 2000-VIII, and Maršálek v. the Czech Republic, no. 8153/04, § 71, 4 April 2006). The child’s best interests, from a personal development perspective, will depend on a variety of individual circumstances, in particular his age and level of maturity, the presence or absence of his parents and his environment and experiences.
(vi) A child’s return cannot be ordered automatically or mechanically when the Hague Convention is applicable, as is indicated by the recognition in that instrument of a number of exceptions to the obligation to return the child (see, in particular, Articles 12, 13 and 20), based on considerations concerning the actual person of the child and his environment, thus showing that it is for the court hearing the case to adopt an in concreto approach to it (see Maumousseau and Washington, cited above, § 72).
(vii) The task to assess those best interests in each individual case is thus primarily one for the domestic authorities, which often have the benefit of direct contact with the persons concerned. To that end they enjoy a certain margin of appreciation, which remains subject, however, to European supervision whereby the Court reviews under the Convention the decisions that those authorities have taken in the exercise of that power (see, for example, Hokkanen v. Finland, 23 September 1994, § 55, Series A no. 299-A, and Kutzner v. Germany, no. 46544/99, §§ 65-66, ECHR 2002-I; see also Tiemann v. France and Germany (dec.), nos. 47457/99 and 47458/99, ECHR 2000-IV; Bianchi, cited above, § 92; and Carlson, cited above, § 69).
(vii) In addition, the Court must ensure that the decision-making process leading to the adoption of the impugned measures by the domestic court was fair and allowed those concerned to present their case fully (see Tiemann, cited above, and Eskinazi and Chelouche v. Turkey (dec.), no. 14600/05, ECHR 2005-XIII (extracts)). To that end the Court must ascertain whether the domestic courts conducted an in-depth examination of the entire family situation and of a whole series of factors, in particular of a factual, emotional, psychological, material and medical nature, and made a balanced and reasonable assessment of the respective interests of each person, with constant concern for determining what the best solution would be for the abducted child in the context of an application for his return to his country of origin (see Maumousseau and Washington, cited above, § 74).
86. The Court will now apply those principles to the specific complaints raised by the applicants.
(b) The order for the second applicant to be returned to Italy
87. The Court reiterates that the second applicant’s return to his father in Italy was ordered by the Rome Youth Court decision of 21 April 2008 (see above, paragraph 28), which was upheld on appeal by the decision of the Rome Court of Appeal adopted on 21 April 2009 (see above, paragraph 37). The return was ordered on the basis of sub-paragraphs (4), (7) and (8) of Article 11 of the Regulation. Article 11 refers to the procedure for the return of a wrongfully removed child. That procedure is set out in Articles 12 and 13 of the Hague Convention.
88. The respondent Government have argued that there has been no interference with the applicants’ family life (see above, paragraph 76). The Court has previously found that an interference occurs where domestic measures hinder the mutual enjoyment by a parent and a child of each other’s company (see, for example, Raban v. Romania, no. 25437/08, § 31, 26 October 2010). In the present case a psychologist, whose report was solicited by the applicants’ representative, has confirmed that M. is suffering psychological stress and anxiety in connection with his potential return to Italy (see above, paragraph 33). That cannot but have a significant impact on the applicants’ enjoyment of their family life. Furthermore, the Court has more than once found that an order for return, even if it has not been enforced, in itself constitutes an interference with the right to respect for family life (see, for example, Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, §§ 90-91, and Lipkowsky and McCormack v. Germany (dec.), no. 26755/10, 18 January 2011). In the present case there are no reasons requiring a departure from that approach. Accordingly, the Rome Youth Court’s order to return M. to Italy constituted an interference with the applicants’ right to respect for family life.
89. Turning to the question of whether the interference complained of was “in accordance with the law” within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention, the Court observes that in the present case the parties have not disputed that the first applicant’s removal of M. from Italy was wrongful within the meaning of Article 3 of the Hague Convention (compare with Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, §§ 99-105). Article 12 of the Hague Convention requires the return of wrongfully removed children, subject to exceptions set out in Article 13 of that Convention. In such circumstances the Court does not doubt that the interference was ordered in accordance with the law, namely Article 11 of the Regulation in combination with Article 12 of the Hague Convention.
90. As to the question of whether the order to return M. to Italy pursued one of the legitimate aims exhaustively listed in Article 8 § 2 of the Convention, the respondent Government advanced two theories: that the interference was necessary to protect M.’s father’s right to respect for family life, or to safeguard the best interests of the child. There is no real dispute between the parties that the decision of the Italian courts to return M. to Italy pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the rights and freedoms of the child and his father. Consequently, the Court accepts that it was the case (see also Neulinger and Shuruk, § 106).
91. The Court must therefore determine whether the interference in question was “necessary in a democratic society” within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention, interpreted in the light of the above-mentioned international instruments, the decisive issue being whether a fair and proportionate balance between the competing interests at stake – those of the child, of the two parents, and of public order – was struck, within the margin of appreciation afforded to States in such matters (see paragraph 85 above, (iv)).
92. In that regard the Court emphasises that it is not its task to take the place of the competent authorities in examining whether there would be a grave risk that M. would be exposed to psychological or physical harm, within the meaning of Article 13 of the Hague Convention, if he returned to Italy. However, the Court is competent to ascertain whether the Italian courts, in applying and interpreting the provisions of that Convention and of the Regulation, secured the guarantees set forth in Article 8 of the Convention, particularly taking into account the child’s best interests (see Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, § 141). It is essential also to keep in mind that the Hague Convention is essentially an instrument of a procedural nature and not a human rights treaty protecting individuals on an objective basis (see Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, § 145).
93. The Court cannot but observe that the reasoning contained in the Italian courts’ decisions of 21 April 2008 (see above, paragraph 28) and 21 April 2009 (see above, paragraph 37) was rather scant (see also the opinion of the European Commission, above, paragraph 45). Even if the Court accepted the Italian courts’ theory that their role was limited by Article 11 (4) of the Regulation to assessing whether adequate arrangements had been made to secure M.’s protection after his return to Italy from any identified risks within the meaning of Article 13 (b) of the Hague Convention, it cannot fail to observe that the Italian courts in their decisions failed to address any risks that had been identified by the Latvian authorities. Thus, for example, the conclusions contained in the Rīga Custody Court’s report (see above, paragraph 18), the expert psychologist’s report (see above, paragraph 19) and the Rīga City Vidzeme District Court’s decision of 11 April 2007 (see above, paragraph 22) were not explicitly mentioned in either of the two decisions. It is therefore necessary to verify whether the arrangements for M.’s protection listed in the Italian courts’ decisions can be in any case considered to have reasonably been taken into account his best interests.
94. The measures proposed by M.’s father and subsequently accepted as adequate by two levels of Italian courts are summarised in paragraph 28 above. The considerations identified by the Latvian authorities were that the child was well adjusted to living with his mother in Rīga (paragraph 18), that his separation from his mother would adversely affect his development and might create neurotic problems, illnesses or both (paragraph 19), and that strong ties had formed between M. and his mother (paragraph 22). In addition, in their observations before this Court the applicants indicated that the first applicant was unable to accompany the child to Italy, since she did not have sufficient financial means to reside there and was essentially unemployable, since she did not know any Italian, and that the child and his father had no language in common, had never lived together without the mother, and had not seen each other for more than three years at the time when the Rome Court of Appeal dismissed the first applicant’s appeal against the decision of 21 April 2008 (see also Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, § 150). The Latvian judicial authorities in their decisions also found that it was financially unfeasible for the first applicant to return to Italy (the Rīga City Vidzeme District Court decision of 11 April 2007, see above, paragraph 22), confirmed that M.’s father had not seen his son since 2006 (the Custody Court’s opinion of 8 January 2008, see above, paragraph 24) and had made no effort to establish contact with M. in the meantime (the Rīga Regional Court decision of 24 May 2007, see above, paragraph 23).
95. The Italian courts did not refer to the two psychologists’ reports that had been drawn up in Latvia pursuant to requests from the applicants’ representative and then relied upon by the Latvian courts. Neither did the Italian courts refer to the potential dangers to M.’s psychological health that had been identified in those reports. Had those courts considered the reports unreliable, they certainly had the opportunity to request a report from a psychologist of their own choosing. However, that was not done either. As to the residence that M.’s father proposed as his accommodation after his return to Italy, no effort was made by any Italian authorities to establish whether it was suitable as a home for a young child. The house was not inspected, either by the courts or by another person of their choosing. Those conditions, taken cumulatively, leave the Court unpersuaded that the Italian courts sufficiently appreciated the seriousness of the difficulties which M. was likely to encounter in Italy (see Neulinger and Shuruk, cited above, § 146, with further references).
96. As to the adequacy of the “safeguards” of M.’s well-being proposed by his father and accepted by the Italian courts as adequate, the Court considers that allowing the first applicant to stay with the child for fifteen to thirty days during the first year and then for one summer month every other year after that is a manifestly inappropriate response to the psychological trauma that would inevitably follow a sudden and irreversible severance of the close ties between mother and child. In the opinion of the Court, the order to drastically immerse a child in a linguistically and culturally foreign environment cannot in any way be compensated by attending a kindergarten, a swimming pool and Russian-language classes. While the father’s undertaking to ensure that M. receives adequate psychological support is indeed laudable, the Court cannot agree that such an external support could ever be considered as an equivalent alternative to psychological support that is intrinsic to strong, stable and undisturbed ties between a child and his mother.
97. Lastly, the Court observes, with the third-party Government, that the Italian courts had not considered any alternative solutions for ensuring contact between M. and his father.
98. For these reasons the Court concludes that the interference with the applicants’ right to respect for their family life was not “necessary in a democratic society” within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention on the account of the Italian courts’ order for M.’s return to Italy.
(c) The procedural fairness of the decision-making in the Rome Youth Court
99. So far as the fairness of the Italian decision-making process is concerned the applicants considered that the first applicant’s absence from the hearing of the Rome Youth Court rendered it unfair and did not afford due respect to the interests safeguarded by Article 8 (see, inter alia, Iosub Caras v. Romania, cited above, § 41).
100. The Court finds that the procedural equality between the parties to the case was observed so far as the observance of the applicants’ interests under Article 8 was concerned. The decisive procedural issue in the present case is whether the authorities charged with decision-making were placed in a position to duly respect and give force to the parties’ rights under Article 8. Taking into account that both M.’s father and the first applicant submitted, with the aid of counsel, detailed written statements to two levels of Italian courts, the Court is satisfied that the procedural fairness requirement of Article 8 has been observed (see also the conclusions of the European Commission, above, paragraph 43). So far as the adequacy of those courts’ reaction to the arguments submitted by the applicants is concerned, the Court refers to its conclusions above.
101. Accordingly there has been no violation of Article 8 on account of the first applicant’s absence from the hearing of the Rome Youth Court.
II. OTHER COMPLAINTS
102. The applicants also complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention about the length and unfairness of the first set of proceedings in the Italian courts and about the fact that M. was not heard in person by any Italian courts.
103. However, in the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
104. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
105. The applicants claimed EUR 10,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, approximately EUR 10 for each day of anxiety since the applicants first learned of M.’s father’s request for M. to be returned to Italy.
106. The respondent Government argued that the applicant had not submitted itemised particulars of that claim, as required by Rule 60 § 2 of the Rules of the Court.
107. The Court notes that the applicants have adequately explained the method used for arriving at the amount claimed in respect of non-pecuniary damage. In the light of the fact that the applicants must have demonstrated a clear link between the violation of Article 8 found by the Court and the non-pecuniary damage caused by the return order, the Court awards the applicants jointly EUR 10,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
108. In respect of costs and expenses, the applicants claimed a total amount of EUR 13,610.69, calculated as follows: EUR 171 for the two psychological examinations of the second applicant, EUR 643 for translations of the documents sent by the Court, EUR 10,500 in legal fees for the first applicant’s representation in the Italian courts, EUR 1,815 for the applicants’ representation before the Court, EUR 371 for family psychotherapy for the applicants and EUR 110.69 for postal expenses.
109. The respondent Government argued that the applicant had not submitted itemised particulars of that claim, as required by Rule 60 § 2 of the Rules of the Court. Furthermore, the applicants had not specified which documents from the Court had needed to be translated.
110. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award to the applicants jointly the sum of EUR 5,000 covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
111. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Dismisses by a majority the respondent Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies;
2. Declares by a majority the complaints concerning the order to return the second applicant to his father in Italy and about the first applicant’s absence from the hearing of the Rome Youth Court admissible;
3. Declares unanimously the remainder of the application inadmissible;
4. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention on account of the Italian courts’ order for the second applicant to be returned to Italy;
5. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention on account of the first applicant’s absence from the hearing of the Rome Youth Court;
6. Holds by six votes to one
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros) jointly to the applicants, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros) jointly to the applicants, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period, plus three percentage points;
7. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 12 July 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Françoise Tulkens
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Popović is annexed to this judgment.
F.T.
S.H.N.


DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE POPOVIĆ
I find the application to be inadmissible in terms of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, because, by failing to file a complaint with the Cassation Court, the applicants did not exhaust domestic remedies.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Eccezione preliminare respinta (non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione dell’ Art. 8; nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 8; resto inammissibile; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA Å NEERSONE E KAMPANELLA C. ITALIA
(Richiesta n. 14737/09)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
12 luglio 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Å neersone e Kampanella c. Italia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, David Thór Björgvinsson Dragoljub Popović, Giorgio Malinverni András Sajó, Guido Raimondi Paulo il de di Pinto Albuquerque, giudici,
e Stanley Naismith, Sezione Cancelliere,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 21 giugno 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 14737/09) contro la Repubblica italiana depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini lettoni, OMISSIS e suo figlio OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), 9 marzo 2009.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dalla Sig.ra OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Rīga. Il Governo italiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig.ra E. Spatafora, l'Agente del Governo.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che il Governo italiano aveva violato il loro diritto al rispetto della loro famiglia garantito dall’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Loro indicarono inoltre che l'assenza del primo richiedente dall'udienza della Corte dei Minori di Romaaveva reso ingiusto il processo decisionale nelle corti italiane.
4. Il 26 novembre 2009 il Presidente della Camera al quale la causa era stata assegnata decise di dare avviso al Governo italiano della parte della richiesta riguardo all'equità procedurale dei procedimenti in Italia, così come l'interferenza addotta col diritto al rispetto della vita famigliare di richiedenti la vita .
5. Le parti risposero per iscritto alle reciproche osservazioni. Inoltre, commenti di terze-parti furono ricevuti dal Governo lettone che aveva esercitato il suo diritto di intervenire (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Decide 44 § 1 (b)). Le parti risposero a quei commenti (Articolo 44 § 6).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1973 e 2002 e vivono a RÄ«ga.
A. Eventi prima della partenza dei richiedenti dall'Italia
7. Nel 2002 M. nacque dal primo richiedente in Italia. Suo padre era un cittadino italiano che non si sposò mai con il primo richiedente ma che non ha mai contestato la sua paternità di M.. Nel 2003 i genitori di M. si separarono ed i richiedenti si trasferirono in una residenza separata a Cerveteri, Italia. I richiedenti adducono che sin dalla nascita di M. lui è stato in pratica in cura esclusiva di sua madre, e la partecipazione di suo padre nella sua educazione è stata minima.
8. Su richiesta del primo richiedente, il 20 settembre 2004 la Corte dei Minori di Roma (Tribunale dei minorenni di Roma) concesse la custodia di M. a sua madre perché il conflitto in corso fra i genitori rendeva la custodia congiunta inattuabile. Comunque, la corte sostenne che il padre aveva diritto ad avere figlio a casa sua nei giorni della settimana specificati ed anche ogni qualvolta il primo richiedente era viaggiante fuori da Roma per una lunghezza di tempo che eccedeva una settimana o fuori dall'Italia per qualsiasi lunghezza di tempo. La decisione entrò in vigore nel giorno che è stata adottata.
9. Il padre di M. fece appello contro questa decisione, richiedendo che venisse accordata la custodia congiunta o che venisse accordata solo la custodia a lui e che al primo richiedente venisse impedito di portare all'estero il figlio o cambiare la sua residenza senza la precedente approvazione del padre. Il Dipartimento dei Minori della Corte d'appello di Roma (Corte d’appello di Roma. Sezione per i minorenni) ha respinto la sua richiesta in una decisione del 1 marzo 2005, notando, inter alia che il figlio si stava sviluppando bene e che era impossibile assicurare il suo sviluppo accordando la custodia solo al padre. Inoltre, si notò che la preoccupazione del padre che fosse probabile che il primo richiedente si trasferisse in Lettonia e prendesse loro figlio con lei era infondata perché un giudice in un’udienza di difesa (giudice tutelare, “il giudice di difesa”) prima aveva rifiutato di emettere un passaporto a M. ed anche perché sua madre aveva aderito severamente alla direttiva della corte di prima - istanza ed aveva lasciato il figlio alle cura di suo padre quando viaggiava in Lettonia.
10. Il 24 giugno 2005 il giudice di difesa accordò un autorizzazione per emettere un passaporto a M.. L’11 luglio2005 il padre di M. fece appello contro quella decisione. Il 14 novembre 2005 la Corte dei Minori di Roma respinse il ricorso del padre di M., perché non c'era nessuna prova che il primo richiedente stava progettando di lasciare l’Italia col figlio.
11. Il 3 febbraio 2006 la Corte (Tribunale) di Civitavecchia decise che il padre di M. doveva fare dei pagamenti di mantenimento per il figlio. La decisione notò, inter alia, che il padre prima aveva evitato di sostenere finanziariamente suo figlio. Il padre di M. non riuscì a fare i pagamenti ordinati e l’ 8 aprile 2006 il primo richiedente presentò un reclamo di questo presso la polizia italiana.
B. La partenza de richiedenti la partenza ed susseguenti i procedimenti in Italia
12. Sembra che a causa dell’ insuccesso del padre di M. nel sostenere finanziariamente i richiedenti il loro solo reddito erano i soldi che la madre del primo richiedente stava spedendo dalla Lettonia. Nel dicembre 2005 la madre del primo richiedente la informò comunque, che lei non era più in grado d offrire appoggio finanziario. Secondo i richiedenti era per questa ragione che loro non avevano altra scelta se non ritornare in Lettonia nell’ aprile 2006. I richiedenti indicano che loro continuarono successivamente a ritornare in Italia per brevi periodi di tempo. Secondo il Governo italiano, loro non sono mai ritornati.
13. Il 7 febbraio2006 fu accordata la cittadinanza lettone a M., poiché si stabilì che la residenza permanente di sua madre al tempo della sua nascita era stata la Lettonia. Successivamente, il primo richiedente registrò la residenza permanente di M. in un appartamento a Rīga appartenente a lei.
14. In una data non specificata il padre di M. richiesto la Corte dei Minori di Roma per accordarlo provvisorio risuola custodia di M. ed ordinare il suo ritorno ad Italia.
15. 5 giugno 2006 che corte emise una decisione nella quale sostenne la richiesta del padre. La decisione notò che le azioni del primo richiedente erano state dannose al figlio. La corte contenne inoltre che non aveva giurisdizione per ordinare il ritorno del figlio ad Italia ma indicò che M. doveva risiedere con suo padre. La decisione infine previde che un'udienza sarebbe contenuta 25 ottobre 2006 e che il padre di M. aveva un obbligo per informare il primo richiedente della decisione della corte prima del 20 settembre 2006.
16. I richiedenti presentano che il primo richiedente non fu informato dell'udienza che era stata elencata, né lei ricevette una citazione a sé. I richiedenti presentano inoltre che il padre di M. non aveva richiesto mai la piena custodia, ma invece aveva chiesto alla corte di riattivare i suoi diritti di contatto col figlio ed ordinare il suo ritorno ad Italia. Il primo richiedente adduce che lei imparò solamente della decisione adottata a marzo di 2007.
C. I procedimenti della Convenzione di Hague in Lettonia
17. Il 16 gennaio 2007 (con cui sembra essere un errore materiale il documento è datato 16 gennaio 2006) il Ministero italiano della Giustizia, nella sua veste come l'Autorità Centrale sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione sugli Aspetti Civili del Rapimento Internazionale del Bambino (“la Convenzione di Hague”), ha emesso una richiesta affinché M. ritornasse in Italia.
18. Dopo avere ricevuto la richiesta, il Ministero lettone delle questioni di Figli e Famiglia, (Bērnu un ģimenes lietu ministrija) che è l'Autorità Centrale lettone all'interno del significato della Convenzione di Hague procedimenti civili ed iniziati contro il primo richiedente nella conformitą con Articolo 7 della Convenzione di Hague. Il Rīga che Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana che era stata assegnata la causa ha richiesto la Cittą di Rīga Rende orfano Corte di ' (bāriņtiesa di Rīgas) valutare i richiedenti la residenza di ' ed emettere un'opinione riguardo alla possibilità di restituire M. a suo padre in Italia. Dopo avere visitato i richiedenti la residenza di ', con una decisione di 20 marzo 2007 gli Orfani che Corte di ' ha stabilito che le condizioni viventi del figlio erano che dà beneficio per la sua crescita e sviluppo. Notò inoltre che M. si era adattato a vivere nella residenza di sua madre e che lei stava assicurando il suo pieno sviluppo fisico ed intellettuale. Di conseguenza, gli Orfani che Corte di ' ha concluso che il ritorno del figlio ad Italia non sarebbe compatibile coi suoi migliori interessi.
19. Che conclusione fu sostenuta anche con le sentenze di un psicologo la cui opinione era stata richiesta coi richiedenti l'avvocato di '. In un rapporto 30 marzo 2007 uscì col psicologo concluso che separazione di contatto fra M. e sua madre non sarebbe stata concessa, in che potesse colpire negativamente lo sviluppo del figlio e potrebbe creare anche problemi neurotici e malattie.
20. Con una lettera di 6 aprile 2007, l'Autorità Centrale italiana attestò all'Autorità Centrale lettone che se qualsiasi delle circostanze menzionate in Articolo 13 (b) della Convenzione di Hague Italia sorse sarebbe in grado attivare una rete di protezione di figlio che ampio-varia che potrebbe assicurare che M. e suo padre ricevettero aiuto psicologico.
21. 11 aprile 2007 il Rīga Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana emise una decisione con la quale rifiutò la richiesta del padre per ritornare M. in Italia. Che corte basò la sua decisione sulla Convenzione di Hague e Consiglio Regolamentazione (EC) N.ro 2201/2003 27 novembre 2003 riguardo a giurisdizione ed il riconoscimento ed esecuzione di sentenze nelle questioni matrimoniali e le questioni della responsabilità parentale (“la Regolamentazione”). La corte contenne che l'allontanamento di M. era stato sbagliato all'interno del significato della Convenzione di Hague e la Regolamentazione, poiché era stato eseguito senza il permesso di suo padre. Si notò inoltre che non era conveniente per ascoltare la propria opinione di M., poiché lui era quattro anni vecchio al tempo e non era capace di formare un'opinione di che dei suoi genitori lui dovrebbe abitare con.
22. La corte lo considerò necessario valutare se le circostanze previdero per in Articolo 13 (b) della Convenzione di Hague esistita. La sua conclusione era che quelle circostanze esisterono. Notò le cravatte fra M. e sua madre ed il fatto che lui aveva stabilito bene in Lettonia e considerato che la sua residenza continuata in Lettonia era essenziale per il suo sviluppo. La Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme fondò che le disposizioni di Articolo 11 (4) della Regolamentazione non era stato adempiuto, perché era finanziariamente impossibile per il primo richiedente per seguire M. ad Italia se lui fosse stato ritornato là. Inoltre, le garanzie previste per con l'Italia non potevano assicurare che il figlio non subirebbe psicologicamente e che la sua salute mentale non sarebbe prevenuta. Di conseguenza la corte fece domanda Articolo 13 (b) della Convenzione di Hague e rifiutò la richiesta del padre.
23. In 24 maggio 2007 il Rīga Corte Regionale adottņ una definitivo decisione con la quale respinse il ricorso del padre contro la decisione della Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme. In sostanza la Corte Regionale si confece con le conclusioni della corte di prima - istanza, mentre aggiungendo che le garanzie offrirono con l'Autorità Centrale italiana riguardo alla protezione disponibile a M. dopo il suo ritorno potenziale ad Italia era troppo vago e non specifico. Si menzionò anche che il padre di M. non aveva fatto nessun sforzo di stabilire sin da allora contatto con suo figlio i richiedenti la partenza di ' dall'Italia.
24. 4 giugno 2007 il primo richiedente richiesto il Rīga Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana per accordarla risuola custodia di M.. 8 gennaio 2008 la Rīga Custodia Corte emise un'opinione nella quale concluse che accordando risuola custodia di M. a sua madre era nei suoi migliori interessi. La Custodia Corte indicò fra le altre considerazioni il fatto che il padre di M. non vedeva suo figlio dal 2006.
D. Procedimenti basati sulla Regolamentazione
25. 7 agosto il padre di 2007 M. depositò una richiesta con la Corte dei Minori di Romache fu basata su Articolo 11 (4), (7) e (8) della Regolamentazione, emettere un immediatamente decisione eseguibile che ordina il ritorno di M. ad Italia.
26. 11 dicembre 2007 il primo richiedente presentò le sue osservazioni a che corte nella quale lei ammise che lei aveva lasciato Italia a causa di un conflitto in corso col padre di M. ed a causa di lei situazione finanziaria e difficile. Lei notò che il padre di M. non aveva mai travelled per vedere suo figlio in Lettonia; comunque, lei affermò che i richiedenti erano disponibili per venire ad Italia ad incontrare il padre di M. durante feste di scuola sempre. In conclusione, lei richiese, che i pagamenti di mantenimento dei figli di ordine della corte nell'importo di 700 euros (EUR) per mese.
27. La Corte di Civitavecchia costituì una sentenza riguardo alla richiesta del primo richiedente pagamenti di mantenimento dei figli ed il padre di M. ordinato pagare il primo richiedente EUR 4,800 11 gennaio 2008 nel contesto di procedimenti separati, più interesse, cominciando da 14 ottobre 2004.
28. Con una decisione di 21 aprile 2008 la Corte dei Minori di Roma sostenne la richiesta del padre. Considerò che il ruolo solo lasciò a sé con Articolo 11 (4) della Regolamentazione verificare era se disposizioni adeguate erano state rese per garantire la protezione del figlio da qualsiasi identificò rischi all'interno del significato di Articolo 13 (b) della Convenzione di Hague dopo suo o il suo ritorno. Dopo in considerazione delle osservazioni del primo richiedente, la corte notò, che il padre aveva proposto che M. avrebbe sospeso con lui, mentre il primo richiedente sarebbe stato autorizzato per usare un alloggio in Aranova per periodi di quindici a trenta giorni consecutivi durante il primo anno e successivamente per uno sarebbe passato l'estate mese ogni altro anno (il primo richiedente dovrebbe coprire suo proprio viaggia spese ed uno la metà dell'affitto dell'alloggio in Aranova) durante che tempo che M. starebbe sospendendo con sua madre, mentre il padre tratterrebbe il diritto per visitarlo su una base quotidiana. M. sarebbe iscritto in un asilo infantile che lui aveva frequentato prima il suo allontanamento dall'Italia. Lui frequenterebbe anche una piscina lui aveva usato prima la sua partenza dall'Italia. Il padre si impegnò inoltre assicurare che il figlio avrebbe ricevuto aiuto psicologico ed adeguato e frequenterebbe classi in lingua Russa per figli russi. La corte considerò tale disposizione adeguato adempiere i requisiti della Regolamentazione ed ordinò un'esecuzione immediata della sua decisione per ritornare M. in Italia ed averlo risieda con suo padre. La corte indicò anche che sarebbe stato preferibile se il primo richiedente accompagnasse M. sul suo modo ad Italia ma, debba quel provi essere impossibile, il suo ritorno sarebbe sistemato con l'ambasciata italiana in Lettonia. A causa della natura urgente della causa, la decisione fu pronunciata immediatamente essere eseguibile.
29. Il 18 giugno 2008 (in cui sembra essere un errore materiale, la data indicata nel documento è 18 giugno 2009) il primo richiedente depositò una richiesta con la Gioventù Corte per sospendere l'esecuzione della sua decisione. Lei dibatté che M. non era stato ascoltato col tribunale e che la Gioventù Corte non aveva preso nell'esame gli argomenti che le corti lettoni avevano usato nelle loro decisioni quando facendo domanda Articolo 13 della Convenzione di Hague.
30. Il 20 giugno 2008 il primo richiedente depositò un ricorso contro la decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma del 21 aprile 2008. Nel suo ricorso lei richiese che l'esecuzione di che decisione sia sospesa; che l'udienza di corte di ricorso M.; che c'è un ordine che lei trattiene risuoli custodia di M.; e che il padre di M. sia ordinato per pagare EUR 700 per mese in pagamenti di mantenimento dei figli.
31. Il 22 luglio 2008 la Corte dei Minori di Roma adottò una decisione nella quale respinse la richiesta del primo richiedente per sospendere l'esecuzione della decisione di 21 aprile. Che corte considerò che non era appropriato per interrogare il figlio, mentre prendendo in considerazione la sua giovane età ed il livello della maturità. Inoltre, considerò che Articolo 42 della Regolamentazione non l'obbligò ad ascoltare le parti in persona. Sottolineò che tutte le decisioni prese con le corti lettoni erano state prese debitamente nell'esame. Infine, la corte sostenne la richiesta del padre per emettere un certificato di ritorno in conformità con Articoli 40, 42 e 47 della Regolamentazione. Il certificato fu emesso il 29 luglio 2008.
32. Il 14 agosto 2008 l'Autorità Centrale italiana spedì una lettera all'Autorità Centrale lettone, mentre spedendo la decisione della Gioventù Corte del 22 luglio 2008 ed invitandolo a consigliare il lato italiano su “le iniziative che saranno prese per eseguire l'ordine di ritorno fatto dalla Corte dei Minori di Roma.”
33. Il 27 agosto 2008 uno psicologo emise un altro rapporto sullo stato psicologico di M.. Il rapporto concluse che il figlio aveva sviluppato i certi problemi psicologici in collegamento con la richiesta di suo padre di farlo ritornare in Italia. Reiterò inoltre la conclusione dal più primo rapporto, che M. aveva legami emotivi e forti con sua madre,per cui la separazione non era possibile .
34. Il 10 settembre 2008 il primo richiedente ricevette informazioni dall'Autorità Centrale lettone della richiesta resa con l'Autorità Centrale italiana. Il primo richiedente si informò che Lettonia aveva un obbligo per eseguire la decisione del 21 aprile2008 della Corte dei Minori .
35. Il 13 febbraio 2009 il primo richiedente presentò una richiesta al Rīga Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana, richiedendolo per indicare misure provvisorie e non concedere il ritorno di M. ad Italia “finché lui lui č d'accordo a ritornare a suo padre in Italia.” Inoltre, lei richiese la corte per costringere la Corte d'appello di Roma e la Corte dei Minori di Roma a cedere alla loro competenza alla Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme, poiché che corte già aveva, 4 giugno 2007, stato assegnato un ancora causa pendente riguardo all'accordare di risuola custodia di M. a sua madre, ed anche perché la residenza permanente del figlio era in Lettonia.
36. 18 febbraio 2009 la Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme adottò una decisione nella quale decise di non procedere con la richiesta del primo richiedente riguardo alla questione della custodia di M., poiché considerò che il ricorso del primo richiedente contro la decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma di 21 aprile 2008 che era pendente al tempo di fronte alla Corte d'appello di Roma concernè lo stesso argomento, con le stesse parti coinvolte.
37. 21 aprile 2009 la Corte d'appello di Roma adottò una decisione riguardo al ricorso del primo richiedente contro la decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma del 21 aprile 2008. La corte di ricorso prima di tutti osservati che facendo seguito ad Articolo 11 (8) della Regolamentazione (vedere sotto, divida in paragrafi 45) aveva giurisdizione per decidere la questione del ritorno del figlio ad Italia. Seguì a poi osservare che la corte di prima - istanza aveva implementato correttamente il set di procedura fuori in Articolo 11 (7) della Regolamentazione (vedere sotto, divida in paragrafi 45), siccome attestato con l'opinione ragionata della Commissione europea (vedere sotto, divide in paragrafi 39-45). La corte continuata con osservare che la decisione di accordare il padre di M. risuola custodia era stata motivata col comportamento del primo richiedente quando lei aveva scelto di portare il figlio a Lettonia e col padre sta impegnandosi prendersi cura del figlio in Italia. La Corte d'appello sostenne perciò la decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma ed ordinò che dopo che il ritorno del figlio ad Italia lui sia iscritto in una scuola elementare.
38. Il 10 luglio 2009 l'ufficiale giudiziario del RÄ«ga che Corte Regionale ha accusato con l'esecuzione della decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma del 21 aprile 2008 il padre di M. invitato ad offrire assistenza nell'esecuzione di quella decisione riattivando contatto con suo figlio. Sembra che il padre di M. non ha risposto a questa richiesta in qualsiasi il modo.
E. Procedimenti nella Commissione europea
39. Il 15 ottobre 2008 la Repubblica della Lettonia introdusse un'azione contro l'Italia di fronte alla Commissione europea nella richiesta di Articolo 227 del Trattato che Stabilisce la Comunità europea. Lettonia addusse, in particolare, che i procedimenti sopra-descritti in Italia (la decisione adottò su 21 aprile 2008 e l'uscita del certificato di ritorno a luglio 2008) non adatti alla Regolamentazione, in che si aveva ascoltato dalla Corte dei Minori di Roma 21 aprile 2008 nessuno dei richiedenti, ed anche che la Corte dei Minori di Roma aveva ignorato le decisioni di 11 aprile 2007 del Rīga Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana e di 24 maggio 2007 della Corte Regionale di Rīga.
40. Il 15 gennaio 2009 la Commissione emise un'opinione ragionata. Contenne che Italia aveva violato la Regolamentazione né il “principi generali della legge di Comunità.” In finora siccome è attinente alla causa di fronte alla Corte, la Commissione sostenne siccome segue.
41. All'inizio reiterò che, determinato le particolari circostanze della causa, dove Lettonia stava contestando la legalità delle azioni di un'autorità italiana con una funzione giudiziale, la sfera della revisione della Commissione era molto limitata. La Commissione potrebbe fare una rassegna solamente questioni di procedura, non la sostanza e doveva rispettare le decisioni rese con le corti italiane nell'esercizio dei loro poteri discrezionali.
42. Riguardo all'argomento della Repubblica di Lettonia che la decisione di 21 aprile 2008 era stata adottata senza tentare di ottenere l'opinione di M., la Commissione sottolineò, che seguì dalla Regolamentazione, la Nazioni Convenzione Unito sui Diritti del Figlio (“l'ONU Convenzione”), la Convenzione di Hague e lo Statuto di Diritti essenziali dell'Unione europea col quale ascolta l'opinione di un figlio riguardo ad a questioni che riguardano che figlio era un principio fondamentale. Comunque, che principio non era assoluto. Che che doveva essere preso in considerazione era il livello dello sviluppo del figlio. Che livello non era e non poteva essere definito in qualsiasi strumenti internazionali, perciò le autorità nazionali trattennero la discrezione ampia in simile questioni. La Commissione sostenne che l'Autorità Centrale italiana aveva usato che la discrezione ed indicò nel certificato di ritorno che non era stato necessario per le corti italiane per ascoltare M.. Perciò, nessuni degli strumenti internazionali che erano stati invocati con la Lettonia era stato violato.
43. Lettonia criticò inoltre il fatto che la decisione di 21 aprile 2008 era stata adottata senza prendere debitamente in considerazione la posizione del primo richiedente, e che la decisione era stata adottata senza ascolti entrambe le parti, incluso il primo richiedente che né fu informato del tempo dell'udienza imminente né invitò a prendere parte in sé. La Commissione notò che la decisione di 21 aprile 2008 era stata adottata in procedimenti scritto, senza ascolti osservazioni orali di entrambe le parti che erano pienamente in conformità alla legislazione procedurale italiana ed applicabile. La Commissione interpretò Articolo 42 (2) (b) della Regolamentazione (vedere sotto, divida in paragrafi 51) nella luce della causa-legge della Corte (riferendosi in particolare a Dombo Beheer B.V. c. i Paesi Bassi, 27 ottobre 1993, § 32 la Serie Un n. 274), e considerato che l'uso di procedimenti scritto era lecito lungo come il principio dell'uguaglianza di braccio fu osservato. La Commissione osservò che il primo richiedente era stato dato un'opportunità di presentare osservazioni scritto su motivi uguali col padre di M. e così né la Regolamentazione né l'ONU Convenzione era stata violata.
44. Infine, Lettonia criticò la decisione di 21 aprile 2008 ed il certificato di ritorno relativo per ignorare le autorità lettoni ' ragiona per rifiutare di ordinare il ritorno di M. ad Italia. La Commissione indicò che il suo ruolo era non analizzare la sostanza delle autorità italiane le decisioni di '-fu limitato a valutando l'ottemperanza con la procedura che condusse all'adozione di quelle decisioni coi requisiti procedurali della Regolamentazione. Nulla nella Regolamentazione impedì le autorità italiane di venire ad una conclusione che era opposta al giunse alle autorità lettoni. Completamente al contrario, la Commissione considerò che la Regolamentazione diede il paese della residenza del figlio prima dell'abduzione “i definitivo dicono” nell'ordinare il ritorno, anche se suo o il suo paese nuovo di residenza aveva declinato ordinare il ritorno. In questo riguardo alla Commissione notņ che il Rīga Corte Regionale, quando adottando la decisione di 24 maggio 2007 (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 23), si era riferito alla Legge di Procedura Civile, sezione 64419 (6) (2) di che rifiuto di licenze per restituire un figlio se il figlio è stabilito bene in Lettonia e suo o il suo ritorno non è in suo o i suoi interessi. La Commissione mise in dubbio l'insuccesso allegato della corte lettone per invocare il “molto più vincolante” Articolo 13 della Convenzione di Hague che nella loro opinione dimostrò che le corti lettoni avevano dedicato attenzione alla situazione di M. in Lettonia invece delle conseguenze potenziali del suo ritorno ad Italia. In breve, la Commissione aveva “non scoprì qualsiasi le indicazioni” che la vita in Italia metterebbe in mostra insieme con padre suo M. a danno fisico o psicologico o altrimenti lo metterebbe in una situazione intollerabile. Essendo così la Commissione considerò che la Corte dei Minori di Roma nella sua decisione di 21 aprile 2008 aveva rivolto direttamente il Rīga le preoccupazioni di Corte Regionale che le misure hanno previsto per la protezione di M. su ritorno suo in Italia erano troppo vaghe-la corte italiana aveva esposto fuori gli specifici obblighi sul padre che lascerebbe spazio a sviluppo equilibrato del figlio e per lui per avere contatto con ambo i genitori.
45. In conclusione la Commissione ammise che la decisione del 21 aprile 2008 non contenne un'analisi dettagliata di o gli argomenti del primo richiedente o di quelli del padre di M.. Comunque, considerò che la Regolamentazione non richiese tale analisi. Perciò, la procedura esatta per essere seguito in che riguardo fu lasciato il nazionale corteggia la discrezione di '. Prendendo che in conto, fu trovato, che né Lettonia né la Commissione, potessero contestare la particolare formulazione della decisione della corte italiana.
II. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
46. La Convenzione di Hague che è stata ratificata dalla Lettonia e l'Italia prevede, in finora come attinente, siccome segue.
Articolo 3
“L'allontanamento o la ritenuta di un figlio sarà considerata sbagliata dove-
un) è in violazione di diritti di custodia attribuita ad una persona, un'istituzione o qualsiasi l'altro corpo, congiuntamente o da solo sotto la legge dello Stato nella quale il figlio abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte all'allontanamento o ritenuta; e
b) al tempo dell'allontanamento o ritenuta quelli diritti davvero furono esercitati, congiuntamente o da solo, o sarebbe stato esercitato così ma per l'allontanamento o ritenuta.
I diritti di custodia menzionarono in supplire-paragrafo un) sopra, può sorgere in particolare con operazione di legge o con ragione di una decisione giudiziale o amministrativa, o con ragione di un accordo che ha effetto legale sotto la legge di che Stato.”
Articolo 4
“La Convenzione farà domanda a qualsiasi figlio che abitualmente era immediatamente residente in un Stato Contraente di fronte a qualsiasi violazione di custodia o diritti di accesso. La Convenzione cesserà fare domanda quando il figlio raggiunge l'età di 16 anni.”
Articolo 6
“Un Stato Contraente designerà una Autorità Centrale per assolvere i doveri che sono imposti con la Convenzione su simile autorità. [..]”
Articolo 7
“Autorità centrali co-opereranno l'un con l'altro e promuoveranno co-operazione fra le autorità competenti nel loro rispettivo Stato garantire il ritorno pronto di figli e realizzare gli altri oggetti di questa Convenzione.
In particolare, o direttamente o per qualsiasi l'intermediario, loro prenderanno tutte le misure appropriate-
[..]
f) iniziare o facilitare l'istituzione di procedimenti giudiziali o amministrativi con una prospettiva ad ottenendo il ritorno del figlio e, in una causa corretta, fabbricare disposizioni per organizzando o garantire l'esercizio effettivo di diritti di accesso; [..]”
Articolo 11
“I giudiziali o autorità amministrative degli Stati Contraenti agiranno rapidamente in procedimenti per il ritorno di figli.
Se il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa riguardate non è giunta ad una decisione entro sei settimane dalla data di principio dei procedimenti, il richiedente o l'Autorità Centrale dello Stato richiesto, su suo proprio iniziale o se a sé si chiede con l'Autorità Centrale dello Stato che richiede, avrà diritto a richiedere una dichiarazione delle ragioni per il ritardo. Se una replica è ricevuta con l'Autorità Centrale dello Stato richiesto, che Autorità trasmetterà la replica all'Autorità Centrale dello Stato che richiede, o al richiedente, siccome può essere la causa.”
Articolo 12
“Dove un figlio è stato rimosso erroneamente o è stato trattenuto in termini di Articolo 3 e, alla data del principio dei procedimenti di fronte al giudiziale o autorità amministrativa dello Stato Contraente dove è il figlio, un periodo di meno che un anno è passato dalla data dell'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta, l'autorità riguardata ordinerà immediatamente il ritorno del figlio.
Il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa, anche dove i procedimenti sono stati cominciati dopo la scadenza del periodo di un anno assegnata a nel paragrafo precedente, ordinerà anche il ritorno del figlio, a meno che ha dimostrato che il figlio ora sia stabilito nel suo ambiente nuovo.
Dove il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa nello Stato richiesto ha ragione di credere che il figlio è stato portato ad un altro Stato, può sospendere i procedimenti o può respingere la richiesta per il ritorno del figlio.”
Articolo 13
“Nonostante le disposizioni dell'Articolo precedente, il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa dello Stato richiesto non è legato per ordinare il ritorno del figlio se la persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che oppongono il suo ritorno stabiliscono che-
un) la persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che hanno la cura della persona del figlio non stavano esercitando davvero i diritti di custodia al tempo dell'allontanamento o ritenuta, o aveva acconsentito ad o successivamente aveva accettato senza protestare l'allontanamento o ritenuta; o
b) c'è un rischio grave che suo o il suo ritorno metterebbe in mostra il figlio a danno fisico o psicologico o altrimenti metterebbe il figlio in una situazione intollerabile.
Il giudiziale o autorità amministrativa possono rifiutare anche di ordinare il ritorno del figlio se trova che il figlio obietta ad essendo ritornato e ha raggiunto un'età e grado di maturità ai quali è appropriato per prendere conto delle sue prospettive.
In in considerazione delle circostanze assegnate ad in questo Articolo, i giudiziali ed autorità amministrative prenderanno in considerazione le informazioni relativo allo sfondo sociale del figlio previsto con l'Autorità Centrale o l'altra autorità competente della residenza abituale del figlio.”
Articolo 20
“Il ritorno del figlio sotto le disposizioni di Articolo 12 si può rifiutare se questo non fosse permesso coi principi fondamentali dello Stato richiesto relativo alla protezione di diritti umani e le libertà fondamentali.”
47. Il paragrafo 17 del preambolo della Regolamentazione spiega la sua sfera, in finora come sé è attinente a questa causa, siccome segue:
“In cause dell'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta di un figlio, il ritorno del figlio dovrebbe essere ottenuto senza ritardo, ed a questa fine la Convenzione di Hague di 25 ottobre 1980 continuerebbe a fare domanda siccome completato con le disposizioni di questa Regolamentazione, nel particolare Articolo 11. Le corti dello Stato membro ad o in che il figlio è stato rimosso erroneamente o è stato trattenuto dovrebbe essere in grado opporre suo o il suo ritorno in specifico, debitamente cause allineato. Comunque, tale decisione potrebbe essere sostituita con una decisione susseguente con la corte dello Stato membro di residenza abituale del figlio prima dell'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta. Debba che sentenza comporta il ritorno del figlio, il ritorno dovrebbe avere luogo senza qualsiasi procedura speciale che è richiesta per riconoscimento ed esecuzione di che sentenza nello Stato membro ad o in che il figlio è stato rimosso o è stato trattenuto.”
48. Con riguardo alla giurisdizione in cause dell'abduzione di figlio, la Regolamentazione, in Articolo 10 prevede, in finora siccome è attinente, siccome segue:
“In causa dell'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta del figlio, le corti dello Stato membro dove abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte all'allontanamento sbagliato il figlio o ritenuta tratterrà la loro giurisdizione finché il figlio ha acquisito una residenza abituale in un altro Stato membro e:
...
(b) il figlio ha risieduto in che l'altro Stato membro per un periodo di almeno un anno dopo la persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che hanno diritti di custodia ha avuto o avrebbe dovuto avere conoscenza del dove del figlio ed il figlio è stabilito in suo o il suo ambiente nuovo ed almeno una delle condizioni seguenti è soddisfatta:
(i) all'interno di uno anno dopo il possessore di diritti di custodia ha avuto o avrebbe dovuto avere conoscenza del dove del figlio, nessuna richiesta per ritorno è stata depositata di fronte alle autorità competenti dello Stato membro dove il figlio è stato rimosso o è stato trattenuto;
...
(l'iv) una sentenza su custodia che non comporta il ritorno del figlio è stata emessa con le corti dello Stato membro dove abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte all'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta il figlio.”
49.L’ Articolo 11 che specificamente esposto nel preambolo prevede come segue:
“1. Dove una persona, istituzione o l'altro corpo che hanno diritti di custodia fanno domanda alle autorità competenti in un Stato membro per consegnare una sentenza sulla base della Convenzione di Hague [..] per ottenere il ritorno di un figlio che è stato rimosso erroneamente o è stato trattenuto in un Stato membro altro che lo Stato membro dove abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte all'allontanamento sbagliato o ritenuta il figlio, divide in paragrafi 2 a 8 faranno domanda.
2. Quando applicando 12 e 13 della Convenzione di Hague del 1980 Articoli, si assicurerà che il figlio è dato l'opportunità essere ascoltato durante i procedimenti a meno che questo sembra avere improprio riguardo ad a suo o la sua età o grado della maturità.
3. Una corte alla quale è resa una richiesta per ritorno di un figlio siccome menzionato in paragrafo 1 agirà rapidamente in procedimenti sulla richiesta, mentre usando le procedure più spedite disponibile in legge nazionale.
Senza pregiudizio al primo subparagraph, la corte può, eccetto dove circostanze eccezionali rendono questo impossibile, emetta la sua sentenza nessuno più tardi che sei settimane dopo che la richiesta è depositata.
4. Una corte non può rifiutare di restituire un figlio sulla base di Articolo 13 (b) del [..] Convenzione di Hague se è stabilito che disposizioni adeguate sono state rese per garantire la protezione del figlio dopo suo o il suo ritorno.
5. Una corte non può rifiutare di restituire un figlio a meno che la persona che richiese il ritorno del figlio è stata data un'opportunità essere ascoltata.
[..]
7. A meno che le corti nello Stato membro dove abitualmente era immediatamente residente di fronte all'allontanamento sbagliato il figlio o ritenuta già è stata sequestrata entro una delle parti, la corte o autorità centrale che ricevono [una copia di un ordine su non-ritorni facendo seguito ad Articolo 13 della Convenzione di Hague e dei documenti attinente a quell'ordine] deve notificarlo alle parti e deve invitarli a fare osservazioni alla corte, in conformità con legge nazionale entro tre mesi della data di notificazione così che la corte può esaminare la questione di custodia del figlio. [..]
8. Nonostante una sentenza di non-ritorno facendo seguito ad Articolo 13 del [..] Convenzione di Hague qualsiasi sentenza susseguente che richiede il ritorno del figlio emise con una corte che ha giurisdizione sotto questa Regolamentazione sarà esecutiva in conformità con Sezione 4 di Capitolo III sotto per garantire il ritorno del figlio.”
50. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 40 (1) (b) della Regolamentazione, la sua Sezione 4 fa domanda a “il ritorno di un figlio comportato con una sentenza data facendo seguito ad Articolo 11 (8)”
51. Articolo 42 in Sezione 4 offre il seguente:
“1. Il ritorno di un figlio assegnò ad in Articolo 40 (1) (b) comportò con una sentenza esecutiva data in un Stato membro sarà riconosciuto ed esecutivo in un altro Stato membro senza il bisogno per una dichiarazione di esecutorietà e senza qualsiasi possibilità di opporre il suo riconoscimento se la sentenza è stata certificata nello Stato membro di origine in conformità con paragrafo 2.
Anche se legge nazionale non prevede per esecutorietà con operazione di legge nonostante qualsiasi il ricorso, di una sentenza che richiede il ritorno del figlio menzionata in Articolo 11 (b) (8), la corte di origine può dichiarare la sentenza esecutivo.
2. Il giudice di origine che consegnò la sentenza assegnò ad in Articolo 40 (1) (b) emetterà il certificato assegnato solamente ad in paragrafo 1 se:
(un) il figlio fu dato un'opportunità essere ascoltato, a meno che un'udienza fu considerata avere improprio riguardo ad a suo o la sua età o grado della maturità;
(b) le parti furono date un'opportunità essere ascoltate; e
(il c) la corte ha preso in considerazione nell'emettere la sua sentenza le ragioni per e prova che è posto sotto all'ordine emise facendo seguito ad Articolo 13 della Convenzione di Hague del 1980. [..]”
52. Come preoccupazioni l'esecuzione di sentenze che richiedono il ritorno di un figlio, Articolo 47 della Regolamentazione offre il seguente:
“1. La procedura di esecuzione è governata con la legge dello Stato membro di esecuzione.
2. Qualsiasi sentenza consegnata con una corte di un altro Membro Stat e [..] munito di certificato in conformità con [..] Articolo 42 (1) sarà eseguito nello Stato membro di esecuzione nelle stesse condizioni come se fosse stato consegnato in quel lo Stato membro.
In particolare, una sentenza secondo la quale è stata certificata [..] Articolo 42 (1) non può essere eseguito se è irreconciliabile con una sentenza esecutiva e susseguente.”
53. Infine, Articoli che 60 e 62 della Regolamentazione offrono che la Regolamentazione “prenderà precedenza” sulla Convenzione di Hague “in finora come [riguarda] questioni governate con questa Regolamentazione” e che la Convenzione di Hague continua “produrre effetti fra il Membro Stati che sono parte inoltre.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
54. I richiedenti si lamentano Articolo 8 della Convenzione sotto che l'italiano corteggia decisioni di ' che ordinano il ritorno di M. ad Italia erano contrarie ai suoi migliori interessi così come in violazione di legge internazionale e lettone.
55. I richiedenti si lamentano anche sotto Articolo 6 della Convenzione dell'equità procedurale di decisionale in corti di italiano. In particolare, loro sono critici del fatto che il primo richiedente non era presente all'udienza della Corte dei Minori .
56. I richiedenti le azioni di reclamo di ' riguardo alla procedura seguita con le corti italiane furono comunicate al Governo sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione che, mentre non contiene requisiti procedurali ed espliciti, richiede che l'elaborazione decisionale che conduce a misure di interferenza deve essere equa e come riconoscere riguardo dovuto agli interessi salvaguardò con che Articolo (vedere, inter l'alia, Iosub Caras c. la Romania, n. 7198/04, § 41, 27 luglio 2006, e Moretti e Benedetti c. l'Italia, n. 16318/07, § 27 ECHR 2010 -... (gli estratti)).
57. In finora siccome è attinente, Articolo 8 della Convenzione prevede siccome segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
A. Ammissibilità
1 Compatibilità. ratione personae
58. Il Governo italiano dibatté che la richiesta, in finora come sé riferì al secondo richiedente, era incompatibile ratione personae con la Convenzione all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 §§ 3 (un) e 4 della Convenzione. In che riguardo al Governo italiano dibatté che la causa presente essenzialmente riguardava un conflitto fra i due genitori del secondo richiedente, e fin da ambo genitori in principio hanno diritto a rispettare insieme per la vita di famiglia con figlio loro, mentre concedendo solamente uno dei genitori (in questa causa la madre) rappresentare gli interessi del figlio di fronte alla Corte disgregherebbe questa uguaglianza parentale. Il Governo si riferì inoltre a Moretti e Benedetti, (citò sopra, § 32), e S.D., D.P. ed A.T. c. il Regno Unito (n. 23715/94, decisione di Commissione di 20 maggio 1996 non segnalato) ed indicò la possibilità che è probabile che un conflitto di interessi esista, nell'il particolare considerare che 5 giugno 2006 la Corte dei Minori di Romaaveva accordato provvisoria risuoli custodia al padre di M. (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra).
59. I richiedenti dibatterono che che che era in pericolo era gli interessi del figlio, il secondo richiedente come opposto agli interessi di suo padre. Dato l'importanza eminente degli interessi del figlio, non c'era altra scelta che averlo come una parte alla causa di fronte alla Corte.
60. Il Governo lettone non fu d'accordo con l'eccezione del Governo italiano. Loro si riferirono alla dichiarazione della Corte in Iosub Caras, (citò sopra, § 21) quel
“minors possono fare domanda anche alla Corte, o davvero specialmente, se loro sono rappresentati con un genitore che è in conflitto con le autorità e critica le loro decisioni e conduce come non essendo coerente coi diritti garantito con la Convenzione. In simile cause, la posizione come il naturale genitore basta riconoscerli lui o il potere necessario per fare domanda alla Corte sul conto del figlio, anche per proteggere gli interessi del figlio.”
Loro indicarono inoltre che, fin dai procedimenti in Italia un ordine era riguardato disgiungere i primo e secondo richiedenti, era chiaro che che che era stato criticando era decisioni incoerente con Articolo 8 della Convenzione (un riferimento fu reso a Neulinger e Shuruk c. la Svizzera [GC], n. 41615/07, § 90 ECHR 2010 -..., ed Iosub Caras, citato sopra, § 29).
61. La Corte osserva nel primo posto che sia delle cause assegnate a col Governo italiano non si riferito alla rappresentanza di un figlio con loro naturale genitore ma invece con individui non relativo ai figli in oggetto. Comunque, anche in simile circostanze la Commissione e la Corte sia accurata per indicare che un approccio restrittivo o tecnico nell'area di rappresentanza di figli prima che la Corte fosse evitata. La Corte non può ma conviene col Governo lettone che i fatti nella causa presente sono più memori di quelli dell'Iosub Caras sopra-citato e Neulinger e Shuruk. La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare dalla linea di ragionare usò in quelle cause. Perciò, l'argomento del Governo italiano riguardo all’ incompatibilità ratione personae deve essere respinto.
2. L'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
62. Il Governo italiano notò che quando prima i richiedenti fecero domanda alla Corte il ricorso del primo richiedente contro la decisione della Corte dei Minori di Romadi 21 aprile 2008 ancora era pendente. Fu aggiudicato solamente il 28 settembre 2009. La richiesta doveva perciò, essere dichiarata inammissibile per il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali facendo seguito ad Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
63. I richiedenti affermarono che loro avevano diritto a presentare una richiesta alla Corte senza aspettare la definitivo aggiudicazione nelle corti italiane dal momento quando il primo richiedente imparò che Italia aveva richiesto ufficialmente le autorità lettoni per assicurare il ritorno di M. ad Italia, poiché tale richiesta era di una natura che stesso-esegue e non era soggetto a qualsiasi revisione supplementare con le autorità lettoni.
64. Il Governo lettone si confece coi richiedenti che, una volta che era stato emesso il certificato non- appellabile di ritorno facendo seguito ad Articolo 42 (1) della Regolamentazione, i richiedenti non avevano un obbligo per aspettare il completamento dell'aggiudicazione nelle corti italiane prima di fare petizione alla Corte.
65. In risposta ai richiedenti ed il Governo lettone il Governo italiano enfatizzò che i concetti di “una sentenza esecutiva” all'interno del significato di Articolo 42 della Regolamentazione, e di un “definitivo decisione” all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, non sarebbe confuso. Il Governo italiano aguzzò fuori in particolare che la Regolamentazione specificamente affermò che un certificato di ritorno può essere emesso sulla base di una sentenza che non è divenuta ancora definitivo.
66. La Corte osserva che non è in controversia fra le parti che l'aggiudicazione nelle corti italiane ora è stata completata. Nelle altre parole, lo Stato italiano è stato riconosciuto l'opportunità di ostacolando o compensare la violazione addotta contro loro (vedere Selmouni c. la Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 74 il 1999-V di ECHR). La Corte prima ha sostenuto che in richiedenti di principio fare un sforzo diligente di esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali prima di presentare una richiesta alla Corte è obbligato. Comunque, è stato ritenuto accettabile se la definitivo tappa dell'esaurimento del posto di prese di via di ricorso nazionale dopo che la richiesta è stata presentata ma prima che la Corte decide sulla sua ammissibilità (vedere, per esempio, Yakup Köse c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 50177/99, 2 maggio 2006). La Corte respinge così l'eccezione del Governo rispondente della non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
3. Ottemperanza con la norma dei sei - mesi
67. Nell'alternativa, il Governo rispondente indicò, che se la Corte fosse considerare la decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma del 21 aprile 2008 di essere il finale, la richiesta sarebbe inammissibile secondo Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione per inosservanza con l'articolo di sei - mesi.
68. I richiedenti indicarono che era solamente 10 settembre 2008 che il primo richiedente aveva imparato che un certificato di ritorno era stato emesso (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 34) che era perciò la data per essere preso in considerazione per calcolare il periodo dei sei – mesi all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
69. In risposta ai richiedenti l'argomento di ', il Governo rispondente presentò che i richiedenti non potessero addurre che loro divennero solamente consapevoli della decisione di 21 aprile 2008 dopo che il certificato di ritorno era stato comunicato a loro, fin dal loro avvocato in Italia la decisione di 21 aprile 2008 attivamente aveva contestato. Fin dal rappresentante del richiedente in Italia un ricorso aveva depositato contro la decisione summenzionata 20 giugno 2008, che data era l'ultima da che cominciare a contare il periodo dei sei - mesi per essersi lamentato alla Corte.
70. Il Governo lettone indicò che la misura che ha interferito direttamente coi richiedenti la vita di famiglia di ' era il certificato di ritorno che i richiedenti ricevettero 10 settembre 2008. Perciò, il tempo-limite per depositare una richiesta con la Corte avviò correre su quel la data. Nell'alternativa, il Governo lettone dibatté, che poiché i richiedenti stavano lamentandosi di “una politica coerente adottata con le autorità italiane nel trattare con la loro causa”, le loro azioni di reclamo in effetto concernerono una situazione che continua.
71. La Corte nota che il Governo rispondente osservò correttamente che al tempo i richiedenti depositarono la loro richiesta con la Corte (9 marzo 2009), i procedimenti ancora erano pendenti di fronte alle corti italiane e furono completati solamente 21 aprile 2009 (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 37). Contro che di fondo, la Corte respinge l'argomento del Governo italiano riguardo all'inadempienza allegato con la norma dei sei - mesi.
4. Conclusione
72. La Corte respinge gli argomenti del Governo rispondente che riguardavano l’incompatibilità addotta ratione personae, l’insuccesso per esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali ed inosservanza con la norma dei sei - mesi. La Corte considera inoltre, alla luce delle osservazioni delle parti per cui le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sollevano problemi seri di fatto e diritto sotto la Convenzione, la determinazione di che richiede un esame dei meriti. La Corte conclude perciò che queste azioni di reclamo non sono mal-fondate manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nessuna altra base per dichiarare queste azioni di reclamo inammissibile è stata stabilita. Le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti le di interferenza con le autorità italiane in vita di famiglia loro e dell'iniquità procedurale dell'elaborazione decisionale nelle corti italiane deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
73. I richiedenti enfatizzarono che là esistè collegamenti emotivi e molto vicini fra loro. Il padre di M. non aveva sviluppato qualsiasi collegamento emotivo col figlio perché loro avevano visto l'un l'altro molto raramente, anche quando i richiedenti ancora risiedevano in Italia. Inoltre, M. e suo padre non avevano una lingua comune. Secondo i richiedenti, il primo richiedente ha emesso inviti ripetuti al padre di M. per visitare suo figlio in Rīga. Lui non ha risposto a quegli inviti che sono solo uno dei molti fatti che non era stato preso in considerazione con le corti italiane. Contro che di fondo i richiedenti indicarono che se M. fosse separato da sua madre sé minaccerebbe il suo sviluppo e salute mentale. In questo riguardo ai richiedenti presentarono che M. stava ricevendo assistenza sistematica da un psicologo per superare lo stress, l'ansia e paura causate con le prospettive della sua separazione da sua madre ed il suo essere spedì ad Italia.
74. I richiedenti presentarono inoltre che quando le corti italiane adottarono decisioni diametralmente opposto a quegli adottati con le corti lettoni, loro non osservarono il principio della fiducia reciproca fra corti. Il presumibilmente inadeguatamente decisioni ragionate adottate inoltre con le corti italiane non presero in considerazione le informazioni disponibili riguardo a M. sta vivendo disposizioni in Lettonia.
75. Secondo i richiedenti, le disposizioni per le visite del primo richiedente con suo figlio previsto con le corti italiane erano improvvisamente inadeguate, nella particolare presa in conto il fatto che lei non aveva il finanziario vuole dire risiedere in Italia, dove era virtualmente inabile al lavoro lei poiché lei non parlò qualsiasi l'italiano. Inoltre, il “la sicurezza misura” suggerì con le autorità italiane ed accettò con le corti italiane non garantisca la sicurezza fisica e psicologica del figlio e sia in contraddizione diretta con le conclusioni del psicologo si appellate su con le corti lettoni. I richiedenti indicarono inoltre che le corti italiane erano andate a vuoto ad esaminare o avere esaminato la residenza proposta del figlio in Italia. Secondo le informazioni disponibile ai richiedenti, l'edificio localizzato all'indirizzo menzionato con le corti italiane contenne uffici. Infine, i richiedenti criticarono l'italiano corteggia l'insuccesso di ' per richiedere e prendere in considerazione qualsiasi informazioni riguardo al padre di M. reddito e proprietà per valutare se lui era capace di alzata il figlio.
(b) Il Governo rispondente
76. Il Governo italiano presentò che non c'era stata interferenza coi diritti del primo richiedente sotto Articolo 8, poiché lei lei era quella che aveva interferito col padre di M. diritto alla vita di famiglia (in questo riguardo un riferimento fu reso a Gnahoré c. la Francia, n. 40031/98, § 59 ECHR 2000-IX), e perciò non poteva dibattere che un'interferenza sorse come un risultato delle autorità italiane ' legittima ma come ancora senza successo tenti di riattivare il prima situazione esistente che era stata in piena conformità con la legge. Nelle altre parole, il genitore le cui azioni erano state contrarie alla legge (il Governo rispondente osservò che non c'era controversia fra le parti che l'allontanamento di M. dall'Italia era stato sbagliato) non sarebbe concesso per trarre profitto da quelle azioni. In qualsiasi la causa, le autorità italiane avevano previsto la possibilità per i richiedenti le riunioni di ' dopo il ritorno di M. ad Italia. Il Governo rispondente presentò inoltre che anche se qualsiasi interferenza coi richiedenti i diritti di ' avevano avuto luogo, era stato in conformità con la legge, vale a dire Articolo 11 della Regolamentazione, ed era stato anche necessario per eliminare le conseguenze dell'allontanamento illegale di M. dall'Italia. Nelle altre parole, lo scopo dell'interferenza era stato la protezione dei diritti e le libertà del figlio.
77. Come preoccupazioni la questione di se ordinare il ritorno di M. era “necessario in una società democratica”, il Governo rispondente presentò che le autorità italiane avevano preso debitamente in considerazione ed avevano pesato i migliori interessi del figlio. Il Governo italiano considerò che i richiedenti argomento di ' che M. e suo padre non potevano comunicare a causa di una barriera linguistica non era appropriato come riguardi un figlio di otto anni che ha speso una grande porzione di vita sua in Italia, dove lui non dovrebbe incontrare qualsiasi le particolari difficoltà, nell'il particolare considerare che Lettonia e l'Italia, erano stati membro dell'Unione europea. Provare l'argomento che l'interferenza allegato coi richiedenti la vita di famiglia di ' era stata “necessario”, il Governo rispondente ancora una volta si riferì alle garanzie offerte con le autorità italiane (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 28). Infine, loro considerarono che le specifiche disposizioni per essere reso in riguardo della pelle di M. all'interno del margine dell'Italia della valutazione.
78. Il Governo rispondente si riferì inoltre all'oggetto e fine della Convenzione di Hague all'interno del significato di Articolo 31 (1) della Convenzione di Vienna sulla Legge di Trattati che, secondo la sentenza della Corte Maumousseau e Washington c. la Francia (n. 39388/05, § 69 ECHR 2007-XIII), era la prevenzione della proliferazione delle abduzioni di figlio internazionali. Che meta potrebbe essere realizzata con evitando il consolidamento di situazioni de facto provocato con allontanamenti sbagliati di figli. Per che fine la quota aggiuntiva di quo di status doveva essere ripristinata il più rapidamente possibile. Come all'applicabilità nella causa presente dell'eccezione all'obbligo generale per restituire un figlio erroneamente remoto che è contenuto in Articolo 13 (b) della Convenzione di Hague, il Governo rispondente analizzato tre possibili justifications per non-ritorna,: in primo luogo, l'argomento che M. aveva stabilito in Lettonia ed aveva adattato alla vita là e che i suoi migliori interessi richiesero la sua residenza continuata con madre sua; in secondo luogo, la dichiarazione che il padre non aveva avuto qualsiasi contatto col figlio; e, in terzo luogo, che a causa della lunghezza delle procedure italiane il ritorno di M. ad Italia e la restituzione della quota aggiuntiva di quo di status non era più possibile.
79. Riguardo alla questione della residenza continuata di M. con sua madre, il Governo rispondente sottolineò il rifiuto del primo richiedente per agire in conformità con le decisioni delle corti italiane. Come al padre di M. la buona volontà per preoccuparsi di figlio suo, il Governo rispondente indicò che il padre avuto mostrò sempre separatamente da controversie brevi riguardo a pagamenti di mantenimento dei figli, la buona volontà per godere di una vita di famiglia stabile con figlio suo in Italia. Il Governo sottolineò anche che il padre non era un alcolizzato, un tossicodipendente di droga o altrimenti inabilita allevare un figlio. Riguardo all'effetto della lunghezza di procedimenti, il Governo rispondente enfatizzò infine, che le corti italiane avevano trattato con la causa in solamente dieci mesi; perciò, le autorità italiane non potevano essere contenute responsabili per la lunghezza di tempo che M. aveva speso via da suo padre.
80. In finora come l'equità procedurale del decisionale nelle corti italiane riguardò, il Governo rispondente girò pienamente le sentenze della Commissione europea (vedere sopra, divide in paragrafi 39-45). Più specificamente, loro indicarono che i procedimenti nelle corti italiane erano stati equi e sia parti erano state date un'opportunità di fare osservazioni a quelle corti, irrispettoso del fatto che le osservazioni erano state rese per iscritto. Inoltre, il primo richiedente era stato rappresentato con consiglio.
81. Il Governo rispondente cercò di rendere differente i fatti che formano lo sfondo alla recente Grande sentenza di Camera Neulinger e Shuruk c. la Svizzera (citò sopra, § 139) dai fatti della causa presente in che il precedente interessato la motivazione per un rifiuto per restituire un figlio al paese di origine, mentre la causa presente riguardava procedimenti nel paese di origine, ed il suo fine era non giustificare le azioni delle autorità lettoni.
( c) Il Governo terzo - parte
82. Il Governo lettone si appellò su Neulinger e Shuruk e criticò le autorità italiane l'insuccesso di ' per condurre un esame profondo della situazione di famiglia intera dei richiedenti ed il padre di M.. Si addusse che le corti italiane erano andate a vuoto a prendere in considerazione il fatto che il primo richiedente era e sempre era stato i caregiver primari di M.. Il padre di M. aveva avuto anche contatto solamente casuale con suo figlio mentre i richiedenti ancora stavano risiedendo in Italia. Inoltre, il padre di M. non aveva reso qualsiasi tenta di contattare suo figlio durante i più di quattro anni che i richiedenti stavano vivendo in Lettonia. In oltre, si indicò che M. molto aveva vissuto in Lettonia più lungo di lui. Infine, le corti italiane non avevano valutato il padre di M. veste di allevare un figlio da solo e non avevano considerato soluzioni alternative per assicurare il loro contatto reciproco (in questo riguardo al Governo lettone si riferì a Deak c. Romania ed il Regno Unito, n. 19055/05, § 69 3 giugno 2008).
83. Riguardo all'equità procedurale del decisionale nelle corti italiane, il Governo lettone presentò, che era incorretto per appellarsi su Articoli 23 (b) e 42 (2) (un) della Regolamentazione in isolamento, poiché quelle disposizioni avevano essere interpretate in armonia con gli articoli attinenti di diritto internazionale, vale a dire l'ONU Convenzione ed Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Questa interpretazione contestuale chiaramente condusse alla conclusione che i richiedenti ' che diritti procedurali erano stati trascurati con le corti italiane.
2. Valutazione della Corte
84. La Corte tratterà separatamente con l'azione di reclamo del richiedente dell'ordine per il ritorno di M., e l'azione di reclamo che il primo richiedente non era presente all'udienza della Corte dei Minori di Roma21 aprile 2008.
(a) Principi Generali
85. In Neulinger e Shuruk (citò sopra, §§ 131-140, con gli ulteriori riferimenti) la Corte articolò e cristallizzò un numero di principi che sono emersi dalla sua causa-legge sul problema dell'abduzione internazionale di figli, siccome segue.
(i) La Convenzione non può essere interpretata in un aspirapolvere, ma, nella conformità con Articolo 31 § 3 (il c) della Convenzione di Vienna sulla Legge di Trattati (1969), conto sarà preso di qualsiasi articoli attinenti di diritto internazionale applicabile alle Parti Contraenti (vedere Streletz, Kessler e Krenz c. la Germania [GC], N. 34044/96, 35532/97 e 44801/98, § 90 ECHR 2001-II).
(ii) Gli obblighi positivi che Articolo 8 della Convenzione impone sugli Stati riguardo a riunendosi genitori coi loro figli devono essere interpretati perciò nella luce dell'ONU Convenzione e la Convenzione di Hague (vedere Maire c. il Portogallo, n. 48206/99, § 72, ECHR 2003-VII, ed Ignaccolo-Zenide c. la Romania, n. 31679/96, § 95 ECHR 2000-io).
(iii) La Corte è competente per fare una rassegna la procedura seguita con le corti nazionali, in particolare accertare se quelle corti, nel facendo domanda ed interpretare le disposizioni della Convenzione di Hague hanno garantito le garanzie della Convenzione e specialmente quelli di Articolo 8 (vedere, a quell'effetto, Bianchi c. la Svizzera, n. 7548/04, § 92, 22 giugno 2006, e Carlson c. la Svizzera, n. 49492/06, § 73 6 novembre 2008).
(iv) In questa area il problema decisivo è se un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi che competono in pericolo-quelli del figlio, dei due genitori e di ordine pubblico - è stato previsto, all'interno del margine della valutazione riconosciuto a Stati in simile questioni (vedere Maumousseau e Washington, citato sopra, § 62), tenendo presente, comunque che i migliori interessi del figlio devono essere la considerazione primaria (vedere, a quell'effetto, Gnahoré citato sopra, § 59).
(v) “gli interessi di Il figlio” si considera primariamente che sia il seguente due,: avere suo o le sue cravatte con suo o la sua famiglia sostenne, a meno che è provò che simile cravatte sono indesiderabili, ed essere concesso per sviluppare in un ambiente di suono (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Elsholz c. la Germania [GC], n. 25735/94, § 50, ECHR 2000-VIII, e Maršálek c. la Repubblica ceca, n. 8153/04, § 71 4 aprile 2006). I migliori interessi del figlio, da una prospettiva di sviluppo personale dipenderanno da una varietà di circostanze individuali, in particolare la sua età e livello della maturità, la presenza o l'assenza dei suoi genitori ed il suo ambiente ed esperimenta.
(vi) il ritorno di Un figlio non si può ordinare automaticamente o meccanicamente quando la Convenzione di Hague è applicabile, siccome è indicato col riconoscimento in che strumento di un numero di eccezioni all'obbligo per restituire il figlio (vedere, in particolare, Articoli 12, 13 e 20), basato sulle considerazioni riguardo alla persona effettiva del figlio ed il suo ambiente, mostrando così che è per l'udienza di corte la causa per adottare un in approccio di concerto a sé (vedere Maumousseau e Washington, citato sopra, § 72).
(vii) Il compito per valutare quelli migliori interessi di ogni causa individuale è così primariamente uno per le autorità nazionali che spesso hanno il beneficio di contatto diretto con le persone riguardate. A quello fine loro godono un certo margine di valutazione che rimane materia comunque, a soprintendenza europea da che cosa la Corte fa una rassegna sotto la Convenzione le decisioni che quelle autorità hanno preso nell'esercizio di che il potere (vedere, per esempio, Hokkanen c. la Finlandia, 23 settembre 1994, § 55 Serie A n. 299-un, e Kutzner c. la Germania, n. 46544/99, §§ 65-66 ECHR 2002-io; vedere anche Tiemann c. Francia e la Germania (il dec.), N. 47457/99 e 47458/99, ECHR 2000-IV; Bianchi, citato sopra, § 92; e Carlson, citato sopra, § 69).
(il vii) In oltre, la Corte deve assicurare che l'elaborazione decisionale che conduce all'adozione delle misure contestate con la corte nazionale era equa e concedè quelli riguardarono presentare pienamente la loro causa (vedere Tiemann, citato sopra, ed Eskinazi e Chelouche c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 14600/05, ECHR 2005-XIII (gli estratti)). A quello fine la Corte deve accertare se le corti nazionali condussero un esame profondo della situazione di famiglia intera e di una serie intera di fattori, in particolare di un che riguarda i fatti, emotivo, psicologico, materiale e natura medica, e fece una valutazione equilibrata e ragionevole dei rispettivi interessi di ogni persona, con preoccupazione continua per determinare ciò che la migliore soluzione sarebbe per il figlio rapito nel contesto di una richiesta per il suo ritorno al suo paese di origine (vedere Maumousseau e Washington, citato sopra, § 74).
86. La Corte ora applicherà quei principi alle specifiche azioni di reclamo sollevate dai richiedenti.
(b) L'ordine per il secondo richiedente per essere ritornato in Italia
87. La Corte reitera che il ritorno del secondo richiedente a suo padre in Italia fu ordinato dalla decisione della Corte dei Minori di Roma del 21 aprile 2008 (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 28) che fu sostenuto su ricorso con la decisione della Corte d'appello di Roma adottò 21 aprile 2009 (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 37). Il ritorno fu ordinato sulla base di supplire-paragrafo (4), (7) e (8) di Articolo 11 della Regolamentazione. Articolo 11 si riferisce alla procedura per il ritorno di un figlio erroneamente remoto. Che procedura è esposta fuori in Articoli 12 e 13 della Convenzione di Hague.
88. Il Governo rispondente ha dibattuto che non c'è stata interferenza coi richiedenti la vita di famiglia di ' (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 76). La Corte prima ha trovato che accade un'interferenza dove misure nazionali impediscono il godimento reciproco con un genitore ed un figlio dell'un l'altro società (vedere, per esempio, Raban c. la Romania, n. 25437/08, § 31 26 ottobre 2010). Al giorno d'oggi la causa un psicologo il cui rapporto fu sollecitato coi richiedenti il rappresentante di ', ha confermato che M. sta soffrendo di stress psicologico e l'ansia in collegamento col suo ritorno potenziale ad Italia (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 33). Quel non ma abbia un impatto significativo sui richiedenti il godimento di ' di vita di famiglia loro. Inoltre, la Corte ha più che una volta fondi che un ordine per ritorno, anche se non è stato eseguito, in se stesso costituisce un'interferenza col diritto per rispettare per la vita di famiglia (vedere, per esempio, Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, §§ 90-91, e Lipkowsky e McCormack c. la Germania (il dec.), n. 26755/10, 18 gennaio 2011). Al giorno d'oggi la causa non ci sono nessuno ragioni che richiedono una partenza da quel l'approccio. Di conseguenza, l'ordine della Corte dei Minori di Romaper ritornare M. in Italia costituì un'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' rispettare per la vita di famiglia.
89. Rivolgendosi alla questione di se l'interferenza si lamentò di era “nella conformità con la legge” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione, la Corte osserva che nella causa presente le parti non hanno contestato che l'allontanamento del primo richiedente di M. dall'Italia era sbagliato all'interno del significato di Articolo 3 della Convenzione di Hague (compari con Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, §§ 99-105). Articolo 12 della Convenzione di Hague richiede il ritorno di figli erroneamente remoti, soggetto ad eccezioni esposte fuori in Articolo 13 di quel la Convenzione. In simile circostanze la Corte non dubita che l'interferenza fu ordinata in conformità con la legge, vale a dire Articolo 11 della Regolamentazione in combinazione con Articolo 12 della Convenzione di Hague.
90. Come alla questione di se l'ordine per ritornare M. in Italia intraprese uno degli scopi legittimi elencato esaurientemente in Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione, il Governo rispondente avanzò due teorie: che l'interferenza era necessaria per proteggere il padre di M. diritto per rispettare per la vita di famiglia, o salvaguardare i migliori interessi del figlio. Non c'è vera controversia fra le parti che la decisione delle corti italiane di ritornare M. in Italia perseguì lo scopo legittimo di proteggere i diritti e le libertà del figlio e suo padre. Di conseguenza, la Corte accetta che era la causa (vedere anche Neulinger e Shuruk, § 106).
91. La Corte deve determinare perciò se l'interferenza in oggetto era “necessario in una società democratica” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione, interpretati nella luce degli strumenti internazionali e summenzionati l'essere di problema decisivo se un equilibrio equo e proporzionato fra gli interessi che competono in pericolo-quelli del figlio, dei due genitori e di ordine pubblico-fu previsto, all'interno del margine della valutazione riconosciuto a Stati in simile questioni (vedere paragrafo 85 sopra, (l'iv)).
92. In che riguardo alla Corte enfatizza che non è il suo compito per succedere nell'esaminare se ci sarebbe un rischio grave che M. sarebbe messo in mostra a danno psicologico o fisico, all'interno del significato di Articolo 13 della Convenzione di Hague se lui ritornasse in Italia. Comunque, la Corte è competente per accertare se le corti italiane, nel facendo domanda ed interpretare le disposizioni di che Convenzione e della Regolamentazione, garantito le garanzie insorsero avanti Articolo 8 della Convenzione, mentre prendendo particolarmente in considerazione i migliori interessi del figlio (vedere Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, § 141). È anche essenziale per ricordare che la Convenzione di Hague essenzialmente è un strumento di una natura procedurale e non un trattato di diritti umani che protegge individui su una base obiettiva (vedere Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, § 145).
93. La Corte non può ma osserva che il ragionamento contenne nell'italiano corteggia decisioni di ' di 21 aprile 2008 (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 28) e 21 aprile 2009 (vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 37) era piuttosto scarso (vedere anche l'opinione della Commissione europea, sopra dividere in paragrafi 45). Anche se la Corte accettò la teoria delle corti italiane che il loro ruolo è stato limitato con Articolo 11 (4) della Regolamentazione a valutando se disposizioni adeguate erano state rese per garantire la protezione di M. dopo il suo ritorno ad Italia da qualsiasi identificò rischi all'interno del significato di Articolo 13 (b) della Convenzione di Hague, non può riuscire ad osservare che le corti italiane nelle loro decisioni andarono a vuoto a rivolgere qualsiasi rischi che erano stati identificati con le autorità lettoni. Per esempio, le conclusioni sostennero così nel rapporto della Rīga Custodia Corte (vedere sopra, paragrafi 18), il rapporto del psicologo competente (vedere sopra, paragrafi 19) ed il Rīga la decisione di Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana di 11 aprile 2007 (vedere sopra, paragrafi 22) non fu menzionato esplicitamente in entrambe le due decisioni. È perciò necessario per verificare se le disposizioni per la protezione di M. elencata nell'italiano corteggia le decisioni di ' possono essere in qualsiasi causa considerò essere stata presa ragionevolmente in considerazione i suoi migliori interessi.
94. Le misure proposte col padre di M. e successivamente accettò come adeguato con due livelli di corti italiane è riassunto in paragrafo 28 sopra. Le considerazioni identificate con le autorità lettoni erano che il figlio si fu adattato bene a vivere con sua madre in Rīga (paragrafo 18), che la sua separazione da sua madre colpirebbe avversamente il suo sviluppo e creerebbe problemi neurotici, malattie o sia (paragrafo 19), e che cravatte forti avevano formato fra M. e sua madre (paragrafo 22). In oltre, nelle loro osservazioni di fronte a questa Corte i richiedenti indicarono che il primo richiedente non era capace di accompagnare il figlio ad Italia, poiché lei non aveva sufficiente finanziario vuole dire risiedere là ed era essenzialmente inabile al lavoro, poiché lei non seppe qualsiasi l'italiano, e che il figlio e suo padre non avevano lingua in comune, non aveva vissuto mai insieme senza la madre, e non vedeva l'un l'altro da più di tre anni al tempo quando la Corte d'appello di Roma respinse il ricorso del primo richiedente contro la decisione di 21 aprile 2008 (vedere anche Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, § 150). Le autorità giudiziali lettoni nelle loro decisioni anche trovate che era finanziariamente inattuabile per il primo richiedente per ritornare in Italia (il Rīga decisione di Corte distrettuale di Vidzeme Urbana di 11 aprile 2007, vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 22), confermò che il padre di M. non vedeva suo figlio dal 2006 (l'opinione della Custodia Corte di 8 gennaio 2008, vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 24) e non aveva fatto nessun sforzo di stabilire nel frattempo contatto con M. (il Rīga decisione di Corte Regionale di 24 maggio 2007, vedere sopra, divida in paragrafi 23).
95. Le corti italiane non si riferirono ai due psicologi rapporti di ' che erano stati disegnati su in Lettonia facendo seguito a richieste dai richiedenti il rappresentante di ' e poi si appellò su con le corti lettoni. Né faceva le corti italiane si riferiscono ai pericoli potenziali alla salute psicologica di M. che era stata identificata in quelli rapporti. Se quelle corti avessero considerato i rapporti inattendibile, loro certamente avevano l'opportunità di richiedere un rapporto da un psicologo del loro proprio scegliere. Comunque, quel non era fatto uno. Come alla residenza che il padre di M. ha proposto come il suo alloggio dopo il suo ritorno ad Italia, nessun sforzo fu reso, con qualsiasi autorità italiane per stabilire se era appropriato come una casa per un giovane figlio. L'alloggio non fu ispezionato, o con le corti o con un'altra persona del loro scegliere. Quelle condizioni, prese cumulativamente lasciano la Corte non persuasa che le corti italiane sufficientemente aumentarono di valore la serietà delle difficoltà che era probabili che M. incontrasse in Italia (vedere Neulinger e Shuruk, citato sopra, § 146, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
96. Come all'adeguatezza del “salvaguarda” del benessere di M. proposto con suo padre ed accettò con le corti italiane come adeguato, la Corte considera che permettendo il primo richiedente per sospendere col figlio per quindici a trenta giorni durante il primo anno e poi per uno passa l'estate mese ogni altro anno dopo quel è un manifestamente risposta impropria al trauma psicologico che seguirebbe inevitabilmente una separazione improvvisa ed irreversibile delle cravatte vicine fra madre e figlio. Nell'opinione della Corte, l'ordine per immergere drasticamente un figlio in un linguisticamente ed ambiente culturalmente estero non può in qualsiasi modo sia compensato con frequentando un asilo infantile, una piscina e classi di lingua russa. Mentre il padre sta impegnandosi assicurare che M. riceve appoggio psicologico ed adeguato è davvero lodabile, la Corte non può concordare che tale appoggio esterno mai potrebbe essere considerato come un'alternativa equivalente ad appoggio psicologico che è intrinseco a cravatte forti, stabili ed imperturbate fra un figlio e sua madre.
97. Infine, la Corte osserva, la teoria del Governo terza -parte che le corti italiane non avevano considerato qualsiasi soluzioni alternative per assicurare contatto fra M. e suo padre.
98. Per queste ragioni la Corte conclude che l'interferenza coi richiedenti il diritto di ' per rispettare per vita di famiglia loro non era “necessario in una società democratica” all'interno del significato di Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione sul conto dell'italiano corteggia ' ordina per il ritorno di M. ad Italia.
( c) L'equità del processo decisionale della Corte dei Minori di Roma
99. Quindi come l'equità dell'elaborazione decisionale italiana concerne i richiedenti considerati che l'assenza del primo richiedente dall'udienza della Corte dei Minori di Roma lo rese ingiusto e non riconobbe riguardo dovuto agli interessi salvaguardati con Articolo 8 (vedere, inter l'alia, Iosub Caras c. la Romania, citato sopra, § 41).
100. I costatazione di Corte che l'uguaglianza procedurale fra le parti alla causa fu osservata finora come l'osservanza dei richiedenti che ' interessa sotto Articolo 8 riguardò. Il problema procedurale e decisivo nella causa presente è se le autorità accusarono con decisionale fu messo in una posizione per rispettare debitamente e vigore determinato alle parti i diritti di ' sotto Articolo 8. Prendendo in considerazione che il padre di ambo il M. ed il primo richiedente presentò, con l'aiuto di consiglio, dichiarazioni scritto e particolareggiate a due livelli di corti italiane, la Corte si soddisfa che il requisito di equità procedurale di Articolo 8 è stato osservato (vedere anche le conclusioni della Commissione europea, sopra dividere in paragrafi 43). Quindi come l'adeguatezza di quelli corteggia la reazione di ' agli argomenti presentati coi richiedenti riguarda, la Corte si riferisce alle sue conclusioni sopra.
101. Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione di Articolo 8 su conto dell'assenza del primo richiedente dall'udienza della Corte dei Minori .
II. ALTRE AZIONI DI RECLAMO
102. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione della lunghezza e l'iniquità del primo set di procedimenti nelle corti italiane e del fatto che M. non fu ascoltato in persona con qualsiasi corti italiane.
103. Comunque, nella luce di tutto il materiale nella sua proprietà, ed in finora come le questioni si lamentò di è all'interno della sua competenza, i costatazione di Corte che loro non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e le libertà espose fuori nella Convenzione o i suoi Protocolli. Segue che questa parte della richiesta è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
104. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
105. I richiedenti chiesero EUR 10,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, verso EUR 10 per ogni giorno dell'ansia fin dai richiedenti prima saputi del padre di M. richiesta per M. essere ritornato in Italia.
106. Il Governo rispondente dibatté che il richiedente non aveva presentato dettagli particolareggiati di che rivendicazione, come richiesto con Articolo 60 § 2 degli Articoli della Corte.
107. La Corte nota che i richiedenti hanno spiegato adeguatamente il metodo usato per arrivare all'importo chiesto in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale. Alla luce del fatto che i richiedenti hanno dovuto dimostrare un collegamento chiaro fra la violazione di Articolo 8 trovata con la Corte ed il danno non-patrimoniale causò con l'ordine di ritorno, la Corte assegna congiuntamente EUR 10,000 i richiedenti in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
108. In riguardo di costi e spese, i richiedenti chiesero un importo totale di EUR 13,610.69, calcolò siccome segue: EUR 171 per i due esami psicologici del secondo richiedente, EUR 643 per traduzioni dei documenti spedite con la Corte, EUR 10,500 in parcelle legali per la rappresentanza del primo richiedente nelle corti italiane, EUR 1,815 per i richiedenti la rappresentanza di ' di fronte alla Corte, EUR 371 per la psicoterapia di famiglia per i richiedenti ed EUR 110.69 per spese postali.
109. Il Governo rispondente dibatté che il richiedente non aveva presentato dettagli particolareggiati di che rivendicazione, come richiesto con Articolo 60 § 2 degli Articoli della Corte. Inoltre, i richiedenti non avevano specificato quale documenta dalla Corte aveva avuto bisogno di essere tradotto.
110. Secondo la causa-legge della Corte, un richiedente è concesso solamente finora al rimborso di costi e spese in come sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi in e sono stati ragionevoli come a quantum. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, riguardo ad essere aveva ai documenti nella sua proprietà ed il criterio sopra, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare congiuntamente ai richiedenti la somma di EUR 5,000 costi di copertura sotto tutti i capi.
C. Interesse di mora
111. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Respinge con una maggioranza l'eccezione del Governo rispondente del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali;
2. Dichiara con una maggioranza le azioni di reclamo riguardo all'ordine restituire il secondo richiedente a suo padre in Italia e dell'assenza del primo richiedente dall'udienza della Corte dei Minori di Roma ammissibile;
3. Dichiara all’unanimità il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
4. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione a causa dell’ordine delle corti italiane di far ritornare il secondo richiedente in Italia;
5. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione a causa dell'assenza del primo richiedente dall'udienza della Corte dei Minori ;
6. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euro) congiuntamente ai richiedenti, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro) congiuntamente ai richiedenti, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito, più tre punti percentuale;
7. Respinge all’unanimità il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 12 luglio 2011, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere Presidentessa
Nella conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e Decide 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione separata di Giudice Popović è annessa a questa sentenza.
F.T.
S.H.N.


OPINIONE CHE DISSENTE DEL GIUDICE POPOVIĆ
Io trovo la richiesta inammissibile ai termini di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, perché, non riuscendo a introdurre un'azione di reclamo presso la Corte di Cassazione, i richiedenti non hanno esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 11/07/2020.