Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GIURAN v. ROMANIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 24360/04/2011
STATO: Romania
DATA: 21/06/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No violation of Art. 6-1 ; No violation of P1-1
THIRD SECTION
CASE OF GIURAN v. ROMANIA
(Application no. 24360/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
21 June 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Giuran v. Romania,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Josep Casadevall, President,
Corneliu Bîrsan,
Alvina Gyulumyan,
Ján Šikuta,
Luis López Guerra,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Santiago Quesada, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 24 May 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 24360/04) against Romania lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Romanian and British national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 1 May 2004.
2. The Romanian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Răzvan-Horaţiu Radu, from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, a violation of his right to a fair trial and peaceful enjoyment of his possessions as a result of the quashing, by way of extraordinary appeal, of a final judgment issued in his favour.
4. On 19 March 2010, the President of the Third Section decided to communicate these complaints to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. The United Kingdom Governments were informed of the application, in view of the applicant’s nationality (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 of the Rules of Court). They did not wish to intervene.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1930 and lives in Slatina. He is retired.
7. On 7 August 2001, he lodged a criminal complaint against E.I., claiming that she had stolen certain items from his flat. He stated that E.I. was regularly at his flat to do cleaning and on 20 January 2001 she had removed several items of jewellery and clothing from his flat. He had only realised in July 2001 that those goods had disappeared from his flat.
8. The case was heard by the Drăgăşani District Court, which delivered its first-instance judgment on 14 January 2002, by which E.I. was found guilty and sentenced to three months’ imprisonment, suspended. E.I. was ordered to pay the applicant damages of 10,000,000 Romanian lei (ROL, approximately 350 euros (EUR) at the time), representing the estimated value of the stolen items, and ROL 2,500,000 (approximately EUR 90) in legal fees. The District Court based its decision on the statements of the parties and of two witnesses. According to one of the witnesses, the applicant had complained to him in July 2001 that several items were missing from his flat. According to the second witness, in February 2001 the defendant had shown him several items of jewellery and clothing, mentioning that she had received them as a gift from the applicant.
9. On 1 April 2002 the Vâlcea County Court dismissed E.I.’s appeal and the judgment of 14 January 2002 thus became final and enforceable.
10. On an unspecified date, the General Prosecutor of Romania lodged an extraordinary appeal (recurs in anulare) against the judgment of 14 January 2002. The General Prosecutor argued that E.I. had been wrongfully convicted, as none of the evidence adduced was conclusive as to her guilt. This led to a breach of her right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty. The prosecutor also indicated that E.I. had submitted two pieces of evidence as part of her defence, which had been ignored in the ordinary proceedings. One of the documents was a request lodged by the applicant to the owners’ association, in which he asked to be exempt from the payment of utility costs for the period December 2000-April 2001, when he would be away in the United Kingdom. This document was relevant, as the applicant stated that E.I. entered his flat only when he was there, and he had declared that the items had been stolen on the exact date of 20 January 2001, when, according to this document, he was not in Romania. The second document was a report of a search conducted by the police at the home of the defendant, which indicated that none of the items claimed to have been stolen from the applicant’s place had been found there.
11. In a decision of 4 November 2003, the High Court of Cassation and Justice allowed the extraordinary appeal, quashed the judgments of 14 January and 1 April 2002, acquitted E.I. and relieved her of the obligation to pay the applicant compensation for the stolen goods and legal costs.
The court held that the prior conviction had been based on the statements of two witnesses, who declared that they knew that E.I. was doing household work for the applicant, that he owned the items mentioned in his criminal complaint, and that after 20 January 2001, some of the items were seen by one of the witnesses in the house of E.I. Nevertheless, the court indicated that these statements were contradicted by the evidence in the case file indicating that the applicant was away from Romania between December 2000 and April 2001. Furthermore, taking into account that he had always stated that E.I. only did housework in his flat when he was also there, the court indicated that it was not credible that he had not noticed E.I. leaving the flat with so many items.
The court further concluded that the evidence adduced to the file was both contradictory and inconclusive in respect of the date the alleged theft was committed and of whether the defendant had committed the theft. It held therefore that the earlier decisions had not been lawful, quashed them and acquitted E.I. of all charges, relieving her also of the obligation to pay compensation for the stolen goods and court costs incurred by the applicant.
12. The applicant attended the hearing and submitted his arguments in support of his claims.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
13. For the summary of the relevant domestic-law provisions concerning this type of extraordinary appeal (“recurs in anulare”) see the judgment in the case of Precup v. Romania (no. 17771/03, § 15, 27 January 2009).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
14. The applicant complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention that the act of quashing the final judgment of 14 January 2002, as confirmed on 1 April 2002, had violated his right to a fair trial and his right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions. The relevant parts of these provisions read as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law...”
A. Admissibility
15. The Government raised a plea of inadmissibility, arguing that the applicant had not suffered a significant disadvantage. They indicated in this respect that the civil head of the proceedings at stake concerned an amount of 350 euros (EUR) and that there was no evidence in the case file that the applicant was in a financial position such that the outcome of the litigation could have a significant impact on his personal life. The Government further submitted that the two safeguards clauses set up by Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention were met, as the Court has ruled numerous times before on issues analogous to that arising in the instant case and that the applicant’s case has been duly examined by the domestic courts.
16. The applicant disagreed.
17. The Court notes that the main element of the criterion set by Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention is whether the applicant has suffered any significant disadvantage (see Adrian Mihai Ionescu v. Romania (dec.), no. 36659/04, 1 June 2010, and Korolev v. Russia (dec.), no. 25551/05, 1 July 2010).
18. Inspired by the general principle de minimis non curat praetor, this admissibility criterion hinges on the idea that a violation of a right, however real from a purely legal point of view, should attain a minimum level of severity to warrant consideration by an international court. The assessment of this minimum level is, in the nature of things, relative, and depends on all the circumstances of the case. The severity of a violation should be assessed taking into account both the applicant’s subjective perceptions and what is objectively at stake in a particular case (see Korolev, cited above). In other words, the absence of any significant disadvantage can be based on criteria such as the financial impact of the matter in dispute or the importance of the case for the applicant (see Adrian Mihai Ionescu, cited above).
19. The Court reiterates in this respect that it has previously considered insignificant the pecuniary loss of some EUR 90 allegedly sustained by the applicant in the cases of Adrian Mihai Ionescu (cited above) and it appreciated as negligible a pecuniary loss of some EUR 0.5 allegedly sustained by the applicant in the case of Korolev, cited above.
20. In the present case, the Court notes that the applicant sought compensation for goods allegedly stolen from his flat by a third person. In the ordinary criminal proceedings, by a final decision, the domestic courts found a third party guilty of theft of a number of items belonging to the applicant and ordered her to pay the applicant compensation for those stolen items, their estimated value being some EUR 350. By virtue of the same final decision the applicant was also awarded costs. The extraordinary appeal and the quashing of that final decision resulted in the applicant’s losing entitlement to the compensation for the stolen goods and legal costs.
21. The Court notes that none of the parties submitted information concerning the financial status of the applicant. Nevertheless, it observes that the applicant is retired, and that according to the Romanian Department of Pensions and Social Insurance the average pension level in Romania in 2003, when the applicant lost entitlement to the sums of money determined by the final judgment of 14 January 2002, was the equivalent of some EUR 50.
22. The Court also takes note of the fact that the domestic proceedings which are the subject of the complaint before it were aimed at the recovery of goods stolen from the applicant’s own apartment. Therefore, in addition to the pecuniary interest in the actual goods and the sentimental value attached to them, it is necessary also to take into account the fact that the proceedings concerned a question of principle for the applicant, namely his right to respect for his possessions and for his home.
23. Under these circumstances, in the Court’s view, the applicant can not be deemed not to have suffered a significant disadvantage.
24. The Court takes note that the admissibility criterion set by Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention is applicable only when the applicant has suffered no significant disadvantage and provided that the two safeguards clauses set by the same provision are respected. It follows that, where it has not been determined that the applicant has suffered no significant disadvantage.
25. The Court accordingly dismisses the Government’s objections. Noting that these complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds, it declares them admissible.
B. Merits
1. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention
(a) Submissions by the parties
26. The applicant complained that the quashing of the final decision of 14 January 2002 violated his right to a fair trial, breaching the principle of legal certainty.
27. The Government indicated at the outset that the applicant was a civil party to the criminal proceedings against E.I. and that his civil claims were closely linked to the outcome of the criminal head of the proceedings. They further argued that the final decision had been quashed in order to remedy a fundamental defect in the criminal proceedings before the lower courts. The only way to remedy the miscarriage of justice was by the quashing of the final decision convicting E.I. The Government submitted that the extraordinary appeal had been lodged within a short time-frame from the adoption of the final decision and that the applicant took part in the proceedings before the High Court of Cassation and Justice and he had the opportunity to submit arguments in support of his claims. The Government further observed that the relevant provisions of the Code for Criminal Proceedings concerning this type of extraordinary appeal had been repealed in the meantime.
(b) General principles
28. The Court reiterates that the right to a fair hearing before a tribunal as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which declares, in its relevant part, the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, among other things, that where the courts have finally determined an issue their ruling should not be called into question (see Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999-VII).
29. This principle insists that no party is entitled to seek reopening of proceedings merely for the purpose of a rehearing and a fresh decision on the case. The mere possibility of there being two views on the subject is not a ground for re-examination.
30. Departures from that principle are justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character (see, mutatis mutandis, Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-X, and Pravednaya v. Russia, no. 69529/01, § 25, 18 November 2004). Higher courts’ powers to quash or alter binding and enforceable judicial decisions should be exercised for correction of fundamental defects. That power must be exercised so as to strike, to the maximum extent possible, a fair balance between the interests of an individual and the need to ensure the effectiveness of the system of justice (see, mutatis mutandis, Nikitin v. Russia, no. 50178/99, §§ 54-61, ECHR 2004-VIII).
31. The relevant considerations to be taken into account in this connection include, in particular, the effect of the reopening and any subsequent proceedings on the applicant’s individual situation and whether the reopening resulted from the applicant’s own request; the grounds on which the domestic authorities revoked the finality of the judgment in the applicant’s case; the compliance of the procedure at issue with the requirements of domestic law; the existence and operation of procedural safeguards in the domestic legal system capable of preventing abuses of this procedure by the domestic authorities; and other pertinent circumstances of the case (see Nikitin, cited above, § 60; Bratyakin v. Russia (dec.), no. 72776/01, 9 March 2006; Fadin v. Russia, no. 58079/00, § 34, 27 July 2006, and Savinskiy v. Ukraine, no. 6965/02, §§ 24-26, 28 February 2006). In addition, the review must afford all the procedural safeguards of Article 6 § 1 and must ensure the overall fairness of the proceedings (see Vanyan v. Russia, no. 53203/99, §§ 63-68, 15 December 2005).
32. In a number of cases the Court, while addressing the notion of “a fundamental defect”, stressed that the mere consideration that the investigation in the applicant’s case was “incomplete and one-sided” or led to an “erroneous” acquittal cannot in itself, in the absence of jurisdictional errors or serious breaches of court procedure, abuses of power, manifest errors in the application of substantive law or any other weighty reasons stemming from the interests of justice, indicate the presence of a fundamental defect in the previous proceedings (see Radchikov v. Russia, no. 65582/01, § 48, 24 May 2007).
33. The Court further reiterates its findings in the case of Lenskaya v. Russia (no. 13151/04, § 18, 31 July 2008). In that case the final judgment in the applicant’s favour was quashed by way of a supervisory review, on the ground that the lower courts “had not established what constituted the criminal conduct under the particular head of the criminal charge, whether it had in fact taken place and whether it had been committed” by the defendant in that case. The decision to quash that final judgment was also based on the reason that the lower courts, without proper assessment of the evidence, presumed that the applicant’s injuries had been committed by the defendant in that case, without proving his guilt, thus violating the principle of presumption of innocence. While concluding that there had been no breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in that case, the Court held (§§ 36 et seq.) that the proceedings had been reopened for the purposes of correcting a fundamental judicial error which could not have been neutralised or corrected by any other means, save by the quashing of the final judgment which was grossly prejudicial to the convicted person. The Court found also that all the procedural guarantees of Article 6 had been available to the applicant in the course of the supervisory review proceedings.
(c) Application to the present case
34. At the outset, the Court notes that, in past cases against Romania, it has been called to examine whether quashing of a final decision by means of an extraordinary appeal was in compliance with the requirements of the Convention and it has systematically found that such quashing amounted to a breach of the right to a fair trial. Those cases concerned either the quashing of a civil decision (see, among others, Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, ECHR 1999-VII, and Cornif v. Romania, no. 42872/02, 11 January 2007) or the quashing of a criminal decision. As regards the latter type of decision, the quashing either concerned only the civil head of those proceedings (see SC Plastik ABC v. Romania, no. 32299/03, § 15, 7 April 2008, and Igna and Igna (Valea) v. Romania, nos. 1526/02 and 1528/02, §§ 44-56, 14 February 2008) or led to the imposition of a heavier sentence on a defendant or his or her conviction after an initial acquittal (see, among others, Bota v. Romania, no. 16382/03, 4 November 2008; Precup v. Romania, no. 17771/03, 27 January 2009, and Ştefan v. Romania, no. 28319/03, 6 April 2010).
35. However, the factual situation in the instant case is different from the cases previously examined against Romania, as the extraordinary appeal concerning mainly the criminal head of the proceedings was lodged in favour of the defendant with a view to correcting a miscarriage of justice, thus being similar to the factual situation in the case of Lenskaya, cited above.
36. In this respect, the Court reiterates that it has previously held that while the institution of supervisory review can give rise to problems of legal certainty because judgments in civil cases remain open to review on relatively minor grounds indefinitely (see Brumărescu and Ryabykh, both cited above), The position regarding criminal cases is somewhat different. The Court has emphasised that the requirements of legal certainty are not absolute, in particular in criminal procedures. In such cases, they must be assessed in the light of, for example, Article 4 § 2 of Protocol No. 7, which expressly permits a State to reopen a case due to the emergence of new facts, or where a fundamental defect which could have affected the outcome of the case is detected in previous proceedings (see, Nikitin, cited above, §§ 55 and 56). The possibility of re-examining or reopening cases has also been considered by the Committee of Ministers as a means of achieving restitutio in integrum, particularly in the context of the execution of the Court’s judgments. In its Recommendation No. R (2000) 2 on the re-examination or reopening of certain cases at the domestic level following judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, it encouraged the Contracting Parties to review their domestic legal systems with a view to ensuring that adequate opportunity for the re-examination of a case, including reopening of proceedings, exists in instances where the Court has found a violation of the Convention.
37. Having regard to the above-mentioned principles, the Court has to ascertain whether the High Court of Cassation and Justice, in its decision of 4 November 2003, reopened the criminal proceedings and quashed the final judgment of 14 January 2002, as confirmed on 1 April 2002, with a view to correcting a fundamental judicial error, and if so whether the actual manner in which the High Court exercised that power undermined the overall fairness of the proceedings at stake (see, mutatis mutandis, Lenskaya, cited above, § 36).
38. As regards the purpose of the quashing, the Court notes that the General Prosecutor, in lodging the request for re-opening of the proceedings, had underlined that important pieces of evidence submitted by the defendant in her defence had not been taken into account during the ordinary proceedings. Furthermore, the High Court of Cassation and Justice in its quashing decision found that the lower courts had failed to give consideration to the fact that the evidence was contradictory and not conclusive in respect of the date when the alleged theft had taken place and in respect of the question whether the defendant had actually committed the alleged theft.
39. The Court considers that in such circumstances, the grounds for the re-opening of the proceedings were based on serious procedural defects, affecting the procedural rights of the defendant and the decision to quash the final judgment convicting E.I. does not appear unreasonable or arbitrary (see, mutatis mutandis, Lenskaya, cited above, § 38). In this connection, the Court once again reiterates that the Convention in principle permits the reopening of a final judgment to enable the State to correct miscarriages of criminal justice. A verdict ignoring key evidence may well constitute such a miscarriage (see Vedernikova v. Russia, no. 25580/02, § 25, 12 July 2007).
40. The Court attributes particular weight to the fact that the judicial error committed by the lower courts could not be neutralised or corrected by any other means than the quashing of the final judgment by which E.I had been found guilty. The quashing of the final judgment in the instant case was the only means of indemnifying the convicted person for the mistakes in the administration of justice.
41. In the circumstances of the instant case, the Court notes that the proceedings have been reopened for the purpose of correcting a fundamental judicial error triggering serious unfavourable consequences for the defendant. It remains to be further analysed whether the procedural guarantees of Article 6 of the Convention were available in the proceedings before the High Court of Cassation and Justice.
42. In this respect, the Court observes that the applicant had the opportunity to present his arguments and to challenge the submissions of the adversary in the proceedings. Furthermore, he attended the proceedings and made oral submissions. The Court finds that there is nothing to indicate that the way in which the High Court of Cassation and Justice established and assessed the evidence was unfair or arbitrary. Therefore, it cannot but conclude that the extraordinary appeal proceedings in the instant case afforded the applicant all the procedural safeguards of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
43. Having regard to the foregoing, the Court finds that in the circumstances of the present case, the High Court of Cassation and Justice struck the correct balance between the competing interests of finality and justice. It therefore finds that the quashing of the final judgment of 14 January 2002, as confirmed on 1 April 2002, did not amount to a breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. There has been accordingly no violation of that Article.
2. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
44. The applicant complained that the quashing of the final judgment of 14 January 2002 deprived him of the right to compensation as it had been set by that judgment.
45. The Government admits that there has been an interference with the applicant’s right to property in respect of the damages that he was awarded by the final judgment of 14 January 2002. Nevertheless, they underline that this interference was justified in the interest of justice in order to remedy a judicial error.
46. The Court reiterates that the existence of a debt confirmed by a binding and enforceable judgment furnishes the judgment beneficiary with a “legitimate expectation” that the debt would be paid, and constitutes the beneficiary’s “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Quashing such a judgment amounts to an interference with his or her right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see, among other authorities, Brumărescu v. Romania, cited above, § 74, ECHR, and Androsov v. Russia, no. 63973/00, § 69, 6 October 2005). An interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must strike a fair balance between the demands of the general interests of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 69, Series A no. 52). In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measure depriving a person of his possessions.
47. Turning to the facts of the present case, the Court observes that by virtue of the judgment of 14 January 2002, as confirmed on 1 April 2002, E.I., found guilty of theft of goods from the applicant’s flat, was ordered to pay him a sum of money in compensation for damage caused as a result of the theft and for legal costs. By operation of law, the payment of the compensation by E.I. was conditional on her conviction for the alleged theft. Following the quashing of the judgments and the acquittal of the defendant, her obligation to pay compensation to the applicant ceased to exist because it had not been established that she had stolen goods from him.
48. Having regard to the Court’s findings under Article 6 of the Convention, the Court concludes that the special circumstances of the present case can be regarded as exceptional grounds justifying the quashing of the judgment of 14 January 2002, as confirmed on 1 April 2002, and the dismissal of the applicant’s claim for compensation (see, mutatis mutandis, Lenskaya, cited above, § 47). The Court finds that the domestic courts struck a fair balance between the applicant’s rights to protection of property and the general interest to correct miscarriages of criminal justice.
49. The Court therefore considers that the quashing in the present case did not amount to an unjustified interference with his property rights as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. There has therefore been no violation of that Convention provision.
II. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
50. The applicant, relying on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention complained that the prosecutor and the judges involved in the judicial proceedings against E.I. had not been impartial and that the authorities had tried to discourage him from lodging a complaint with the Court by preventing him to obtain a copy of the final decision of 4 November 2003.
51. However, in the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols.
It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention concerning the quashing, by means of an extraordinary appeal, of the judgment of 14 January 2002, as confirmed on 1 April 2002, admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 21 June 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Santiago Quesada Josep Casadevall
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; nessuna violazione di P1-1
TERZA SEZIONE
CAUSA GIURAN C. ROMANIA
(Richiesta n. 24360/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
21 giugno 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Giuran c. Romania,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Josep Casadevall, Presidente, Corneliu Bîrsan, Alvina Gyulumyan, Ján Šikuta, Luis López Guerra, Nona Tsotsoria, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e da Santiago Quesada, Sezione Cancelliere,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 24 maggio 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 24360/04) contro la Romania depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino rumeno e britannico, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), il 1 maggio 2004.
2. Il Governo rumeno (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Răzvan-Horaţiu Radu, dal Ministero di Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, una violazione del suo diritto ad un processo equanime e del godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà come risultato dell'annullamento, tramite ricorso straordinario, di una sentenza definitiva emessa a suo favore.
4. Il 19 marzo 2010, il Presidente della terza Sezione decise di comunicare queste azioni di reclamo al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità ed i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 1).
5. Il Governo del Regno Unito fu informato della richiesta, nella prospettiva della nazionalità del richiedente (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 dell’Ordinamento di Corte). Non desiderò intervenire.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1930 e vive a Slatina. Lui è andato in pensione.
7. Il 7 agosto 2001, lui presentò un reclamo penale contro E.I., sostenendo che aveva rubato certi articoli dal suo appartamento. Lui affermò che E.I. era presso il suo appartamento per fare le pulizie regolarmente e il 20 gennaio 2001 aveva rimosso molti articoli di gioielleria e di vestiario dal suo appartamento. Lui aveva compreso solamente nel luglio 2001 che quei beni erano scomparsi dal suo appartamento.
8. La causa fu ascoltata dalla Corte distrettuale di Drăgăşani che consegnò la sua sentenza di prima – istanza il 14 gennaio 2002 con cui E.I. fu trovato colpevole e condannato alla reclusione di tre mesi, sospesa. Ad E.I. fu ordinato di pagare i danni di richiedente di 10,000,000 lei rumeni (ROL, approssimativamente 350 euro (EUR) al tempo), rappresentanti il valore di stima degli articoli rubati, e ROL 2,500,000 (circa EUR 90) in parcelle legali. La Corte distrettuale basò la sua decisione sulle dichiarazioni delle parti e di due testimoni. Secondo uno dei testimoni, il richiedente si era lamentato con lui nel luglio 2001 che molti articoli mancavano dal suo appartamento. Nel febbraio 2001 l'imputato gli aveva mostrato molti articoli di gioielleria e vestiario secondo il secondo testimone, menzionando che li aveva ricevuti come regalo dal richiedente.
9. Il 1 aprile 2002 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Vâlcea respinse il ricorso di E.I. e la sentenza del 14 gennaio 2002 divenne così definitiva ed esecutiva.
10. In una data non specificata, il Procuratore Generale della Romania depositò un ricorso straordinario (recurs in anulare) contro la sentenza del 14 gennaio 2002. Il il Procuratore Generale dibatté che E.I. era stato dichiarato colpevole erroneamente, siccome nessuna prova addotta era conclusiva in merito alla sua colpa. Questo aveva condotto ad una violazione del suo diritto ad essere presunto innocente sino che lo si dimostri colpevole. Il procuratore indicò anche che E.I. aveva presentato due prove come parte della sua difesa che erano state ignorate nei procedimenti ordinari. Uno dei documenti era una richiesta depositata dal richiedente all’associazione dei proprietari in cui lui chiedeva di essere esente dal pagamento di costi di utilità per il periodo dicembre 2000-aprile 2001, quando lui sarebbe partito per il Regno Unito. Questo documento era attinente, siccome il richiedente affermava che E.I. entrava nel suo appartamento solamente quando lui era là, e lui aveva dichiarato che gli articoli erano stati rubati nella data esatta del 20 gennaio 2001, quando, secondo questo documento, lui non era in Romania. Il secondo documento era un rapporto di un’indagine condotta dalla polizia presso la dimora dell'imputato che indicava che nessuno degli articoli rivendicati come rubati dal del richiedente era stato trovato là.
11. In una decisione del 4 novembre 2003, l’ Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia accolse il ricorso straordinario, annullò le sentenze del 14 gennaio e del 1 aprile 2002, assolse E.I. e l'alleviò dall'obbligo di pagare il risarcimento al richiedente per i beni rubati e le spese processuali.
La corte sostenne che la precedente condanna era stata basata sulle dichiarazioni di due testimoni che dichiararono che loro sapevano che E.I. era la collaboratrice famigliare del richiedente, che lui possedeva gli articoli menzionati nella sua azione di reclamo penale, e che dopo il 20 gennaio 2001, alcuni degli articoli furono visti da uno dei testimoni nell'alloggio di E.I. Ciononostante, la corte indicò che queste dichiarazioni erano contraddette dalle prove nell'archivio di causa che indicavano che il richiedente aveva lasciato la Romania fra il dicembre 2000 e l’ aprile 2001. Inoltre, prendendo in considerazione che lui aveva affermato sempre che E.I. faceva solamente le faccende domestiche nel suo appartamento quando anche lui era là, la corte indicò che non era credibile che lui non aveva osservato E.I. lasciando l'appartamento con così molti articoli.
La corte concluse inoltre che le prove addotte all'archivio erano sia contraddittorie che inconcludenti a riguardo della data in cui il furto addotto fu commesso e in merito a se l'imputato aveva commesso il furto. Sostenne perciò che le precedenti decisioni non erano state legali, le aveva annullate ed aveva assolto E.I. da tutte le accuse, alleviandola anche dall'obbligo di pagare il risarcimento per i beni rubati e costi di corte in cui era incorso il richiedente.
12. Il richiedente frequentò l'udienza e presentò i suoi argomenti in appoggio delle sue rivendicazioni.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
13. Per il riassunto delle norme di legge nazionale attinente riguardo a questo tipo di ricorso straordinario (“recurs in anulare”) vedere la sentenza nella causa Precup c. Romania (n. 17771/03, § 15 27 gennaio 2009).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
14. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che l'atto di annullamento della sentenza definitiva del 14 gennaio 2002, come confermato il 1 aprile 2002, aveva violato il suo diritto ad un processo equanime ed il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Le parti attinenti di queste disposizioni recitano come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale...”
A. Ammissibilità
15. Il Governo sollevò una dichiarazione d'inammissibilità, dibattendo che il richiedente non aveva sofferto di uno svantaggio significativo. Indicò a questo riguardo che il capo civile dei procedimenti in gioco riguardava un importo di 350 euro (EUR) e che non c'era prova nell'archivio di causa che il richiedente era in una posizione finanziaria tale che il risultato della causa potesse avere un impatto significativo sulla sua vita personale. Il Governo presentò inoltre che le due clausole di salvaguardia stabilite dall’ Articolo 35 § 3 (b) della Convenzione erano state rispettate, come la Corte ha deciso in numerose precedenti occasioni su problemi analoghi a quelli che sorgono nella presente causa e che la causa del richiedente è stata esaminata debitamente dalle corti nazionali.
16. Il richiedente non fu d'accordo.
17. La Corte nota che l'elemento principale del criterio esposto nell’ Articolo 35 § 3 (b) della Convenzione è se il richiedente ha subito qualsiasi svantaggio significativo (vedere Adrian Mihai Ionescu c. Romania (dec.), n. 36659/04, 1 giugno 2010, e Korolev c. la Russia (dec.), n. 25551/05, 1 luglio 2010).
18. Inspirato dal principio generale de minimis non curat praetor, questo criterio di ammissibilità si fonda sull'idea che una violazione di un diritto, comunque reale da un punto di vista puramente legale, dovrebbe raggiungere un minimo di livello di gravità per garantire la considerazione da parte di una corte internazionale. La valutazione di questo livello minimo è, per natura di cose, relativa, e dipende da tutte le circostanze della causa. La gravità di una violazione dovrebbe essere valutata prendendo in conto sia le percezioni soggettive del richiedente e che ciò è obiettivamente in pericolo in una particolare causa (vedere Korolev, citata sopra). In altre parole, l'assenza di qualsiasi svantaggio significativo può essere basato su criteri come l'impatto finanziario della questione nella controversia o l'importanza della causa per il richiedente (vedere Adrian Mihai Ionescu, citata sopra).
19. La Corte reitera a questo riguardo che prima ha considerato insignificante la perdita patrimoniale di circa EUR 90 subita presumibilmente dal richiedente nelle cause Adrian Mihai Ionescu (citata sopra) ed valutò come trascurabile una perdita patrimoniale di circa EUR 0.5 subita presumibilmente dal richiedente nella causa di Korolev, citata sopra.
20. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota che il richiedente chiese il risarcimento per i beni rubati presumibilmente dal suo appartamento da un terza persona. Nei procedimenti penali ordinari, con una decisione definitiva le corti nazionali trovarono una terza parte colpevole di furto di un numero di articoli appartenenti al richiedente e le ordinarono di pagare al richiedente il risarcimento per quegli articoli rubati, essendo il loro valore di stima circa 'EUR 350. In virtù della stessa decisione definitiva al richiedente furono assegnati anche i costi. Il ricorso straordinario e l'annullamento di quella decisione definitiva diede luogo alla perdita da parte del richiedente del diritto al risarcimento per i beni rubati e le spese processuali.
21. La Corte nota che nessuna delle parti ha presentato delle informazioni riguardo allo status finanziario del richiedente. Ciononostante, osserva che il richiedente è andato in pensione, e che secondo il Dipartimento rumeno delle Pensioni e della Previdenza Sociale il livello medio di pensione in Romania nel 2003, quando il richiedente perse il diritto alle somme di soldi determinate dalla sentenza definitiva del 14 gennaio 2002, era l'equivalente di circa EUR 50.
22. La Corte prese anche nota del fatto che i procedimenti nazionali che sono la materia dell'azione di reclamo di fronte a sé erano tesi al ricupero dei beni rubati dal proprio appartamento del richiedente. Perciò, oltre all'interesse patrimoniale nei beni effettivi ed al valore sentimentale legato a loro, è anche necessario prendere in considerazione il fatto che i procedimenti riguardavano una questione di principio per il richiedente, vale a dire il suo diritto al rispetto delle sue proprietà e della sua casa.
23. Sotto queste circostanze, nella prospettiva della Corte non si può ritenere che il richiedente non abbia sofferto di uno svantaggio significativo.
24. La Corte prende nota che il criterio di ammissibilità esposto nell’ Articolo 35 § 3 (b) della Convenzione è solamente applicabile quando il richiedente ha sofferto di nessun svantaggio significativo e purché le due clausole di salvaguardia nella stessa disposizione siano state rispettato. Ne segue che, dove non è stato determinato che il richiedente ha sofferto di nessun svantaggio significativo.
25. La Corte respinge di conseguenza le eccezioni del Governo. Notando che queste azioni di reclamo non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo, le dichiara ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione
(a) Osservazioni delle parti
26. Il richiedente si lamentò che l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 14 gennaio 2002 violò il suo diritto ad un processo equanime, violando il principio della certezza legale.
27. Il Governo indicò all'inizio che il richiedente era una parte civile ai procedimenti penali contro E.I. e che le sue rivendicazioni civili erano collegate da vicino al risultato del capo penale dei procedimenti. Dibatté inoltre che la decisione definitiva era stata annullata per rimediare ad un difetto fondamentale nei procedimenti penali di fronte alle corti inferiori. Il solo modo per rimediare all'errore giudiziario era l’annullamento della decisione definitiva che dichiarava colpevole E.I. Il Governo presentò che il ricorso straordinario era stato depositato all'interno di una cornice di tempo breve dall'adozione della decisione definitiva e che il richiedente prese parte ai procedimenti di fronte all’Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia e lui aveva avuto l'opportunità di presentare argomenti in appoggio alle sue rivendicazioni. Il Governo osservò inoltre che le disposizioni attinenti del Codice per i Procedimenti Penali riguardo a questo tipo di ricorso straordinario erano state abrogate nel frattempo.
(b) Principi generali
28. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad un'udienza giusta di fronte ad un tribunale come garantito dall’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere interpretato alla luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che dichiara nella sua parte attinente, la preminenza del diritto come parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali della preminenza del diritto è il principio di certezza legale che richiede fra le altre cose che dove le corti infine hanno deciso un problema la loro direttiva non dovrebbe essere richiamata in questione (vedere Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999-VII).
29. Questo principio insiste che a nessuna parte è concesso chiedere la riapertura di procedimenti soltanto al fine di un riesame e di una nuova decisione sulla causa. La mera possibilità che ci siano due prospettive sulla stesso soggetto non è una base per un riesame.
30. Discostarsi da questo principio è giustificato solamente quando reso necessario da circostanze di carattere sostanziale ed irresistibile (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Ryabykh c. Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-X, e Pravednaya c. Russia, n. 69529/01, § 25 18 novembre 2004). Il potere delle corti più alte di annullamento o di modifica di decisioni giudiziali vincolanti ed esecutive dovrebbe essere esercitato per correzione di difetti fondamentali. Questo potere deve essere esercitato così da prevedere, nella misura massima possibile, un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di un individuo ed il bisogno di assicurare l'efficacia del sistema della giustizia (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Nikitin c. Russia, n. 50178/99, §§ 54-61 ECHR 2004-VIII).
31. Le considerazioni attinenti da prendere in considerazione in questo collegamento includono, in particolare, l'effetto della riapertura e qualsiasi susseguente procedimento sulla situazione individuale del richiedente e se la riapertura è stato il risultato della propria richiesta del richiedente; i motivi su cui le autorità nazionali revocarono la finalità della sentenza nella causa del richiedente; l'ottemperanza della procedura in questione coi requisiti di diritto nazionale; l'esistenza e l’applicazione delle salvaguardie procedurali nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale capace di ostacolare abusi di questa procedura da parte delle autorità nazionali; e le altre circostanze pertinenti della causa (vedere Nikitin, citata sopra, § 60; Bratyakin c. Russia (dec.), n. 72776/01, 9 marzo 2006; Fadin c. Russia, n. 58079/00, § 34, 27 luglio 2006, e Savinskiy c. Ucraina, n. 6965/02, §§ 24-26 28 febbraio 2006). Inoltre, la revisione deve riconoscere tutte le salvaguardie procedurali dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 e deve assicurare l'equità complessiva dei procedimenti (vedere Vanyan c. Russia, n. 53203/99, §§ 63-68 15 dicembre 2005).
32. In un numero di cause la Corte, rivolgendosi la nozione di “difetto fondamentale”, sottolineò che la mera considerazione che l'indagine nella causa del richiedente era “incompleta ed unilaterale” o conduceva ad un’ assoluzione “erroneo” non può di per sé, in assenza di errori giurisdizionali o di violazioni serie di procedura di corte, di abusi di potere, di errori manifesti nell’applicazione del diritto sostanziale o di qualsiasi altra ragione pesante che scaturiscono dagli interessi della giustizia, indicare la presenza di un difetto fondamentale nei procedimenti precedenti (vedere Radchikov c. Russia, n. 65582/01, § 48 24 maggio 2007).
33. La Corte reitera inoltre i suoi giudizi nella causa Lenskaya c. Russia (n. 13151/04, § 18 31 luglio 2008). In quella causa la sentenza definitiva a favore del richiedente fu annullata tramite una revisione direttiva, sulla base che le corti inferiori “non avevano stabilito ciò che costituiva la condotta penale sotto il particolare capo dell'accusa criminale, se fosse di fatto successo e se era stato commesso” dall'imputato in quella causa. La decisione di annullare questa sentenza definitiva fu basata anche sulla ragione che le corti inferiori, senza valutazione corretta delle prove hanno presunto che i danni del richiedente erano stati commessi dall'imputato in quella causa, senza provare la sua colpa violando così il principio di presunzione dell'innocenza. Concludendo che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in quella causa, la Corte sostenne (§§ 36 et seq.) che i procedimenti erano stati riaperti ai fini di correggere un errore giudiziale e fondamentale che non poteva essere neutralizzato o avrebbe potuto essere corretto con qualsiasi altro mezzo, tranne che con l'annullamento della sentenza definitiva che era grezzamente pregiudizievole alla persona condannata. La Corte trovò anche che tutte le garanzie procedurali dell’ Articolo 6 erano state disponibili al richiedente nel corso dei procedimenti di revisione direttiva.
(c) L’applicazione alla causa presente
34. All'inizio, la Corte nota, che, in cause passate contro la Romania, è stata chiamata ad esaminare, se l’annullamento di una decisione definitiva tramite un ricorso straordinario era in ottemperanza coi requisiti della Convenzione e ha trovato sistematicamente che simile annullamento corrisposero ad una violazione del diritto ad un processo equanime. Quelle cause o riguardavano l'annullamneto di una decisione civile (vedere, fra alte,, Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, ECHR 1999-VII, e Cornif c. Romania, n. 42872/02, 11 gennaio 2007) o l'annullamento di una decisione penale. Riguardo il secondo tipo di decisione, gli annullamenti riguardarono solamente il capo civile di quei procedimenti (vedere SC Plastik ABC c. Romania, n. 32299/03, § 15, 7 aprile 2008, ed Igna ed Igna (Valea) c. Romania, N. 1526/02 e 1528/02, §§ 44-56 del 14 febbraio 2008) o conducevano all'imposizione di una frase più pesante su un imputato o alla sua condanna dopo un'assoluzione iniziale (vedere, fra altre, Bota c. Romania, n. 16382/03, 4 novembre 2008; Precup c. Romania, n. 17771/03, 27 gennaio 2009, e Ştefan c. Romania, n. 28319/03, 6 aprile 2010).
35. La situazione che riguarda i fatti nella presente causa è comunque, diversa dalle cause esaminate prima contro la Romania, siccome il ricorso straordinario che riguardava principalmente il capo penale dei procedimenti fu depositato a favore dell'imputato nella prospettiva di correggere un errore giudiziario, essendo così simile alla situazione che riguarda i fatti nella causa Lenskaya citata sopra.
36. A questo riguardo, la Corte reitera, che prima ha sostenuto che mentre l'istituzione di revisione direttiva può generare problemi di certezza legale perché delle sentenze in giudizi civili rimangono aperte a revisione indefinitamente su dei motivi relativamente minori (vedere Brumărescu e Ryabykh, entrambe citate sopra), La posizione riguardo alle cause penali è piuttosto diversa. La Corte ha enfatizzato che i requisiti della certezza legale non sono assoluti, in particolare in procedimenti penali. In simili casi, loro devono essere valutati alla luce , per esempio, dell’Articolo 4 § 2 di Protocollo N.ro 7 che espressamente permette ad uno Stato per riaprire una causa a causa della comparsa di fatti nuovi, o dove un difetto fondamentale che avrebbe potuto colpire il risultato della causa è scoperto in procedimenti precedenti (vedere, Nikitin, citata sopra, §§ 55 e 56). La possibilità di riesaminare o riaprire cause è stata considerata anche dal Comitato dei Ministri come un mezzo per realizzare una restitutio in integrum, particolarmente nel contesto dell'esecuzione di sentenze della Corte. Nella sua Raccomandazione N.ro R (2000) 2 sul riesame o riapertura di certe cause a livello nazionale seguenti sentenze della Corte europea dei Diritti umani, incoraggiò le Parti Contraenti a fare un riesame dei loro ordinamenti giuridici nazionali nella prospettiva di assicurare che l'opportunità adeguata per il riesame di una causa, incluso la riapertura di procedimenti esiste in istanze dove la Corte ha trovato una violazione della Convenzione.
37. Avendo riguardo ai principi summenzionati, la Corte deve accertare se l’ Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia, nella sua decisione del 4 novembre 2003 riaprì i procedimenti penali ed annullò la sentenza definitivo del 14 gennaio 2002, come confermato il 1 aprile 2002, nella prospettiva di correggere un errore giudiziale fondamentale ed in tal caso se il modo effettivo in cui l’Alta Corte esercitò questo potere minò l'equità complessiva dei procedimenti in gioco (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Lenskaya citata sopra, § 36).
38. Riguardo al fine dell'annullamento, la Corte nota che il Procuratore Generale, nel depositare la richiesta d riapertura dei procedimenti aveva sottolineato che importanti prove presentati dall'imputato a sua difesa non erano stati presi in considerazione durante i procedimenti ordinari. Inoltre, l’Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia nella sua decisione di annullamento ha trovato che le corti inferiori erano andate a vuoto nel dare considerazione al fatto che le prove erano contraddittorie e non conclusive a riguardo della data in cui il furto addotto aveva avuto luogo ed a riguardo della questione se l'imputato davvero aveva commesso il furto addotto.
39. La Corte considera che in simili circostanze, i motivi per la riapertura dei procedimenti furono basati su difetti procedurali seri, che colpivano i diritti procedurali dell'imputato e la decisione per l’annullamento della sentenza definitivo che dichiarava colpevole E.I. e non sembrano irragionevoli o arbitrari (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Lenskaya citata sopra, § 38). In questo collegamento, la Corte ancora una volta reitera, che la Convenzione in principio permette la riapertura di una sentenza definitiva per permettere allo Stato di correggere dei mancamenti della giustizia penale. Un verdetto che ignora le prove chiave può costituire tale mancamento (vedere Vedernikova c. Russia, n. 25580/02, § 25 del 12 luglio 2007).
40. La Corte attribuisce particolare peso al fatto che l'errore giudiziale commesso dalle corti inferiori non poteva essere neutralizzato o avrebbe potuto essere corretto con qualsiasi altro mezzo diverso dall'annullare della sentenza definitiva con la quale E.I era stato trovato colpevole. L'annullamento della sentenza definitiva nella presente causa era il solo mezzo per indennizzare la persona condannata per gli errori nell'amministrazione della giustizia.
41. Nelle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota, che i procedimenti sono stati riaperti al fine di correggere un errore giudiziale fondamentale che provocava conseguenze serie sfavorevoli per l'imputato. Rimane da analizzare inoltre se le garanzie procedurali dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione erano disponibili nei procedimenti di fronte all’ Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia.
42. A questo riguardo, la Corte osserva, che il richiedente aveva l'opportunità di presentare i suoi argomenti ed impugnare le osservazioni dell'avversario nei procedimenti. Inoltre, lui frequentò i procedimenti e fece osservazioni orali. La Corte costata che non c'è niente che indichi che il modo in cui l’Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia stabilì e valutò le prove era ingiusto o arbitrario. Perciò, non può che concludere che i procedimenti di ricorso straordinari nella presente causa riconobbero al richiedente tutte le salvaguardie procedurali dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
43. Avendo riguardo a ciò che precede, la Corte costata che nelle circostanze della presente causa, l’Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia ha previsto l'equilibrio corretto fra gli interessi in competizione delle finalità e della giustizia. Trova perciò che l'annullamento della sentenza definitiva del 14 gennaio 2002, come confermato il 1 aprile 2002, non corrispose ad una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Non c'è stata di conseguenza violazione di quell'Articolo.
2. Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
44. Il richiedente si lamentò che l’annullamento della sentenza definitiva del 14 gennaio 2002 lo spogliò del diritto al risarcimento come era stato stabilito in quella sentenza.
45. Il Governo ammette che c'è stata un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente alla proprietà a riguardo dei danni che gli era stato assegnato con la sentenza definitiva del 14 gennaio 2002. Ciononostante, loro sottolineano che questa interferenza era giustificata nell'interesse della giustizia per rimediare ad un errore giudiziale.
46. La Corte reitera che l'esistenza di un debito confermato da una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante fornisce al beneficiario della sentenza un’ “aspettativa legittima” che il debito sarebbe stato pagato, e costituisce “la proprietà” del beneficiario all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Annullando tale importo di sentenza corrispose ad un'interferenza con il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Brumărescu c. Romania, citata sopra, § 74, ECHR, ed Androsov c. Russia, n. 63973/00, § 69 6del ottobre 2005). Un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra le richieste degli interessi generali della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 69 Serie A n. 52). In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo che si cerca di raggiungere con qualsiasi misura che spoglia una persona delle sue proprietà.
47. Rivolgendosi ai fatti della presente causa, la Corte osserva che in virtù della sentenza del 14 gennaio 2002, come confermato il 1 aprile 2002, a E.I., trovato colpevole di furto di beni dall'appartamento del richiedente, fu ordinato di pagargli una somma di soldi in risarcimento per danno causato come risultato del furto e per spese processuali. Con operazione di legge, il pagamento del risarcimento di E.I. era condizionale alla sua condanna per il furto addotto. In seguito all’annullamento delle sentenze e all'assoluzione dell'imputato, il suo obbligo di pagare il risarcimento al richiedente cessò di esistere perché non era stato stabilito che aveva rubato i suoi beni..
48. Avendo riguardo alle sentenze della Corte sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione, la Corte conclude, che le circostanze speciali della presente causa possono essere considerate motivi eccezionali che giustificano l'annullamento della sentenza del 14 gennaio 2002, come confermato il 1 aprile 2002, ed il proscioglimento della rivendicazione del richiedente per il risarcimento (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Lenskaya citata sopra, § 47). La Corte costata che le corti nazionali hanno previsto un equilibrio equo fra i diritti del richiedente alla protezione della proprietà e l'interesse generale di correggere le mancanze della giustizia penale.
49. La Corte considera perciò che l’ annullamento nella presente causa non corrisposero ad un'interferenza ingiustificata coi suoi diritti di proprietà come garantiti dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Non c'è stata perciò violazione di quella disposizione di Convenzione.
II. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
50. Il richiedente, appellandosi all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione si lamentava che il procuratore ed i giudici coinvolti nei procedimenti giudiziali contro E.I. non erano stati imparziali e che le autorità avevano tentato di scoraggiarlo dal presentare un reclamo presso la Corte impedendogli di ottenere una copia della decisione definitiva del 4 novembre 2003.
51. Comunque, alla luce di tutto il materiale in suo possesso, nella misura in cui le questioni di cui ci si lamentava sono all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte costata che loro non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e delle libertà esposte nella Convenzione o nei suoi Protocolli.
Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione riguardo all'annullamento, tramite un ricorso straordinario, della sentenza del 14 gennaio 2002 come confermato il 1 aprile 2002, ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 21 giugno 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Santiago Quesada Josep Casadevall
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.