Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MAGGIO AND OTHERS v. ITALY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 14, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 46286/09/2011
STATO: Italia
DATA: 31/05/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of Art. 6-1; No violation of P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 14+P1-1 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - awards
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF MAGGIO AND OTHERS v. ITALY
(Applications nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
31 May 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Maggio and Others v. Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Danutė Jočienė,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Dragoljub Popović,
András Sajó,
Işıl Karakaş,
Guido Raimondi, judges,
and Françoise Elens-Passos, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 10 May 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in five applications (nos. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08, 54486/08 and 56001/08) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by five Italian nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 13 August 2009, 28 October 2008, 3 November 2008, 4 November 2008 and 12 November 2008 respectively.
2. The first applicant was represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Lecce. The second, third, fourth and fifth applicants were represented by OMISSIS, a lawyer practising in Brescia. The Italian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent Ms E. Spatafora, and their Co-Agents, Mr N. Lettieri and Ms P. Accardo.
3. The applicants alleged that the legislative intervention while their proceedings were pending was discriminatory and breached their right to a fair trial. The first applicant also complained that, in consequence, he was deprived of his possessions.
4. On 8 June 2010 the Court declared the applications partly inadmissible and decided to communicate the complaints concerning Article 6 § 1, Article 13 and Article 14 in respect of the alleged discrimination vis-à-vis persons whose pensions have not already been liquidated, and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, to the Government. It also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the applications at the same time (Article 29 § 1). The Court also decided, under Rule 54 § 2 (c) of the Rules of Court, to grant the cases priority under Rule 41 and to invite the parties to submit further written observations on the above applications.
5. The Chamber furthermore decided to inform the parties that it was considering the suitability of applying a pilot judgment procedure in the cases (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 and the operative part, ECHR 2004-V, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC] no. 35014/97, ECHR 2006-... §§ 231-239 and the operative part) and requested the parties' observations on the matter. Having considered the circumstances and the observations received, the Chamber decided not to apply the pilot judgment procedure.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1938, 1942, 1939, 1942 and 1940 respectively, and live in Italy.
A. Background of the case
1. Mr M.
7. Mr M. worked in Switzerland from 1980 to 1992.
8. On 25 June 1997 Mr M. requested the Istituto Nazionale della Previdenza Sociale (“INPS”), an Italian welfare entity, to re-examine his old-age pension and to liquidate it on the basis of the real remuneration received (“retribuzione effettiva”) during his years of employment in Switzerland, in accordance with the 1962 Italo-Swiss Convention.
9. On an unspecified date the INPS rejected his request, since the calculation had to be based on the remuneration received in Switzerland and then be re-adjusted on the basis of the tables supplied in Circular no. 324 of 4 January 1978.
10. Mr M. instituted proceedings before the Lecce Tribunal, claiming that the payment of old-age pensions had to be calculated on the basis of the real remuneration received (in the last five years of employment) and of the contributions paid in part in Switzerland and in part in Italy.
11. By a judgment filed in the registry on 8 May 2002, his claim was rejected.
12. Mr M. appealed to the Lecce Court of Appeal which, by a judgment filed in the registry on 30 October 2003, rejected his claim. It took into consideration a technical expert report in relation to Article 23 of the Italo-Swiss Convention (see Relevant Domestic Law below), which provided for the transfer of contributions paid in Switzerland to the Italian insurance scheme for use in the calculation of old-age pensions, and guaranteed the benefits of Italian legislation. Consequently, it held that the pension calculation was to be made on the basis of Italian criteria, even though they were less favourable than the Swiss ones. Indeed, Italian law (decree of 27 April 1968 no. 488) provided for a calculation based on higher contributory rates than those in Switzerland, thus providing a lower pension than that expected by Mr M..
13. By a judgment of 11 December 2008 filed in the registry on 13 February 2009, the Court of Cassation dismissed Mr M.'s claim, after rejecting his request for a preliminary reference to the ECJ. It held that the criteria used by the Court of Appeal were eventually acknowledged in Article 1, paragraph 777, of Law no. 296 of 27 December 2006 (“Law 296/2006”), which had retroactive effect. This Law had not been found to be unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court in a judgment of 23 May 2008 (see Relevant Domestic Law below).
2. Mr G.
14. In 2005 Mr G. requested the INPS to establish his pension on the basis of the contributions paid in Switzerland for work he had performed there between November 1963 and June 2001. As a basis for the calculation of his pension, the INPS employed a theoretical remuneration (“retribuzione teorica”) instead of the real remuneration (“retribuzione effettiva”). The former resulted in a re-adjustment on the basis of the existing ratio between the contributions applied in Switzerland (8%) and in Italy (32.7%), which led to a reduction of 25% in the basic amount used to calculate the pension and therefore a reduction in the pension itself. Consequently, in 2006 Mr G. instituted judicial proceedings.
15. By a judgment of the Brescia Tribunal (Labour Section) of 2 October 2006, Mr G.'s claim was upheld on the basis of the relevant Court of Cassation case-law at the time (see Relevant Domestic Law below).
16. The INPS appealed.
17. By a judgment of 7 August 2007, the Brescia Court of Appeal reversed the first-instance judgment in view of the entry into force of Law 296/2006. Mr G. did not appeal to the Court of Cassation, deeming it to be futile in the circumstances of the case. Thus, the judgment became final on 7 August 2008.
3. Mr F.
18. Mr F. was entitled to an old-age pension from 1 April 1999.
19. In 2006 Mr F. requested the INPS to establish his pension on the basis of the contributions paid in Switzerland for work he had performed there between 1 December 1958 and 31 March 1999. As a basis for the calculation of his pension, the INPS employed a theoretical remuneration (“retribuzione teorica”) instead of the real remuneration (“retribuzione effettiva”). The former resulted in a re-adjustment on the basis of the existing ratio between the contributions applied in Switzerland (8%) and in Italy (32.7%), which led to a reduction of 25% in the basic amount used to calculate the pension and therefore a reduction in the pension itself. Consequently, in 2006 Mr F. instituted judicial proceedings.
20. By a judgment of the Brescia Tribunal (Labour Section) of 20 October 2008, Mr F.'s claims were rejected in view of Law 296/2006 and the subsequent Constitutional Court judgment. Mr F. did not appeal, deeming it to be futile in view of the relevant case-law at the time.
4. Ms F.
21. Ms F. was entitled to an old-age pension from 1 April 1995 and to a survivor's pension, as a widow, her husband having become a pensioner on 1 April 1997, from the date of her husband's death.
22. In 2006 Ms F. requested the INPS to establish her pension on the basis of the contributions paid in Switzerland for work she had performed there between 1 August 1959 and 30 November 1994, and those paid by her husband. As a basis for the calculation of the relevant pensions, the INPS employed a theoretical remuneration (“retribuzione teorica”) instead of the real remuneration (“retribuzione effettiva”). The former resulted in a re-adjustment on the basis of the existing ratio between the contributions applied in Switzerland (8%) and in Italy (32.7%), which led to a reduction of 25% in the basic amount used to calculate the pension and therefore a reduction in the pension itself. Consequently, in 2006 Ms F. instituted judicial proceedings.
23. By a judgment of the Brescia Tribunal (Labour Section) of 20 October 2008, Ms F.'s claims were rejected in view of Law 296/2006 and the subsequent Constitutional Court judgment. Ms F. did not appeal, deeming it to be futile in view of the relevant case-law at the time.
Ms Z.
24. Ms Z. was entitled to an old-age pension from 1 August 1997.
25. In 2006 Ms Z. requested the INPS to establish her pension on the basis of the contributions paid in Switzerland for work she had performed there between March 1960 and July 1997. As a basis for the calculation of her pension, the INPS employed a theoretical remuneration (“retribuzione teorica”) instead of the real remuneration (“retribuzione effettiva”). The former resulted in a re-adjustment on the basis of the existing ratio between the contributions applied in Switzerland (8%) and in Italy (32.7%), which led to a reduction of 25% in the basic amount used to calculate the pension and therefore a reduction in the pension itself. Consequently, in 2006 Ms Z. instituted judicial proceedings.
26. By a judgment of the Brescia Tribunal (Labour Section) of 20 October 2008, Ms Z.'s claims were rejected in view of Law 296/2006 and the subsequent Constitutional Court judgment. Ms Z. did not appeal, deeming it to be futile in view of the relevant case-law at the time.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Security
27. Article 23 of the transitional provisions of the Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Security, of 14 December 1962, provides, in so far as relevant, as follows (unofficial translation):
“1. In so far as Switzerland is concerned, performance shall be in accordance with the provisions of this Convention, even in cases where the insured event occurred before the entry into force of the Convention. Old-age and survivors' ordinary annuities will, however, only apply in accordance with these provisions if the insured event took place before 21 December 1959, and if the contributions were not or will not be transferred or reimbursed in accordance with the Convention of 17 October 1951, or paragraph 5 of this Article. (...)
2. In so far as Italy is concerned, performance shall be in accordance with the provisions of this Convention where the insured event occurred on or after the date of its entry into force. Nevertheless, when the insured event occurred before that date, performance shall take place in accordance with the present Convention from the date of its entry into force, if it would not have been possible to grant such a pension due to the insufficiency of the insurance periods, and only if the contributions have not been reimbursed by the Italian social insurance scheme.
3. With the exception of the above provisions, periods of insurance, of contributions and of residence occurring before the entry into force of this Convention will be taken into consideration.
5. For a period of five years from the entry into force of this Convention, upon the attainment of pensionable age under Italian law, Italian citizens may request, in derogation of Article 7, that the contributions paid by them and their employers into the Swiss old-age and survivors insurance schemes be transferred to the Italian insurance scheme, on condition that they have left Switzerland for permanent settlement in Italy or in a third country prior to the end of the year in which their pensionable age was reached. Article 5 (4) and (5) of the Convention of 17 October 1951 will apply to the use of such transferred contributions, eventual reimbursements and the effects of such transfers.”
28. In so far as relevant, Article 5 of the Italo-Swiss Convention on Social Insurance of 17 October 1951 provides (unofficial translation):
“...(4) Italian citizens not covered by the preceding sub-paragraph (*) or their survivors, may request contributions paid by them and their employers into the Swiss old-age and survivors' insurance to be transferred to the Italian social welfare insurance scheme as indicated in Article 1 (*). The latter will use the said contributions to ensure that the insured person obtains the benefits derived from Italian law quoted in Article 1 (*) and any other dispositions issued by the Italian authorities. In the event that, under the relevant Italian legal provisions, the insured person cannot assert a right to a pension, the Italian social welfare services will reimburse, upon request, the transferred contributions.
(5) Transfer of contributions as provided for in the above sub-paragraph may be requested:
(a) if the Italian citizen has left Switzerland at least ten years before,
(b) on the occurrence of the insured event.
The Italian citizen whose contributions have been transferred to the Italian social insurance scheme cannot assert any right in respect of the Swiss old-age and survivors' insurance on the basis of such contributions. Such a person, or his [or her] survivors, may expect an ordinary annuity from the Swiss old-age and survivors insurance scheme only ... [under] the conditions set out in the first paragraph (*).”
29. It is noted that the articles marked (*) were repealed by Article 26 (3) of the 1962 Convention, except for the purposes of the above cited Article 23 (5).
30. The transitional provision of Article 23 of the 1961 Convention became definitive by means of the additional agreement of 4 July 1969, whose Article 1 (1) and (3) reads:
“On reaching pensionable age under Italian law, and where they have not already been in receipt of a pension, Italian citizens may request, in derogation of Article 7, that the contributions paid by them and their employers into the Swiss old-age and survivors' insurance scheme be transferred to the Italian insurance scheme, on condition that they have left Switzerland for permanent settlement in Italy ...”
“The Italian social welfare entities must use such contributions in favour of the insured or his or her heirs in such a way as to ensure the attainment of the advantages derived from Italian law, as cited in Article 1 of the Convention, in accordance with the specific arrangements issued by the Italian authorities. If no advantage can be attained on the basis of such arrangements, the Italian social welfare entities must reimburse the transferred contributions to the interested parties.”
B. Case-law relevant to the period before the enactment of Law 296/2006.
31. The Court of Cassation's judgment of 6 March 2004, and other analogous jurisprudence at the material time, established that, in the absence of specific legislation regulating the transfer of contributions, the method of calculation in determining workers' pensions should be based on the real remuneration received by that person, including any work undertaken in Switzerland, irrespective of the fact that contributions paid in Switzerland and transferred to Italy had been calculated on the basis of much lower rates than those established under Italian legislation.
C. Law no. 296 of 27 December 2006
32. Article 1, paragraph 777, of Law 296/2006, which entered into force on 1 January 2007, provides (unofficial translation):
“Article 5 (2) of Presidential Decree no. 488 of 27 April 1968 and subsequent modifications must be interpreted to the effect that, in the event of transfer of contributions paid to foreign welfare entities to the Italian obligatory general insurance scheme, as a consequence of international social security treaties and conventions, the pensionable remuneration relative to the employment period abroad is calculated by multiplying the amount of transferred contributions by a hundred and dividing the result by the contribution rates for the invalidity, old-age and survivors insurance scheme, as applicable during the relevant contributory period. More favourable pension treatment already liquidated before the entry into force of the current law is exempted.”
D. Constitutional Court judgment of 23 May 2008, no. 172
33. By a writ of 5 March 2007, the Court of Cassation questioned the legitimacy of Law 296/2006 and remitted the case to the Constitutional Court. The Constitutional Court gave judgment on 23 May 2008, holding, in sum, as follows.
34. Although interpretative, Law 296/2006 was innovative. There had been no conflicting case-law on the pension regime but a single well established interpretation, according to which the Italian worker could ask to transfer his or her contributions, paid in Switzerland, to the INPS, in order to obtain the advantages provided by Italian law on invalidity, old-age and survivors' insurance, including that of remuneration-based pension calculations, on the basis of the wages earned in Switzerland, irrespective of the fact that the transferred contributions had been paid at a much lower Swiss rate.
35. The Constitutional Court noted that the laws defining pension remuneration were part of a welfare system which balanced available resources and the services supplied. A change in calculating pensions from the contributory criterion to the remuneration-based one (“retributivo”), was not to the detriment of the financial sustainability of the system. Thus, the changes brought about by the impugned Law sought to bring the relationship between pensionable remuneration and contributions in line with the system in force in Italy during the same period of time. The Law provided that remuneration received abroad (used as a basis for pension calculations) was to be adjusted by applying the same percentage ratios used for pension contributions paid in Italy during the same period. Thus, the norm made explicit what had been in the original interpretative provisions. Consequently, there had been no breach of the principle of legal certainty. Nor was the norm discriminatory since the acquired and more favourable rights of earlier pensioners were, by then, unassailable. Furthermore, the Law did not discriminate against people who had worked abroad, because it simply ensured an overall balance in the welfare system, and avoided the situation whereby persons who had made small contributions to a foreign pension scheme could receive the same pension as those who had paid the much higher Italian contributions. The contested Law did not provide for any ex post reductions, as it merely imposed an interpretation which could already have been inferred from the original provisions. Lastly, this system still allowed for a sufficient and satisfactory pension, adequate for the lifestyle of a worker. Accordingly, the claim of unconstitutionality of the said Law was manifestly ill-founded.
THE LAW
I. ADMISSIBILITY
36. The Court considers that any apparent objection ratione materiae in relation to the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention should be joined to the merits. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
37. The applicants complained of an alleged breach of their right to a fair hearing as provided in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
1. The parties' submissions
38. The applicants submitted that before the entry into force of the legge finanziaria of 2007 (“Law 296/2006”), the prevailing established case-law, which, as confirmed by the Court of Cassation judgment of 6 March 2004 (see paragraph 31 above), had not been ambiguous, could have allowed a favourable evaluation of the applicants' pensions on the basis of the “real remuneration” (salaries earned) while they worked in Switzerland. The law at issue, however, applied a new method of pension calculation, based on an adjusted and therefore “theoretical remuneration”. This resulted in a lower amount of pension, since the amount on the basis of which the applicants' pension was fixed, and consequently the pension award, was reduced by approximately 25%. Thus, the new law applied new rules to situations that had arisen before it came into force and which had already given rise to claims in this respect in pending proceedings, thereby producing a retrospective effect. As a result, the applicants as owners of pension rights were deprived of a part of their pensions.
39. According to the applicants such a legislative interference could not be justified by economic reasons under the Court's case-law. Furthermore, the Government had not proved that other persons having worked abroad in countries other than Switzerland, or who had worked in Italy and paid lower contributions in accordance with their specific regimes, had also suffered the same treatment in order to balance the economic situation.
40. Even assuming that the application of the principle of solidarity in welfare regimes amounted to a general interest consideration, accepted by the Court, the applicants noted that the situation of the Italian welfare system had not improved significantly and to the extent that it could annul any (discriminatory) effects on the persons in the applicants' situation.
41. The Government submitted that the system in 1962, when the Italo-Swiss Convention came into force, had stipulated that the calculations should be made on the basis of the contributions paid and not the salaries received. In 1982 this had been changed and the INPS, following certain case-law, had tried to adapt the interpretation of Law no. 1987 of 1982 to a new context while maintaining the spirit of the Italo-Swiss Convention. The criteria applied by the INPS to the applicants took into account the low contributions paid by the applicants in Switzerland, namely 8% of the salary, as opposed to the Italian 32.7%. Otherwise, the applicants as persons having worked in Switzerland would have had greater benefits for the relevant period, which constituted an advantage both vis-à-vis other Italian citizens who had paid higher contributions, and other Swiss citizens who ultimately received lower pensions. However, a number of affected individuals applied to the domestic courts contesting their pension calculation. The outcome of such cases created a prevalent but not univocal case-law, favourable to pensioners, which applied the remuneration-based (“retributivo”) method of calculation, based on the salaries received in Switzerland and not on the basis of the contributions paid.
42. According to the Government there had not been interference by the legislature. The interpretation of the relevant provision had in any event been controversial, there having been some first-instance judgments and at least one case on appeal confirming the INPS's practice. Moreover, the calculation did not affect already liquidated pensions. The entry into force of the impugned provision catered for an equitable distribution of collective resources. Its enactment had been reasonable, as the provision aimed to reinforce an interpretation already applied by the INPS and confirmed by a minority case-law that made it possible to attribute the same value to periods of work served in Italy or abroad. Thus, although the financial burden was not negligible, the reason had not been solely financial as in the cases of Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others v. France ([GC], nos. 24846/94 and 34165/96 to 34173/96, ECHR 1999-VII), and Scordino v. Italy ((no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, ECHR 2006-V). Moreover, the enactment of this legislation had been necessary as the previous interpretation had been a literal one, arising out of provisions set out in a different normative context.
2. The Court's assessment
43. The Court has repeatedly ruled that although the legislature is not prevented from regulating, through new retrospective provisions, rights derived from the laws in force, the principle of the rule of law and the notion of a fair trial enshrined in Article 6 preclude, except for compelling public-interest reasons, interference by the legislature with the administration of justice designed to influence the judicial determination of a dispute (see, among many other authorities, Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 49, Series A no. 301-B; National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society v. the United Kingdom, 23 October 1997, § 112, Reports 1997-VII; and Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others v. France [GC], nos. 24846/94 and 34165/96 to 34173/96, § 57, ECHR 1999-VII). Although statutory pension regulations are liable to change and a judicial decision cannot be relied on as a guarantee against such changes in the future (see Sukhobokov v. Russia, no. 75470/01, § 26, 13 April 2006), even if such changes are to the disadvantage of certain welfare recipients, the State cannot interfere with the process of adjudication in an arbitrary manner (see, mutatis mutandis, Bulgakova v. Russia, no. 69524/01, § 42, 18 January 2007).
44. In the instant case, the Court must look at the effect of Law 296/2006 and the timing of its enactment. It notes that the Law expressly excluded from its scope court decisions that had become final (pension treatments already liquidated) and settled once and for all the terms of the disputes before the ordinary courts retrospectively. Indeed, the enactment of Law 296/2006, while the proceedings were pending, in reality determined the substance of the disputes and the application of it by the various ordinary courts made it pointless for an entire group of individuals in the applicants' positions to carry on with the litigation. Thus, the law had the effect of definitively modifying the outcome of the pending litigation, to which the State was a party, endorsing the State's position to the applicants' detriment.
45. It remains to be determined whether there was any compelling general interest reason capable of justifying such a measure. Respect for the rule of law and the notion of a fair trial require that any reasons adduced to justify such measures be treated with the greatest possible degree of circumspection (see, Stran Greek Refineries, cited above, § 49).
46. The Court notes that in their submissions the Government claimed that, apart from any financial reasons, the promulgation of Law 296/2006 had been reasonable as it aimed to reinforce an interpretation already applied by the INPS and confirmed by a minority case-law that made it possible to attribute the same value to periods of employment served in Italy or abroad, thus creating an equilibrium in the welfare system.
47. The Court has previously held that financial considerations cannot by themselves warrant the legislature substituting itself for the courts in order to settle disputes (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 132, ECHR 2006-V, and Cabourdin v. France, no. 60796/00, § 37, 11 April 2006).
48. The Court notes that, after 1982, the INPS applied an interpretation of the law in force at the time which was most favourable to it as the disbursing authority. This system was not supported by the majority case-law. The Court cannot imagine in what way the aim of reinforcing a subjective and partial interpretation, favourable to a State's entity as party to the proceedings, could amount to justification for legislative interference while those proceedings were pending, particularly when such an interpretation had been found to be fallacious on a majority of occasions by the domestic courts, including the Court of Cassation (see paragraph 31 above).
49. As to the Government's argument that the Law had been necessary to re-establish an equilibrium in the pension system by removing any advantages enjoyed by individuals who had worked in Switzerland and paid lower contributions, while the Court accepts this to be a reason of general interest, the Court is not persuaded that it was compelling enough to overcome the dangers inherent in the use of retrospective legislation, which has the effect of influencing the judicial determination of a pending dispute to which the State was a party.
50. In conclusion, the State infringed the applicants' rights under Article 6 § 1 by intervening in a decisive manner to ensure that the outcome of proceedings to which it was a party were favourable to it. There has therefore been a violation of that Article.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
51. The first applicant further complained that the reduction in his pension, as a result of the new method of calculation envisaged in Law 296/2006, constituted interference with the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties' observations
52. The first applicant submitted that his future pension had already matured under the previous laws and therefore constituted a possession. The fact that the first applicant was denied that possession as a consequence of an illegitimate interference was, in his view, in breach of the lawfulness requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Moreover, the first applicant submitted that his category of pensioners, as sole targets of the impugned provisions, were made to suffer an excessive individual burden in the name of any general interest that may be invoked, which created an unfair balance.
53. The Government submitted that a possible, more favourable amount of pension could not constitute an already established possession. Thus, at the time the first applicant's only possession was that awarded by the INPS under the impugned law. Moreover, on the basis of the reasons argued above, there had been no violation of the said provision, particularly in view of the general interest invoked, namely the need to ensure the economic and financial stability of the Italian welfare system.
B. General Principles
54. The Court reiterates that, according to its case-law, an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or assets, including, in certain well-defined situations, claims. For a claim to be capable of being considered an “asset” falling within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the claimant must establish that it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it. Where that has been done, the concept of “legitimate expectation” can come into play (see Maurice v. France [GC], no. 11810/03, § 63, ECHR 2005-IX).
55. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee as such any right to become the owner of property (see Van der Mussele v. Belgium, 23 November 1983, § 48, Series A no. 70; Slivenko v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II; and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Nor does it guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX; Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V; and Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X). Similarly, the right to receive a pension in respect of activities carried out in a State other than the respondent State is not guaranteed (see L.B. v. Austria (dec.), no. 39802/98, 18 April 2002). However, a “claim” concerning a pension can constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 where it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example where it is confirmed by a final court judgment (see Pravednaya v. Russia, no. 69529/01, §§ 37-39, 18 November 2004; and Bulgakova, cited above, § 31).
56. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: “the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, “distinct” in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule” (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98; Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II; and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I).
57. An essential condition for interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful. Any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 85, 17 October 2002, and Wieczorek v. Poland, no. 18176/05, § 59, 8 December 2009). Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81-94, ECHR 2005-VI). The requisite fair balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52).
58. Where the amount of a benefit is reduced or discontinued, this may constitute interference with possessions which requires to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40, and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009).
C. The Court's assessment
59. The Court does not consider it necessary to decide on the Government's preliminary objection and therefore to determine whether the first applicant in the present case had a possession within the meaning of the Protocol No. 1, as in any event it considers that there has been no breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention for the following reasons.
60. The Court has previously acknowledged that laws with retrospective effect which were found to constitute legislative interference still conformed with the lawfulness requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Maurice v. France [GC], no. 11810/03, § 81, ECHR 2005-IX; Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, § 73, 6 October 2005, and Kuznetsova v. Russia, no. 67579/01, § 50, 7 June 2007). It finds no reason to deem otherwise in the present case. It further accepts that the enactment of Law 296/2006 pursued the public interest (such as providing a harmonised pension calculation, aiming at a balanced and sustainable welfare system).
61. In considering whether the interference imposed an excessive individual burden on the first applicant, the Court has regard to the particular context in which the issue arises in the present case, namely that of a social security scheme. Such schemes are an expression of a society's solidarity with its vulnerable members (see, mutatis mutandis, Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI).
62. The Court notes that Law 296/2006 provided that the pensionable remuneration relative to the working period abroad was to be calculated by multiplying the amount of contributions transferred by a hundred and dividing the result by the contribution rates for the invalidity, old-age and survivors' insurance scheme, as applicable during the relevant contributory period. As a consequence, according to the first applicant, between the years 1996 when he started receiving his pension and 2009, he received a monthly pension of EUR 873 as opposed to EUR 1,372 which he would have obtained had his proceedings not been interfered with and he had been successful, and for the year 2010 he received a pension of EUR 1,178 instead of EUR 1,900. On the basis of these calculations the Court observes that the first applicant lost considerably less than half of his pension. Thus, the Court considers that the applicant was obliged to endure a reasonable and commensurate reduction, rather than the total deprivation of his entitlements (see, conversely, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above § 45).
63. In consequence, the applicant's right to derive benefits from the social insurance scheme in question has not been infringed in a manner resulting in the impairment of the essence of his pension rights. In this respect the Court notes that the applicant had in fact paid lower contributions in Switzerland than he would have paid in Italy, and thus he had had the opportunity to enjoy more substantial earnings at the time. Moreover, this reduction only had the effect of equalizing a state of affairs and avoiding unjustified advantages (resulting from the decision to retire in Italy) for the applicant and other persons in his position. Against this background, bearing in mind the State's wide margin of appreciation in regulating the pension system and the fact that the applicant only lost a partial amount of pension, the Court considers that the applicant was not made to bear an individual and excessive burden.
64. It follows that, even assuming the provision was applicable, there has not been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
65. The second, third, fourth and fifth applicants complained that, as a result of the recent case-law, any judicial remedies would have had no prospects of success. Thus, they did not have at their disposal an effective domestic remedy for their Convention complaints under Article 6 to the Convention. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
66. The Government submitted that the applicants had made use of judicial remedies to contest their pension calculation by the INPS. Moreover, the Constitutional Court had also pronounced itself on the matter in its judgment of 28 May 2008, finding that the interpretation given had been rational and had established an equilibrium between contributions paid abroad and the amount to be paid in pension.
67. Having regard to the finding relating to Article 6 (see paragraph 50 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a violation of Article 13 in this case.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
68. The first applicant further complained that he had suffered discrimination in the enjoyment of his Convention rights because his pension claims had not been liquidated at the material time, as opposed to others whose proceedings had been finalised, contrary to Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 6 and/or Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. He relied on Article 14 of the Convention, which provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
69. The Government submitted that, in accordance with the Italo-Swiss Convention, the INPS paid out pensions after taking into consideration the working period in Switzerland and contributions paid there, in order to avoid the above-mentioned advantage. In the case of individuals who had not contested the amounts paid by the INPS, the latter was the final decision in respect of the amount of pension. Those who opted to contest that amount could only hope for a favourable outcome. However, the practical effects of Law 296/2006 were that the judicial decisions of the pending proceedings confirmed the original amount awarded by the INPS. Thus, there had been no discrimination, particularly because Law 296/2006 aimed to establish a homogenous situation while eliminating unjustified privileges for persons who had worked abroad. In the Government's subsequent observations, referring to a report prepared by the INPS, they submitted that any favourable treatment enjoyed by persons whose pensions had already been liquidated was an inevitable situation, in view of the necessity of the Government to regulate possessions in the general interest.
70. The Court notes that Article 6 is applicable to the present case and this suffices to hold that Article 14 is also applicable.
71. The Court reiterates that a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (see Stec and Others, [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 51, ECHR 2006-VI). The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject-matter and the background. The Court has previously held that the choice of a cut-off date when transforming social security regimes must be considered as falling within the wide margin of appreciation afforded to a State when reforming its social strategy policy (see Twizell v. the United Kingdom, no. 25379/02, § 24, 20 May 2008).
72. What needs to be considered is whether in the instant case the impugned cut-off date arising out of Law 296/2006 can be deemed reasonably and objectively justified.
73. It must be recalled that Law 296/2006 was intended to level out any favourable treatment arising from the previous interpretation of the provisions in force, which had guaranteed to persons in the first applicant's position an unjustified advantage, bearing in mind the needs of the social security system in Italy. The Court reiterates that in creating a scheme of benefits it is sometimes necessary to use cut-off points that apply to large groups of people and which may to a certain extent appear arbitrary (see Twizell, cited above, § 24). The Court considers that this is an inevitable consequence of introducing new regulations to replace previous schemes. Thus, in the present case, bearing in mind the margin of appreciation afforded to States in this sphere, the impugned cut-off date can be deemed reasonably and objectively justified.
74. The fact that the impugned cut-off date arose out of legislation enacted pending the first applicant's proceedings for the determination of his pension does not alter the above conclusion for the purposes of the examination under Article 14.
75. It follows that there has not been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 6.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
76. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
77. Mr M. claimed EUR 140,000 plus interest to cover the difference in pension received over the relevant years, namely EUR 100,360 revalued according to inflation. He further claimed a future pension of EUR 1,900 per month.
78. The remaining applicants claimed the sum representing the partial loss of their pensions from the date when they were first due, to 78 years of age in respect of the male applicants and 82 years in respect of the female applicants (representing life expectancy), which, according to their calculations, amounted to the following sums respectively, EUR 1,380,000 in respect of Mr G., EUR 746,022.42 in respect of Mr F., EUR 1,671,082.53 in respect of Ms F. and EUR 903,948.24 in respect of Ms Z..
79. All the applicants claimed non-pecuniary damage, leaving it to the Court to determine an adequate amount.
80. The Court notes that in the present case an award of just satisfaction can only be based on the fact that the applicants did not have the benefit of the guarantees of Article 6 in respect of the fairness of the proceedings. Whilst the Court cannot speculate as to the outcome of the trial had the position been otherwise, it does not find it unreasonable to regard the applicants as having suffered a loss of real opportunities (see Zielinski, cited above, § 79 and SCM Scanner de l'Ouest Lyonnais and Others v. France, no. 12106/03, § 38, 21 June 2007). Thus, bearing in mind the amount of years each applicant worked in Switzerland, the Court awards EUR 20,000 to Mr M. and EUR 50,000 to each of the other four applicants in respect of pecuniary damage. To that must be added non-pecuniary damage, which the finding of a violation in this judgment does not suffice to remedy. Making its assessment on an equitable basis as required by Article 41, the Court awards each applicant EUR 12,000 under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
81. The first applicant also claimed EUR 10,000 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and the Court. The remaining applicants also claimed costs and expenses and left it to the Court to quantify such sums.
82. The Government did not submit any comments in this respect.
83. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the above criteria and the fact that no documents have been presented justifying the alleged expenses the Court rejects the claim for costs and expenses in its entirety.
C. Default interest
84. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decided to join to the merits the Government's preliminary objection in relation to the first applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and declared the remainder of the applications admissible;
2. Held that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in respect of all the applicants;
3. Held that there has not been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the first applicant and that it is not necessary to consider the Government's above-mentioned objection after having examined the merits;
4. Held that it is not necessary to examine the second, third, fourth and fifth applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention;
5. Held that there has not been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 6 in respect of the first applicant;
6. Held
(a) that the respondent State is to pay, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention,
(i) EUR 20,000 (twenty thousand euros) to Mr M. and EUR 50,000 (fifty thousand euros) to each of the other four applicants in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 12,000 (twelve thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to each applicant in respect of non-pecuniary damage; (b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
7. Dismissed the remainder of the applicants' claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 31 May 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Françoise Elens-Passos Françoise Tulkens Deputy Section Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; nessuna violazione di P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1; danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - assegnazioni
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA MAGGIO ED ALTRI C. ITALIA
(Richieste N. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08 54486/08 e 56001/08)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
31 maggio 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Maggio ed Altri c. Italia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, Danutė Jočienė, David Thór Björgvinsson, Dragoljub Popović, András Sajó, Işıl Karakaş, Guido Raimondi, giudici,
e Françoise Elens-Passos, Cancelliere di Sezione Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 10 maggio 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da cinque richieste (N. 46286/09, 52851/08, 53727/08 54486/08 e 56001/08) contro la Repubblica italiana depositata presso la Corte sotto Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da cinque cittadini italiani, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), rispettivamente il 13 agosto 2009, il 28 ottobre 2008, il 3 novembre e il 4 novembre 2008 e il 12 novembre 2008.
2. Il primo richiedente fu rappresentato da OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Lecce. Il secondo, terzo , quarto e quinto richiedente sono stati rappresentati da OMISSIS, un avvocato che pratica a Brescia. Il Governo italiano (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Rappresentante la Sig.ra E. Spatafora, e dai suoi Co-agenti, il Sig. N. Lettieri ed la Sig.ra P. Accardo.
3. I richiedenti addussero che l'intervento legislativo mentre i loro procedimenti erano pendenti erano discriminatorio e ha violato il loro diritto ad un processo equanime. Il primo richiedente si lamentò anche che, di conseguenza, lui fu privato delle sue proprietà.
4. L’ 8 giugno 2010 la Corte dichiarò le richieste parzialmente inammissibili e decise di comunicare le azioni di reclamo riguardo all’ Articolo 6 § 1, all’Articolo 13 ed all’ Articolo 14 a riguardo delle persone vis-à-vis alla discriminazione addotta le cui pensioni non sono ancora state liquidate, ed all’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, al Governo. Decise anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 1). La Corte decise anche, sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (c) dell’Ordinamento di Corte, di accordare la priorità delle cause sotto l’Articolo 41 e inoltre di invitare le parti a presentare osservazioni scritte sulle richieste sopra.
5. La Camera decise inoltre di informare le parti che stava considerando l'appropriatezza dell’applicazione di una procedura di sentenza di pilota nelle cause (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 e parte operativa, il 2004-V di ECHR, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC] n. 35014/97, ECHR 2006 -... §§ 231-239 e parte operativa) e richiese le osservazioni delle parti sulla questione. Avendo considerato le circostanze e le osservazioni ricevute, la Camera decise di non applicare la procedura di sentenza pilota.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1938, 1942, 1939 1942 e 1940, e vivono in Italia.
A. Background della causa
1. Il Sig. M.
7. Il Sig. M. ha lavorato in Svizzera dal 1980 al 1992.
8. Il25 giugno 1997 il Sig. M. richiese all’ 'Istituto della di Nazionale Previdenza Sociale (“INPS”), un'entità di welfare italiana, di riesaminare la sua pensione di anzianità e liquidarlo sulla base della vera rimunerazione ricevuta (“retribuzione effettiva”) durante i suoi anni di lavoro in Svizzera, in conformità con la Convenzione Italo - svizzera del 1962.
9. In una data non specificata l'INPS respinse la sua richiesta, poiché il calcolo doveva essere basato sulla rimunerazione ricevuta in Svizzera e poi corretta sulla base delle tabelle fornite dalla Circolare n. 324 del 4 gennaio 1978.
10. Il Sig. M. avviò procedimenti di fronte al Tribunale di Lecce, chiedendo che il pagamento della pensione di anzianità doveva essere calcolata sulla base della vera rimunerazione ricevuta (negli ultimi cinque anni di lavoro) e dei contributi pagati in parte in Svizzera ed in parte in Italia.
11. Con una sentenza registrata presso la cancelleria il 8 maggio 2002, la sua rivendicazione fu respinta.
12. Il Sig. M. fece ricorso presso la Corte d'appello di Lecce che, con una sentenza registrata presso la cancelleria il 30 ottobre 2003, respinse la sua rivendicazione. Prese in esame un rapporto tecnico competente in relazione all’ Articolo 23 della Convenzione Italo - svizzera (vedere Diritto nazionale Attinente sotto) che prevedeva il trasferimento dei contributi pagati in Svizzera al piano assicurativo italiano per l’uso nel calcolo di pensioni di anzianità , e garantiva i benefici della legislazione italiana. Di conseguenza, sostenne che il calcolo della pensione sarebbe stato fatto sulla base dei criteri italiani, anche se loro erano meno favorevoli di quelli svizzeri. Effettivamente, la legge italiana (decreto del 27 aprile 1968 n. 488) prevedeva un calcolo basato su tassi di contributi più alti di quelli in Svizzera, offrendo così una pensione più bassa di quella che si aspettava il Sig. M..
13. Con una sentenza dell’ 11 dicembre 2008 registrata presso la cancelleria il 13 febbraio 2009, la Corte di Cassazione respinse la rivendicazione del Sig. M., dopo avere respinto la sua richiesta per un riferimento preliminare all'ECJ. Sostenne che i criteri usati dalla Corte d'appello fu infine riconosciuti dall’Articolo 1, vedere paragrafi 777, della Legge n. 296 27 dicembre 2006 (“Legge 296/2006”) che aveva effetto retroattivo. Questa Legge non era stata trovata incostituzionale dalla Corte Costituzionale in una sentenza del 23 maggio 2008 (vedere Diritto nazionale Attinente sotto).
2. Il Sig. G.
14. Nel 2005 il Sig. G. richiese all'INPS di stabilire la sua pensione sulla base dei contributi pagati in Svizzera per il lavoro che lui aveva compiuto fra il novembre 1963 e il giugno 2001. Come base per il calcolo della sua pensione, l'INPS assunse una rimunerazione teorica (“retribuzione teorica”) invece della vera rimunerazione (“retribuzione effettiva”). I precedenti diedero luogo ad una rettifica ulteriore sulla base del rapporto esistente fra i contributi applicati in Svizzera (8%) ed in Italia (32.7%) che condusse ad una riduzione del 25% nell'importo di base usato per calcolare la pensione e perciò una riduzione nella pensione stessa. Nel 2006 il Sig. G. avviò di conseguenza, procedimenti giudiziali.
15. Con una sentenza del Tribunale di Brescia (Sezione Lavoro) del 2 ottobre 2006, la rivendicazione del Sig. G. fu sostenuta sulla base della giurisprudenza della Corte di Cassazione al tempo attinente (vedere Diritto nazionale Attinente sotto).
16. L'INPS fece ricorso.
17. Con una sentenza del 7 agosto 2007, la Corte d'appello di Brescia invertì la sentenza di prima - istanza nella prospettiva dell'entrata in vigore della Legge 296/2006. Il Sig. G. non fece ricorso presso la Corte di Cassazione, ritenendolo futile nelle circostanze della causa. Così, la sentenza divenne definitiva il 7 agosto 2008.
3. Il Sig. F.
18. Al Sig. F. fu concessa una pensione di anzianità dal 1 aprile 1999.
19. Nel 2006 il Sig. F. richiese all'INPS di stabilire la sua pensione sulla base dei contributi pagati in Svizzera per il lavoro che aveva compiuto là fra il1 dicembre 1958 e il 31 marzo 1999. Come base per il calcolo della sua pensione, l'INPS assunse una rimunerazione teorica (“retribuzione teorica”) invece della vera rimunerazione (“retribuzione effettiva”). I precedenti diedero luogo ad una nuova rettifica sulla base del rapporto esistente fra i contributi applicati in Svizzera (8%) ed in Italia (32.7%) che condusse ad una riduzione del 25% dell'importo di base usato per calcolare la pensione e perciò una riduzione nella pensione stessa. Nel 2006 il Sig. F. avviò di conseguenza, procedimenti giudiziali.
20. Con una sentenza del Tribunale di Brescia (Sezione Lavoro) del 20 ottobre 2008, le rivendicazioni del Sig. F. furono respinte nella prospettiva di Legge 296/2006 e della susseguente sentenza della Corte Costituzionale. Il Sig. F. non fece ricorso, ritenendolo futile nella prospettiva dell’ attinente giurisprudenza al tempo.
4. Il Sig.ra F.
21. Alla Sig.ra F. fu concessa una pensione di anzianità dal 1 aprile 1995 ed alla pensione di un superstite, come vedova di suo marito che era divenuto pensionato dal 1 aprile 1997, dalla data della morte di suo marito.
22. Nel 2006 il Sig.ra F. richiese all'INPS di stabilire la sua pensione sulla base dei contributi pagati in Svizzera per il lavoro che lei aveva compiuto là fra il 1 agosto 1959 e il 30 novembre 1994, e quelli pagati da suo marito. Come base per il calcolo delle pensioni attinenti, l'INPS assunse una rimunerazione teorica (“retribuzione teorica”) invece della vera rimunerazione (“retribuzione effettiva”). I precedenti diedero luogo ad una nuova rettifica sulla base del rapporto esistente fra i contributi applicati in Svizzera (8%) ed in Italia (32.7%) che condusse ad una riduzione del 25% nell'importo di base usato per calcolare la pensione e perciò una riduzione nella pensione stessa. Nel 2006 il Sig.ra F. avviò di conseguenza, procedimenti giudiziali.
23. Con una sentenza del Tribunale di Brescia (Sezione Lavoro) del 20 ottobre 2008, le rivendicazioni della Sig.ra F. furono respinte nella prospettiva della Legge 296/2006 e della susseguente sentenza della Corte Costituzionale . La Sig.ra F. non fece ricorso, ritenendolo futile nella prospettiva della giurisprudenza attinente al tempo.
Il Sig.ra Z.
24. Alla Sig.ra Z. fu concessa una pensione di anzianità dal 1 agosto 1997.
25. Nel 2006 la Sig.ra Z. richiese all'INPS di stabilire la sua pensione sulla base dei contributi pagati in Svizzera per il lavoro che lei aveva compiuto là fra il marzo 1960 e il luglio 1997. Come base per il calcolo della sua pensione, l'INPS assunse una rimunerazione teorica (“retribuzione teorica”) invece della vera rimunerazione (“retribuzione effettiva”). I precedenti diedero luogo ad una rettifica sulla base del rapporto esistente fra i contributi applicati in Svizzera (8%) ed in Italia (32.7%) che condusse ad una riduzione del 25% nell'importo di base usato per ricalcolare la pensione e perciò una riduzione nella pensione stessa. Nel 2006 la Sig.ra Z. avviò di conseguenza, procedimenti giudiziali.
26. Con una sentenza del Tribunale di Brescia (Sezione Lavoro) del 20 ottobre 2008, le rivendicazioni della Sig.ra Z. furono respinte nella prospettiva della Legge 296/2006 e della susseguente sentenza della Corte Costituzionale. La Sig.ra Z. non fece ricorso, ritenendolo futile nella prospettiva della giurisprudenza attinente al tempo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Convenzione Italo - svizzera sulla Previdenza Sociale
27. L’Articolo 23 delle disposizioni di transizione della Convenzione Italo - svizzera su Previdenza Sociale, del 14 dicembre 1962 prevede, nella parte attinente, come segue (traduzione non ufficiale):
“1. Nella misura in cui è riguardata la Svizzera, l'adempimento sarà in conformità con le disposizioni di questa Convenzione, anche in casi dove l'evento assicurato accadde prima dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione. Le annualità ordinarie di anzianità e di superstiti, comunque, si applicheranno solamente in conformità con queste disposizioni se l'evento assicurato avrà luogo prima del 21 dicembre 1959, e se i contributi non erano o non saranno trasferiti o rimborsati in conformità con la Convenzione del 17 ottobre 1951, o paragrafo 5 di questo Articolo. (...)
2. Nella misura in cui è riguardata l'Italia, l'adempimento sarà in conformità con le disposizioni di questa Convenzione dove l'evento assicurato accadde nella data o dopo la data della sua entrata in vigore. Ciononostante, quando l'evento assicurato accadde prima di questa data, l'adempimento avrà luogo in conformità con la presente Convenzione dalla data della sua entrata in vigore, se non fosse stato possibile accordare tale pensione a causa dell'insufficienza dei periodi di assicurazione, e solamente se i contributi non sono stati rimborsati dal piano assicurativo sociale italiano.
3. Ad eccezione delle disposizioni sopra, i periodi di assicurazione, di contributi e di residenza avvenuti prima dell'entrata in vigore di questa Convenzione saranno presi in esame.
5. Per un periodo di cinque anni dall'entrata in vigore di questa Convenzione, al conseguimento dell’ età pensionabile sotto la legge italiana i cittadini italiani possono richiedere, in deroga all’ Articolo 7, che i contributi pagati da loro e dai loro datori di lavoro nei piani assicurativi svizzeri dei superstiti e di anzianità vengano trasferiti al piano assicurativo italiano, a condizione che loro abbiano lasciato la Svizzera per accordo permanente in Italia o in un terzo paese prima della fine dell'anno in cui la loro età pensionabile è stata raggiunta. L’Articolo 5 (4) e (5) della Convenzione del 17 ottobre 1951 si applicherà all'uso di simili contributi trasferiti, ad eventuali rimborsi e agli effetti di simili trasferimenti.”
28. Nella parte attinente, l’Articolo 5 della Convenzione Italo-svizzera sulla Previdenza Sociale del 17 ottobre 1951 prevede (traduzione non ufficiale):
“... (4) i cittadini italiani non coperti dal precedente sub paragrafo (*) o i loro superstiti, possono richiedere che i contributi pagati da loro e dai loro datori di lavoro nella previdenza di anzianità e di superstiti vengano trasferiti ai piano assicurativi di benessere sociale italiano come indicato nell’ Articolo 1 (*). Quest’ultima userà i detti contributi per garantire che la persona assicurata ottenga i benefici derivati dalla legge italiana citata nell’ Articolo 1 (*) e qualsiasi altra disposizione emessa dalle autorità italiane. Nel caso in cui, sotto le disposizioni legali italiane attinenti, la persona assicurata non può asserire un diritto ad una pensione, i servizi di benessere sociale italiani rimborseranno, su richiesta, i contributi trasferiti.
(5) Il trasferimento dei contributi come previsto per nella sub-paragrafo sopra può essere richiesto:
(a) se il cittadino italiano ha lasciato la Svizzera almeno prima dieci anni,
(b) all'avvenimento dell'evento assicurato.
Il cittadino italiano i cui contributi sono stati trasferiti al piano assicurativo sociale italiano non può asserire qualsiasi diritto a riguardo dell’assicurazione svizzera di anzianità e all'assicurazione di superstiti sulla base di simili contributi. Tale persona, o i suoi superstiti, possono aspettarsi solamente un'annualità ordinaria del piano assicurativo svizzero di anzianità e di superstiti... [sotto] le condizioni esposte nel primo paragrafo (*).”
29. Si nota che gli articoli contrassegnati con (*) furono abrogati dall’ Articolo 26 (3) della Convenzione del 1962, ad eccezione dei fini dell’Articolo 23 (5) citato sopra.
30. La disposizione di transizione dell’ Articolo 23 della Convenzione del 1961 divenne definitiva tramite accordo supplementare del 4 luglio 1969 il cui Articolo 1 (1) e (3) recita:
“Al sopraggiungere dell’ età pensionabile sotto legge italiana, e dove già non stanno ricevendo una loro pensione, i cittadini italiani possono richiedere, in deroga all’ Articolo 7, che i contributi pagati da loro e dai loro datori di lavoro nel piano assicurativo svizzero di anzianità e dei superstiti vengano trasferiti al piano assicurativo italiano, a condizione che loro hanno lasciato la Svizzera stabilirsi permanente in Italia...”
“Le entità di welfare sociale italiane devono usare simili contributi a favore dell'assicurato o dei suoi eredi in tal modo da assicurare il conseguimento dei vantaggi derivati dalla legge italiana, come citato nell’ Articolo 1 della Convenzione, in conformità con le specifiche disposizioni emesse dalle autorità italiane. Se nessun vantaggio può essere raggiunto sulla base di simili disposizioni, le entità di welfare sociale italiane devono rimborsare i contributi trasferiti alle parti interessate.”
B. Giurisprudenza attinente al periodo prima della promulgazione della Legge 296/2006.
31. Il giudizio della Corte di Cassazione del 6 marzo 2004, e l'altra giurisprudenza analoga al tempo attinente, stabilito che, in assenza di specifica legislazione che regola il trasferimento di contributi, il metodo di calcolo nel determinare le pensioni di lavoratori dovrebbe essere basato sulla vera rimunerazione ricevuta da questa persona incluso qualsiasi lavoro impegnato in Svizzera, a prescindere dal fatto che i contributi pagati in Svizzera e trasferiti in Italia erano stati calcolati sulla base di tassi molto più bassi di quelli stabiliti sotto la legislazione italiana.
C. Legge n. 296 27 dicembre 2006
32. L’ Articolo 1, paragrafo 777, della Legge 296/2006 che entrò in vigore il 1 gennaio 2007 prevede (traduzione non ufficiale):
“L’Articolo 5 (2) del Decreto Presidenziale n. 488 del 27 aprile 1968 e susseguenti modifiche devono essere interpretati all'effetto che, nel caso di trasferimento di contributi pagati alle entità di welfare estere al piano assicurativo generale obbligatorio italiano, come conseguenza di trattati di previdenza sociale internazionali e convenzioni, la rimunerazione pensionabile relativa al periodo di lavoro all'estero è calcolata moltiplicando l'importo dei contributi trasferiti per cento e dividendo il risultato per la tassa di contributo per i piani pensionistici di invalidità, di vecchiaia e dei superstiti, come applicabile durante il periodo contribuente attinente. Il trattamento pensionistico più favorevole già liquidato prima dell'entrata in vigore della legge corrente è esentato.”
D. Giudizio della Corte Costituzionale del 23 maggio 2008, n. 172
33. Con un documento del 5 marzo 2007, la Corte di Cassazione mise in dubbio la legittimità della Legge 296/2006 e rinviò la causa alla Corte Costituzionale. La Corte Costituzionale rese la sentenza il 23 maggio 2008, sostenendo, riassumendo come segue.
34. Benché interpretativa, la Legge 296/2006 era innovativa. Non c'era stata giurisprudenza contraddittoria sul regime pensionistico ma una sola interpretazione ben stabilita secondo cui il lavoratore italiano avrebbe potuto chiedere di trasferire i suoi contributi, pagati in Svizzera, all'INPS per ottenere i vantaggi previsti dalla legge italiana sulla pensione di invalidità, di vecchiaia e la pensione dei superstiti incluso quei calcoli pensionistici basati sulla rimunerazione , sulla base dei salari guadagnati in Svizzera irrispettoso del fatto che i contributi trasferiti erano stati pagati ad un tasso svizzero molto più basso.
35. La Corte Costituzionale notò che le leggi che definivano la rimunerazione pensionistica erano parte di un sistema di welfare che bilanciava risorse disponibili ed i servizi forniti. Uno cambio nel calcolo delle pensioni dai criteri dei contribuenti a quelli basati sulla rimunerazione (“retributivo”), non era a danno della sostenibilità finanziaria del sistema. Così, i cambi provocati dalla Legge contestata cercarono di portare la relazione fra la rimunerazione pensionabile e i contributi in linea col sistema in vigore in Italia durante lo stesso periodo di tempo. La Legge prevedeva che la rimunerazione ricevuta all'estero (usata come base per i calcoli di pensione) sarebbe stata corretta applicando gli stessi rapporti di percentuale usati per i contributi pensionistici pagati in Italia durante lo stesso periodo. Così, la norma rese esplicito ciò che era stato nelle disposizioni interpretative originali. Non c'era stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione del principio di certezza legale. Né era la norma discriminatoria poiché i diritti acquisiti più favorevoli di precedenti pensionati era, da allora in poi, inattaccabile. Inoltre, la Legge non discriminò le persone che avevano lavorato all'estero, perché assicurò semplicemente un equilibrio complessivo nel sistema di welfare, ed evitò la situazione da cui le persone che avevano fatto piccoli contributi ad uno schema pensionistico estero avrebbero potuto ricevere la stessa pensione di coloro che avevano pagato contributi italiani e molto più alti. La Legge contestata non prevedeva nessuna riduzione ex post, siccome impose soltanto un'interpretazione che già avrebbe potuto essere dedotta dalle disposizioni originali. Questo sistema lasciò ancora spazio infine, ad una pensione sufficiente e soddisfacente, adeguata al modo di vivere di un lavoratore. La rivendicazione di incostituzionalità della detta Legge era di conseguenza manifestamente mal-fondata.
LA LEGGE
I. AMMISSIBILITÀ
36. La Corte considera che qualsiasi evidente eccezione ratione materiae in relazione all'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione dovrebbe essere congiunta ai meriti. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivio. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
37. I richiedenti si lamentarono di una violazione addotta del loro diritto ad un'udienza corretta come prevista nell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che recita:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
38. I richiedenti presentarono che prima dell'entrata in vigore della legge finanziaria del 2007 (“Legge 296/2006”), la giurisprudenza consolidata prevalente che, come confermato dal giudizio della Corte di Cassazione del 6 marzo 2004 (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra), non era stata ambigua, avrebbe potuto permettere una valutazione favorevole delle pensioni dei richiedenti sulla base della “vera rimunerazione” (salari guadagnati) mentre loro lavorarono in Svizzera. Comunque, la legge in questione applicava un nuovo metodo del calcolo della pensione, basato su una rimunerazione corretta e perciò “teorica.” Questo diede luogo ad un importo più basso della pensione, poiché l'importo sulla base della quale era fissata la pensione dei richiedenti e di conseguenza l'assegnazione della pensione, era stato ridotto approssimativamente del 25%. Così, la nuova legge applicava norme nuove a situazioni che erano sorte prima che entrò in vigore e che già aveva generato rivendicazioni a questo riguardo in procedimenti pendenti, producendo con ciò un effetto retroattivo. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti come proprietari di diritti di pensione furono privati di una parte delle loro pensioni.
39. Secondo i richiedenti tale interferenza legislativa non poteva essere giustificata da ragioni economiche sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte. Inoltre, il Governo non ha provato che altre persone che hanno lavorato all'estero in paesi diversi dalla Svizzera, o che avevano lavorato in Italia e pagato contributi più bassi in conformità coi loro specifici regimi, avevano sofferto allo stesso modo dello stesso trattamento per bilanciare la situazione economica.
40. Presumendo anche che l’applicazione del principio della solidarietà in regimi di welfare corrispondeva ad una considerazione di interesse generale, accettata dalla Corte i richiedenti hanno notato che la situazione del sistema di welfare italiano non aveva migliorato significativamente e nella misura tale da poter annullare qualsiasi effetto (discriminatorio) sulle persone nella situazione dei richiedenti.
41. Il Governo presentò che il sistema nel 1962, quando la Convenzione Italo - svizzera entrò in vigore, aveva stipulato che i calcoli avrebbero dovuto essere fatti sulla base dei contributi pagati e non sui salari ricevuti. Nel 1982 questo era cambiato e l'INPS, seguendo la giurisprudenza certa, aveva tentato di adattare l'interpretazione della Legge n. 1987 del 1982 ad un contesto nuovo mantenendo lo spirito della Convenzione Italo - svizzera. I criteri applicati dall'INPS ai richiedenti prese in considerazione i contributi bassi pagati dai richiedenti in Svizzera, vale a dire l’8% del salario in opposizione all'italiano 32.7%. Altrimenti, i richiedenti come persone che hanno lavorato in Svizzera avrebbero benefici più grandi dal periodo attinente che costituì un vantaggio vis-à-vis agli altri cittadini italiani che avevano pagato contributi più alti, e agli altri cittadini svizzeri che alla fine ricevettero pensioni più basse. Comunque, un numero di individui colpiti fece domanda alle corti nazionali contestando il loro calcolo pensionistico. Il risultato di simili cause creò una giurisprudenza prevalente ma non univoca, favorevole a pensionati a cui era stata applicato metodo del calcolo basato sulla rimunerazione (“retributivo”), basato sui salari ricevuti in Svizzera e non sulla base dei contributi pagati.
42. Secondo il Governo non c’era stata interferenza con la legislatura. L'interpretazione della disposizione attinente era stata in qualsiasi caso controversa, dopo esserci state delle sentenze di prima - istanza ed almeno una causa su ricorso che confermava la pratica dell'INPS. Inoltre, il calcolo non colpì pensioni già liquidate. L'entrata in vigore della disposizione contestata fornì una distribuzione equa delle risorse collettive. La sua promulgazione era stata ragionevole, siccome la disposizione era tesa a rafforzare un'interpretazione già applicata dall'INPS e confermata da una giurisprudenza di minoranza che ha reso possibile attribuire lo stesso valore a periodi di lavoro serviti in Italia o all'estero. Così, benché il carico finanziario non fosse trascurabile, la ragione non era stata solamente finanziaria come nelle cause Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri c. Francia ([GC], N. 24846/94 e 34165/96 a 34173/96, ECHR 1999-VII), e Scordino c. Italia ((n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, il 2006-V di ECHR). Inoltre, la promulgazione di questa legislazione era stata necessaria siccome l'interpretazione precedente era stata una letterale, nata dal set di disposizioni in un contesto normativo diverso.
2. La valutazione della Corte
43. La Corte ha deciso ripetutamente che benché alla legislatura non sia impedito di regolare, tramite disposizioni retroattive nuovi diritti derivanti dalle leggi in vigore, il principio della preminenza del diritto e la nozione di un processo equanime custodito bell’ Articolo 6 precludono, a parte forti ragioni d’interesse pubblico, l’ interferenza con la legislatura da parte dell'amministrazione della giustizia progettata per influenzare la determinazione giudiziale di una controversia (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 49 Serie A n. 301-B; National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society c. Regno Unito, 23 ottobre 1997, § 112 Relazioni 1997-VII; e Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri c. Francia [GC], N. 24846/94 e 34165/96 a 34173/96, § 57 ECHR 1999-VII). Benché le regolamentazioni della pensione legali siano passibili di cambiamento e non si può fare appello ad una decisione giudiziale come garanzia contro simili cambi nel futuro (vedere Sukhobokov c. Russia, n. 75470/01, § 26 13 aprile 2006), anche se simili cambi sono a svantaggio di certi destinatari del welfare, lo Stato non può interferire con il processo dell'aggiudicazione in un modo arbitrario (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Bulgakova c. Russia, n. 69524/01, § 42 del 18 gennaio 2007).
44. Nella presente causa, la Corte deve guardare l'effetto della Legge 296/2006 ed il tempismo della sua promulgazione. Nota che la Legge escludeva espressamente dalla sua sfera le sue decisioni di corte che erano divenute definitive (trattamenti di pensione già liquidati) e stabilì una volta e per sempre retroattivamente i termini delle controversie di fronte alle corti ordinarie. Effettivamente, la promulgazione della Legge 296/2006, mentre i procedimenti erano pendenti, in realtà determinò la sostanza delle controversie e l’applicazione di questa da parte delle varie corti ordinarie rese inutile per un gruppo intero di individui nella posizione dei richiedenti continuare la causa. Così, la legge aveva l'effetto di cambiare definitivamente il risultato della causa pendente alla quale lo Stato era una parte, girando la posizione dello Stato a danno dei richiedenti.
45. Rimane da determinare se c'era una qualsiasi ragione impellente di interesse generale capace di giustificare tale misura. Il rispetto per la preminenza del diritto e la nozione di un processo equanime richiede che qualsiasi ragione addotta per giustificare simili misure sia trattata col grado più grande possibile di circospezione (vedere, Stran Raffinerie greche, citata sopra, § 49).
46. La Corte nota che nelle sue osservazioni il Governo chiese che, separatamente da qualsiasi ragione finanziaria, la promulgazione della Legge 296/2006 era stata ragionevole siccome mirava a rafforzare un'interpretazione già applicata dall'INPS e confermata da una giurisprudenza di minoranza che ha reso possibile attribuire lo stesso valore ai periodi di lavoro serviti in Italia o all'estero, creando così un equilibrio nel sistema del welfare.
47. La Corte prima ha sostenuto che le considerazioni finanziarie non possono garantire che la legislatura si sostituisca alle corti per stabilire le controversie da sole (vedere Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 132, il 2006-V di ECHR, e Cabourdin c. Francia, n. 60796/00, § 37 11 aprile 2006).
48. La Corte nota che, dopo il 1982, l'INPS applicò un'interpretazione del diritto vigente al tempo che era molto favorevole a lei come autorità erogante. Questo sistema non fu sostenuto dalla giurisprudenza della maggioranza. La Corte non può immaginare in che modo lo scopo di rafforzare un'interpretazione soggettiva e parziale, favorevole all'entità di uno Stato come parte ai procedimenti, potrebbe corrispondere ad una giustificazione per l’ interferenza legislativa mentre quei procedimenti erano pendenti, in particolare quando tale interpretazione era stata trovata fallace in una maggioranza di occasioni dalle corti nazionali, incluso la Corte di Cassazione (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra).
49. In merito all'argomento del Governo per cui la Legge era stata necessaria per riattivare un equilibrio nel sistema pensionistico rimuovendo qualsiasi vantaggio goduto da individui che avevano lavorato in Svizzera e pagato contributi più bassi, mentre la Corte accetta questo come ragione di interesse generale, la Corte non si persuade che era impellente abbastanza da superare i pericoli inerenti all'uso della legislazione retroattiva che ha l'effetto di influenzare il risultato giudiziale di una controversia pendente alla quale lo Stato era una parte.
50. Lo Stato infranse i diritti dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 intervenendo in una maniera decisiva per assicurare in conclusione, che il risultato dei procedimenti ai quali era una parte fosse favorevole a lui. C'è stata perciò una violazione di quell'Articolo.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
51. Il primo richiedente si lamentò inoltre che la riduzione nella sua pensione, come risultato del nuovo metodo del calcolo previsto nella Legge 296/2006 costituiva un’interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
52. Il primo richiedente presentò che la sua futura pensione era già maturata sotto le leggi precedenti e perciò costituiva una proprietà. Il fatto che al primo richiedente fu negata questa proprietà come conseguenza di un'interferenza illegittima era, nella sua prospettiva, in violazione del requisito di legalità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Inoltre, il primo richiedente presentò che alla sua categoria di pensionati, come soli obiettivi delle disposizioni contestate, fu fatto sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo a nome di un qualsiasi interesse generale che può essere invocato il che creò un equilibrio ingiusto.
53. Il Governo presentò che un possibile importo più favorevole di pensione non poteva costituire una proprietà già stabilita. Così, al tempo il primo richiedente solamente proprietà era quel assegnò con l'INPS sotto la legge contestata. Sulla base delle ragioni dibattute sopra, non c’era stata inoltre, nessuna violazione della detta disposizione, in particolare nella prospettiva dell'interesse generale invocato vale a dire il bisogno di assicurare la stabilità economica e finanziaria del sistema del welfare italiano.
B. Principi Generali
54. La Corte reitera che, secondo la sua giurisprudenza , un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nella misura in cui decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato di quella disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistente” o beni, incluso, in certe situazioni ben definite, rivendicazioni. Perché una rivendicazione sia in grado di essere considerata un “bene” rientrando all'interno della sfera dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, il rivendicatore deve stabilire che ha una base sufficiente in legge nazionale, per esempio dove vi è una giurisprudenza consolidata delle corti nazionali che lo confermano. Dove ciò è stato fatto, il concetto di “aspettativa legittima” può entrare in gioco (vedere Maurizio c. Francia [GC], n. 11810/03, § 63 ECHR 2005-IX).
55. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce come tale qualsiasi diritto per divenire il proprietario di proprietà (vedere Van der Mussele c. Belgio, 23 novembre 1983, § 48 Serie A n. 70; Slivenko c. Lettonia (dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121 ECHR 2002-II; e Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 (b), ECHR 2004-IX). Né garantisce, come tale qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson c. Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39 ECHR 2004-IX; Domalewski c. Polonia (dec.), n. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V; e Janković c. Croatia (dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X). Similmente, il diritto a ricevere una pensione a riguardo delle attività svolte in uno Stato differente dallo Stato rispondente non è garantito (vedere L.B. c. Austria (dec.), n. 39802/98, 18 aprile 2002). Comunque, una “rivendicazione” riguardo ad una pensione può costituire una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 dove ha una base sufficiente in diritto nazionale, per esempio dove è confermato da una sentenza definitiva di corte (vedere Pravednaya c. Russia, n. 69529/01, §§ 37-39 del 18 novembre 2004; e Bulgakova, citata sopra, § 31).
56. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: “il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà la sottopone certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti viene concesso, fra le altre cose, il controllo dell'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono “distinti” nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo” (vedere, fra le altre autorità, James ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37 Serie A n. 98; Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 55 ECHR 1999-II; e Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 98 ECHR 2000-io).
57. Una condizione essenziale perché l’ interferenza venga ritenuto compatibile con l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale. Qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se serve un legittimo interesse pubblico (o generale). A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio meglio collocate del giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta così alle autorità nazionali di fare la valutazione iniziale in merito all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che assicura misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c. Italia, n. 27265/95, § 85, 17 ottobre 2002, e Wieczorek c. Polonia, n. 18176/05, § 59 dell’8 dicembre 2009).L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che qualsiasi interferenza sia ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo che si cerca di perseguire (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81-94 ECHR 2005-VI). L'equilibrio equo richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardata sopporta un carico individuale eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 Serie A n. 52).
58. Dove l'importo di un beneficio è ridotto o è cessato, questo può costituire un’interferenza con la proprietà che richiede giustificazione (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 40, e Rasmussen c. Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 del 28 aprile 2009).
C. La valutazione della Corte
59. La Corte non considera necessario decidere sull'eccezione preliminare del Governo e perciò determinare se il primo richiedente nella presente causa aveva una proprietà all'interno del significato del Protocollo N.ro 1 siccome in qualsiasi caso consideri questo non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione per le seguenti ragioni.
60. La Corte prima ha ammesso che le leggi con effetto retroattivo che furono trovate costituire un’interferenza legislativa si conformavano ancora al requisito di legalità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Maurizio c. Francia [GC], n. 11810/03, § 81 ECHR 2005-IX; Draon c. Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, § 73, 6 ottobre 2005, e Kuznetsova c. Russia, n. 67579/01, § 50 del 7 giugno 2007). Non trova nessuna ragione di ritenere altrimenti nella presente causa. Accetta inoltre che la promulgazione della Legge 296/2006 perseguì l'interesse pubblico (offrendo un calcolo di pensione armonizzato, mirando ad un sistema di welfare equilibrato e sostenibile).
61. Nel considerare se l'interferenza impose un carico individuale eccessivo sul primo richiedente, la Corte ha riguardo al particolare contesto nel quale il problema sorge nella presente causa, vale a dire quello di un schema di previdenza sociale. Simili schemi sono un'espressione della solidarietà di una società coi suoi membri vulnerabile (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Goudswaard-Van der Lans c. i Paesi Bassi (il dec.), n. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI).
62. La Corte nota che la Legge 296/2006 prevedeva che la rimunerazione pensionabile relativa al periodo di lavoro all'estero sarebbe stata calcolata moltiplicando l'importo dei contributi trasferiti per cento e dividendo il risultato con il tasso di contributo per invalidità , di anzianità e del piano assicurativo dei superstiti, come applicabile durante il periodo contribuente attinente. Come conseguenza, secondo il primo richiedente fra gli anni 1996 quando lui cominciò a ricevere la sua pensione e il 2009, lui ricevette una pensione mensile di EUR 873 contro EUR 1,372 che lui avrebbe ottenuto se non ci fosse stata interferenza coi suoi procedimenti e lui avrebbe avuto successo, e per l'anno 2010 ricevette una pensione di EUR 1,178 invece di EUR 1,900. Sulla base di questi calcoli la Corte osserva che il primo richiedente perse notevolmente meno della metà della sua pensione. Così, la Corte considera che il richiedente fu obbligato a sopportare una riduzione ragionevole e commisurata, piuttosto che la privazione totale dei suoi diritti (vedere, a contrario., Kjartan Ásmundsson, § 45 sopra e citata).
63. Di conseguenza, il diritto del richiedente a dedurre benefici dal piano assicurativo sociale in oggetto non è stato infranto in una maniera che dà luogo al danneggiamento dell'essenza dei suoi diritti di pensione. A questo riguardo la Corte nota che il richiedente avrebbe infatti pagato contributi più bassi in Svizzera di quelli che lui avrebbe pagato in Italia, e così lui aveva avuto l'opportunità di godere di guadagni più sostanziali al tempo. Questa riduzione aveva solamente inoltre, l'effetto di pareggiare uno stato di affari ed evitare vantaggi ingiustificati (essendo il risultato della decisione di andare in pensione in Italia) per il richiedente e le altre persone nella sua posizione. Contro questo sfondo, tenendo presente il margine ampio di valutazione dello Stato nel regolare il sistema di pensione ed il fatto che il richiedente perse solamente un importo parziale di pensione, la Corte considera che al richiedente non fu fatto sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo.
64. Ne segue che, presumere anche che la disposizione, fosse applicabile, non c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
65. Il secondo, il terzo , il quarto e quinto richiedente si sono lamentati che, come risultato della recente giurisprudenza qualsiasi misura giuridica non avrebbe avuto nessuna prospettiva di successo. Così, loro non avevano alla loro disposizione una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per le loro azioni di reclamo di Convenzione sotto l’Articolo 6 alla Convenzione. Loro si appellarono all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
66. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti si erano avvalsi di misure giuridiche per contestare il loro calcolo di pensione da parte dell'INPS. La Corte Costituzionale si era pronunciata anche inoltre, sulla questione nella sua sentenza del 28 maggio 2008, trovando che l'interpretazione data era stata razionale ed aveva stabilito un equilibrio fra contributi pagati all'estero e l'importo da pagare come pensione.
67. Avendo riguardo alla costatazione relativa all’ Articolo 6 (vedere paragrafo 50 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario esaminare se c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 in questa causa.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
68. Il primo richiedente si lamentò inoltre di aver sofferto di discriminazione nel godimento dei suoi diritti della Convenzione perché le sue rivendicazioni di pensione non erano state liquidate al tempo attinente, in opposizione ad altri i cui procedimenti erano stati resi definitivi, contrariamente all’articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 6 e/o all’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
69. Il Governo presentò che, in conformità con la Convenzione Italo - svizzera, l'INPS pagò pensioni dopo avere preso in esame il periodo di lavoro in Svizzera e i contributi pagati per evitare il vantaggio summenzionato. Nel caso di individui che non avevano contestato gli importi pagati dall'INPS, quest’ultima era la decisione definitiva a riguardo dell'importo della pensione. Quelli che optarono per contestare questo importo potevano sperare solamente in un risultato favorevole. Comunque, gli effetti pratici della Legge 296/2006 erano che le decisioni giudiziali dei procedimenti pendenti confermarono l'importo originale assegnato dall'INPS. Non c'era stata così, discriminazione, particolarmente perché la Legge 296/2006 mirava a stabilire una situazione omogenea eliminando i diritti ingiustificati per le persone che avevano lavorato all'estero. Nelle susseguenti osservazioni del Governo, riferendosi ad un rapporto preparato dall'INPS, presentò che qualsiasi trattamento favorevole goduto da persone le cui pensioni erano già state liquidate era una situazione inevitabile, nella prospettiva della necessità del Governo di regolare la proprietà nell'interesse generale.
70. La Corte nota che Articolo 6 è applicabile alla causa presente e questo basta sostenere che Articolo 14 è anche applicabile.
71. La Corte reitera che una differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; in altre parole, se non intraprende uno scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo che si cerca di perseguire. Lo Stato Contraente gode di un margine di valutazione nel valutare se ed in che misura le differenze in situazioni altrimenti simili giustificano un trattamento diverso (vedere Stec ed Altri, [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 51 ECHR 2006-VI). La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, l’oggetto-questione e il background. La Corte prima ha sostenuto che la scelta di una data di fine nella trasformazione dei regimi di previdenza sociale deve essere considerata rientrante all'interno del margine ampio di valutazione riconosciuto ad un Stato nella riforma della sua politica di strategia sociale (vedere Twizell c. Regno Unito, n. 25379/02, § 24 del 20 maggio 2008).
72. Ciò che occorre considerare è se nella presente causa la data di fine e contestata che nasce dalla
Legge 296/2006 può essere ritenuta ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificata.
73. Si deve ricordare che la Legge 296/2006 fu voluta per togliere qualsiasi trattamento favorevole che sorge dall'interpretazione precedente delle disposizioni in vigore che aveva garantito a persone nella posizione del primo richiedente un vantaggio ingiustificato tenendo presente le necessità del sistema di previdenza sociale in Italia. La Corte reitera che nel creare uno schema di benefici è necessario usare date di scadenza che si applicano a grandi gruppi di persone e che qualche volta in una certa misura sembrano arbitrari (vedere Twizell, citata sopra, § 24). La Corte considera che questa è una conseguenza inevitabile dell’introduzione di nuove regolamentazioni per sostituire i precedenti schemi. Così, nella presente causa, tenendo presente il margine di valutazione riconosciuto agli Stati in questa sfera, la data di scadenza contestata può essere ritenuta ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificata.
74. Il fatto che la data di scadenza contestata emerse dalla legislazione decretata durante i procedimenti del primo richiedente per la determinazione della sua pensione non altera la conclusione sopra ai fini dell'esame sotto l’Articolo 14.
75. Ne segue che non c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 6.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
76. L’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
77. Il Sig. M. chiese EUR 140,000 più interesse per coprire la differenza della pensione ricevuta negli anni attinenti, vale a dire EUR 100,360 rivalutati secondo l'inflazione. Lui chiese inoltre una pensione futura di EUR 1,900 al mese.
78. I rimanenti richiedenti chiesero la somma che rappresentava la perdita parziale delle loro pensioni nella data in cui loro erano dovuti per la prima volta, all’età do 78 anni a riguardo dei richiedenti maschi e 82 anni a riguardo dei richiedenti femmina (rappresentanti la durata presunta della vita) che, secondo i loro calcoli, corrispondeva rispettivamente alle seguenti somme, EUR 1,380,000 a riguardo del Sig. G. EUR 746,022.42 a riguardo del Sig. F., EUR 1,671,082.53 a riguardo della Sig.ra F. ed EUR 903,948.24 a riguardo della Sig.ra Z..
79. Tutti i richiedenti chiesero danno non-patrimoniale, mentre lasciandolo alla Corte per determinare un importo adeguato.
80. La Corte nota che nella presente causa un'assegnazione della soddisfazione equa può essere basata solamente sul fatto che i richiedenti non avevano il beneficio delle garanzie dell’ Articolo 6 a riguardo dell'equità dei procedimenti. Mentre la Corte non può speculare in merito al risultato del processo se la posizione fosse stata altrimenti, non trova irragionevole a riguardo dei richiedenti siccome avevano sofferto di una perdita di vere opportunità (vedere Zielinski, citata sopra, § 79 e SCM SCM Scanner de l'Ouest Lyonnais and Others ed Altri c. la Francia, n. 12106/03, § 38 21 giugno 2007). Così, tenendo presente l'importo degli anni che ogni richiedente lavorò in Svizzera, la Corte assegna EUR 20,000 al Sig. M. ed EUR 50,000 ad ognuno degli altri quattro richiedenti a riguardo del danno patrimoniale. A questo deve essere aggiunto il danno non-patrimoniale che la costatazione di una violazione in questa sentenza non basta a rimediare. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41, la Corte assegna EUR 12,000 ad ogni richiedente sotto questo capo.
B. Costi e spese
81. Il primo richiedente chiese anche EUR 10,000 per i costi e le spese incorsi di fronte alle corti nazionali e alla Corte. I rimanenti richiedenti chiesero anche i costi e le spese e lasciarono alla Corte di quantificare simili somme.
82. Il Governo non presentò qualsiasi commento a questo riguardo.
83. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente è concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese sé è stato dimostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli in merito al quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo ai criteri sopra ed alla mancanza di documenti che giustificano le spese addotte la Corte respinge la rivendicazione per i costi e le spese nella sua interezza.
C. Interesse di mora
84. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere ai meriti l'eccezione preliminare del Governo in relazione all'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e dichiara il resto delle richieste ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a riguardo di tutti i richiedenti;
3. Sostiene che non c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione a riguardo del primo richiedente e che non è necessario considerare l'eccezione summenzionata del Governo dopo avere esaminato i meriti;
4. Sostiene che non è necessario esaminare l’azione di reclamo del secondo, terzo, quarto e l'azione quinto richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che non c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 6 a riguardo del primo richiedente;
6. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione
(i) EUR 20,000 (venti mila euro) al Sig. M. ed EUR 50,000 (cinquanta mila euro) ad ognuno degli altri quattro richiedenti a riguardo del danno patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 12,000 (dodici mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, ad ogni richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale; (b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europeo durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
7. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 31 maggio 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Françoise Elens-Passos Françoise Tulkens Cancelliere Di Sezione Aggiunto Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.