CASO: CASE OF ESMUKHAMBETOV AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ESMUKHAMBETOV AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 02, 03, 13, 35, 08, P1-1

NUMERO: 23445/03/2011
STATO: Russia
DATA: 29/03/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of Art. 2 (procedural aspect) ; Violation of Art. 2 (substantive aspect) ; Violation of Art. 13+2 ; Violation of Art. 13+8 ; Violation of Art. 13+P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 8 and P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 3 (substantive aspect) ; Violation of Art. 3 (substantive aspect) ; Pecuniary damage and non-pecuniary damage - award
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF ESMUKHAMBETOV AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 23445/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
29 March 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Esmukhambetov and Others v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nina Vajić, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Christos Rozakis,
Peer Lorenzen,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
George Nicolaou,
Julia Laffranque, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 March 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 23445/03) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by twenty-seven Russian nationals listed in Annex I (“the applicants”) on 21 July 2003. On 7 February 2004 the tenth applicant died, and his son, OMISSIS, expressed the wish to pursue the application on his behalf. On 18 August 2004 the twenty-second applicant died, and her daughter, OMISSIS, expressed the wish to pursue the application on her behalf. As of 1 March 2005 the second applicant, whose surname at the time of introduction of the application was OMISSIS, has changed it to OMISSIS. On 11 July 2009 the seventeenth applicant died, and his wife, OMISSIS, expressed the wish to pursue the application on his behalf. The Court accepted that OMISSIS, M OMISSIS had standing to continue the present proceedings on behalf of the tenth, twenty-second and seventeenth applicants respectively.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by lawyers of the Memorial Human Rights Centre (Moscow) and the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre (London). The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by OMISSIS, the former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicants complained, in particular, that an aerial strike on the village in which they had been living resulted in the deaths of the family members of the first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants and in the destruction of all applicants' houses and property. They also complained of the moral suffering they had endured in connection with those events, the lack of an investigation into the matter and the lack of effective remedies in respect of the alleged violations. The applicants relied on Articles 2, 3, 8 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 29 August 2004 the President of the First Section decided to grant priority to the application under Rule 41 of the Rules of Court.
5. On 21 May 2007 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 1).
6. The Government objected to the joint examination of the admissibility and merits of the application. Having considered the Government's objection, the Court dismissed it.
7. On 8 March 2011 the Court decided that a hearing in the case was unnecessary (Rule 59 § 3 of the Rules of Court).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
8. The applicants are residents of various villages in the Republic of Dagestan.
A. The facts
1. Background to the case
9. At the material time the applicants were residents of the village of Kogi in the Shelkovskiy District of the Chechen Republic. The village of Kogi, also known as farm no. 2 of the “Shelkovskiy” State farm or Runnoye, is situated on the steppe close to the administrative border of the Republic of Dagestan. The village is nine kilometres away from the village of Kumli in Dagestan. Prior to the events described below Kogi was inhabited by people belonging to the Nogay ethnic group and consisted of thirty houses comprising twenty-six to thirty families. Its residents made their living from agriculture, mostly raising sheep and cows.
10. According to the applicants, Kogi was a peaceful village; no rebel fighters ever lived there. In 1999 it was regularly patrolled by federal servicemen from a checkpoint situated near Kumli. In the night of 11 to 12 September 1999 an armoured personnel carrier arrived from the checkpoint on the outskirts of Kogi and fired a “lightning bomb” (осветительная бомба) into the air. According to the third applicant, there was a flare hanging from a parachute for about five minutes which lit the village very brightly. The next day the seventeenth applicant found duralumin casing which was 1 metre long and 10 centimetres in diameter near the electricity transformer. It was black inside. A white parachute was hanging on the wires above the transformer.
2. Attack of 12 September 1999
(a) The applicants' version
11. In the late afternoon of 12 September 1999 most of the adult villagers were working in the field and most of the children were at school. The weather was bright and sunny.
12. At about 5.15 p.m. two military planes flying at a low altitude appeared from the direction of Kumli. The planes flew away but several minutes later reappeared. They were narrow at the front, had wide wings and resembled Russian military SU-25 planes.
13. The planes circled over Kogi for about five minutes and then one of them swooped down and opened fire with machine guns and bombed the western end of the village. The first bomb exploded in the courtyard of the first applicant's house. His two sons – OMISSIS aged eight, and OMISSIS, aged two – were playing there at that moment. The children were instantly killed.
14. The first applicant, his wife – OMISSIS, born in 1969 – and the thirteenth applicant were inside the house when the bombing began. The first applicant and his wife rushed towards the boys, whilst the thirteenth applicant, who was wounded in her leg by shrapnel, ran to her house. In the courtyard the first applicant saw his sons lying near a bomb crater of approximately one metre in diameter. He grabbed the boys, clasped them to his chest and realised they were dead. At that moment the second bomb hit the first applicant's house. The first applicant shouted to his wife not to approach him and the children and to lie down. Instead, OMISSIS ran screaming towards them. The first applicant noticed that she was wounded in the hip. The third bomb exploded near the OMISSIS immediately after the second one. The first applicant's wife was fatally wounded with shrapnel in the abdomen and died in his arms. In the first applicant's submission, he is unable to recall the further sequence of events from that point until several hours later. According to eyewitness statements, the first applicant was in a state of deep shock, screaming that all his family members had been killed and cursing the planes.
15. The second plane fired from large-calibre machine guns and bombed the northern end of the village. There was a large amount of smoke and dust in the air. Houses, sheds, other constructions, cattle, poultry and haystacks were destroyed and burnt down. The villagers, some barefoot and some half-naked, ran in panic in the direction of Kumli.
16. The planes indiscriminately fired shots and bombs at a distance from one another. They carried out four sweeps and then left.
17. Immediately after the attack the eighteenth and nineteenth applicants started their tractors. The former drove off to Kumli, together with a number of his neighbours, picking up other villagers along the way. The latter, along with the twenty-third applicant, arrived at the first applicant's house to collect the corpses of the OMISSIS family members. At a distance of approximately 150 metres they also found the body of OMISSIS, born in 1948 – the second applicant's mother, the thirteenth applicant's sister and the twenty-second applicant's daughter. The woman had been killed by shrapnel. According to numerous eyewitness statements, the corpses of the deceased were severely mutilated and heavily bleeding, and numerous pieces of shrapnel fell from the wounds when the bodies were moved. The bodies having been collected, the tractor drove to Kumli, picking up survivors along the way.
18. Meanwhile, the third applicant was looking for his mother, OMISSIS, born in 1936, and his seventeen-month-old son. They had gone for a walk earlier that day. Some of the villagers told him that, during the attack, they had seen her running with the boy in her arms in the direction of Kumli. The third applicant went to Kumli and was told that his family members had not been seen there. He then returned to Kogi in the nineteenth applicant's tractor with several other villagers. After some searching, OMISSIS 's body was found in the field near the village. There was a shrapnel wound to the back of her head. The third applicant's son was crying nearby, unhurt.
19. The bodies of all the deceased were delivered to the village of Kumli late on 12 September 1999, and were washed and buried the next day. According to the applicants, approximately seventy bombs were dropped on their village during the attack of 12 September 1999, resulting in the deaths of two children and three women and the destruction of, or severe damage to, about thirty houses.
20. On 13 September 1999 the Kogi administration issued certificates in respect of each of the victims, stating that they had been killed during the bombing in Kogi the day before. On 24 December 1999 medical death certificates were issued in respect of the victims. The documents stated that the first applicant's wife, OMISSIS, born in 1969, and his son, OMISSIS, born in 1997, had died from multiple shrapnel wounds and that his son OMISSIS, born in 1991, had died from trauma to the head. They also stated that the second applicant's mother, OMISSIS, born in 1948, had died as a result of multiple shrapnel wounds and that the third applicant's mother, OMISSIS, born in 1936, had died from a shrapnel wound to the back of her head. The place and the date of the death of all the victims were recorded as the village of Kogi, 12 September 1999. On 24 and 27 December 1999 and 14 February 2003 respectively the registry office of the Shelkovskiy District of the Chechen Republic certified the death of the third applicant's mother, the second applicant's mother and the first applicant's relatives.
(b) The Government's version
21. According to the Government, in early September 1999 a military body in command of counter-terrorist activities within the territory of the Chechen Republic received information to the effect that a concentration of members of illegal armed groups and a base for training of terrorists had been detected in farm no. 2 of the Shelkovskiy State farm near the village of Runnoye, and that a number of large-scale terrorist attacks in the Chechen Republic and in the territory of the Republic of Dagestan adjacent to the Shelkovskiy District of the Chechen Republic, including hostage taking in Kizlyar, were being prepared. In the Government's submission, in order to prevent terrorist attacks and suppress the criminal activities of illegal armed groups and in view of the impossibility of using ground troops in the area of the village of Runnoye, military officials in command of counter-terrorist activities took a decision to launch a pinpoint missile strike by air forces on the location of illegal armed groups near the village in question.
22. On 12 September 1999 at about 5 p.m. two military SU-25 planes performed a strike with light missiles using a precision guidance system on the base of illegal armed groups located at farm no. 2 of the Shelkovskiy State farm. As a result of “the preventive use of air forces” in the village of Runnoye, houses and outhouses belonging to the Shelkovskiy State farm were destroyed. Also, the bodies of OMISSIS were found on the site.
3. Return to Kogi
23. On 14 September 1999 the seventeenth applicant arranged for the villagers to return to Kogi to collect their belongings. A column of eight tractors was accompanied by an infantry battle vehicle (боевая машины пехоты) from the federal checkpoint near Kumli.
24. There were numerous federal servicemen in Kogi armed with automatic rifles. They were collecting shrapnel and unexploded bombs. The soldiers warned the villagers that they should hurry up, since there might be a military strike to destroy the village to prevent rebel fighters from using it. The villagers were forced to leave the village before 3 p.m. that day.
25. On 15 September 1999 some of the villagers, including the second and seventeenth applicants, again went to Kogi to take belongings which they had not managed to collect the day before. They saw the servicemen destroying one of the houses in order to organise a checkpoint there. The soldiers were under the command of an officer in green camouflage uniform without shoulder straps who had a field cap with a peak. The seventeenth applicant told the officer that if it was necessary for the servicemen to destroy any building, they could destroy a village shop. The soldiers then proceeded to demolish the shop.
26. Several days later more villagers, including several of the applicants, went to Kogi on two occasions. They saw the servicemen, some of them from the checkpoint near Kumli, demolishing houses and other buildings in the village and loading building materials into their vehicles. The servicemen were also collecting shrapnel and unexploded bombs.
27. Having picked up their belongings, most of the applicants left Kogi and never came back. They spent the winter of 1999 to 2000 in a refugee camp in the Republic of Dagestan.
28. In the spring of 2000 the twenty-fourth applicant and her family members returned to the village and rebuilt her house. The twenty-fourth applicant collected fragments of bombs. According to her, in June 2000 police officers also took away another unexploded bomb.
29. The applicants submitted numerous witness statements confirming their account of events and photographs depicting the devastated village and fragments of bombs, as well as a number of newspaper articles reporting on the incident of 12 September 1999.
30. On 24 December 2007 the head of the administration of the Shelkovskiy District issued each of the applicants with a certificate confirming that his or her family had owned a house and annexes, title to which had been transferred to them by the Shelkovskiy State farm at the beginning of the 1990s, and that those houses and annexes, as well as the applicants' belongings inside them, had been destroyed and burnt during an aerial attack on Kogi (Runnoye) in September 1999.
4. Official investigation
(a) The applicants' complaints to public bodies and information received by them
31. According to the applicants, following the attack of 12 September 1999 they repeatedly applied to various State bodies, including prosecutors at different levels, the district and regional departments of the interior, several federal ministries, the State Duma and others. In their letters to the authorities the applicants described in detail the events of 12 September 1999 and asked for assistance and details of the investigation. These enquiries remained largely unanswered, or only formal responses were given, stating that the applicants' requests had been forwarded to various prosecutors' offices.
32. Shortly after the bombing of Kogi the second applicant addressed a letter to a military prosecutor's office in Makhachkala, in the Republic of Dagestan, seeking the punishment of those responsible and compensation. A month later an investigator from the military prosecutor's office, Mr A., visited the second applicant and questioned her about the events of 12 September 1999. On the same date the second applicant, her cousin, sister and Mr A. went to Kogi, where they spent an hour. The investigator inspected and photographed the ruins and the places where the victims had been killed during the attack. The second applicant gave Mr A. pieces of shrapnel, including some which had numbers on them. She requested him to draw up an official note on the matter, but the investigator replied that it was unnecessary. Then the second applicant signed a transcript of her interview (протокол допроса) and Mr A. left.
33. During the winter of 1999 to 2000 investigator A. on four occasions visited a village in Dagestan in which the former inhabitants of Kogi were living and questioned them.
34. Some time later the second and thirteenth applicants found out that the case had been taken from Mr A. and transferred to another investigator. At some point the thirteenth applicant was informed that the case file had been sent to the federal military base in Khankala in the Chechen Republic for investigation.
35. In a letter of 2 February 2001 the Russian Ministry of the Interior forwarded the second applicant's complaint to the Chechen Department of the Interior. The latter sent the second applicant's complaint on to the prosecutor's office of the Chechen Republic (“the republican prosecutor's office”) on 13 February 2001.
36. On 8 February 2001 the Prosecutor General's Office transmitted the second applicant's complaint to the republican prosecutor's office for examination.
37. On 19 February 2001 the republican prosecutor's office forwarded the second applicant's complaint concerning “her mother's death in a bombing attack of 12 September 1999” to the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20102 and notified the second applicant of that step in a letter of 28 February 2001.
38. On 22 March 2001 the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20102 transmitted the second applicant's complaint concerning “her mother's death” to the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 for investigation. The latter sent the complaint on to the military prosecutor of the Makhachkala Garrison (военный прокурор махачкалинского гарнизона – “the garrison prosecutor”) on 11 April 2001.
39. In a letter of 3 May 2001, with a copy for the second applicant, the garrison prosecutor informed the military prosecutor of military unit no. 20111 that in December 1999 the investigator A. had carried out an inquiry (проверка) into the attack of 12 September 1999 and had sent the materials from that inquiry to the relevant military prosecutors' offices, including that of military unit no. 20102, and that the garrison prosecutor's office had never received those materials back.
40. On 11 September 2001 the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office (Главная военная прокуратура) forwarded the applicants' request concerning compensation for damage inflicted on their property to the Russian Ministry of Defence.
41. In letters of 21 September 2001 the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office transmitted the applicants' complaints concerning the death of their relatives and destruction of their property as a result of an aerial attack to the military prosecutor's office of the North Caucasus Military Circuit (военная прокуратура Северо-Кавказского военного округа). The latter transmitted the complaints to the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 for examination on 19 October 2001.
42. On 27 September 2001 the Russian Ministry of Federation Affairs and National and Migration Policies (Министерство по делам федерации, национальной и миграционной политики РФ) informed the thirteenth applicant that her request for compensation for destroyed property had been examined and that the Ministry was working on the adoption of legal provisions aiming to support the residents of the Chechen Republic who had incurred losses in 1999 and 2000.
43. On 10 October 2001 the Russian Ministry of Defence stated in a letter to the thirteenth applicant that it was not competent to pay compensation for damage inflicted on property during the operation in Chechnya.
44. On 26 October 2001 the Russian Ministry of the Interior notified the thirteenth applicant that her letter had been forwarded to the Department of the Interior in the Southern Federal Circuit.
45. In a letter of 13 November 2001 the Russian Ministry of Defence stated in reply to the thirteenth applicant's request that it had no funds allocated for compensation for damage caused by military actions in the Chechen Republic, and that the thirteenth applicant should apply to the Chechen Government.
46. On 7 December 2001 the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 forwarded the applicants' complaint to the prosecutor's office of the Shelkovskiy District (“the district prosecutor's office”), stating that the military prosecutor's office was only competent to investigate offences committed by servicemen or those committed within the territory of their military unit, whereas in the present case no specific servicemen had been identified and the identification numbers and the type of plane were not known. The letter further stated that the circumstances of the deaths of the residents of Kogi and the destruction of their property required examination and that it had been explained to the applicants that they could seek compensation in court.
47. On 8 December 2001 the republican prosecutor's office transmitted the applicants' complaint regarding the attack of 12 September 1999 to the district prosecutor's office for investigation.
48. In a letter of 15 January 2002 the district prosecutor's office informed the republican prosecutor's office and the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 that there was no village named Kogi in the Shelkovskiy District and that the district prosecutor's office was currently investigating the circumstances of an aerial attack on the village of Runnoye.
49. According to the second applicant, in the spring of 2002 she was summoned to the Shelkovskiy District Office of the Interior. An investigator, S., informed her that a criminal investigation would be opened into the events of 12 September 1999 in accordance with the instructions of the superior military prosecutors. The investigator interviewed the second applicant and then assured her that he would contact the former investigator A. and obtain the fragments of shells that she had given to him. In the second applicant's submission, a year later there was still no progress in the investigation.
50. On 18 and 25 March 2003 the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office sent the applicants' complaints to the military prosecutor of the United Group Alignment (военный прокурор Объединенной группировки войск).
51. On 28 March 2003 the Russian Ministry for Emergency Situations informed the applicants in reply to their request for compensation that they should apply to the Chechen Government.
52. On 4 April 2003 the garrison prosecutor's office transmitted the applicants' complaint concerning the attack on their village on 12 September 1999 to the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 for investigation.
53. On 10 April 2003 the Chief Military Prosecutor's Office forwarded the applicants' complaint to the military prosecutor of the United Group Alignment.
54. In a letter of 25 April 2003 the military prosecutor's office of the North Caucasus Military Circuit informed the applicants that their complaint about the killing of five residents of Kogi and the destruction of property had been transmitted to the military prosecutor of the United Group Alignment and invited them to address their further queries to that prosecutor.
55. On 30 April 2003 the district prosecutor's office notified the applicants that a criminal investigation into the attack of 12 September 1999 on the village of Runnoye had been commenced on 21 January 2002, and that the case file had been assigned no. 69003. The letter further stated that the district prosecutor's office had requested the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 to submit the materials from the inquiry that had previously been conducted, but so far they had not been received by the district prosecutor's office. According to the letter, the investigation was under way and measures aimed at identifying the planes which had attacked Kogi on 12 September 1999 were being taken.
56. On 11 May 2003 the military prosecutor's office of the United Group Alignment informed the applicants that on 21 January 2002 a criminal case under Article 167 § 2 (aggravated deliberate destruction of property) of the Russian Criminal Code had been opened, and that on 8 May 2003 the military prosecutor's office of the United Group Alignment had requested the republican prosecutor's office to transmit the case file to them for examination. The letter assured the applicants that they would be kept updated.
57. On 19 May 2003 the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 forwarded the applicants' complaint to the district prosecutor's office.
58. In a letter of 27 May 2003 the Chechen Government invited the applicants to address their request for compensation for their destroyed property to the administration of the Shelkovskiy District.
59. On 2 June 2003 the military prosecutor's office of the United Group Alignment notified the applicants that their complaints had been studied and transmitted to the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111 for “examination on the merits”.
60. On 30 June 2003 the district prosecutor's office forwarded the applicants' complaint to the military prosecutor's office of military unit no. 20111.
61. In a letter of 6 October 2004 the military prosecutor's office of the United Group Alignment stated in reply to the applicants' query that the decision of 19 January 2004 to discontinue criminal proceedings in case no. 34/00/0030-04 opened in connection with the aerial attack on the village of Runnoye on 12 September 1999 had been set aside and that on 5 October 2004 the military prosecutor's office of the United Group Alignment had taken up the case. The letter assured the applicants that all their allegations would be verified and that they would be informed of the eventual results.
(b) Information submitted by the Government
62. According to the Government, on 21 January 2002 the district prosecutor's office instituted criminal proceedings under Article 167 § 2 of the Russian Criminal Code (aggravated deliberate destruction of or damage to property) upon the second applicant's complaint of 29 August 2001 sent to the Office of the Russian President and received by the district prosecutor's office on 21 January 2002. The case file was assigned no. 69003 and then transferred to a military prosecutor's office, where it was assigned no. 34/00/0030-04. In the absence at that time of information concerning the deaths of the five residents of Kogi (Runnoye), no proceedings had been brought in that connection.
63. The Government further submitted that the investigation had subsequently established that five residents of Kogi (Runnoye) had been killed as a result of a strike by the federal air forces on 12 September 1999. According to them, it had been impossible to carry out a medical forensic examination of the corpses as the relatives had refused to allow exhumation on account of national traditions, which had obstructed the investigation and had had a negative impact on its effectiveness.
64. A number of documents appear to have been drawn up, including transcripts of witness interviews, expert reports and reports on examinations. The Government did not elaborate any further on the procedural documents they mentioned.
65. According to the Government, on 23 September 2005 the criminal proceedings were discontinued owing to the absence of constituent elements of a crime punishable under Article 109 of the Russian Criminal Code (inflicting death by negligence) in the servicemen's actions. The relevant decision stated that the pilots of SU-25 planes had bombed the village pursuant to their superiors' binding order, and that therefore their actions had not constituted a crime. The actions of military officials who had ordered the pilots to perform the missile strike had been justified by the absolute necessity to prevent large-scale terrorist attacks that had been planned by members of illegal armed formations, who were showing active armed resistance to the federal forces, and to eliminate the danger to the public interest, the interests of the State and the lives of servicemen and local residents. That danger could not have been eliminated by any other means and the actions of the military officials in command of that operation had been appropriate in view of the resistance shown by the illegal fighters. In the Government's submission, the investigating authorities thus concluded that the actions of the representatives of the federal forces had been no more than absolutely necessary, and therefore had not constituted a crime.
66. According to the Government, the “interested parties”, including the first, second, third, fourth, eleventh, thirteenth, fourteenth, sixteenth, eighteenth, nineteenth and twenty-sixth applicants, were apprised of the decision of 23 September 2005 and their rights to challenge it before a higher prosecutor or in court were explained to them. The Government also stated that copies of the relevant decision had been sent to those declared victims in the case.
5. Proceedings for compensation
67. At some point the first three applicants filed a court claim against the Russian Ministry of Finance and the Federal Treasury, seeking compensation in connection with the deaths of their relatives.
68. By a default judgment of 18 March 2004 the Nogayskiy District Court of the Republic of Dagestan (“the District Court”) granted the first three applicants' claims in full and awarded the first applicant 60,000 Russian roubles (RUB; approximately 1,500 EUR) and the second and third applicants RUB 20,000 (approximately EUR 500) each. The judgment was not appealed against and became final some time later.
69. On 9 September 2004 the Presidium of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Dagestan quashed the above-mentioned judgment in supervisory review proceedings and remitted the case to the District Court for a fresh examination.
70. In a default judgment of 18 March 2005 the District Court again granted the applicants' claims and awarded them the same amounts as those awarded in the judgment of 18 March 2004. The court noted that by virtue of Presidential Decree no. 898 of 5 September 1995, relatives of those who had died as a result of the hostilities in the Chechen Republic were entitled to a lump sum of RUB 20,000 in compensation, and that the payment of that compensation did not depend on the establishment of a causal link between the damage caused and the actions of the State.
71. On 13 July 2005 the Supreme Court of the Republic of Dagestan upheld the judgment of 18 March 2005 on appeal. The amounts awarded were paid to the first three applicants in full.
72. It does not appear that any of the applicants applied to the domestic courts with a view to obtaining compensation for their destroyed or damaged property.
B. The Court's requests for the investigation file
73. In May 2007, when the application was communicated to them, the Government were invited to produce a copy of the investigation file in the criminal case opened in connection with the aerial attack of 12 September 1999 on the village of Kogi (Runnoye). In reply, the Government refused to produce any documents from the file, stating it would be inappropriate to do so, given that under Article 161 of the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure, disclosure of the documents was contrary to the interests of the investigation and could entail a breach of the rights of the participants in the criminal proceedings. Besides, in the Government's submission the file on the criminal investigation in the present case was classified as it contained information which could not be disclosed to the public.
74. The Government also submitted that they had taken into account the possibility of requesting confidentiality under Rule 33 of the Rules of Court, but noted that the Court provided no guarantees that once in receipt of the investigation file the applicants or their representatives, some of whom were not Russian nationals and resided outside Russia's territory, would not disclose the material in question to the public. According to the Government, in the absence of any possible sanctions for the applicants in the event of their disclosure of confidential information and materials, there were no guarantees as to their compliance with the Convention and the Rules of Court. At the same time, the Government suggested that a Court delegation could be given access to the file in Russia, with the exception of those documents containing military and State secrets, and without the right to make copies of the case file.
75. In October 2007 the Court reiterated its request. In reply, the Government again refused to produce any documents from the file for the aforementioned reasons.
II. RELEVANT INTERNATIONA AND DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. International humanitarian law
76. Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and Relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts adopted on 8 June 1977 provides in its part IV relating to civilian population as follows:
Article 13.-Protection of the civilian population
“1. The civilian population and individual civilians shall enjoy general protection against the dangers arising from military operations. To give effect to this protection, the following rules shall be observed in all circumstances.
2. The civilian population as such, as well as individual civilians, shall not be the object of attack. Acts or threats of violence the primary purpose of which is to spread terror among the civilian population are prohibited.
3. Civilians shall enjoy the protection afforded by this Part, unless and for such time as they take a direct part in hostilities.”
Article 14.-Protection of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population
“Starvation of civilians as a method of combat is prohibited. It is therefore prohibited to attack, destroy, remove or render useless, for that purpose, objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population, such as foodstuffs, agricultural areas for the production of foodstuffs, crops, livestock, drinking water installations and supplies and irrigation works.
...”
Article 17.-Prohibition of forced movement of civilians
“1. The displacement of the civilian population shall not be ordered for reasons related to the conflict unless the security of the civilians involved or imperative military reasons so demand. Should such displacements have to be carried out, all possible measures shall be taken in order that the civilian population may be received under satisfactory conditions of shelter, hygiene, health, safety and nutrition.
2. Civilians shall not be compelled to leave their own territory for reasons connected with the conflict.”
B. Domestic law
1. Code of Criminal Procedure
77. Until 1 July 2002 criminal-law matters were governed by the 1960 Code of Criminal Procedure of the RSFSR. On 1 July 2002 the old Code was replaced by the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCP”).
78. Article 124 of the CCP states that a prosecutor can examine a complaint concerning actions or omissions of various officials in charge of a criminal investigation. Once a complaint is examined, the complainant should be informed of its outcome and of possible avenues of appeal against the prosecutor's decision.
79. Article 125 of the CCP provides that the decision of an investigator or prosecutor to dispense with or terminate criminal proceedings, and other decisions and acts or omissions which are liable to infringe the constitutional rights and freedoms of the parties to criminal proceedings or to impede citizens' access to justice, may be appealed against to a district court, which is empowered to examine the lawfulness and grounds of the impugned decisions.
80. Article 161 of the CCP enshrines the rule that information from the preliminary investigation may not be disclosed. Paragraph 3 of the same Article provides that information from the investigation file may be divulged with the permission of a prosecutor or investigator and only in so far as it does not infringe the rights and lawful interests of the participants in the criminal proceedings and does not prejudice the investigation. It is prohibited to divulge information about the private lives of participants in criminal proceedings without their permission.
81. Article 162 of the CCP provides that a preliminary investigation in a criminal case must be completed within two months. This term may be extended up to three months by the head of the relevant investigative body. In a criminal case where the preliminary investigation is particularly complex, the term may be extended up to twelve months. Any further extension of the term may be made only in exceptional cases.
2. Civil Code
82. By virtue of Article 151 of the Russian Civil Code, if certain actions impairing an individual's personal non-property rights or encroaching on other incorporeal assets have caused him or her non-pecuniary damage (physical or mental suffering), the court may require the perpetrator to pay pecuniary compensation for that damage.
83. Article 1067 provides that damage inflicted in a situation of absolute necessity, notably for the elimination of a danger threatening the tortfeasor or third parties if the danger, in the circumstances, could not be eliminated by any other means, is to be compensated for by the tortfeasor. Having regard to the circumstances in which the damage was caused, a court may impose an obligation to compensate for such damage on a third party in whose interests the tortfeasor acted, or may release from such an obligation, partly or in full, both the third party and the tortfeasor.
84. Article 1069 provides that a State agency or a State official will be liable towards a citizen for damage caused by their unlawful actions or failure to act. Compensation for such damage will be awarded at the expense of the federal or regional treasury.
3. Suppression of Terrorism Act
85. The Federal Law on Suppression of Terrorism of 25 July 1998 (Федеральный закон от 25 июля 1998 г. № 130-ФЗ «О борьбе с терроризмом» – “the Suppression of Terrorism Act”), as in force at the relevant time, provided as follows:
Section 3. Basic Concepts
“For the purposes of the present Federal Law the following basic concepts shall be applied:
... 'suppression of terrorism' shall refer to activities aimed at the prevention, detection, suppression and minimisation of consequences of terrorist activities;
'counter-terrorist operation' shall refer to special activities aimed at the prevention of terrorist acts, ensuring the security of individuals, neutralising terrorists and minimising the consequences of terrorist acts;
'zone of a counter-terrorist operation' shall refer to an individual terrain or water surface, means of transport, building, structure or premises with adjacent territory where a counter-terrorist operation is conducted; ... ”
Section 21. Exemption from liability for damage
“On the basis of the legislation and within the limits established by it, damage may be caused to the life, health and property of terrorists, as well as to other legally protected interests, in the course of a counter-terrorist operation. However, servicemen, experts and other persons engaged in the suppression of terrorism shall be exempted from liability for such damage, in accordance with the legislation of the Russian Federation.”
4. Presidential and governmental decrees
86. Presidential Decree no. 898 of 5 September 1995 provided, inter alia, for a lump-sum payment of 20,000 Russian roubles (RUB) to the families of individuals who had died as a result of the hostilities in the Chechen Republic. The Decree also stated that individuals who had incurred pecuniary losses, including those who had lost their home, should be paid compensation, and entrusted the Russian Government with the task of making the relevant payments to those concerned.
87. In Decree no. 510 of 30 April 1997 the Russian Government established that residents of the Chechen Republic who had lost their housing and/or other possessions during the hostilities in the republic and who, no later than before 12 December 1994, had left permanently for another region were entitled to compensation.
88. Governmental Decree no. 404 of 4 July 2003 established the right of all permanent residents of the Chechen Republic who had lost their housing and any possessions in it after 12 December 1994 to receive compensation in the amount of RUB 300,000 for the housing and RUB 50,000 for the other possessions.
C. Practice of the Russian courts
89. On 14 December 2000 the Basmanny District Court of Moscow delivered a judgment in civil proceedings brought by a OMISSIS, who claimed that the block of flats in which he had lived had collapsed during heavy shelling of Grozny by the federal armed forces in January 1995 and sought compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage in that connection. While acknowledging the fact that OMISSIS 's property, including his apartment in the block of flats, had been destroyed as a result of an attack in 1995, the court noted, inter alia, that under Articles 1069-1071 and 1100 of the Russian Civil Code, the State was only liable for damages for its agents' actions that were unlawful. It further held that the military operation in the Chechen Republic had been launched by virtue of relevant presidential and governmental decrees which had been found to be constitutional by the Russian Constitutional Court and were still in force. Accordingly, the court concluded that the actions of the federal armed forces in the Chechen Republic had been lawful and dismissed Mr Dunayev's claim for compensation (see Dunayev v. Russia, no. 70142/01, § 8, 24 May 2007).
90. On 4 July 2001 the Basmanny District Court of Moscow dismissed a claim against the Ministry of Finance brought by a OMISSIS, who stated that his house and other property had been destroyed during massive air strikes and artillery shelling of Grozny by the federal armed forces in October and November 1999 and sought compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage in that connection. The court acknowledged the fact that OMISSIS 's private house and other belongings had been destroyed as a result of the hostilities in 1999 to 2000. It held, however, that under Article 1069 of the Russian Civil Code, the State was only liable for damages for its agents' actions which were unlawful. It noted that the military operation in Chechnya had been launched by virtue of relevant presidential and governmental decrees which had been found to be constitutional by the Russian Constitutional Court, except for two provisions of the relevant governmental decree. In that connection the court noted that the two provisions had never been applied to OMISSIS, and therefore no unlawful actions on the part of State bodies had ever taken place to warrant compensation for damage inflicted on his property. On 12 April 2002 the Moscow City Court upheld that judgment on appeal (see Umarov v. Russia (dec.), no. 30788/02, 18 May 2006).
91. By a default judgment of 3 December 2001 the Leninskiy District Court of Stavropol dismissed a claim brought by a OMISSIS against a number of federal ministries in so far as she alleged that the block of flats in which she had lived had been destroyed by a missile during an attack by the federal armed forces on Grozny in January 2000 and sought compensation for the destroyed flat and belongings that had been in it. She also sought compensation for non-pecuniary damage. The court noted, inter alia, that under Article 1069 of the Russian Civil Code, the State was liable only for damage caused by its agents' actions which were unlawful. It further found that the actions of the Russian federal troops in Chechnya had been lawful, as the military operation in Chechnya had been launched under relevant presidential and governmental decrees which had been found to be constitutional by the Russian Constitutional Court. The court concluded that there were no grounds to grant OMISSIS 's claim for pecuniary damage and that her claim for compensation for non-pecuniary damage could not be granted either, in the absence of any fault or unlawful actions on the part of the defendants. The judgment was upheld on appeal by the Stavropol Regional Court on 30 January 2002 (Trapeznikova v. Russia, no. 21539/02, § 30, 11 December 2008).
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENT'S OBJECTION REGARDING EXHAUSTION OF DOMESTIC REMEDIES
A. Submissions by the parties
1. The Government
92. The Government argued that the applicants had failed to exhaust the effective remedies available to them at domestic level. In particular, none of the procedural decisions taken in case no. 34/00/0030-04 had ever been appealed against to a higher prosecutor, in accordance with Article 124 of the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure, or to a court, in accordance with Article 125 of the same Code.
93. The Government further argued that, in so far as the applicants had complained of moral suffering in breach of Article 3 of the Convention, they could have sought compensation for non-pecuniary damage in court under Article 151 of the Russian Civil Code, but at no time had they lodged such a claim.
94. As regards the applicants' complaints under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Government submitted that, after the criminal proceedings had been discontinued, the “interested persons” – the first, second, third, fourth, eleventh, thirteenth, fourteenth, sixteenth, eighteenth, nineteenth and twenty-sixth applicants being among their number – had been informed of their right to seek compensation for their lost property in civil proceedings. In that connection the Government referred to the provisions of domestic civil law which established the rules on compensation for damage inflicted on property in a situation of absolute necessity (Article 1067 of the Russian Civil Code) and those concerning compensation for damage caused by State bodies and their officials (Article 1069 of the Russian Civil Code). The Government further argued that the applicants were also entitled to compensation in accordance with Governmental Decree no. 510 of 30 April 1997 and Governmental Decree no. 404 of 4 July 2003. However, to date the applicants had not availed themselves of any of those remedies, and therefore, in the Government's view, they had failed to exhaust the domestic remedies in respect of their complaints on that subject.
2. The applicants
95. The applicant insisted that they had done everything that could have reasonably been expected from them to bring the incident of 12 September 1999 to the attention of the authorities; however, the latter's response had been utterly inadequate. In particular, it did not appear that any meaningful investigation had been carried out into the circumstances of the incident. The applicants further stated that in the absence of any meaningful findings in the context of the investigation, all their attempts to bring civil proceedings for compensation in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage would have been doomed to failure.
96. Overall, the applicants insisted that the domestic remedies usually available had been illusory and ineffective in their situation.
B. The Court's assessment
97. The Court reiterates that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention obliges applicants to use first the remedies which are available and sufficient in the domestic legal system to enable them to obtain redress for the breaches alleged. The existence of the remedies must be sufficiently certain both in theory and in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness. Article 35 § 1 also requires that complaints intended to be brought subsequently before the Court should have been made to the appropriate domestic body, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law and, further, that any procedural means that might prevent a breach of the Convention should have been used. However, there is no obligation to have recourse to remedies which are inadequate or ineffective (see Aksoy v. Turkey, 18 December 1996, §§ 51-52, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI; Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, §§ 65-67, Reports 1996-IV; and, more recently, Cennet Ayhan and Mehmet Salih Ayhan v. Turkey, no. 41964/98, § 64, 27 June 2006).
98. The Court has emphasised that the application of the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies must make due allowance for the fact that it is being applied in the context of machinery for the protection of human rights that the Contracting States have agreed to set up. Accordingly, it has recognised that Article 35 § 1 must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. It has further recognised that the rule of exhaustion is neither absolute nor capable of being applied automatically; for the purposes of reviewing whether it has been observed, it is essential to have regard to the circumstances of the individual case. This means, in particular, that the Court must take realistic account not only of the existence of formal remedies in the legal system of the Contracting State concerned but also of the general context in which they operate, as well as the personal circumstances of the applicant. It must then examine whether, in all the circumstances of the case, the applicant did everything that could reasonably be expected of him or her to exhaust domestic remedies (see Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 69; Aksoy, cited above, §§ 53-54; and Tanrıkulu v. Turkey [GC], no. 23763/94, § 82, ECHR 1999-IV).
99. In the present case, in so far as the Government pointed to the applicants' alleged failure to challenge before higher prosecutors procedural decisions taken in the context of the criminal proceedings concerning the events of 12 September 1999, the Court reiterates that the powers conferred on the superior prosecutors constitute extraordinary remedies, the use of which depends upon the prosecutors' discretion. The Court does not accept that the applicants were required to use this remedy in order to comply with the requirements of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see Trubnikov v. Russia (dec.), no. 9790/99, 14 October 2003).
100. As regards the applicants' alleged failure to appeal against the same procedural decisions to a court under Article 125 of the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure, the Court observes that the legal instrument referred to by the Government became operational on 1 July 2002 and that the applicants were clearly unable to have recourse to this remedy prior to that date. As regards the period thereafter, the Court considers that this limb of the Government's objection raises issues which are closely linked to the question of the effectiveness of the investigation, and it would therefore be appropriate to join this matter to the merits and to address it in the examination of the substance of the applicants' complaints under Article 2 of the Convention.
101. Lastly, in so far as the Government alleged that the applicants had failed to have recourse to civil-law remedies or to obtain compensation under governmental decrees in respect of their complaints under Articles 3 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that this limb of the Government's objection raises issues which are closely linked to the question of the availability at national level of effective remedies in respect of the relevant complaints, and it would therefore be appropriate also to join this matter to the merits and to address it in the examination of the substance of the applicants' complaint under Article 13, in conjunction with Articles 3 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 2 OF THE CONVENTION
102. The first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants (“the relevant applicants”) complained about the deaths of their family members during the attack of 12 September 1999. The first applicant complained about the deaths of his wife, OMISSIS, and his two sons, OMISSIS; the second, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants complained about the death of OMISSIS, the mother of the second applicant, sister of the thirteenth applicant and daughter of the twenty-second applicant, and the third applicant complained about the death of his mother, OMISSIS. The relevant applicants alleged that there had not been an effective investigation into the matter. They also complained that the State had failed to comply with its positive obligations to protect their relatives' lives. The relevant applicants referred to Article 2 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“1. Everyone's right to life shall be protected by law. No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law.
2. Deprivation of life shall not be regarded as inflicted in contravention of this article when it results from the use of force which is no more than absolutely necessary:
(a) in defence of any person from unlawful violence;
(b) in order to effect a lawful arrest or to prevent the escape of a person lawfully detained;
(c) in action lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot or insurrection.”
A. Admissibility
103. The Government stated that, taking into account the applicants' submissions and witness statements on the circumstances surrounding the incident of 12 September 1999, “it should be acknowledged” that the use of lethal force resulting in the death of five residents of Kogi (Runnoye) – OMISSIS – had constituted an infringement of Article 2 of the Convention in so far as that Article secured the right to life of the relevant applicants' deceased relatives. They further submitted that, having acknowledged that infringement, the national authorities had paid compensation in that respect to the first three applicants in the amount of 60,000 Russian roubles (RUB, approximately EUR 1,500) to the first applicant and RUB 20,000 (approximately EUR 500) to each of the second and third applicants.
104. The relevant applicants referred to the Court's well-established case-law, asserting that the payment of compensation was insufficient to remedy the alleged violation of Article 2 of the Convention and that an effective criminal investigation into the circumstances of their family members' deaths was required.
105. Having regard to the parties' submissions, the Court observes that the question arises whether, in accordance with Article 34 of the Convention, the relevant applicants can still claim to be “victims” of the alleged violation of Article 2 of the Convention. In this connection, the Court reiterates that an applicant is deprived of his or her status as a victim if the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded appropriate and sufficient redress for, a breach of the Convention (see, for example, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-93, ECHR 2006-V).
106. In the present case, the Government may be said to have acknowledged the alleged violation of Article 2 of the Convention as far as the deaths of the relevant applicants' relatives were concerned (see paragraph 103 above). It remains to be ascertained whether the relevant applicants were afforded appropriate and sufficient redress in that respect.
107. The Court observes that the first, second and third applicants obtained compensation in the amounts of RUB 60,000, RUB 20,000 and RUB 20,000 respectively for the deaths of their family members in the attack of 12 September 1999. The Court reiterates that, in the case of a breach of Articles 2 or 3 of the Convention, compensation for the pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage flowing from the breach should in principle be available as part of the range of redress (see Z and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 29392/95, § 109, ECHR 2001-V). However, the alleged violation of Article 2 of the Convention in cases of fatal assault by State agents cannot be remedied only by awarding damages to the relatives of the victims (see, among other authorities, Kaya v. Turkey, 19 February 1998, § 105, Reports 1998-I, and Yaşa v. Turkey, 2 September 1998, § 74, Reports 1998-VI). This is so because, if the authorities could confine their reaction to such incidents to the mere payment of compensation, while not doing enough to prosecute and punish those responsible, this might result in wrongful use of lethal force by State agents who would be placed in a position of virtual impunity, and the protection of the right to life under Article 2 of the Convention, despite its fundamental importance, would be rendered ineffective in practice. Accordingly, an effective investigation is required, in addition to adequate compensation, to provide sufficient redress to an applicant complaining of a violation of Article 2 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Nikolova and Velichkova v. Bulgaria, no. 7888/03, §§ 55 and 56, 20 December 2007).
108. The Court therefore notes that the question of the relevant applicants' status as “victims”, in accordance with Article 34 of the Convention, is closely linked to the question of the effectiveness of the investigation in the present case, and it would therefore be appropriate to join this question to the merits and to address it in the examination of the substance of the relevant complaint under Article 2 of the Convention.
109. The Court further finds that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
110. In the light of its observation in paragraph 108 above, the Court finds it appropriate to begin by examining the relevant applicants' submissions in so far as they raise an issue under the procedural limb of Article 2 of the Convention and then to turn to the examination of the substantive issue under this Convention provision.
1. Alleged inadequacy of the investigation
(a) Submissions by the parties
111. The relevant applicants contended that the Government had failed to carry out an adequate, effective and timely investigation into the circumstances of the incident of 12 September 1999. They pointed out that apart from indicating the dates on which the investigation had been commenced and discontinued the Government had failed to explain in any detail what steps had been taken in the course of the investigation, and to disclose any documents relating to it. The relevant applicants further invited the Court to draw inferences as to the well-foundedness of their allegations from the Government's failure to submit any documents from the criminal investigation file.
112. The Government argued that the circumstances of the attack of 12 September 1999 had been duly investigated by the domestic authorities, which, having carried out the investigation, had decided to discontinue the criminal proceedings “in the absence of any lawful grounds for holding anyone criminally liable”. The Government submitted that the fact that the investigation had been discontinued did not prevent any of the applicants from seeking compensation in civil proceedings for the damage caused, this right having been explained to the individuals who had been declared victims in the present case. The Government further pointed out that the first three applicants had availed themselves of that right and had obtained compensation in connection with their relatives' deaths. The Government thus insisted that in such circumstances the investigation in the present case had met the standard of effectiveness established in relation to Article 2 of the Convention.
113. The Government refused to submit any documents from the file on the criminal investigation with reference to their classified nature, stating that their disclosure would be contrary to the interests of the investigation and could entail a breach of the rights of the participants in the criminal proceedings. They also insisted that they had “in due manner” indicated the procedural steps taken during the investigation and, in particular, had indicated the authority in charge, the numbers assigned to the case file and the dates of the major procedural steps.
(b) The Court's assessment
114. The Court firstly notes that the Government acknowledged the fact that the relevant applicants' relatives had been deprived of their lives as a result of the federal aerial attack of 12 September 1999. Accordingly, it finds that the relevant applicants have an arguable claim under the substantive limb of Article 2 of the Convention.
115. The Court further reiterates that the obligation to protect the right to life under Article 2 of the Convention, read in conjunction with the State's general duty under Article 1 of the Convention to “secure to everyone within [its] jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in [the] Convention”, requires by implication that there should be some form of effective official investigation when individuals have been killed as a result of the use of force, in particular by agents of the State. The investigation must be effective in the sense that it is capable of leading to a determination of whether the force used in such cases was or was not justified in the circumstances (see Kaya, cited above, § 87) and to the identification and punishment of those responsible (see Oğur v. Turkey [GC], no. 21594/93, § 88, ECHR 1999-III).
116. In particular, the authorities must take the reasonable steps available to them to secure the evidence concerning the incident, including, inter alia, eyewitness testimony, forensic evidence and, where appropriate, an autopsy which provides a complete and accurate record of injury and an objective analysis of clinical findings, including the cause of death (see, concerning autopsies, for example, Salman v. Turkey [GC], no. 21986/93, § 106, ECHR 2000-VII; concerning witnesses, for example, Tanrıkulu, cited above, § 109; and concerning forensic evidence, for example, Gül v. Turkey, no. 22676/93, § 89). Any deficiency in the investigation which undermines its ability to establish the cause of death or the person responsible may risk falling foul of this standard.
117. Also, there must be an implicit requirement of promptness and reasonable expedition (see Yaşa, cited above, §§ 102-04, and Mahmut Kaya v. Turkey, no. 22535/93, §§ 106-07, ECHR 2000-III). It must be accepted that there may be obstacles or difficulties which prevent progress in an investigation in a particular situation. However, a prompt response by the authorities in investigating the use of lethal force may generally be regarded as essential in maintaining public confidence in the maintenance of the rule of law and in preventing any appearance of collusion in or tolerance of unlawful acts.
118. For the same reasons, there must be a sufficient element of public scrutiny of the investigation or its results to secure accountability in practice as well as in theory. The degree of public scrutiny required may well vary from case to case. In all cases, however, the next of kin of the victim must be involved in the procedure to the extent necessary to safeguard his or her legitimate interests (see Shanaghan v. the United Kingdom, no. 37715/97, §§ 91-92, 4 May 2001).
119. In the present case, the Court notes that despite its repeated requests for a copy of the file on the investigation concerning the attack of 12 September 1999, the Government refused to disclose any document from that file, referring to Article 161 of the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure. Moreover, they also failed to give an outline, let alone a detailed account, of the investigative steps, if any, taken by the authorities. The Government only indicated the dates on which the criminal proceedings had been instituted and discontinued, referred to the investigating authorities' conclusion as to the absence of the constituent elements of a crime in the federal servicemen's actions and mentioned certain transcripts of witness interviews, expert reports and reports on examinations, without providing any further details (see paragraphs (b) Information submitted by the Government
62-65 above). The Court finds such a manifest lack of cooperation in the present case on the part of the Government to be unacceptable.
120. Drawing inferences from the respondent Government's conduct when evidence was being obtained (see Ireland v. the United Kingdom, 18 January 1978, § 161, Series A no. 25), the Court, in the light of these inferences, will have to assess the merits of this complaint on the basis of the scarce information submitted by the Government on the progress of the investigation and the few documents produced by the applicants.
121. To that end, the Court notes firstly that criminal proceedings in connection with the aerial attack of 12 September 1999 resulting in the deaths of the relevant applicants' relatives were not instituted until more than two years later, on 21 January 2002. The Government did not advance any justification for such a delay, merely alleging that the competent prosecutor's office had initiated the proceedings on the same date when it had received the second applicant's complaint of 29 August 2001 from the Russian President's Office.
122. In so far as the Government may be understood to be arguing that, prior to that date, the authorities were unaware of the incident of 12 September 1999, the Court finds such an argument implausible and contradictory to the facts of the present case. In the Court's opinion, the results of a large-scale attack involving federal aircraft should normally become known to the authorities immediately after such an attack. It falls to the State to ensure that State agents who participated in the attack duly report on it, and that the competent authorities, including those in charge of it, check its results without delay. The Court further notes the applicants' submissions to the effect that they met numerous federal servicemen in Kogi (Runnoye) when they returned to the village two days after the incident (see paragraphs 24-26 above) and that they started complaining to various State bodies shortly after the attack (see paragraph (a) The applicants' complaints to public bodies and information received by them
31 above). It is furthermore evident from the authorities' replies to the applicants' complaints that, in any event, the authorities were aware of the incident in Kogi (Runnoye) no later than in December 1999, when an investigator of the garrison prosecutor's office carried out a certain “inquiry” into the events in question (see paragraph 39 above). The Court finds it striking that for more than two years the Russian authorities demonstrated such indifference towards an incident involving multiple deaths of civilians – minor children and women – and the devastation of a whole village as a result of the actions of the federal forces. It also notes that such a considerable delay between the incident and the beginning of the investigation into it cannot but significantly undermine the effectiveness of the investigation.
123. It is furthermore highly doubtful that, even after the investigation into the attack of 12 September 1999 was opened, the deaths of the relevant applicants' family members were duly investigated. In particular, the Government pointed out that criminal proceedings had been brought only in connection with the destruction of property during the attack, as, allegedly, the authorities were unaware of the deaths at the time when they commenced the investigation. The Court is sceptical about that argument, given that the documents submitted by the applicants reveal that, prior to the date on which the criminal proceedings were instituted, the second applicant complained about her mother's death on several occasions and the authorities received those complaints (see paragraphs 37-38 above).
124. The Court further observes that the Government alleged that it had been established in the course of the investigation that the relevant applicants' relatives had died as a result of the missile strike by the federal forces; however, no medical forensic examination of the bodies had been carried out as the relevant applicants had allegedly refused to allow exhumation. The Court cannot accept this explanation for the authorities' failure to take one of the most essential steps in investigating incidents such as the one in the present case. Even assuming that, as alleged by the Government, the relevant applicants obstructed the investigating authorities in this respect by refusing to give their consent to the exhumation of their relatives' remains, the Court does not consider that this alleged refusal could have absolved the authorities from their obligations to obtain detailed information about the cause of the deaths of five persons in suspicious circumstances. Indeed, it does not appear, and it was not convincingly demonstrated by the Government, that the investigating authorities ever attempted to obtain a court order for the exhumation, or tried otherwise to pursue the matter (see Mezhidov v. Russia, no. 67326/01, § 70, 25 September 2008).
125. Moreover, in the absence of any reliable information and documents, it is not unlikely that a number of other essential investigative measures were either delayed or were not taken at all.
126. The Court further observes that the investigation remained pending between 21 January 2002 and 23 September 2005, that is, for three years and eight months. Having regard to the relevant legal provision clearly establishing the time-limits for a preliminary investigation (see paragraph 81 above), the Court finds it reasonable to assume that during the indicated period the investigation was stayed and reopened on several occasions.
127. It is also clear from the material in the Court's possession that the applicants received almost no information on the investigation. It appears that it was only on 30 April 2003 that the applicants were informed for the first time of the institution on 21 January 2002, that is more than a year previously, of criminal proceedings concerning the events of 12 September 1999 (see paragraph 55 above). They subsequently appear to have been notified once again of the beginning of the investigation (see paragraph 56 above) and then of its suspension and reopening (see paragraph 61 above). It does not appear that any further pertinent information on the investigation was ever provided to them. In particular, the Court is not convinced that, as asserted by the Government, the “interested persons” – some of the applicants being among their number – were duly notified of the decision of 23 September 2005, by which the criminal proceedings concerning the events of 12 September 1999 were terminated, and that “those declared victims” were furnished with a copy of that decision, as the Government failed to corroborate their assertion to that effect with any documentary evidence. Moreover, they failed to indicate clearly whether the applicants had been granted victim status in the present case, and, if so, which of them and on what date(s). The Court thus considers that the applicants were, in fact, excluded from the criminal proceedings and were unable to have their legitimate interests upheld.
128. Against this background, and having regard to the Government's argument concerning the applicants' alleged failure to appeal to a court, under Article 125 of the Russian Code of Criminal Procedure, against procedural decisions taken in the context of the investigation into the attack of 12 September 1999, the Court notes that the Government failed to indicate which particular decisions, apart from that of 23 September 2005, the applicants should have challenged. As regards this latter decision, the Court reiterates that, in principle, an appeal against a decision to discontinue criminal proceedings may offer a substantial safeguard against the arbitrary exercise of power by the investigating authority, given a court's power to annul such a decision and indicate the defects to be addressed (see, mutatis mutandis, Trubnikov (dec.), cited above). Therefore, in the ordinary course of events such an appeal might be regarded as a possible remedy where the prosecution has decided not to investigate the claims. The Court, however, has strong doubts that this remedy would have been effective in the present case. It reiterates its above finding that it is reasonable to assume that the investigation was stayed and reopened on several occasions (see paragraph 126 above). In such circumstances, the Court is not convinced that an appeal to a court, which could only have had the same effect, would have offered the applicants any redress. It considers, therefore, that such an appeal in the particular circumstances of the present case would be devoid of any purpose. The Court finds that the applicants were not obliged to pursue that remedy and that this limb of the Government's objection should therefore be dismissed (see Khatsiyeva and Others v. Russia, no. 5108/02, § 151, 17 January 2008).
129. In the light of the foregoing, and drawing inferences from the Government's refusal to submit the criminal investigation file, the Court concludes that the authorities failed to carry out a thorough and effective investigation into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of the relevant applicants' five relatives. In view of this finding, the Court does not consider it necessary to examine the question as to whether the compensation awarded to the first three applicants in connection with the deaths of their family members was “adequate”, as, in the absence of an effective investigation into those deaths, the relevant applicants were not afforded sufficient redress in respect of the alleged violations of Article 2 of the Convention and may still claim to be “victims” thereof, in accordance with Article 34 of the Convention.
130. The Court therefore dismisses the Government's objection in this respect and finds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention under its procedural head.
2. Alleged failure to protect the right to life
(a) Submissions by the parties
(i) The relevant applicants
131. The relevant applicants pointed out that the Government had admitted that the attack by the federal air forces on, or in the vicinity of, the village of Kogi (Runnoye) on 12 September 1999 had resulted, in particular, in the deaths of OMISSIS and OMISSIS – the first applicant's wife and sons; OMISSIS – the mother of the second applicant, sister of the thirteenth applicant and daughter of the twenty-second applicant; and OMISSIS – the third applicant's mother. The relevant applicants further argued that the Government had clearly failed to account for those deaths. In particular, they had not submitted any information or documents indicating the identity of the military personnel involved in the planning and conduct of the particular attack, the extent to which those personnel had been trained, the legal basis for the operation and the manner in which it had been planned and controlled, the measures taken in order to minimise the risk to the lives of civilians during that operation, and the specific instructions given to the pilots of the SU-25 planes who had bombed the village.
132. The relevant applicants maintained that the way in which the operation of 12 September 1999 had been planned, controlled and conducted had constituted a clear violation of the right to life of their family members. They insisted that the authorities had known, or should have known, of the presence of civilians in Kogi (Runnoye) at the relevant time. Moreover, the choice of means by the authorities had clearly fallen foul of the Convention “strict proportionality” test – the lethal force used had clearly been disproportionate to the aim pursued by the federal military forces, as the village had in fact been subjected to indiscriminate bombing.
133. The relevant applicants further disputed as wholly unreliable the Government's argument to the effect that the aerial attack had been necessary in order to suppress the criminal activity of illegal armed groups and prevent terrorist attacks allegedly planned by them. They pointed out that the Government had not produced any documentary evidence confirming the presence of any illegal armed groups in Kogi (Runnoye) before the strike or that any illegal fighters had been killed or captured or any fighters' property destroyed as a result of that strike.
134. The relevant applicants also pointed out that the Government had not indicated whether the villagers had been warned in advance about the attack, or whether the authorities had duly assessed the need for the use of indiscriminate weapons within a populated area.
135. Lastly, the relevant applicants alleged that the legal framework concerning the use of force and firearms by military personnel in Russia, being vague and inadequate, did not provide for sufficient safeguards to prevent the arbitrary deprivation of life and to satisfy the requirement of protection “by law” of the right to life secured by Article 2 of the Convention.
(ii) The Government
136. The Government argued that the deprivation of the lives of the relevant applicants' relatives as a result of the use of lethal force had been justified for the purposes of Article 2 § 2 (a) and (b) of the Convention. In particular, the Government stated that on 12 September 1999 the federal air forces had performed a pinpoint missile strike on farm no. 2 of the Shelkovskiy State farm in the village of Kogi (Runnoye), where, according to their information, illegal fighters had been located. The Government referred to the findings of the domestic investigation to the effect that the actions of the military officials who had ordered a strike on the illegal fighters' base had been justified in the circumstances, given that illegal armed groups had been showing violent armed resistance to the authorities, thus posing a danger to local residents and other persons and to the public interest. In the Government's submission, that danger could not have been eliminated by any other means, and, in particular, it was impossible to use ground troops in the vicinity of Kogi (Runnoye). The pilots, for their part, had acted in strict compliance with their superiors' order, which had been binding on them. The Government insisted that the federal servicemen, both commanding officers and their subordinates, had acted in full compliance with national legislation and regulations for securing the safety of the civilian population, as well as those relating to the use of lethal force.
137. The Government further submitted that the investigating authorities had examined matters relating to the planning and control of the operation in question and had not found any breaches in that regard. In particular, it had been established that when planning the aerial attack in the vicinity of the village of Kogi (Runnoye) the commanding officers had had “reliable and sufficient information” on the location of the terrorist base and on the concentration of illegal fighters at that base and the preparation by them of large-scale terrorist attacks. The Government alleged that it had been clear in the circumstances of the case which military targets had been situated near Kogi (Runnoye), their designation and the degree of danger they had posed for, inter alia, residents of the nearby Republic of Dagestan, and, as a result, the need for their destruction had been obvious.
(b) The Court's assessment
138. The Court reiterates that Article 2, which safeguards the right to life and sets out the circumstances where deprivation of life may be justified, ranks as one of the most fundamental provisions in the Convention, from which in peacetime no derogation is permitted under Article 15. The situations where deprivation of life may be justified are exhaustive and must be narrowly interpreted. The use of force which may result in the deprivation of life must be no more than “absolutely necessary” for the achievement of one of the purposes set out in Article 2 § 2 (a), (b) and (c). This term indicates that a stricter and more compelling test of necessity must be employed than that normally applicable when determining whether State action is “necessary in a democratic society” under paragraphs 2 of Articles 8 to 11 of the Convention. Consequently, the force used must be strictly proportionate to the achievement of the permitted aims. In the light of the importance of the protection afforded by Article 2, the Court must subject deprivations of life to the most careful scrutiny, particularly where deliberate lethal force is used, taking into consideration not only the actions of State agents who actually administer the force but also all the surrounding circumstances including such matters as the planning and control of the actions under examination (see McCann and Others v. the United Kingdom, 27 September 1995, §§ 146-50, Series A no. 324; Andronicou and Constantinou v. Cyprus, 9 October 1997, § 171, Reports 1997-VI; and Oğur, cited above, § 78).
139. In addition to setting out the circumstances when deprivation of life may be justified, Article 2 implies a primary duty on the State to secure the right to life by putting in place an appropriate legal and administrative framework defining the limited circumstances in which law-enforcement officials may use force and firearms, in the light of the relevant international standards (see Makaratzis v. Greece [GC], no. 50385/99, §§ 57-59, ECHR 2004-XI, and Nachova and Others v. Bulgaria [GC], nos. 43577/98 and 43579/98, § 96, ECHR 2005-VII). Furthermore, the national law regulating policing operations must secure a system of adequate and effective safeguards against arbitrariness and abuse of force and even against avoidable accident (see Makaratzis, cited above, § 58). In particular, law-enforcement agents must be trained to assess whether or not there is an absolute necessity to use firearms, not only on the basis of the letter of the relevant regulations, but also with due regard to the pre-eminence of respect for human life as a fundamental value (see Nachova and Others, cited above, § 97).
140. In the present case, it has been acknowledged by the Government that five residents of Gekhi – OMISSIS – were killed as a result of a missile attack on 12 September 1999 by two SU-25 military planes belonging to the federal air forces. The State's responsibility is therefore engaged, and it is for the State to account for the deaths of the aforementioned five persons. It is notably for the State to demonstrate that the force used by the federal servicemen could be said to have been absolutely necessary and therefore strictly proportionate to the achievement of one of the aims set out in paragraph 2 of Article 2.
141. The Government argued that the use of lethal force in the present case had been justified under Article 2 § 2 (a) and (b) of the Convention. In the absence of any reliable evidence that any unlawful violence was threatened or likely, or that the lethal force was used in an attempt to effect a lawful arrest of any person, the Court has certain doubts that the above-mentioned provisions can be said to be applicable. In any event, even assuming that the use of lethal force in the present case can be said to have pursued any of the aforementioned aims, the Court does not consider that the Government properly accounted for the use of that force resulting in the deaths of the five residents of Kogi (Runnoye).
142. In this connection, the Court notes first of all that its ability to assess the circumstances surrounding the deaths of the relevant applicants' relatives, including the legal or regulatory framework in place, the planning and control of the operation in question and the actions of the federal servicemen who actually administered the force, is severely hampered by the manifest unwillingness of the respondent Government to cooperate with the Court in the present case and their failure to submit any documents or information regarding the events under consideration.
143. In particular, the Court notes that, whilst claiming that the federal servicemen involved in the incident of 12 September 1999 – both the commanding officers in charge of the operation and the pilots of the SU-25 planes who took part in the attack – had acted in full compliance with national legislation and regulations for securing the safety of the civilian population, as well as those relating to the use of lethal force, the respondent Government failed to provide a copy of any such legal act or regulations, or even to indicate more specifically the legal instruments to which they referred. This has prevented the Court from assessing whether an appropriate legal framework concerning the use of lethal force by military personnel was in place and, if so, whether it contained clear safeguards to prevent arbitrary deprivation of life and to satisfy the requirement of protection “by law” of the right to life secured by Article 2 of the Convention.
144. The Court further finds unacceptable the Government's failure to provide any meaningful information and documentary evidence as to the planning and execution of the aerial attack of 12 September 1999 and the actions of the pilots who participated in that attack. They did no more than refer to the domestic investigating authorities' conclusions in a decision of 23 September 2005 to discontinue the criminal proceedings concerning the incident of 12 September 1999. In particular, according to the Government, the actions of the commanding officers who had ordered an aerial strike on Kogi (Runnoye) had been justified, as they had “reliable and sufficient” information on the location in the vicinity of that village of numerous illegal fighters who had allegedly been preparing large-scale terrorist attacks and therefore had posed a danger which could not have been eliminated by any other means, in particular by using ground troops. The actions of the pilots had also been justified, in the Government's view, as they had acted pursuant to their superiors' binding order.
145. The Court regards the explanations advanced by the Government as inadequate and unconvincing. First of all, the Court is sceptical about the Government's argument concerning the presence of illegal fighters in the vicinity of Kogi (Runnoye) at the relevant time as, apart from blankly stating that the information to that effect had been “reliable and sufficient”, the Government produced no evidence to corroborate that assertion.
146. Moreover, even assuming that the competent domestic authorities had information at their disposal as to the location of a terrorist base in the vicinity of Kogi (Runnoye), the Government failed to demonstrate that the necessary degree of care had been exercised in evaluating that information and in preparing the operation of 12 September 1999 in such a way as to avoid or minimise, to the greatest extent possible, risks of loss of lives, both of persons at whom the measures were directed and of civilians, and to minimise the recourse to lethal force (see McCann, cited above, §§ 194 and 201). In particular, in so far as the Government relied on Article 2 § 2 (b) of the Convention, the Court considers the deployment of military aviation equipped with heavy weapons to be, in itself, grossly disproportionate to the purpose of effecting the lawful arrest of a person. The applicants' argument to the effect that the Government had produced no evidence that any fighter had been captured as a result of the attack in question is of direct relevance.
147. In so far as the Government invoked Article 2 § 2 (a) of the Convention, claiming that the lethal force had been used in defence of persons from unlawful violence, the Court notes first of all the applicants' argument, which remained undisputed by the Government, that the authorities were most probably aware, or, in any event, should have been aware, of the presence of a civilian population in Kogi (Runnoye). With this in mind, the Court is struck by the Russian authorities' choice of means in the present case for the achievement of the purpose indicated by the Government.
148. It does not find satisfactory the Government's argument that they could not have attained the aim in question by any other means and, in particular, by using ground troops, as the Government failed to explain this allegation in any detail, let alone to submit any documentary evidence in support of it. The Court further rejects as unconvincing the Government's assertions to the effect that the strike performed by the federal air forces in the vicinity of Kogi (Runnoye) was of a “pinpoint” nature and that it was directed against military targets, their designation and the degree of danger having been “obvious”, in the Government's submission. The Government failed to name any of those targets. Moreover, their statements are not corroborated by any evidence and contradict the detailed description of the incident given by the applicants and the officially recorded results of the attack attesting the deaths of five civilians – three women and two minor children – and the destruction of about thirty houses, that is, almost the entire village (see paragraphs 19, 20 and 30 above). Against this background, the Court cannot but agree with the applicants that their home village did in fact come under indiscriminate bombing by the federal air forces.
149. It furthermore does not appear that the authorities had considered at all comprehensively the limits and constraints on the use of indiscriminate weapons within a populated area (see Isayeva v. Russia, no. 57950/00, § 189, 24 February 2005). There is also no evidence that at any stage of the operation any measures were taken in order to avoid, or at least to minimise, the risk to the lives of the residents of Kogi (Runnoye). In particular, it does not appear that the authorities took any steps with a view to informing the villagers of the attack beforehand and to securing their evacuation. In these circumstances, the Court cannot but conclude that the authorities failed to exercise appropriate care in the organisation and control of the operation of 12 September 1999.
150. In sum, the Court considers that the indiscriminate bombing of a village inhabited by civilians – women and children being among their number – was manifestly disproportionate to the achievement of the purpose under Article 2 § 2 (a) invoked by the Government. It therefore finds that the respondent State failed in its obligation to protect the right to life of OMISSIS – the mother of the second applicant, sister of the thirteenth applicant and daughter of the twenty-second applicant; and OMISSIS – the third applicant's mother.
151. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention on that account.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
152. The first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants complained that there had been no effective domestic remedies in respect of the alleged violation of Article 2 of the Convention in so far as the deaths of their relatives were concerned. All the applicants also complained that they had had no effective domestic remedies as regards the alleged violation of the rights under Articles 3 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
153. The applicants referred to other cases concerning events in the Chechen Republic during the same period in which a violation of Article 13 had been found and invited the Court to make a similar finding in the present case.
154. The Government argued that the applicants had had effective domestic remedies in respect of their complaints and that the authorities had not prevented them from using those remedies. In particular, criminal proceedings had been instituted and an investigation into the circumstances of the incident of 12 September 1999 had been conducted following the applicants' complaint to the competent bodies. The Government further pointed out that the first three applicants had obtained compensation in connection with the deaths of their family members, which, in their view, proved that effective domestic remedies were available at national level. In support of their argument the Government also referred to decisions taken by domestic courts in two unrelated sets of court proceedings in which the claimants had been awarded compensation in respect of the unlawful actions of State officials. The Government did not submit copies of the court decisions to which they referred.
A. Admissibility
155. The Court reiterates that, according to its case-law, Article 13 applies only where an individual has an “arguable claim” to be the victim of a violation of a Convention right. Notwithstanding the terms of Article 13 read literally, the existence of an actual breach of another provision of the Convention (a substantive provision) is not a prerequisite for the application of the Article (see Boyle and Rice v. the United Kingdom, 27 April 1988, § 52, Series A no. 131).
156. In the present case, the Court observes that, as already noted in paragraph (b) The Court's assessment
114 above, the Government acknowledged that the federal aerial attack of 12 September 1999 had resulted in the deaths of five residents of Kogi (Runnoye). Moreover, they also acknowledged that a number of residential and non-residential buildings had been destroyed as a result of that attack (see paragraph 22 above). Against this background, the Court is satisfied that the applicants have an arguable claim under Articles 2, 3 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for the purpose of Article 13.
157. The Court therefore notes that the applicants' complaints under Article 13 in conjunction with Articles 2, 3 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. General principles
158. The Court reiterates that Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights and freedoms in whatever form they might happen to be secured in the domestic legal order. The effect of Article 13 is thus to require the provision of a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief, although Contracting States are afforded some discretion as to the manner in which they comply with their Convention obligations under this provision. The scope of the obligation under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant's complaint under the Convention. Nevertheless, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law, in particular in the sense that its exercise must not be unjustifiably hindered by acts or omissions of the authorities of the respondent State (see Aksoy, cited above, § 95).
159. The Court further reiterates that, when an individual formulates an arguable claim in respect of killing, torture or destruction of property involving the responsibility of the State, the notion of an “effective remedy”, in the sense of Article 13 of the Convention, entails, in addition to the payment of compensation where appropriate, a thorough and effective investigation capable of leading to the identification and punishment of those responsible and including effective access by the complainant to the investigative procedure (see Kaya, cited above, § 107; Aksoy, cited above, § 98; Menteş and Others v. Turkey, 28 November 1997, § 89, Reports 1997-VIII; and Çaçan v. Turkey (dec.), no. 33646/96, 28 March 2000).
2. Application in the present case
160. In the present case, the Government insisted that a variety of effective remedies had been available to the applicants at domestic level. In particular, they pointed to the fact that, in accordance with Presidential Decree no. 898 of 5 September 1995, the first three applicants had received compensation in court proceedings for their relatives' deaths. They also argued that the applicants had been free to lodge a civil action, under Articles 1067 and 1069 of the Russian Civil Code, for compensation for the damage inflicted on their homes and property, and/or to obtain extra-judicial compensation on that account as provided for in Governmental Decrees nos. 510 and 404 dated 30 April 1997 and 4 July 2003 respectively.
(a) Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 2
161. The Court does not find the Government's arguments convincing. In particular, in so far as the Government relied on the judgment of the Nogayskiy District Court of 18 March 2005, as upheld by the Supreme Court of the Republic of Dagestan on 13 July 2005, by which the first three applicants were awarded compensation for the deaths of their family members (see paragraphs 70-71 above), it does not consider that this remedy can be regarded as effective for the purpose of Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention, despite its positive outcome for the first three applicants in the form of a financial award. That award was based on Presidential Decree no. 898 of 5 September 1995, which provided for a lump-sum payment of a fixed amount to relatives of each individual killed as a result of the hostilities in the Chechen Republic, without distinguishing between deaths inflicted by private individuals and those caused by State agents (see paragraph 86 above). When awarding compensation, the District Court clearly stated that its payment was not dependent on the establishment of a causal link between the damage caused and the State's actions. It is therefore clear that the proceedings in question were incapable of making any meaningful findings as to the perpetrators of the fatal assault, and still less to establish their responsibility (see, in a similar context, Khashiyev and Akayeva v. Russia, nos. 57942/00 and 57945/00, § 121, 24 February 2005).
162. The Court further notes that, as it has held on many occasions, in circumstances where, as in the present case, the criminal investigation into the deaths was ineffective and the effectiveness of any other remedy that may have existed was consequently undermined, the State has failed in its obligation under Article 13 of the Convention. Consequently, there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in respect of the aforementioned violations of Article 2 of the Convention concerning the deaths of the first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants' family members.
(b) Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 8 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
163. As regards all applicants' complaint under Article 13 in connection with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers, in the light of the principles restated in paragraph 159 above, that the only potentially effective domestic remedy in the circumstances would be an adequate criminal investigation. In this connection it refers to its above finding regarding the ineffectiveness of the investigation into the deaths of the five residents of Kogi (Runnoye). The Court finds that this is also true as regards the investigation into the destruction of the applicants' homes and property, given that all those offences were investigated within the same set of criminal proceedings.
164. It further considers that, similarly to its finding made in paragraph 162 above as regards the existence of effective domestic remedies in respect of the applicants' complaints under Article 2 of the Convention, in the absence of any meaningful results of the investigation into the destruction of their housing and property, their civil claim for damages on that account would hardly have had any prospects of success. Indeed, Article 1069 of the Russian Civil Code, which establishes the rules on compensation for damage inflicted by representatives of the State and which would have been applicable if the applicants had brought civil proceedings as suggested by the Government, provides that State agents are only liable for damage caused by their unlawful actions or failure to act (see paragraph 84 above). In the circumstances of the present case, where, as mentioned by the Government, the investigation into the attack ended with a decision of 23 September 2005 stating that the federal servicemen's actions had been justified, the applicants' civil claim for damages would have been doomed to failure. In support of this finding, the Court also refers to the practice of the Russian courts, which have consistently refused to award any compensation for damage caused by the federal forces during the conflict in the Chechen Republic, stating, in particular, that the latter's actions had been lawful as the counter-terrorist operation in the region had been launched under relevant presidential and governmental decrees which had not been found to be unconstitutional (see paragraphs 89-91 above). With this in mind, the Court rejects the Government's argument that it was open to the applicants to file a civil claim for compensation in respect of their lost housing and property, as the right in question was illusory and devoid of substance. In sum, the Court finds the remedy under examination inadequate and ineffective, given that it was clearly incapable of leading to the identification and punishment of those responsible, or even to any financial award in the circumstances of the present case.
165. As regards the Government's argument that the applicants could have received extra-judicial compensation for their lost property, the Court notes firstly that Governmental Decree no. 510 of 30 April 1997, referred to by the Government, concerns the payment of compensation in respect of property that had been destroyed before 12 December 1994 (see paragraph 87 above), and is therefore clearly irrelevant in the present case. It is also doubtful that Governmental Decree no. 404 of 4 July 2003, which afforded the right to compensation to permanent residents of the Chechen Republic (see paragraph 88 above), can be applied in the applicants' situation, given that after the attack most of them permanently left the region (see paragraph 27 above). In any event, even assuming that the applicants are entitled to extra-judicial compensation under this latter decree as suggested by the Government, it is clear from the relevant legal instrument that the compensation in question is paid without regard to the particular circumstances in which the property was lost, that is to say, irrespective of whether State agents were responsible for the destruction. Moreover, the value of the lost property is not taken into account either, since the overall amount paid for lost housing and other possessions cannot exceed RUB 350,000 (approximately EUR 9,000). In such circumstances, the Court is not persuaded that the compensation referred to by the Government can be regarded as an effective remedy for the violation alleged.
166. In the light of the foregoing considerations, the Court dismisses the Government's objection in so far as it concerns the applicants' alleged failure to exhaust the available domestic remedies in respect of their complaints under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and finds that the applicants had no effective domestic remedies in respect of the alleged violation of their rights secured by the aforementioned Convention provisions. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention on that account.
(c) Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 3
167. Lastly, having regard to its conclusions in paragraphs 162 and 166 above, the Court finds that the applicants had no effective remedies as regards their complaint under Article 3 of the Convention, and therefore the Government's objection on that account should be dismissed. It considers, however, that the applicants' complaint under Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 3 of the Convention does not raise a separate issue in the circumstances of the present case, and therefore there is no need to examine it.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
168. All applicants complained under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that their homes and property had been destroyed by the federal armed forces, with the result that they had been forced to leave their home village and had become refugees. Those provisions, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 8
“Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home ...
There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
169. The applicants referred to certificates of 24 December 2007 (see paragraph 30 above) to corroborate their assertion that they had been owners of the houses and outbuildings that had been destroyed, stating that all other documents confirming their title to the property in question had been lost during the bombing.
170. The Government acknowledged that the attack of 12 September 1999 had resulted in the destruction of a number of residential and non-residential buildings in the village of Kogi (Runnoye). At the same time they alleged that the domestic investigation into the attack had established that those buildings had belonged to the State and that the applicants had held them on the terms of a lease, and therefore they could only complain under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 about the damage inflicted on their personal belongings.
171. The Government further argued that the alleged interference with the applicants' rights secured by Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been lawful, as the counter-terrorist operations in the territory of the Chechen Republic, in the context of which the strike of 12 September 1999 had been performed, had been carried out on the basis of the Suppression of Terrorism Act of 25 July 1998 and “relevant regulations of State bodies”. They further insisted that the strike resulting in the damage to or destruction of the applicants' homes and property had been necessary in order to suppress the criminal activity of members of illegal armed groups and to prevent terrorist attacks they had been preparing. Lastly, the Government submitted that the applicants could have obtained compensation for the alleged damage in civil proceedings.
A. Admissibility
172. The Court finds that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
173. The Court observes at the outset that the Government disputed the applicants' property rights to the houses and outbuildings, which had come under the federal aerial attack on 12 September 1999, stating that the property in question had belonged to the State. The Court observes that the Government produced no documentary evidence in support of their argument, whereas the applicants, for their part, submitted certificates issued by the district administration confirming their title to the destroyed buildings (see paragraph 30 above). The Court considers that the applicants can hardly be required to adduce any other documents proving their title to the property in question, as it is very likely that, as asserted by the applicants, any such documents were destroyed together with their property during the attack. In such circumstances, the Court finds it established that the applicants were the rightful owners of the houses and outbuildings in the village of Kogi (Runnoye) at the relevant time.
174. The Court further notes that the Government acknowledged that the federal aerial attack on 12 September 1999 had resulted in the destruction of a number of residential and non-residential buildings in the village of Kogi (Runnoye). It is therefore clear that there was an interference with the applicants' rights secured by Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court has now to satisfy itself that this interference met the requirement of lawfulness, pursued a legitimate aim and was proportionate to the aim pursued.
175. As regards the lawfulness of the interference in question, the Government referred to the Suppression of Terrorism Act and unnamed “relevant regulations of State bodies” as a legal basis for the alleged interference.
176. The Court reiterates, as it has already noted in cases concerning the conflict in the Chechen Republic, that the Suppression of Terrorism Act and, in particular, section 21, which releases State agents participating in a counter-terrorist operation from any liability for damage caused to, inter alia, “other legally protected interests”, while vesting wide powers in State agents within the zone of the counter-terrorist operation, does not define with sufficient clarity the scope of those powers and the manner of their exercise so as to afford an individual adequate protection against arbitrariness (see Khamidov v. Russia, no. 72118/01, § 143, ECHR 2007-XII (extracts). The Government's reference to this Act cannot replace specific authorisation of an interference with an individual's rights under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, delimiting the object and scope of that interference and drawn up in accordance with the relevant legal provisions. The provisions of the above-mentioned Act are not to be construed so as to create an exemption for any kind of limitations of personal rights for an indefinite period of time and without setting clear boundaries for the security forces' actions (see, mutatis mutandis, Imakayeva v. Russia, no. 7615/02, § 188, ECHR 2006-XIII (extracts).
177. Similarly, in the present case the Court considers that the legal instrument in question, formulated in vague and general terms, cannot serve as a sufficient legal basis for such a drastic interference as the destruction of an individual's housing and property. It further observes that the Government did not submit any document, such as an order, instruction or regulation, specifically authorising the federal servicemen to inflict damage on the applicants' property, including their homes, nor did they provide any details regarding such a document, if there was one.
178. The Court thus concludes, in view of the above considerations and in the absence of an individualised decision or order which clearly indicated the grounds and conditions for inflicting damage to the applicants' property, including their housing, and which could have been appealed against in a court, that the interference with the applicants' rights was not “lawful”, within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In view of this finding the Court does not consider it necessary to examine whether the interference in question pursued a legitimate aim and was proportionate to that aim.
179. It thus finds that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the destruction of the applicants' property, including their housing, in the federal aerial attack of 12 September 1999.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 3 OF THE CONVENTION
180. All applicants complained that they had suffered severe mental distress and anguish in connection with the attack on their village, the deaths of their close relatives and the destruction of their houses and other property. They relied on Article 3 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
181. The applicants referred to the cases of Selçuk and Asker v. Turkey (24 April 1998, Reports 1998-II), Yöyler v. Turkey (no. 26973/95, 24 July 2003) and Ayder and Others v. Turkey (no. 23656/94, 8 January 2004), in which the Court had found a violation of Article 3 on account of the destruction of the applicants' homes before their eyes. The applicants argued that their moral suffering had been even more profound than that in the Turkish cases, given that they had witnessed the destruction of their homes during a bombing attack. They also contended that they had repeatedly complained about the attack of 12 September 1999 to various State bodies, which, however, had failed to deal adequately with their complaints. It remained unclear to them whether the authorities had taken any steps in connection with those complaints apart from sending an investigator who had interviewed the villagers and had taken photographs of the destroyed village.
182. The Government argued that the investigation had not established that the applicants had been subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment prohibited by Article 3 of the Convention and that the applicants had at no time submitted any such complaints to the domestic authorities.
A. Admissibility
183. The Court finds that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
184. The Court has observed on many occasions that Article 3 enshrines one of the fundamental values of democratic society. Even in the most difficult of circumstances, such as the fight against terrorism or organised crime, the Convention prohibits in absolute terms torture or inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Unlike most of the substantive clauses of the Convention and of Protocols Nos. 1 and 4, Article 3 makes no provision for exceptions and no derogation from it is permissible under Article 15 even in the event of a public emergency threatening the life of the nation (see, among other authorities, Aksoy, cited above, § 62). Ill-treatment must attain a minimum level of severity if it is to fall within the scope of Article 3. The assessment of this minimum is relative: it depends on all the circumstances of the case, such as the duration of the treatment, its physical and/or mental effects and, in some cases, the sex, age and state of health of the victim (see, among other authorities, Ireland v. the United Kingdom, cited above, § 162).
185. As regards complaints about moral suffering brought under Article 3 of the Convention by relatives of victims of security operations carried out by the authorities, the Court has adopted a restrictive approach, stating that while a family member of a “disappeared person” can claim to be a victim of treatment contrary to Article 3 (see Kurt v. Turkey, 25 May 1998, §§ 130-34, Reports 1998-III), the same principle would not usually apply to situations where the person taken into custody has later been found dead (see, for example, Tanlı v. Turkey, no. 26129/95, § 159, ECHR 2001-III; Yasin Ateş v. Turkey, no. 30949/96, § 135, 31 May 2005; and Bitiyeva and Others v. Russia, no. 36156/04, § 106, 23 April 2009). In such cases the Court has normally limited its findings to Article 2. On the other hand, the Court has found a violation of Article 3 on account of mental suffering endured by applicants as a result of the acts of security forces who had burnt down their homes and possessions before their eyes (see Selçuk and Asker, cited above, §§ 77-80; Yöyler, cited above, §§ 74-76; and Ayder and Others, cited above, §§ 109-11).
186. In the present case, the Court has established above that the applicants came under an indiscriminate bombing attack during which their homes and possessions were destroyed and the relatives of the first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants were killed (see paragraphs 148, 150 and 179 above). The Court has no doubt that the applicants endured profound mental suffering on account of all these events. Its task is to ascertain whether that suffering has a dimension capable of bringing it within the scope of Article 3.
187. In this connection, the Court notes firstly that, as far as the destruction of the applicants' possessions including their housing was concerned, the present case is distinguishable from the Turkish cases referred to by the applicants (see paragraph 185 above). In particular, in the case of Selçuk and Asker the Court had regard to the manner in which the applicants' homes had been destroyed, and namely to the fact that the exercise had been premeditated and carried out contemptuously and without respect for the feelings of the applicants, whose protests had been ignored (see Selçuk and Asker, cited above, § 77), and, with this in mind, found that the acts of the security forces had amounted to “inhuman treatment” within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention. A similar line of reasoning appears to be implicit in the cases of Yöyler and Ayder and Others. It may therefore be reasonably assumed that in the quoted cases the security forces burnt the applicants' homes and possessions with a view to causing them mental suffering, which has enabled the Court to find a violation of Article 3 on that account.
188. In the present case, however, the Court has no evidence to be able to reach the same conclusion. It is true that, as has been found above, the attack of 12 September 1999 was not adequately planned and controlled (see paragraph 149 above) but this attack can hardly be said to have had as its purpose subjecting the applicants to inhuman treatment, and in particular, causing them moral suffering. The Court accepts that the applicants may have suffered considerable distress as a result of the destruction of their homes and property in the attack of 12 September 1999. However, in the light of the foregoing, and also bearing in mind that it has already found a violation of Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on that account, the Court is unable to find a violation of Article 3 of the Convention in the circumstances of the present case, in so far as the applicants' complaint about the destruction of their homes and possessions is concerned.
189. As regards the moral suffering endured by the second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants because of the deaths of their next of kin, the Court observes that, as can be ascertained from the facts, these applicants did not witness the killing of their relatives but found out about the latter's deaths after the attack, when the bodies were found. In the Court's opinion, this situation is somewhat similar to that of applicants whose relatives have been found dead after having been taken into custody by State agents, where the Court has concluded that a finding of a violation of Article 2 of the Convention would suffice. Therefore, while having no doubt as to the profound suffering caused to the second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants by the deaths of their relatives, the Court finds no violation of Article 3 on that account, given that it has already found a violation of Article 2 of the Convention in its substantive and procedural aspects.
190. On the other hand, the Court cannot reach the same conclusion as regards the first applicant, who witnessed the killing of his whole family. The Court has regard to the first applicant's submission to the effect that he is unable to recall the events after the deaths of his family members until several hours later, and to eyewitness statements to the effect that the first applicant appeared to have been in a state of deep shock after his relatives had been killed (see paragraph 14 above). The Court does not find it implausible that, having been an eyewitness to the instantaneous deaths of his two young sons and his wife, the first applicant experienced a shock of such intensity that he suffered from a temporary loss of memory. The Court further considers that the suffering endured by the first applicant was of such severity for the authorities' acts resulting in the deaths of the first applicant's family members to be categorised as inhuman treatment within the meaning of Article 3.
191. In sum, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention on account of the moral suffering endured by the first applicant as a result of the deaths of his wife and two sons and that there has been no violation of the provision in so far as the complaints were submitted by the other applicants.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
192. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
1. The applicants
193. The applicants claimed various amounts indicated in Annex II, totalling 6,315,510.96 euros (EUR). They referred to their statements produced to the Court, where each of them described in detail, and indicated the value of, the property that had been destroyed during the attack of 12 September 1999 and sought compensation for that property, as well as for the loss of income and the costs of renting alternative accommodation and buying food after the attack of 12 September 1999. The first three applicants also claimed reimbursement of expenses they had incurred in connection with the burial of their relatives.
194. Each of the applicants stated, in particular, that, prior to the incident in question, his or her family had grown crops, part of which, in amounts ranging between 35,000 Russian roubles (RUB) and RUB 40,000 for each applicant per year, had been kept for personal consumption, whereas the surplus had been sold and generated a yearly profit of RUB 50,000 to RUB 70,000 for each applicant. The applicants further listed the exact number of each kind of livestock raised by each of them before the events of 12 September 1999, described the crops in the garden, gave the exact number of each kind of tree in the orchard and provided the total value of all this property, which ranged between RUB 256,000 and RUB 390,000. Each of the applicants went on to describe the house, indicating its surface area, and outbuildings owned by his or her family before the attack and provided their value, ranging between RUB 640,000 and RUB 920,000. The applicants also listed their household belongings, indicating their overall value, which ranged between RUB 190,000 and RUB 420,000. The applicants then indicated the amount of income received by them in 1998 from the sale of their crops, varying between RUB 22,000 and RUB 56,000, and from the sale of their livestock, ranging from RUB 256,000 to RUB 390,000.
195. The applicants further mentioned the various amounts of rent which at present they were paying monthly, ranging between RUB 500 and RUB 1,000, and indicated the overall sums, varying between RUB 38,000 and RUB 75,000, which they had paid in rent from 1999 until the time of the submission of their claims to the Court. They also indicated various amounts paid since 1999 for food, clothes and utilities.
196. In support of their claim, the applicants relied on the certificates of 24 December 2007 (see paragraph 30 above) and other documents. In particular, the applicants submitted certificates issued by the head of the administration of the Shelkovskiy District of the Chechen Republic on 27 December 2007 in respect of each of them. Each certificate attested that, prior to 12 September 1999, the relevant applicant had resided in farm no. 2 of the Shelkovskiy State farm (the village of Kogi) and had had in ownership a house, outbuildings, garden, orchard, cattle and poultry. The certificates further gave a description, and indicated the value, of the applicants' lost property, as well as the average yearly income from the sale of the applicants' crops and livestock and the income received in 1998. As can be ascertained, all that information is taken word for word from the applicants' statements submitted to the Court (see paragraphs 194-195 above).
197. A certificate issued on 22 January 2008 by the Property Committee of the administration of the Shelkovskiy District attested that the average price of a house with annexes in the district in 1999 varied between RUB 500,000 and RUB 900,000. Another certificate issued by the same authority on the same date confirmed that the average value of household belongings of a villager in the district in 1999 ranged between RUB 250,000 and RUB 400,000.
198. A certificate issued on 22 January 2008 by the Land Committee of the administration of the Shelkovskiy District stated that the average price of a plot of land measuring 150 to 200 square metres in the district in 1999 amounted to between RUB 40,000 and RUB 70,000.
199. A certificate of the same date issued by the Department for Agriculture of the administration of the Shelkovskiy District indicated that the average yearly value of the crops from the garden of a villager of that district totalled RUB 50,000 to RUB 70,000, and that the average yearly income from the sale of such crops amounted to a sum from RUB 30,000 to RUB 50,000. In a certificate dated 27 January 2008 the Department of Agriculture of the Nogayskiy District of the Republic of Dagestan referred to the same figures with regard to the Nogayskiy District. Another certificate issued by the latter authority on the same date listed approximate prices for various kinds of livestock in the district in 1999.
200. In a certificate of 28 January 2008 the local council of one of the villages in the Nogayskiy District stated that in 1999 plots of land measuring approximately 100 square metres, which at that time had had a market value of RUB 20,000 to RUB 30,000, had been allocated free of charge. A certificate issued on the same date by an inventory authority of the Nogayskiy District confirmed that the average price of a house with annexes in that district in 2008 ranged between RUB 500,000 and RUB 900,000.
201. The first three applicants also referred to certificates of 25 December 2007 issued by the local councils of the villages in which they were now living, confirming that they had incurred expenses in the amount of RUB 160,000, RUB 80,000 and RUB 88,000 respectively for the burial of their family members killed on 12 September 1999.
2. The Government
202. The Government contested the applicants' claim under this head as unsubstantiated and unsupported by any reliable documents. They stated that the certificates relied on by the applicants could not be regarded as evidence attesting the real pecuniary damage.
3. The Court's assessment
203. The Court reiterates that there must be a clear causal connection between the pecuniary damage claimed by the applicants and the violation of the Convention (see, among other authorities, Çakıcı v. Turkey [GC], no. 23657/94, § 127, ECHR 1999-IV). It has found a violation of Article 2 on account of the deaths of the relatives of the first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants and a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the destruction of all applicants' property during the attack of 12 September 1999 by the federal forces. The Court has no doubt that there is a direct link between those violations and the pecuniary losses alleged by the applicants.
204. It further observes that, in order to substantiate their claim as to the quantity and value of their lost property, the applicants relied on a number of certificates issued by the authorities of the Shelkovskiy District of the Chechen Republic and the authorities of the Nogayskiy District of the Republic of Dagestan (see paragraphs 196-201 above). The Court notes that it is only the certificates of 27 December 2007 that listed the applicants' destroyed possessions and indicated their value. The other documents provided reference information regarding the average prices of relevant items of property at the material time.
205. As regards the certificates of 27 December 2007, the Court observes that these documents, although issued more than eight years after the attack, describe the applicants' destroyed possessions in detail, indicating, in particular, the exact surface area of their houses, and the exact number of each kind of livestock, fruit trees, and so on. In the absence of references in these certificates to any reliable source for those descriptions, it is more than likely that they were based solely on the applicants' own submissions as made to the Court. In such circumstances, the Court is not convinced that these certificates can serve as reliable evidence confirming the quantity of the applicants' lost property and its exact value to enable it to make an assessment of the amounts to be awarded.
206. On the other hand, the Court recognises the practical difficulties for the applicants to obtain documents relating to their destroyed property and considers it appropriate to award the applicants equal amounts on an equitable basis, taking into account information on the average prices of the relevant items of property at the material time, as reflected in the documents submitted by the applicants (see paragraphs 197-201 above). In this connection, the Court rejects the Government's argument that the certificates adduced cannot be regarded as reliable evidence confirming the extent of the damage actually incurred by the applicants, as the Government did not dispute the authenticity of the documents, or the amounts indicated therein, and did not suggest any alternative methods of evaluating the damage inflicted.
207. In so far as the applicants sought compensation for their destroyed houses and outbuildings, the Court firstly refers to its above finding, in which it has accepted that the applicants owned the houses in which they were living (see paragraph 173 above). It further takes account of the relevant certificate of 22 January 2008, stating that in 1999 the average price of a house with annexes in the Shelkovskiy District varied between RUB 500,000 (approximately EUR 12,000) and 900,000 (approximately EUR 22,000). The indicated amounts do not appear excessive or unreasonable. With this in mind, and having regard to the relevant part of the applicants' claims, the Court awards EUR 20,000 to each of them in respect of their destroyed houses, which takes into account the time that has elapsed since the events in question.
208. On the other hand, the Court is unable to accept the applicants' claim regarding compensation for plots of land. Even assuming that the applicants had title to the plots of land, there is no evidence that the authorities obstructed them from using those plots. Indeed, it is clear from the facts of the case that some time after the attack some of the applicants returned to the village and resettled there (see paragraph 28 above). Accordingly, the Court makes no award on that account.
209. The applicants also submitted a claim for compensation for their lost household belongings, livestock and crops. Seeing that the Government did not dispute the existence of such property before the attack, the Court finds it reasonable to assume that the applicants possessed the property in question. In the absence of any independent and conclusive evidence as to the quantity and the exact value of that property, on the basis of principles of equity and taking into account the relevant certificates indicating the average value of property of that kind, the Court considers it reasonable to award each of the applicants EUR 18,000 on that account.
210. As regards the applicants' claim for compensation for their lost income, the Court observes that the certificates of 27 December 2007 are the only documents confirming that the applicants received some income from farming. However, the Court has already noted above that these documents appear to have been based entirely on the applicants' own submissions and therefore cannot serve as reliable evidence in support of their claim in its relevant part. The applicants did not adduce any other documents, such as, for example, their tax returns, capable of confirming that their farming was at all profitable, and attesting the amount of any such profit. The Court recognises that it might be difficult in practice for the applicants to obtain documents relating to their farming activities before the attack. Nevertheless, in the absence of any reliable documents confirming that those activities brought the applicants profit, the Court considers that any award regarding their lost income would be speculative. It therefore dismisses this part of the applicants' claim (see Khamidov, cited above, § 197).
211. Similarly, the Court finds the applicants' claim for reimbursement of the costs of alternative accommodation unsubstantiated, as the applicants did not corroborate their claim with any reliable documents, such as lease contracts confirming that they paid any rent at all and indicating its amount and the duration of the lease (see, by contrast, Khamidov, cited above, § 186). In such circumstances, the Court makes no award on that account.
212. Lastly, in so far as the first three applicants sought compensation for funeral expenses, the Court finds it reasonable to assume that some expenses were borne in connection with the burial of these applicants' relatives. In the absence of any reliable information as to the exact amount of those expenses, the Court considers it appropriate to award EUR 3,000 to the first applicant and EUR 1,000 to each of the second and third applicants on that account.
213. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court awards EUR 41,000 to the first applicant, EUR 39,000 to each of the second and third applicants, EUR 38,000 to each of the fourth to ninth, eleventh to sixteenth, eighteenth to twenty-first, and twenty-third to twenty-seventh applicants, EUR 38,000 to OMISSIS, who pursued the present application on the tenth applicant's behalf, EUR 38,000 to OMISSIS, who pursued the present application on the seventeenth applicant's behalf, and EUR 38,000 to OMISSIS, who pursued the present application on the twenty-second applicant's behalf, in respect of pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on these amounts.
B. Non-pecuniary damage
214. The applicants also sought compensation for non-pecuniary damage, stating that in the attack of 12 September 1999 the first to third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants had lost their family members and all of the applicants had lost their homes and property and had been forced to leave their home village. The applicants stated that they had suffered severe emotional pain, fear, anguish and distress on account of those events and in view of the authorities' failure duly to investigate the matter. The applicants claimed the following amounts under this head:
(i) EUR 120,000 for the first applicant,
(ii) EUR 120,000 for the second, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants jointly,
(iii) EUR 120,000 for the third applicant, and
(iv) EUR 25,000 for each of the remaining applicants.
215. The Government made no particular comments in this respect.
216. The Court observes that it has found a violation of Article 2 of the Convention on account of the killing in a federal aerial attack of the relatives of the first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants and the Russian authorities' failure to carry out an effective investigation into those deaths. It has further found a violation of Articles 8 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the destruction in that attack of all applicants' homes and property and the absence of effective domestic remedies. It has also found a violation of Article 3 on account of the mental suffering endured by the first applicant because of the deaths of his wife and two sons before his eyes. The applicants must have suffered anguish and distress as a result of all these circumstances, which cannot be compensated by a mere finding of a violation. Having regard to these considerations, and taking into account the awards received by the first three applicants at the domestic level (see paragraphs 67-71 above), the Court considers it appropriate to award, on an equitable basis, EUR 120,000 to the first applicant, EUR 30,000 to the second applicant, EUR 60,000 to the third applicant, EUR 15,000 to the thirteenth applicant, EUR 10,000 to each of the fourth to ninth, eleventh, twelfth, fourteenth to sixteenth, eighteenth to twenty-first and twenty-third to twenty-seventh applicants, EUR 10,000 to OMISSIS, who pursued the present application on the tenth applicant's behalf, EUR 10,000 to OMISSIS, who pursued the present application on the seventeenth applicant's behalf, and EUR 15,000 to OMISSIS, who pursued the present application on the twenty-second applicant's behalf, plus any tax that may be chargeable on these amounts.
C. Request for restoration of rights
217. The applicants also sought an order for the restoration of their houses and outhouses.
218. The Government did not comment on this point.
219. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (restitutio in integrum). However, if restitutio in integrum is in practice impossible, the respondent States are free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach, and the Court will not make consequential orders or declaratory statements in this regard. It falls to the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, acting under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention, to supervise compliance in this respect (see Selçuk and Asker, cited above, § 125, and Yöyler, cited above, § 124).
D. Costs and expenses
220. The applicant claimed 8,720.47 United Kingdom pounds sterling (GBP – approximately EUR 10,200) for the fees and costs they had incurred before the Court. These amounts included GBP 4,916 for Mr Philip Leach, a lawyer of the European Human Rights Advocacy Centre, GBP 175 for administrative costs and GBP 3,629.47 for translation of documents. They submitted invoices from translators.
221. The Government made no particular comments on this point.
222. The Court reiterates that costs and expenses will not be awarded under Article 41 unless it is established that they were actually and necessarily incurred, and are also reasonable as to quantum (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-XI). The Court, having regard to the documents submitted by the applicants, is satisfied that their claim was substantiated. It further notes that this case has been quite complex, involving a great number of applicants, and required research work. Having regard to the amount of research and preparation carried out by the applicants' representatives, the Court does not find the amount claimed to be excessive.
223. In these circumstances, the Court awards the applicants the overall amount of EUR 10,200, less EUR 850 already received by way of legal aid from the Council of Europe, together with any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants. The amount awarded in respect of costs and expenses shall be payable to the representatives directly.
E. Default interest
224. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Joins to the merits the Government's objections concerning the exhaustion of domestic remedies and the first three applicants' victim status and rejects them;
2. Declares the application admissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention on account of the authorities' failure to carry out an adequate and effective investigation into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of OMISSIS;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention as regards the deaths of OMISSIS;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13, taken in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention in respect of the first, second, third, thirteenth and twenty-second applicants, and a violation of Article 13, taken in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of all applicants;
6. Holds that no separate issue arises under Article 13 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 3 of the Convention;
7. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of all applicants;
8. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 3 of the Convention as far as the second to twenty-seventh applicants are concerned;
9. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention on account of the mental suffering endured by the first applicant because of the deaths of his wife and two sons;
10. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 41,000 (forty-one thousand euros) to the first applicant, EUR 39,000 (thirty-nine thousand euros) to each of the second and third applicants, EUR 38,000 (thirty-eight thousand euros) to each of the fourth to ninth, eleventh to sixteenth, eighteenth to twenty-first and twenty third to twenty-seventh applicants, EUR 38,000 (thirty-eight thousand euros) to OMISSIS, EUR 38,000 (thirty-eight thousand euros) to OMISSIS, and EUR 38,000 (thirty-eight thousand euros) to OMISSIS all these amounts to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 120,000 (one hundred and twenty thousand euros) to the first applicant, EUR 30,000 (thirty thousand euros) to the second applicant, EUR 60,000 (sixty thousand euros) to the third applicant, EUR 15,000 (fifteen thousand euros) to the thirteenth applicant, EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros) to each of the fourth to ninth, eleventh, twelfth, fourteenth to sixteenth, eighteenth to twenty-first and twenty-third to twenty-seventh applicants, EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros) to OMISSIS, EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros) to OMISSIS, and EUR 15,000 (fifteen thousand euros) to OMISSIS, all these amounts to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 9,350 (nine thousand three hundred and fifty euros), to be converted into United Kingdom pounds sterling at the rate applicable at the date of settlement and paid into the applicants' representatives' bank account in the United Kingdom, in respect of costs and expenses;
(iv) any tax, including value-added tax, that may be chargeable to the applicants on the above amounts;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
11. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants' claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 March 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Nina Vajić
Registrar President


ANNEX I
List of applicants
OMISSIS
ANNEX II
Applicants' claim for pecuniary damage
No. Name House and outbuildings Direct losses, RUB Loss of profit, RUB Other expenses, RUB Total, RUB Total, EUR
Land Livestock total Crops Belongings Rent Food Funeral

Garden Orchard




1 OMISSIS 800,000 70,000 304,300 45,000 300,000 380,000 3,909,300 163,400 2,066,700 160,000 8,198,700 226,678.79
2 OMISSIS 730,000 70,000 246,900 37,000 260,000 364,000 7,726,200 530,800 3,223,200 80,000 13,268,100 366,838.27
3 OMISSIS 810,000 70,000 290,400 32,000 390,000 383,000 4,743,000 182,952 2,232,000 88,000 9,221,352 254,953.22
4 OMISSIS 730,000 70,000 197,000 32,000 342,000 270,000 5,871,800 224,400 2,206,600
9,943,800 274,927.56
5 . OMISSIS 810,000 70,000 300,600 41,000 326,000 320,000 6,457,500 225,400 3,062,700
11,613,200 321,083.36
6 . OMISSIS 810,000 70,000 254,500 45,000 348,000 308,000 2,696,900 97,400 1,549,600
6,179,400 170,848.91
7 . OMISSIS 890,000 70,000 393,100 46,000 312,000 348,000 3,434,400 254,400 4,536,800
10,284,700 284,352.81
8 . OMISSIS 850,000 70,000 334,600 35,000 310,000 335,000 6,251,000 191,400 3,520,300
11,897,300 328,938.20
9 . OMISSIS 680,000 70,000 334,850 35,000 362,000 310,000 4,610,200 156,400 1,838,900
8,577,350 237,137.76
10 OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 381,100 38,000 355,000 330,000 5,317,600 179,400 1,618,400
9,129,500 252,413.68
11 OMISSIS 640,000 70,000 235,150 39,000 360,000 320,000 3,685,200 181,680 1,992,000
7,523,030 207,997.78
12 OMISSIS 640,000
186,500 39,000 360,000 320,000 947,200 132,000 531,200
3,155,900 87,254.76
13 OMISSIS 720,000 70,000 265,900 31,000 360,000 330,000 4,408,800 211,728 2,745,600
9,143,028 252,787.71
14 . OMISSIS 680,000 70,000 212,900 34,000 330,000 420,000 2,988,000 110,000 830,000
4,927,900 136,247.26
15 OMISSIS 770,000 70,000 364,150 37,000 300,000 360,000 4,546,100 159,400 2,232,700
8,839,350 244,391.58
16 OMISSIS 910,000 70,000 244,600 42,000 280,000 340,000 4,941,900 172,400 2,745,500
10,656,400 294,629.63
17 OMISSIS 880,000 70,000 577,800 44,000 310,000 350,000 1,787,100 195,000 655,500
4,869,400 134,629.85
18 . OMISSIS 760,000 70,000 385,850 28,000 290,000 320,000 2,085,000 80,320 1,320,500
5,339,670 147,631.94
19 . OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 320,500 35,000 315,000 330,000 2,118,200 80,400 987,700
5,096,800 140,917.03
20 OMISSIS 910,000 70,000 244,600 42,000 280,000 340,000 4,941,900 172,400 2,745,500
10,656,400 294,629.63
21 OMISSIS 760,000 70,000 179,400 32,000 295,0000 190,000 486,200 98,000 159,800
2,270,400 62,772.33
22 OMISSIS 730,000 70,000 246,900 37,000 260,000 364,000 7,726,200 530,800 3,223,200 80,000 13,268,100 366,838.27
23 OMISSIS 920,000 70,000 353,200 39,000 256,000 330,000 6,031,200 213,400 2,979,700
11,192,500 309,451.79
24 . OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 361,000 45,000 324,000 342,000 3,486,600 163,880 2,223,00
7,855,480 217,189.40
25 OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 296,100 39,000 328,000 310,000 8,398,400 281,400 3,851,200
14,414,100 398,523.04
26 . OMISSIS 830,000 70,000 228,100 36,000 316,000 280,000 452,100 170,400 1,616,600
3,999,200 110,570.44
27 OMISSIS 745,000 70,000 240,300 40,000 330,000 280,000 6,699.200 178,400 2,883,200
13,171,400 364,164.69


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Eccezione preliminare congiunta ai meriti e respinta (non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione dell’ Art. 2 (aspetto procedurale); Violazione dell’ Art. 2 (aspetto effettivo); Violazione dell’ Art. 13+2; violazione dell’ Art. 13+8; violazione dell’ Art. 13+P1-1; Violazione dell’ Art. 8 e P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 3 (aspetto effettivo); Violazione dell’ Art. 3 (aspetto effettivo); danno Patrimoniale e danno non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA ESMUKHAMBETOV ED ALTRI C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 23445/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
29 marzo 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nrll’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Esmukhambetov ed Altri c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nina Vajić, Presidente Anatoly Kovler, Christos Rozakis il Pari Lorenzen, Khanlar Hajiyev, Giorgio Nicolaou, Julia Laffranque, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato l’8 marzo 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 23445/03) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da ventisette cittadini russi elencati nell’Annesso I (“i richiedenti”) il 21 luglio 2003. 7 febbraio 2004 il decimo richiedente morì, e suo figlio, OMISSIS espresse il desiderio di intraprendere la richiesta per conto suo. Il 18 agosto 2004 il ventiduesimo richiedente morì, e sua figlia, OMISSIS espresse il desiderio di intraprendere la richiesta per conto suo. Al 1 marzo 2005 il secondo richiedente il cui cognome al tempo dell’ introduzione della richiesta era OMISSIS, l'ha cambiato in OMISSIS. L’ 11 luglio 2009 il diciassettesimo richiedente morì, e sua moglie, OMISSIS espresse il desiderio di intraprendere la richiesta per conto suo. La Corte accettò che OMISSIS, OMISSIS aveva qualità per continuare i procedimenti presenti a favore del decimo, rispettivamente ventiduesimo e diciassettesimo richiedente.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stato accordato il patrocinio gratuito furono rappresentati da avvocati del Centro Commemorativo dei Diritti umani (Mosca) e del Centro dell'Avvocatura dei Diritti umani europeo (Londra). Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato da OMISSIS, il Rappresentante dell’ex Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani.
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono, in particolare, che un sciopero aereo sul villaggio dove vivevano ha dato luogo alle morti dei membri della famiglia del primo, del secondo, del terzo, del tredicesimo e del ventiduesimo richiedente e nella distruzione di tutti gli alloggi e le proprietà dei richiedenti e. Loro si lamentarono anche della sofferenza morale che avevano sopportato in collegamento con quegli eventi, la mancanza di un'indagine nella questione e la mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo delle violazioni addotte. I richiedenti si appellarono gli Articoli 2, 3 8 e 13 della Convenzione e all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. Il 29 agosto 2004 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di accordare priorità alla richiesta sotto l’Articolo 41 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
5. Il 21 maggio 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 1).
6. Il Governo obiettò all'esame unito dell'ammissibilità e dei meriti della richiesta. Avendo considerato l'eccezione del Governo, la Corte la respinse.
7. L’ 8 marzo 2011 la Corte decise che un'udienza nella causa non era necessaria (Articolo 59 § 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
8. I richiedenti sono residenti di vari villaggi nella Repubblica di Dagestan.
A. I fatti
1. Background della causa
9. Al tempo attinente i richiedenti erano residenti nel villaggio di Kogi nel Distretto di Shelkovskiy della Repubblica della Cecenia. Il villaggio di Kogi, anche noto come fattoria n. 2 della fattoria Statale “Shelkovskiy” o Runnoye, è situato nella steppa vicino al confine amministrativo della Repubblica di Dagestan. Il villaggio dista nove chilometri dal villaggio di Kumli a Dagestan. Prima degli eventi descritti sotto Kogi era abitato da persone appartenenti al gruppo etnico Nogay e consisteva di trenta alloggi comprendenti da ventisei a trenta famiglie. I suoi residenti vivevano di agricoltura, allevando soprattutto pecore e vacche.
10. Secondo i richiedenti, Kogi era un villaggio tranquillo; nessun combattenti ribelli vissero mai là. Nel 1999 fu pattugliato regolarmente da membri delle Forze Armate federali da un posto di controllo situato vicino a Kumli. Nella notte tra l’ 11 e il 12 settembre 1999 un blindato da trasporto arrivò dal di posto di controllo della periferia Kogi e sparò un “razzo luminoso” (осветительная бомба) in aria. Secondo il terzo richiedente, era un bagliore pendente da un paracadute per approssimativamente cinque minuti che illuminò molto brillantemente il villaggio. Il giorno successivo il diciassettesimo richiedente trovò un telaio di duralluminio che era lungo 1 metro e 10 centimetri di diametro vicino al trasformatore di elettricità. Era nero dentro. Un paracadute bianco era appeso sui fili sopra del trasformatore.
2. Attacco del 12 settembre 1999
(a) La versione dei richiedenti
11. Alla fine del pomeriggio del 12 settembre 1999 la maggior parte degli abitanti di un villaggio adulti stavano lavorando nel campo e la maggior parte dei figli erano a scuola. Il tempo era soleggiato e sereno.
12. Approssimativamente alle 5.15 di sera due aerei militari che volavano ad un'altitudine bassa comparvero dalla direzione di Kumli. Gli aerei volarono via ma alcuni minuti più tardi riapparvero. Avevano il muso stretto, ali ampie ed assomigliavano ad aerei militari russi SU-25.
13. Gli aerei girarono su Kogi per approssimativamente cinque minuti e poi uno di loro piombò in giù ed aprì il fuoco con le mitragliatrici e bombardò l’estremità occidentale del villaggio. La prima bomba esplose nel cortile dell'alloggio del primo richiedente. I suoi due figli- OMISSIS, di otto anni, ed OMISSIS, di due- stava giocando a là in quel momento. I figli furono uccisi immediatamente.
14. Il primo richiedente, sua moglie-OMISSIS, nata nel 1969-ed il tredicesimo richiedente erano tutti nell'alloggio quando il bombardamento cominciò. Il primo richiedente e sua moglie si precipitarono verso i ragazzi, mentre il tredicesimo richiedente che fu ferito alla gamba con granata corse al suo alloggio. Nel cortile il primo richiedente vide i suoi figli che giacevano vicino ad un cratere di bomba di approssimativamente un metro di diametro. Lui afferrò i ragazzi, li avvicinò al suo torace e comprese che erano morti. In quel momento la seconda bomba ha colpito l'alloggio del primo richiedente. Il primo richiedente gridò a sua moglie di non avvicinarsi a lui e ai figli che giacevano in giù. Invece, OMISSIS corse gridando verso loro. Il primo richiedente notò che lei era ferita nell'anca. La terza bomba immediatamente esplose vicina l'OMISSIS dopo il secondo. La moglie del primo richiedente fu ferita fatalmente con una granata all'addome e morì nelle sue braccio. Nell'osservazione del primo richiedente, lui non è in grado di ricordare l'ulteriore sequenza di eventi da quek punto sino a molte ore più tardi. Secondo le dichiarazioni di testimoni oculari, il primo richiedente era in uno stato di shock profondo, gridando che tutti i suoi membri della famiglia erano stati uccisi e inveendo contro gli aerei.
15. Il secondo aereo sparò da mitragliatrici a grande calibro e bombardò l’estremità settentrionale del villaggio. C'era una grande quantità di fumo e polvere nell'aria. Case, capannoni, altre costruzioni, bestiame bovino, pollame e mucchi di fieno furono distrutti e bruciati completamente. Gli abitanti di un villaggio, alcuni a piedi nudi e qualcuno seminudo, corsero nel panico nella direzione di Kumli.
16. Gli aerei spararono indiscriminatamente colpi e bombe ad una distanza l'uno dall'altro. Loro eseguirono quattro sorvoli e poi se ne andarono.
17. Immediatamente dopo questo attacco il diciottesimo e diciannovesimo richiedente avviarono i loro trattori. Il primo se ne andò a Kumli, insieme con un numero di suoi vicini di casa, raccogliendo altri abitanti di un villaggio lungo la strada. Il secondo, insieme al ventitreesimo richiedente arrivarono all'alloggio del primo richiedente per raccogliere i cadaveri dei membri di famiglia di OMISSIS. Ad una distanza di approssimativamente 150 metri loro trovarono anche il corpo di OMISSIS, nato nel 1948-la madre del secondo richiedente, la sorella del tredicesimo richiedente e la figlia del venti-secondo richiedente. La donna era stata uccisa con una granata. Secondo numerose dichiarazioni di testimoni oculari, i cadaveri del defunto erano mutilati sanguinanti severamente e pesantemente, e pezzi numerose schegge di granata uscirono dalle ferite quando i corpi furono mossi. I corpi sono stati raccolti, il trattore guidò verso Kumli, raccogliendo superstiti lungo la strada.
18. Nel frattempo, il terzo richiedente stava cercando sua madre, OMISSIS nata nel 1936, ed suo figlio di diciassette mesi. Loro erano andati a fare una passeggiata precedentemente in quel giorno. Alcuni degli abitanti di un villaggio gli dissero che, loro avevano l’avevano vista correre col bambino nelle sue braccio nella direzione di Kumli durante l'attacco. Il terzo richiedente andò a Kumli e gli fu detto che i suoi membri della famiglia non erano stati visti là. Lui ritornò poi a Kogi col trattore del diciannovesimo richiedente con molti altri abitanti di un villaggio. Dopo la ricerca, il corpo di OMISSIS fu trovato nel campo vicino il villaggio. C'era una ferita di granata dietro ilsuo capo. Il figlio del terzo richiedente stava piangendo vicino, incolume.
19. I corpi di tutto i defunti furono consegnati più tardi al villaggio di Kumli il 12 settembre 1999, e furono lavati e seppelliti il giorno successivo. Secondo i richiedenti, approssimativamente settanta bombe furono lasciate cadere sul loro villaggio durante l'attacco del 12 settembre 1999, dando luogo alle morti di due bambini e tre donne e la distruzione di, o danni gravi a, approssimativamente trenta alloggi.
20. Il 13 settembre 1999 l'amministrazione di Kogi emise certificati a riguardo di ognuno delle vittime, affermando che loro erano stati uccisi prima durante il giorno del bombardamento a Kogi. Nel 1999 i certificati medici di morte del 24 dicembre furono emessi a riguardo delle vittime. I documenti affermavano che la moglie del primo richiedente, OMISSIS nata nel 1969, e suo figlio, OMISSIS nato nel 1997, erano morti per ferite multiple di granata e che suo figlio OMISSIS, nato nel 1991, era morto per trauma cranico. Loro affermavano anche che la madre del secondo richiedente, OMISSIS nato nel 1948, era morto come risultato di ferite multiple da granata e che la madre del terzo richiedente, OMISSIS nata nel 1936, era morta per una ferita di granata dietro al suo capo. Il posto e la data delle morti di tutte le vittime furono registrate come il villaggio di Kogi, il 12 settembre 1999. Il 24 27 dicembre 1999 ed il 14 febbraio 2003 l'ufficio di cancelleria del Distretto di Shelkovskiy della Repubblica di Cecenia certificò la morte rispettivamente della madre del terzo richiedente, della madre del secondo richiedente e dei parenti del primo richiedente.
(b) La versione del Governo
21. Secondo il Governo all’inizio di settembre 1999 un corpo militare in comando delle attività di anti-terrorismo all'interno del territorio della Repubblica di Cecenia ricevette delle informazioni all'effetto che una concentrazione di membri di gruppi armati illegali ed una base di addestramento di terroristi era stata scoperta nella fattoria, n. 2 della fattoria statale Shelkovskiy vicino al villaggio di Runnoye, e che un numero di attacchi terroristi di grande potenza nella Repubblica di Cecenia e nel territorio della Repubblica di Dagestan adiacente al Distretto di Shelkovskiy della Repubblica di Cecenia, incluso presa di ostaggi in Kizlyar erano in corso di preparazione. Nell'osservazione del Governo per ostacolare gli attacchi terroristi e sopprimere le attività criminali di gruppi armati illegali gli ufficiali militari in comando delle attività di anti-terrorismo presero una decisione di avviare per via aerea un attacco missilistico di precisione sull'ubicazione di gruppi armati illegali vicino al villaggio in oggetto nella prospettiva dell'impossibilità di usare truppe con base nell'area del villaggio di Runnoye.
22. Il 12 settembre 1999 approssimativamente alle 5 di sera due aerei militari SU-25 compirono un attacco con missili leggeri che usavano un sistema di guida di precisione sulle basi di gruppi armati illegali localizzate nella fattoria statale n. 2 dello Shelkovskiy. Come risultato dell’ “uso preventivo di forze aeree” nel villaggio di Runnoye, alloggi e capanne apaprtenenti alla fattoria di Stato di Shelkovskiy furono distrutti. Anche, i corpi di OMISSIS furono trovati sul luogo.
3. Ritorno a Kogi
23. 14 settembre 1999 il diciassettesimo richiedente sistemò per gli abitanti di un villaggio per ritornare a Kogi a raccogliere il loro effetti personali. Una colonna di otto trattori fu accompagnata con un veicolo di battaglia di fanteria (пехоты di машины di боевая) dal posto di controllo federale Kumli vicino.
24. C'erano membri delle Forze Armate federali e numerosi in Kogi armò con fucili automatici. Loro stavano raccogliendo granata e bombe inesplose. I soldati avvertirono gli abitanti di un villaggio che loro dovrebbero affrettare, poiché è probabile che ci sia un sciopero militare per distruggere il villaggio per impedire a combattenti di ribelle di usarlo. Gli abitanti di un villaggio furono costretti per lasciare il villaggio di fronte a 3 di sera quel giorno.
25. 15 settembre 1999 alcuni degli abitanti di un villaggio, incluso il secondo e diciassettesimo richiedenti andarono di nuovo a Kogi a prendere effetti personali che loro non erano riusciti a raccogliere prima il giorno. Loro videro i membri delle Forze Armate che distruggono uno degli alloggi a per organizzare un posto di controllo là. I soldati erano sotto il comando di un ufficiale in uniforme di camuffamento verde senza spalline che avevano una copertura di campo con una vetta. Il diciassettesimo richiedente disse all'ufficiale che se fosse necessario per i membri delle Forze Armate per distruggere qualsiasi costruendo, loro potrebbero distruggere un negozio di villaggio. I soldati procederono poi demolire il negozio.
26. Molto giorni più tardi più abitanti di un villaggio, incluso molto dei richiedenti, andò a Kogi su due occasioni. Loro videro i membri delle Forze Armate, alcuno di loro dal posto di controllo Kumli vicino, demolendo alloggi e gli altri edifici nel villaggio e caricando materiali di edificio nei loro veicoli. I membri delle Forze Armate stavano raccogliendo anche granata e bombe inesplose.
27. Avendo raccolto il loro effetti personali, la maggior parte dei richiedenti lasciarono Kogi e mai non ritornarono. Loro passarono l'inverno di 1999 a 2000 in un rifugiato si accampi nella Repubblica di Dagestan.
28. Nella primavera di 2000 il venti-quarto richiedente ed i suoi membri di famiglia ritornarono al villaggio e ricostruito il suo alloggio. Il venti-quarto richiedente raccolto frammenta di bombe. A giugno 2000 agenti di polizia portarono anche via un'altra bomba inesplosa secondo lei.
29. I richiedenti presentarono dichiarazioni di testimone numerose che confermano il loro conto di eventi e fotografie che dipingono il villaggio devastato e frammenti di bombe, così come un numero di articoli di giornale che riportano sull'incidente di 12 settembre 1999.
30. 24 dicembre 2007 il capo dell'amministrazione del Distretto di Shelkovskiy emise ognuno dei richiedenti con un certificato che conferma che suo o la sua famiglia aveva posseduto un alloggio ed aveva annesso, intitoli a che era stato trasferito a loro con la fattoria di Stato di Shelkovskiy all'inizio degli anni novanta, e che quegli alloggi ed annette, così come i effetti personali dei richiedenti in loro, era stato distrutto ed era stato bruciato durante un attacco aereo su Kogi (Runnoye) a settembre 1999.
4. Indagine ufficiale
(un) le azioni di reclamo di I richiedenti ad organi pubblici ed informazioni ricevute con loro
31. Secondo i richiedenti, seguendo l'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 loro fecero domanda ripetutamente ai vari corpi Statali, incluso accusatori a livelli diversi, il distretto e reparti regionali degli interni, molti ministeri federali, i Duma Statali ed altri. Nelle loro lettere alle autorità i richiedenti descrissero in dettaglio gli eventi di 12 settembre 1999 e chiesero assistenza e dettagli dell'indagine. Questi domande rimasero estesamente senza risposta, o risposte solamente formali furono date, mentre affermando che le richieste dei richiedenti erano state spedite agli uffici di vari accusatori.
32. Brevemente dopo il bombardamento di Kogi il secondo richiedente rivolse una lettera all'ufficio di un accusatore militare in Makhachkala, nella Repubblica di Dagestan chiedendo la punizione di quelli responsabile ed il risarcimento. Un mese più tardi un investigatore dall'ufficio dell'accusatore militare, il Sig. A., visitò il secondo richiedente e l'interrogò degli eventi di 12 settembre 1999. Sulla stessa data il secondo richiedente, suo cugino, sorella ed il Sig. A. andarono a Kogi, dove loro passarono un'ora. L'investigatore ispezionò e fotografò le rovine ed i posti dove le vittime erano state uccise durante l'attacco. Il secondo richiedente diede Sig. pezzi di A. di granata, incluso alcuni che avevano numeri su loro. Lei lo richiese per stendere un ufficiale noti sulla questione, ma l'investigatore rispose che era non necessario. Poi il secondo richiedente firmò una trascrizione del suo colloquio (протокол допроса) e Sig. sinistra di A..
33. Durante l'inverno di 1999 a 2000 investigatore A. su quattro occasioni un villaggio visitò in Dagestan nel quale gli abitanti precedenti di Kogi stavano vivendo e li interrogarono.
34. Alcuni calcolano più tardi il secondo e tredicesimo richiedenti fondarono fuori che la causa era stata presa dal Sig. A. ed era stata trasferita ad un altro investigatore. A del punto il tredicesimo richiedente fu informato che l'archivio di causa era stato spedito alla base militare e federale in Khankala nella Repubblica di Cecenia per indagine.
35. In una lettera di 2 febbraio 2001 il Ministero russo dell'Interno spedì l'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente al Settore di Cecenia dell'Interno. I secondi spedirono l'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente su all'ufficio dell'accusatore della Repubblica di Cecenia (“l'ufficio dell'accusatore repubblicano”) 13 febbraio 2001.
36. 8 febbraio 2001 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale trasmise l'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente all'ufficio dell'accusatore repubblicano per esame.
37. 19 febbraio 2001 l'ufficio dell'accusatore repubblicano spedì l'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente che riguarda “la morte di sua madre in un attacco di bombardamento di 12 settembre 1999” all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20102 e notificò il secondo richiedente di che passo in una lettera di 28 febbraio 2001.
38. 22 marzo 2001 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20102 trasmisero l'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente che riguarda “la morte di sua madre” all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 per indagine. I secondi spedirono l'azione di reclamo su all'accusatore militare della Guarnigione di Makhachkala (военный прокурор махачкалинского гарнизона-“l'accusatore di guarnigione”) 11 aprile 2001.
39. In una lettera di 3 maggio 2001, con una copia per il secondo richiedente l'accusatore di guarnigione informò l'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 che a dicembre 1999 l'investigatore A. aveva eseguito un'indagine (l'ïðîâåðêà) nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 ed aveva spedito i materiali da che indagine agli uffici degli accusatori militari attinenti, incluso che di unità militare n. 20102, e che l'ufficio dell'accusatore di guarnigione non aveva ricevuto mai indietro quelli materiali.
40. 11 settembre 2001 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Militare Principale (прокуратура di военная di Главная) spedì la richiesta dei richiedenti riguardo al risarcimento per danno inflitto sulla loro proprietà al Ministero russo di Difesa.
41. In lettere di 21 settembre 2001 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Militare Principale trasmise le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti riguardo alla morte dei loro parenti e la distruzione della loro proprietà come un risultato di un attacco aereo all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare del nord Caucasus Circuito Militare (военная прокуратура округа di военного di Северо-Кавказского). I secondi trasmisero le azioni di reclamo all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 per esame 19 ottobre 2001.
42. 27 settembre 2001 il Ministero russo di Federazione Affari e Cittadino e Migrazione Politiche (Министерство по делам федерации, национальной политики di миграционной di и РФ) informato il tredicesimo richiedente che la sua richiesta per il risarcimento per proprietà distrutta era stata esaminata e che il Ministero stava lavorando sull'adozione di disposizioni legali che mirano a sostenere i residenti della Repubblica di Cecenia che era incorsa in perdite nel 1999 e 2000.
43. 10 ottobre 2001 il Ministero russo di Difesa affermò in una lettera al tredicesimo richiedente che non era competente per pagare il risarcimento per danno inflisse su proprietà durante l'operazione in Cecenia.
44. 26 ottobre 2001 il Ministero russo dell'Interno notificò il tredicesimo richiedente che la sua lettera era stata spedita al Settore dell'Interno nel Circuito Federale e Meridionale.
45. In una lettera di 13 novembre 2001 il Ministero russo di Difesa affermò in replica alla richiesta del tredicesimo richiedente che non aveva finanziamenti assegnò per il risarcimento per danno causato con azioni militari nella Repubblica di Cecenia, e che il tredicesimo richiedente dovrebbe fare domanda al Governo di Cecenia.
46. 7 dicembre 2001 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 spedirono l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti all'ufficio dell'accusatore del Distretto di Shelkovskiy (“l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto”), affermando che l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare era solamente competente per investigare reati commessi con membri delle Forze Armate o quelli commisero all'interno del territorio della loro unità militare, mentre nella causa presente nessuno specifico membro delle Forze Armate era stato identificato ed i numero di identificazione ed il tipo di aereo non furono conosciuti. La lettera affermò inoltre che le circostanze delle morti dei residenti di Kogi e la distruzione della loro proprietà richiesero esame e che era stato spiegato ai richiedenti che loro potessero chiedere il risarcimento in corte.
47. 8 dicembre 2001 l'ufficio dell'accusatore repubblicano trasmise l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti riguardo all'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 all'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto per indagine.
48. In una lettera di 15 gennaio 2002 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto informò l'ufficio dell'accusatore repubblicano e l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 che c'era nessun villaggio chiamato Kogi nel Distretto di Shelkovskiy e che l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto stava investigando attualmente le circostanze di un attacco aereo sul villaggio di Runnoye.
49. Nella primavera di 2002 lei fu chiamata in causa allo Shelkovskiy Distretto Ufficio dell'Interno secondo il secondo richiedente. Un investigatore, S. l'informò che un'indagine penale sarebbe stata aperta negli eventi di 12 settembre 1999 in conformità con le istruzioni degli accusatori militari e superiori. L'investigatore intervistò il secondo richiedente e poi l'assicurò che lui avrebbe contattato l'investigatore precedente A. ed otterrebbe i frammenti di bombardamenti che lei aveva dato a lui. Nell'osservazione del secondo richiedente, non era ancora un anno più tardi progresso nell'indagine.
50. 18 e 25 marzo 2003 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Militare Principale spedì le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti all'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito (военный прокурор войск di группировки di Объединенной).
51. 28 marzo 2003 il Ministero russo per Situazioni Emergenza informò i richiedenti in replica alla loro richiesta per risarcimento che loro dovrebbero fare domanda al Governo di Cecenia.
52. 4 aprile 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di guarnigione trasmise l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti riguardo all'attacco sul loro villaggio 12 settembre 1999 all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 per indagine.
53. 10 aprile 2003 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Militare Principale spedì l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti all'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito.
54. In una lettera di 25 aprile 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare del nord Caucasus Circuito Militare informò i richiedenti che la loro azione di reclamo dell'uccisione di cinque residenti di Kogi e la distruzione di proprietà era stata trasmessa all'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito e li era stati invitati a rivolgere le loro ulteriori consultazioni a quel l'accusatore.
55. 30 aprile 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto notificò i richiedenti che un'indagine penale nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 sul villaggio di Runnoye era stata cominciata 21 gennaio 2002, e che l'archivio di causa era stato assegnato n. 69003. La lettera affermò inoltre che l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto aveva richiesto l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 per presentare i materiali dall'indagine che prima era stata condotta, ma finora loro non erano stati ricevuti con l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto. Secondo la lettera, l'indagine era in corso e misure mirarono ad identificando gli aerei che avevano attaccato Kogi 12 settembre 1999 era stato prendendo.
56. In 11 maggio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito informò i richiedenti che 21 gennaio 2002 una causa penale sotto Articolo 167 § 2 (aggravò distruzione intenzionale di proprietà) del Codice Penale russo era stato aperto, e che in 8 maggio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito aveva richiesto l'ufficio dell'accusatore repubblicano per trasmettere l'archivio di causa a loro per esame. La lettera assicurò i richiedenti che loro sarebbero tenuti aggiornati.
57. In 19 maggio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 spedirono l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti all'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto.
58. In una lettera di 27 maggio 2003 il Governo di Cecenia invitò i richiedenti a rivolgere la loro richiesta per il risarcimento per la loro proprietà distrutta all'amministrazione del Distretto di Shelkovskiy.
59. 2 giugno 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito notificò i richiedenti che le loro azioni di reclamo erano state studiate ed erano state trasmesse all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111 per “esame sui meriti.”
60. 30 giugno 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto spedì l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti all'ufficio dell'accusatore militare di unità militare n. 20111.
61. In una lettera di 6 ottobre 2004 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito affermò in replica alla consultazione dei richiedenti che la decisione di 19 gennaio 2004 di cessare procedimenti penali in causa n. 34/00/0030-04 aperti in collegamento con l'attacco aereo sul villaggio di Runnoye 12 settembre 1999 erano stati accantonati e che 5 ottobre 2004 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Di gruppo ed Unito aveva preso sulla causa. La lettera assicurò i richiedenti che tutte le loro dichiarazioni sarebbero verificate e che loro sarebbero informati dei risultati eventuali.
(b) Informazioni presentate dal Governo
62. 21 gennaio 2002 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto avviò procedimenti penali sotto Articolo 167 § 2 del Codice Penale russo secondo il Governo, (aggravò la distruzione intenzionale di o danneggia a proprietà) sull'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente di 29 agosto 2001 spedita all'Ufficio del Presidente russo e ricevette con l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto 21 gennaio 2002. L'archivio di causa fu assegnato n. 69003 e poi trasferì all'ufficio di un accusatore militare, dove fu assegnato n. 34/00/0030-04. Nell'assenza a che tempo di informazioni riguardo alle morti dei cinque residenti di Kogi (Runnoye), nessuno procedimenti erano stati tratti quel il collegamento.
63. Il Governo presentò inoltre che l'indagine aveva stabilito successivamente che cinque residenti di Kogi (Runnoye) era stato ucciso come un risultato di un sciopero coi vigori di aria federali 12 settembre 1999. Secondo loro, era stato impossibile per eseguire un esame forense e medico dei cadaveri come i parenti aveva rifiutato di concedere l'esumazione su conto di tradizioni nazionali che avevano ostruito l'indagine ed avevano avuto un impatto negativo sulla sua efficacia.
64. Un numero di documenti sembra essere stato disegnato su, incluso trascrizioni di colloqui di testimone, rapporti competenti e rapporti su esami. Il Governo non elaborò qualsiasi inoltre sui documenti procedurali loro menzionarono.
65. 23 settembre 2005 i procedimenti penali furono cessati dovendo all'assenza di elementi costituenti di un punibile delittuoso sotto Articolo 109 del Codice Penale russo secondo il Governo, (infliggendo morte con negligenza) nelle azioni dei membri delle Forze Armate. La decisione attinente affermò che i piloti degli aerei di SU-25 avevano bombardato il villaggio facendo seguito al loro superiors' ordine vincolante, e che perciò le loro azioni non avevano costituito un crimine. Le azioni di ufficiali militari che avevano ordinato che i piloti compiessero l’attacco missile erano state giustificate con la necessità assoluta per ostacolare attacchi di terrorista di grande potenza che erano stati progettati con membri di formazioni armate ed illegali che stavano mostrando resistenza armata ed attiva ai vigori federali ed eliminare il pericolo all'interesse pubblico, gli interessi dello Stato e le vite di membri delle Forze Armate e residenti locali. Che pericolo non poteva essere eliminato con qualsiasi altro vuole dire e le azioni degli ufficiali militari in comando di che operazione era stata appropriata in prospettiva della resistenza mostrata coi combattenti illegali. Nell'osservazione del Governo, le autorità inquirenti conclusero così, che le azioni dei rappresentanti dei vigori federali erano state nessuno più che assolutamente necessario, e perciò non aveva costituito un crimine.
66. Secondo il Governo, il “parti interessate”, incluso il primo, secondo, terzo, quarto undicesimo, tredicesimo decimoquarto, sedicesimo diciottesimo, diciannovesimo e venti-sesto richiedenti furono informati della decisione di 23 settembre 2005 ed i loro diritti di impugnarlo di fronte ad un accusatore più alto o in corte fu spiegato a loro. Il Governo affermò anche che copie della decisione attinente erano state spedite a quelle vittime dichiarate nella causa.
5. Procedimenti per il risarcimento
67. A del punto i primi tre richiedenti registrarono una rivendicazione di corte contro il Ministero russo di Finanza e la Tesoreria Federale, mentre chiedendo il risarcimento in collegamento con le morti dei loro parenti.
68. Con una sentenza contumaciale di 18 marzo 2004 la Corte distrettuale di Nogayskiy della Repubblica di Dagestan (“la Corte distrettuale”) concesso le rivendicazioni dei primi tre richiedenti in pieno ed assegnò 60,000 rubli russi il primo richiedente (RUB; approssimativamente 1,500 EUR) ed il secondo e terzi richiedenti RUBno 20,000 (verso EUR 500) ognuno. La sentenza non fu piaciuta contro e succedè più tardi del tempo definitivo.
69. 9 settembre 2004 il Presidium della Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Dagestan annullò la sentenza summenzionata in procedimenti di revisione direttivi e rinviò la causa alla Corte distrettuale per un esame nuovo.
70. In una sentenza contumaciale di 18 marzo 2005 la Corte distrettuale ammise di nuovo i ricorsi dei richiedenti ed assegnò loro gli stessi importi come quegli assegnati nella sentenza di 18 marzo 2004. La corte notò che con virtù di Decreto Presidenziale n. 898 5 settembre 1995, parenti di quelli che erano morti come un risultato delle ostilità nella Repubblica di Cecenia furono concessi ad un prezzo globale di RUB 20,000 in risarcimento, e che il pagamento di che il risarcimento non dipese dalla costituzione di un collegamento causale fra il danno causato e le azioni dello Stato.
71. 13 luglio 2005 la Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Dagestan sostenne la sentenza di 18 marzo 2005 su ricorso. Gli importi assegnati furono pagati ai primi tre richiedenti in pieno.
72. Non sembra che qualsiasi dei richiedenti fatti domanda alle corti nazionali con una prospettiva ad ottenendo il risarcimento per loro distrusse o proprietà danneggiata.
B. Le richieste della Corte per l'archivio dell’ indagine
73. In maggio 2007, quando la richiesta fu comunicata a loro, il Governo fu invitato per produrre una copia dell'archivio di indagine nella causa penale aprì in collegamento con l'attacco aereo di 12 settembre 1999 sul villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye). In replica, il Governo rifiutò di produrre qualsiasi documenti dall'archivio, affermare che sé, sarebbe improprio per fare così, determinato che sotto Articolo 161 del Codice russo di Diritto processuale penale, rivelazione dei documenti era contraria agli interessi dell'indagine e potrebbe comportare una violazione dei diritti dei partecipanti nei procedimenti penali. Inoltre, nell'osservazione del Governo l'archivio sull'indagine penale nella causa presente fu classificato come sé contenne informazioni che non potevano essere rivelate al pubblico.
74. Il Governo presentò anche che loro avevano preso in considerazione la possibilità di richiedere la riservatezza sotto Articolo 33 degli Articoli di Corte, ma celebre che la Corte non offrì garanzie che una volta in ricevuta dell'archivio di indagine i richiedenti o i loro rappresentanti, alcuno di chi non erano cittadini russi e risieddero fuori il territorio della Russia, non rivelerebbe il materiale in oggetto al pubblico. Secondo il Governo, nell'assenza di qualsiasi le possibili sanzioni per i richiedenti nell'evento della loro rivelazione di informazioni riservate e materiali, non c'erano garanzie come alla loro ottemperanza con la Convenzione e gli Articoli di Corte. Allo stesso tempo, il Governo suggerì, che una delegazione di Corte potrebbe essere data accesso all'archivio in Russia, con l'eccezione di quelli documenti che contengono secrets militare e Statale e senza il diritto per fare copie dell'archivio di causa.
75. Ad ottobre 2007 la Corte reiterò la sua richiesta. In replica, il Governo rifiutò di nuovo di produrre qualsiasi documenti dall'archivio per le ragioni summenzionate.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE E PRATICA ATTINENTI
A. Legge umanitaria Internazionale
76. Protocollo Supplementare alle Convenzioni di Ginevra di 12 agosto 1949, e relativo alla Protezione di Vittime di Conflitti Armati e Non - internazionali adottata 8 giugno 1977 prevede nella sua parte IV relativo a popolazione civile siccome segue:
Articolo 13.-Protezione della popolazione civile
“1. La popolazione civile e civili individuali godranno protezione generale contro i pericoli che sorgono da operazioni militari. Dare effetto a questa protezione, gli articoli seguenti saranno osservati in tutte le circostanze.
2. La popolazione civile come così, così come civili individuali, non sarà l'oggetto di attacco. Atti o minacce della violenza il fine primario di che è diffondere terrore fra la popolazione civile è proibito.
3. Civili godranno la protezione riconosciuta con questa Parte, a meno che e per simile tempo siccome loro prendono una parte diretta in ostilità.”
Articolo 14.-protezione degli oggetti indispensabile alla sopravvivenza della popolazione civile
“Fame di civili come un metodo di combattimento è proibita. È proibito perciò per attaccare, distrugga, rimuova o renda inutile, per che fine, oggetti indispensabile alla sopravvivenza della popolazione civile, come generi alimentari aree agricole per la produzione di generi alimentari, raccolti, bestiame, bevendo installazioni di acqua ed approvvigionamenti e lavori irrigatori.
...”
Articolo 17.-proibizione del prelievo forzato di civili
“1. Il dislocamento della popolazione civile non sarà ordinato per ragioni riferite al conflitto a meno che la sicurezza dei civili coinvolse o ragioni militari ed imperative così richiesta. Se simile dislocamenti dovessero dovere essere eseguiti, tutte le possibili misure saranno prese in ordine che la popolazione civile può essere ricevuta condizioni soddisfacenti di ricovero, igiene, salute, la sicurezza e nutrizione sotto.
2. Civili non saranno obbligati per lasciare il loro proprio territorio per ragioni connesse col conflitto.”
B. Diritto nazionale
1. Codice di Diritto Penale
77. Finché le il 2002 questioni di penale-legge di 1 luglio furono governate col Codice del 1960 di Diritto processuale penale del RSFSR. 1 luglio 2002 il vecchio Codice fu sostituito col Codice russo di Diritto processuale penale (“il CCP”).
78. Articolo 124 degli stati di CCP che un accusatore può esaminare un'azione di reclamo riguardo ad azioni od omissioni di vari ufficiali in accusa di un'indagine penale. Una volta un'azione di reclamo è esaminata, il reclamante dovrebbe essere informato della sua conseguenza e dei possibili viali di ricorso contro la decisione dell'accusatore.
79. Articolo 125 del CCP prevede che la decisione di un investigatore o accusatore di dispensare con o procedimenti penali e limitati, e le altre decisioni ed atti od omissioni che sono responsabili infrangere i diritti costituzionali e le libertà delle parti a procedimenti penali o impedire l'accesso di cittadini alla giustizia, può essere fatto appello contro ad una corte distrettuale che è conferita poteri per esaminare la legalità ed i motivi delle decisioni contestate.
80. Articolo 161 del CCP custodisce l'articolo che informazioni dall'indagine preliminare non possono essere rivelate. Divida in paragrafi 3 dello stesso Articolo prevede che informazioni dall'archivio di indagine possono essere divulgate col permesso di un accusatore o investigatore e solamente in finora come sé non infranga i diritti ed interessi legali dei partecipanti nei procedimenti penali e non faccia pregiudizio l'indagine. È proibito per divulgare informazioni delle vite private di partecipanti in procedimenti penali senza permesso loro.
81. Articolo 162 del CCP prevede che un'indagine preliminare in una causa penale deve essere completata entro due mesi. Questo termine può essere prolungato su a tre mesi col capo del corpo investigativo ed attinente. In una causa penale dove è particolarmente complessa l'indagine preliminare, il termine può essere prolungato su a dodici mesi. Qualsiasi l'ulteriore proroga del termine può essere resa solamente in cause eccezionali.
2. Codice civile
82. Con virtù di Articolo 151 del Codice civile russo, se le certe azioni danneggiando i diritti di non-proprietà personali di un individuo o abusando di su altri beni incorporei hanno provocato lui o il suo danno non-patrimoniale (sofferenza fisica o mentale), la corte può costringere il perpetratore a pagare il risarcimento patrimoniale per quel il danno.
83. Articolo 1067 prevede che danno inflisse in una situazione della necessità assoluta, notevolmente per l'eliminazione di un pericolo che minaccia il disonesto o terze parti se il pericolo, nelle circostanze non potesse essere eliminato con qualsiasi altro vuole dire, sarà compensato per col disonesto. Avendo riguardo ad alle circostanze nelle quali fu causato il danno, una corte può imporre un obbligo per compensare per simile danno su una terza parte in cui interessa il disonesto agì, o può rilasciare da tale obbligo, in parte o in pieno, sia la terza parte ed il disonesto.
84. Articolo 1069 prevede che un'agenzia Statale o una volontà ufficiale e Statale sono responsabili verso un cittadino per danno causato con le loro azioni illegali od omissione di atto. Il risarcimento per simile danno sarà assegnato alla spesa del federale o tesoreria regionale.
3. Atto di Soppressione del Terrorismo
85. La Legge Federale su Soppressione del Terrorismo di 25 luglio 1998 (от di закон di Федеральный 25 июля 1998 г. № 130-ФЗ «il борьбе di О с терроризмом»-“la Soppressione di Atto di Terrorismo”), come in vigore al tempo attinente, purché siccome segue:
Sezione 3. Concetti di base
“Per i fini della Legge Federale e presente i concetti di base e seguenti saranno fatti domanda:
... 'soppressione del terrorismo' si riferirà ad attività mirate alla prevenzione, la scoperta, soppressione e minimisation di conseguenze delle attività terroriste;
'operazione di cassa-terrorista' si riferirà ad attività speciali mirate alla prevenzione di atti terroristici, mentre assicurando la sicurezza di individui, terroristi di neutralising e minimising le conseguenze di atti terroristici;
'zona di un'operazione di cassa-terrorista' si riferirà ad un terreno individuale o superficie di acqua, vuole dire di trasporto, mentre costruendo, struttura o locali con territorio adiacente dove un'operazione di cassa-terrorista è condotta;... ”
Sezione 21. Esenzione dalla responsabilità per danni
“Sulla base della legislazione ed all'interno dei limiti stabiliti con sé, danno può essere causato alla vita, salute e proprietà di terroristi, così come agli altri interessi giuridicamente protegguti, nel corso di un'operazione di cassa-terrorista. Comunque, membri delle Forze Armate, esperti e le altre persone prese parte nella soppressione del terrorismo saranno esentate dalla responsabilità per simile danno, nella conformità con la legislazione della Federazione russa.”
4. Decreti presidenziali e governativi
86. Decreto presidenziale n. 898 5 settembre 1995 purché, inter l'alia, per un pagamento di grumo-somma di 20,000 rubli russi (RUB) alle famiglie di individui che erano morti come un risultato delle ostilità nella Repubblica di Cecenia. Il Decreto affermò anche che individui che erano incorsi in perdite patrimoniali, incluso quelli che avevano perso la loro casa dovrebbero essere pagati il risarcimento, ed affidò il Governo russo col compito di fare i pagamenti attinenti a quelli riguardarono.
87. In Decreto n. 510 30 aprile 1997 che il Governo russo ha stabilito che residenti della Repubblica di Cecenia che aveva perso il loro and/or dell'alloggio le altre proprietà durante le ostilità nella repubblica e che, nessuno più tardi che prima 12 dicembre 1994, aveva lasciato permanentemente per un'altra regione fu concesso al risarcimento.
88. Decreto governativo n. 404 4 luglio 2003 stabilito il diritto di tutti i residenti permanenti della Repubblica di Cecenia che aveva perso il loro alloggio e qualsiasi proprietà in sé dopo 12 dicembre 1994 per ricevere il risarcimento nell'importo di RUBno 300,000 per l'alloggio e RUBno 50,000 per le altre proprietà.
C. Pratica delle corti russe
89. 14 dicembre 2000 la Corte distrettuale di Basmanny di Mosca consegnò una sentenza in procedimenti civili portati con un OMISSIS che chiese che il blocco di appartamenti nel quale lui aveva vissuto era crollato durante sgusciatura pesante di Grozny con le forze armate federali a gennaio 1995 ed aveva chiesto il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale in quel il collegamento. Mentre dando credito al fatto che OMISSIS 'proprietà di s, incluso il suo appartamento nel blocco di appartamenti era stata distrutta come un risultato di un attacco nel 1995, la corte notò, inter l'alia che sotto Articoli 1069-1071 e 1100 del Codice civile russo, lo Stato era solamente responsabile per danni per le azioni dei suoi agenti che erano illegali. Contenne inoltre che l'operazione militare nella Repubblica di Cecenia era stata avviata con virtù di decreti presidenziali e governativi attinenti che erano stati trovati essere costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale russa ed erano stati stati ancora in vigore. Di conseguenza, la corte concluse che le azioni delle forze armate federali nella Repubblica di Cecenia erano state legali ed avevano respinto la rivendicazione del Sig. Dunayev per il risarcimento (vedere Dunayev c. la Russia, n. 70142/01, § 8 24 maggio 2007).
90. 4 luglio 2001 la Corte distrettuale di Basmanny di Mosca respinse una rivendicazione contro il Ministero di Finanza portato con un OMISSIS che affermò che il suo alloggio e l'altra proprietà erano state distrutte durante scioperi di aria massicci ed artiglieria che aprono di Grozny con le forze armate federali in ottobre e novembre 1999 ed erano state chieste il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale in quel il collegamento. La corte diede credito al fatto che OMISSIS 's che alloggio privato e gli altri effetti personali erano stati distrutti come un risultato delle ostilità nel 1999 a 2000. Comunque, contenne che sotto Articolo 1069 del Codice civile russo, lo Stato era solamente responsabile per danni per le azioni dei suoi agenti che erano illegali. Notò che l'operazione militare in Cecenia era stata avviata con la virtù di decreti presidenziali e governativi attinenti che erano stati trovati essere costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale russa, a parte due disposizioni del decreto governativo ed attinente. In che collegamento che la corte ha notato che le due disposizioni non erano state fatte domanda mai ad OMISSIS, e perciò nessuno azioni illegali da parte di corpi Statali mai avevano avuto luogo per garantire il risarcimento per danno inflisse sulla sua proprietà. 12 aprile 2002 la Mosca che Corte Urbana ha sostenuto che sentenza su ricorso (vedere Umarov c. la Russia (il dec.), n. 30788/02, 18 maggio 2006).
91. Con una sentenza contumaciale di 3 dicembre 2001 la Corte distrettuale di Leninskiy di Stavropol respinse una rivendicazione tratta finora con un OMISSIS contro un numero di ministeri federali siccome lei addusse che il blocco di appartamenti nel quale lei aveva vissuto era stato distrutto con un missile durante un attacco con le forze armate federali su Grozny a gennaio 2000 e chiese il risarcimento per l'appartamento distrutto e effetti personali che erano stati in sé. Lei chiese anche il risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale. La corte notò, inter l'alia che sotto Articolo 1069 del Codice civile russo, lo Stato era solamente responsabile per danno causato con le azioni dei suoi agenti che erano illegali. Fondò inoltre che le azioni delle truppe federali russe in Cecenia erano state legali, come l'operazione militare in Cecenia decreti presidenziali e governativi attinenti che erano stati trovati essere costituzionale con la Corte Costituzionale russa erano stati avviati sotto. La corte concluse che non c'erano nessuno motivi per accordare OMISSIS 's chiedono per danno patrimoniale e che la sua rivendicazione per il risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale non poteva essere accordata uno, nell'assenza di qualsiasi colpa o azioni illegali da parte degli imputati. La sentenza fu sostenuta su ricorso con lo Stavropol Corte Regionale 30 gennaio 2002 (Trapeznikova c. la Russia, n. 21539/02, § 30 11 dicembre 2008).
LA LEGGE
I. L'ECCEZIONE DEL GOVERNO RIGUARDO ALL'ESAURIMENTO DELLE VIE DI RICORSO NAZIONALI
A. Osservazioni delle parti
1. Il Governo
92. Il Governo dibatté che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire le via di ricorso effettive disponibile a loro a livello nazionale. In particolare, nessuna delle decisioni procedurali preso in causa n. 34/00/0030-04 mai erano stati piaciuti contro ad un accusatore più alto, in conformità con Articolo 124 del Codice russo di Diritto processuale penale o ad una corte, in conformità con Articolo 125 dello stesso Codice.
93. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che, in finora come i richiedenti si era lamentato della sofferenza morale in violazione di Articolo 3 della Convenzione, loro avrebbero potuto chiedere il risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale in corte sotto Articolo 151 del Codice civile russo, ma a nessun tempo loro avevano depositato tale rivendicazione.
94. Come riguardi le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il Governo presentò che, dopo che i procedimenti penali erano stati cessati, il “persone interessate”-il primo, secondo, terzo quarto, undicesimo tredicesimo, quattordicesimo sedicesimo, diciottesimo diciannovesimo e venti-sesto richiedenti che sono fra il loro numero-era stato informato del loro diritto per chiedere il risarcimento per la loro proprietà perduta in procedimenti civili. In che il collegamento il Governo si riferì alle disposizioni di diritto civile nazionale che stabilì gli articoli su risarcimento per danno inflitte su proprietà in una situazione della necessità assoluta (Articolo 1067 del Codice civile russo) e quelli riguardo al risarcimento per danno causato con corpi Statali ed i loro ufficiali (Articolo 1069 del Codice civile russo). Il Governo dibatté inoltre che i richiedenti furono concessi anche al risarcimento in conformità con Decreto Governativo n. 510 30 aprile 1997 e Decreto Governativo n. 404 4 luglio 2003. Comunque, uscire coi richiedenti non si era giovato a di qualsiasi di quelle via di ricorso, e nella prospettiva del Governo, loro non erano riusciti perciò, ad esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali in riguardo delle loro azioni di reclamo su quel la materia.
2. I richiedenti
95. Il richiedente insistette che loro avessero fatto tutto quello che si sarebbe potuto essere aspettato ragionevolmente da loro portare l'incidente di 12 settembre 1999 all'attenzione delle autorità; la risposta seconda era stata improvvisamente comunque, inadeguata. In particolare, non sembrò che qualsiasi indagine significativa era stata portata fuori nelle circostanze dell'incidente. I richiedenti affermarono inoltre che nell'assenza di qualsiasi sentenze significative nel contesto dell'indagine, tutti i loro tentativi di portare procedimenti civili per il risarcimento in riguardo di danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale sarebbero stati condannati ad insuccesso.
96. In generale, i richiedenti insisterono che le via di ricorso nazionali di solito disponibile era stato illusorio ed inefficace nella loro situazione.
B. La valutazione della Corte
97. La Corte reitera che l'articolo dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali sotto Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione obbliga richiedenti ad usare le via di ricorso che sono disponibili e sufficiente nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale per abilitarli ottenere compensazione per le violazioni addotte prima. L'esistenza delle via di ricorso deve essere sufficientemente sicura sia in teoria ed in pratica, fallendo a loro mancherà quale l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia. Articolo che 35 § 1 richiede anche che azioni di reclamo intesero di essere portate successivamente di fronte alla Corte sarebbe dovuto essere reso al corpo nazionale ed appropriato, almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e tempo-limiti posati in giù in diritto nazionale e, inoltre, che qualsiasi procedurale vuole dire che ostacolerebbe una violazione della Convenzione dovrebbe essere usata. Non c'è comunque, nessun obbligo per avere ricorso a via di ricorso che sono inadeguate o inefficaci (vedere Aksoy c. la Turchia, 18 dicembre 1996, §§ 51-52 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI; Akdivar ed Altri c. la Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, §§ 65-67 Relazioni 1996-IV; e, più recentemente, Cennet Ayhan e Mehmet Salih Ayhan c. la Turchia, n. 41964/98, § 64 27 giugno 2006).
98. La Corte ha enfatizzato che la richiesta dell'articolo dell'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali deve costituire assegno dovuto il fatto che è fatto domanda nel contesto di sistema per la protezione di diritti umani che gli Stati Contraenti sono stati d'accordo ad esporre su. Di conseguenza, ha riconosciuto che Articolo 35 § 1 deve essere fatto domanda con del grado della flessibilità e senza il formalismo eccessivo. Ha riconosciuto inoltre che l'articolo dell'esaurimento è né assoluto né capace di essere fatto domanda automaticamente; per i fini di fare una rassegna se è stato osservato, è essenziale per avere riguardo ad alle circostanze della causa individuale. Questo vuole dire, in particolare, che la Corte non solo deve prendere conto realistico dell'esistenza di via di ricorso formali nell'ordinamento giuridico dello Stato Contraente riguardato ma anche del contesto generale nel quale loro operano, così come le circostanze personali del richiedente. Deve esaminare poi se, in tutte le circostanze della causa, il richiedente faceva tutto quello che potrebbe essere aspettatosi ragionevolmente che di lui o lei esauriscano via di ricorso nazionali (vedere Akdivar ed Altri, citato sopra, § 69; Aksoy, citato sopra, §§ 53-54; e Tanrıkulu c. la Turchia [GC], n. 23763/94, § 82 ECHR 1999-IV).
99. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, in finora come il Governo aguzzato all'insuccesso addotto dei richiedenti per impugnare prima accusatori più alti decisioni procedurali preso nel contesto dei procedimenti penali riguardo agli eventi di 12 settembre 1999, la Corte reitera che i poteri conferirono sugli accusatori superiori costituisca via di ricorso straordinarie, l'uso di che dipende sulla discrezione degli accusatori. La Corte non accetta che i richiedenti furono costretti ad usare questa via di ricorso per attenersi coi requisiti di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Trubnikov c. la Russia (il dec.), n. 9790/99, 14 ottobre 2003).
100. Come riguardi l'insuccesso addotto dei richiedenti per fare appello contro le stesse decisioni procedurali ad una corte sotto Articolo 125 del Codice russo di Diritto processuale penale, la Corte osserva che lo strumento legale assegnò a col Governo divenne operativo 1 luglio 2002 e che i richiedenti chiaramente non erano capaci di avere ricorso a questa via di ricorso prima di quel la data. Come riguardi il periodo da allora in poi, la Corte considera che questo margine dell'eccezione del Governo solleva problemi che sono collegati da vicino alla questione dell'efficacia dell'indagine, e sarebbe perciò appropriato congiungere questa questione ai meriti e rivolgerlo nell'esame della sostanza delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
101. Infine, in finora come il Governo addotto che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad avere ricorso a civile-legge rimedia ad od ottenere il risarcimento sotto decreti governativi in riguardo delle loro azioni di reclamo sotto Articoli 3 e 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che questo margine dell'eccezione del Governo solleva problemi che sono collegati da vicino alla questione della disponibilità a livello di cittadino di via di ricorso effettive in riguardo delle azioni di reclamo attinenti, e sarebbe perciò anche appropriato congiungere questa questione ai meriti e rivolgerlo nell'esame della sostanza dell'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto Articolo 13, in concomitanza con Articoli 3 e 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 2 DELLA CONVENZIONE
102. Il primo, secondo, terzo tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti (“i richiedenti attinenti”) si lamentò delle morti dei loro membri di famiglia durante l'attacco di 12 settembre 1999. Il primo richiedente si lamentò delle morti di sua moglie, OMISSIS, ed i suoi due figli, OMISSIS; il secondo, tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti si lamentarono della morte di OMISSIS, la madre del secondo richiedente, sorella del tredicesimo richiedente e figlia del venti-secondo richiedente ed il terzo richiedente si lamentò della morte di sua madre, OMISSIS. I richiedenti attinenti addussero che non c'era stata un'indagine effettiva nella questione. Loro si lamentarono anche che lo Stato era andato a vuoto ad attenersi con obblighi positivi suoi per proteggere le vite dei loro parenti. I richiedenti attinenti si riferirono ad Articolo 2 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
"1. Il diritto di ogni persona alla vita è protetto dalla legge. La morte non può essere inflitta a nessuno intenzionalmente, salvo nel corso dell’ esecuzione di una sentenza capitale pronunziata da un tribunale nel caso in cui il reato sia punito da questa pena per legge.
2. La morte non è considerata come inflitta in violazione di questo articolo nei casi in cui risultasse da un ricorso alla forza resa assolutamente necessaria:
a) per garantire la difesa di ogni persona contro la violenza illegale;
b) per effettuare un arresto regolare o per impedire l'evasione di una persona regolarmente detenuta;
c) per reprimere, conformemente alla legge, una sommossa o un'insurrezione. "
A. Ammissibilità
103. Il Governo affermò che, prendendo in considerazione le osservazioni dei richiedenti e dichiarazioni di testimone sulle circostanze che circondano l'incidente di 12 settembre 1999, “dovrebbe essere ammesso” che l'uso di vigore letale che dà luogo alla morte di cinque residenti di Kogi (Runnoye)- OMISSIS-aveva costituito finora una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione in come che Articolo garantì il diritto alla vita dei parenti deceduti dei richiedenti attinenti. Loro presentarono inoltre che, avendo ammesso che violazione, le autorità nazionali avevano pagato il risarcimento in che riguardo ai primi tre richiedenti nell'importo di 60,000 rubli russi (RUB, verso EUR 1,500) al primo richiedente e RUB 20,000 (verso EUR 500) ad ognuno del secondo e terzi richiedenti.
104. I richiedenti attinenti si riferirono alla causa-legge ben stabilita della Corte, mentre asserendo che il pagamento del risarcimento era insufficiente per rimediare alla violazione addotto di Articolo 2 della Convenzione e che un'indagine penale ed effettiva nelle circostanze delle morti dei loro membri di famiglia fu richiesta.
105. Avendo riguardo ad alle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte osserva, che la questione sorge se, nella conformità con Articolo 34 della Convenzione, i richiedenti attinenti ancora possono chiedere di essere “le vittime” della violazione addotto di Articolo 2 della Convenzione. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che un richiedente è privato di suo o il suo status come una vittima se le autorità nazionali hanno ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconobbe compensazione appropriata e sufficiente per, una violazione della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Scordino c. l'Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, §§ 178-93 il 2006-V di ECHR).
106. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, si può dire che il Governo abbia dato credito come lontano come le morti alla violazione addotto di Articolo 2 della Convenzione dei parenti dei richiedenti attinenti, riguardò (vedere paragrafo 103 sopra). Rimane essere accertato se i richiedenti attinenti furono riconosciuti compensazione appropriata e sufficiente in quel il riguardo.
107. La Corte osserva che il primo, secondo e terzi richiedenti ottenuti il risarcimento negli importi di RUB 60,000, RUB 20,000 e RUB rispettivamente 20,000 per le morti dei loro membri di famiglia nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999. La Corte reitera che, nella causa di una violazione di Articoli 2 o 3 della Convenzione, il risarcimento per il patrimoniale e danno non-patrimoniale che fluiscono dalla violazione deve in principio sia disponibile come parte della serie di compensazione (vedere Z ed Altri c. il Regno Unito [GC], n. 29392/95, § 109 il 2001-V di ECHR). La violazione addotto di Articolo 2 della Convenzione in cause di aggressione fatale con agenti Statali non può essere rimediata a solamente comunque, con assegnando danni ai parenti delle vittime (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Kaya c. la Turchia, 19 febbraio 1998, § 105 le Relazioni 1998-io, e Yaşa c. la Turchia, 2 settembre 1998, § 74 Relazioni 1998-VI). Questo è così perché, se le autorità potessero confinare la loro reazione a simile incidenti al pagamento mero del risarcimento, mentre non facendo abbastanza per perseguire e punire quelli responsabile, è probabile che questo dia luogo ad uso sbagliato di vigore letale con agenti Statali che sarebbero messi in una posizione dell'impunità virtuale, e la protezione del diritto alla vita sotto Articolo 2 della Convenzione, nonostante importanza fondamentale sua sarebbe resa inefficace in pratica. Di conseguenza, un'indagine effettiva è richiesta, oltre al risarcimento adeguato, offrire compensazione sufficiente ad un richiedente che si lamenta di una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Nikolova e Velichkova c. la Bulgaria, n. 7888/03, §§ 55 e 56, 20 dicembre 2007).
108. La Corte nota perciò che la questione dello status dei richiedenti attinenti come “le vittime”, nella conformità con Articolo 34 della Convenzione, è collegato da vicino alla questione dell'efficacia dell'indagine nella causa presente, e sarebbe perciò appropriato congiungere questa questione ai meriti e rivolgerlo nell'esame della sostanza dell'azione di reclamo attinente sotto Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
109. La Corte costata ulteriormente che questa parte della richiesta non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
110. Alla luce della sua osservazione in paragrafo 108 sopra, la Corte lo trova appropriato cominciare con esaminare finora le osservazioni dei richiedenti attinenti in siccome loro sollevano un problema sotto il margine procedurale di Articolo 2 della Convenzione e poi rivolgersi all'esame del problema effettivo sotto questa disposizione di Convenzione.
1. L'inadeguatezza addotta dell'indagine
(a) Osservazioni delle parti
111. I richiedenti attinenti contesero che il Governo era andato a vuoto ad eseguire un'indagine adeguata, effettiva ed opportuna nelle circostanze dell'incidente di 12 settembre 1999. Loro indicarono che separatamente dall'indicare le date sulle quali l'indagine era stata cominciata ed era stata cessata il Governo non era riuscito a spiegare in qualsiasi dettaglio che questi passi erano stati presi nel corso dell'indagine, e rivelare qualsiasi documenti relativo a sé. I richiedenti attinenti invitarono inoltre la Corte a disegnare inferenze come alla fondatezza delle loro dichiarazioni dall'insuccesso del Governo per presentare qualsiasi documenti dall'archivio di indagine penale.
112. Il Governo dibatté che le circostanze dell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 erano state investigate debitamente con le autorità nazionali che, avendo eseguito l'indagine, aveva deciso di cessare i procedimenti penali “nell'assenza di qualsiasi i motivi legali per sostenere chiunque criminalmente responsabile.” Il Governo presentò che il fatto che l'indagine era stata cessata non ostacoli qualsiasi dei richiedenti dal chiedere il risarcimento in procedimenti civili per il danno causato, questo corretto stato stato spiegato agli individui che erano stati dichiarati vittime nella causa presente. Il Governo indicò inoltre che i primi tre richiedenti si erano giovati a di che diritto ed aveva ottenuto il risarcimento in collegamento con le morti dei loro parenti. Il Governo insistette così che in simile circostanze l'indagine nella causa presente avesse soddisfatto lo standard dell'efficacia stabilito in relazione ad Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
113. Il Governo rifiutò di presentare qualsiasi documenti dall'archivio sull'indagine penale con riferimento alla loro natura riservata, affermando che la loro rivelazione sarebbe contraria agli interessi dell'indagine e potrebbe comportare una violazione dei diritti dei partecipanti nei procedimenti penali. Loro insisterono anche che loro avessero “in maniera dovuta” indicò i passi procedurali presi durante l'indagine e, in particolare, aveva indicato l'autorità in accusa, i numeri assegnarono all'archivio di causa e le date dei passi procedurali e notevoli.
(b) la valutazione di La Corte
114. La Corte nota in primo luogo che il Governo diede credito al fatto che i parenti dei richiedenti attinenti erano stati privati di vite loro come un risultato dell'attacco aereo e federale di 12 settembre 1999. Di conseguenza, trova che i richiedenti attinenti hanno una rivendicazione difendibile sotto il margine effettivo di Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
115. La Corte reitera inoltre che l'obbligo per proteggere il diritto alla vita sotto Articolo 2 della Convenzione, legga in concomitanza col dovere generale dello Stato sotto Articolo 1 della Convenzione a “garantisca ad ognuno entro [la sua] giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definite [nella] Convenzione”, richiede per implicazione che ci dovrebbe essere una forma di indagine ufficiale ed effettiva quando individui sono stati uccisi come un risultato dell'uso della forza, in particolare con agenti dello Stato. L'indagine deve essere effettiva nel senso che è capace di portare ad una determinazione di se la forza usata in simili casi era o meno giustificata nelle circostanze (vedere Kaya, citata sopra, § 87) ed all'identificazione e punizione di quelli responsabile (vedere Oğur c. Turchia [GC], n. 21594/93, § 88 ECHR 1999-III).
116. In particolare, le autorità devono portare i passi ragionevoli disponibili a loro garantire la prova riguardo all'incidente, incluso, inter alia, testimonianza di testimone oculare prova forense e, dove appropriato, un'autopsia che offre un documento completo ed accurato di danno ed un'analisi obiettiva di sentenze cliniche, incluso la causa di morte (vedere, riguardo ad autopsie, per esempio Salman c. la Turchia [GC], n. 21986/93, § 106 ECHR 2000-VII; riguardo a testimoni, per esempio Tanrıkulu, citato sopra, § 109; e concernendo prova forense, per esempio Gül c. la Turchia, n. 22676/93, § 89). Qualsiasi la deficienza nell'indagine che mina la sua capacità di stabilire la causa di morte o la persona responsabile può rischiare urto cadente di questo standard.
117. Ci deve essere anche, un requisito implicito della prontezza e la spedizione ragionevole (vedere Yaşa, citato sopra, §§ 102-04, e Mahmut Kaya c. la Turchia, n. 22535/93, §§ 106-07 ECHR 2000-III). Si deve accettare che ci possono essere ostacoli o le difficoltà che ostacolano progresso in un'indagine in una particolare situazione. Una risposta pronta con le autorità nell'investigare l'uso di vigore letale generalmente può essere riguardata comunque, come essenziale nel mantenere la fiducia pubblica nel mantenimento dell'articolo di legge e nell'ostacolare qualsiasi comparizione di collusione in o la tolleranza di atti illegali.
118. Per le stesse ragioni, deve essere un elemento sufficiente di scrutinio pubblico dell'indagine o i suoi risultati per garantire la responsabilità in pratica così come in teoria. Il grado di scrutinio pubblico richiesto può variare bene da causa a causa. In tutte le cause, comunque il parente prossimo della vittima deve essere coinvolto nella procedura alla misura necessario salvaguardare suo o i suoi interessi legittimi (vedere Shanaghan c. il Regno Unito, n. 37715/97, §§ 91-92 4 maggio 2001).
119. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte nota che nonostante le sue richieste ripetute per una copia dell'archivio sull'indagine riguardo all'attacco di 12 settembre 1999, il Governo rifiutò di rivelare qualsiasi il documento da che archivio, riferendosi ad Articolo 161 del Codice russo di Diritto processuale penale. Loro non riuscirono anche inoltre, a dare un contorno, affitti un conto dettagliato, dei passi investigativi da solo se qualsiasi, preso con le autorità. Il Governo indicò solamente le date sulle quali i procedimenti penali erano stati avviati ed erano stati cessati, si riferì alla conclusione delle autorità inquirenti come all'assenza degli elementi costituenti di un crimine nelle azioni dei membri delle Forze Armate federali e certe trascrizioni menzionate di colloqui di testimone, rapporti competenti e rapporti su esami, senza prevedere qualsiasi gli ulteriori dettagli (vedere paragrafi (b) Informazioni presentate dal Governo
62-65 sopra). La Corte trova tale mancanza manifesta della cooperazione nella causa presente da parte del Governo essere inaccettabile.
120. Inferenze che disegnano dalla condotta del Governo rispondente quando prova era ottenuta (vedere Irlanda c. il Regno Unito, 18 gennaio 1978, § 161 la Serie Un n. 25), la Corte, nella luce di queste inferenze dovrà valutare i meriti di questa azione di reclamo sulla base delle informazioni scarse presentato col Governo sul progresso dell'indagine ed i pochi documenti prodotto coi richiedenti.
121. A quello fine, la Corte nota in primo luogo che procedimenti penali nel collegamento con l'attacco aereo di 12 settembre 1999 che dà luogo alle morti dei parenti dei richiedenti attinenti non furono avviati sino a più che due anni più tardi, 21 gennaio 2002. Il Governo non avanzò qualsiasi la giustificazione per tale ritardo, adducendo soltanto che l'ufficio dell'accusatore competente era iniziato i procedimenti sulla stessa data quando aveva ricevuto l'azione di reclamo del secondo richiedente di 29 agosto 2001 dall'Ufficio del Presidente russo.
122. Nella misura in cui il Governo può essere capito per stare dibattendo che, prima di questa data, le autorità non sapevano dell'incidente di 12 settembre 1999, la Corte trova tale argomento non plausibile e contraddittorio ai fatti della causa presente. Nell'opinione della Corte, i risultati di un attacco di grande potenza che comporta aereo federale normalmente dovrebbero essere conosciuti immediatamente alle autorità dopo tale attacco. Incorre allo Stato per assicurare che agenti Statali che parteciparono debitamente nell'attacco rapporto su sé, e che le autorità competenti, incluso quegli in accusa di sé controllano i suoi risultati senza ritardo. La Corte nota inoltre le osservazioni dei richiedenti all'effetto che loro incontrarono membri delle Forze Armate federali e numerosi in Kogi (Runnoye) quando loro ritornarono al villaggio due giorni dopo l'incidente (vedere divide in paragrafi 24-26 sopra) e che loro cominciarono a lamentarsi brevemente ai vari corpi Statali dopo l'attacco (vedere paragrafo31 sopra (a) le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti ad organi pubblici ed informazioni ricevute da loro). È inoltre evidente dalle repliche delle autorità alle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti che in qualsiasi l'evento, le autorità erano consapevoli dell'incidente in Kogi (Runnoye) nessuno più tardi che a dicembre 1999, quando un investigatore dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di guarnigione eseguì un certo “l'indagine” negli eventi in oggetto (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra). La Corte lo trova prevedendo che per più di due anni le autorità russe dimostrarono simile indifferenza verso un incidente che comporta morti multiple di civili-figli minori e donne-e la devastazione di un villaggio intero come un risultato delle azioni dei vigori federali. Nota anche che tale ritardo considerevole fra l'incidente e l'inizio dell'indagine in sé non può ma significativamente mina l'efficacia dell'indagine.
123. È inoltre estremamente dubbioso che, anche dopo l'indagine nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 fu aperto, le morti dei membri di famiglia dei richiedenti attinenti furono investigate debitamente. In particolare, il Governo indicò che procedimenti penali erano stati portati solamente in collegamento con la distruzione di proprietà durante l'attacco, come, presumibilmente, le autorità non sapevano delle morti al tempo quando loro cominciarono l'indagine. La Corte è scettica di che argomento, determinato che i documenti presentarono coi richiedenti riveli che, prima della data sulla quale furono avviati i procedimenti penali, il secondo richiedente si lamentò della morte di sua madre su molte occasioni e le autorità ricevette quelle azioni di reclamo (vedere paragrafi 37-38 sopra).
124. La Corte osserva inoltre che il Governo addusse che era stato stabilito nel corso dell'indagine che i parenti dei richiedenti attinenti erano morti come un risultato dell’attacco missile coi vigori federali; comunque, nessun esame forense e medico dei corpi era stato eseguito come i richiedenti attinenti aveva rifiutato presumibilmente di concedere l'esumazione. La Corte non può accettare questo chiarimento per l'insuccesso delle autorità per prendere uno dei passi più essenziali in incidenti inquirenti come quello nella causa presente. Presumendo anche che, come addotto col Governo, i richiedenti attinenti ostruirono le autorità inquirenti in questo riguardo rifiutando di dare il loro beneplacito all'esumazione dei resti dei loro parenti, la Corte non considera che questo addusse rifiuto avrebbe potuto assolvere le autorità dai loro obblighi per ottenere informazioni particolareggiate della causa delle morti di cinque persone in circostanze diffidenti. Effettivamente, non sembra, e non fu dimostrato convincentemente col Governo che le autorità inquirenti mai hanno tentato di ottenere un ordine della corte per l'esumazione, o tentò altrimenti di intraprendere la questione (vedere Mezhidov c. Russia, n. 67326/01, § 70 25 settembre 2008).
125. Inoltre, in assenza di qualsiasi informazioni affidabili e documenti, non è improbabile che un numero di altre misure investigative essenziali o fu differito o non fu preso affatto.
126. La Corte osserva inoltre che l'indagine rimase durante fra il 2002 e 23 settembre 2005 di 21 gennaio, quel è, per tre anni ed otto mesi. Avendo riguardo ad alla disposizione legale ed attinente che chiaramente stabilisce i tempo-limiti per un'indagine preliminare (vedere paragrafo 81 sopra), la Corte lo trova ragionevole presumere che durante il periodo indicato l'indagine fu sospesa e riaprì su molte occasioni.
127. È anche chiaro dal materiale nella proprietà della Corte che i richiedenti non ricevettero pressoché informazioni sull'indagine. Sembra che era solamente 30 aprile 2003 che i richiedenti furono informati dell'istituzione 21 gennaio 2002 per la prima volta, quel prima è più di un anno, di procedimenti penali riguardo agli eventi di 12 settembre 1999 (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra). Loro sembrano successivamente ancora una volta essere stati notificati dell'inizio dell'indagine (vedere paragrafo 56 sopra) e poi della sua sospensione e riaprendo (vedere paragrafo 61 sopra). Non sembra che qualsiasi le ulteriori informazioni pertinenti sull'indagine mai furono previste a loro. In particolare, la Corte non è convinta che, siccome asserito col Governo, il “persone interessate”-alcuni dei richiedenti che sono fra il loro numero-fu notificato debitamente della decisione di 23 settembre 2005 con la quale i procedimenti penali riguardo agli eventi di 12 settembre 1999 furono terminati, e che “quelle vittime dichiarate” era fornito di una copia di che decisione, siccome il Governo andò a vuoto a corroborare la loro asserzione a che effetto con qualsiasi prova documentaria. Inoltre, loro non riuscirono a chiaramente indicare se i richiedenti erano stati accordati status di vittima nella causa presente, e, in tal caso che di loro e su che date(s). La Corte considera così che i richiedenti, infatti, fu escluso dai procedimenti penali e non era capace di avere i loro interessi legittimi sostenuto.
128. Contro questo sfondo, ed avendo riguardo ad all'argomento del Governo riguardo all'insuccesso addotto dei richiedenti per fare appello ad una corte, la Corte nota sotto Articolo 125 del Codice russo di Diritto processuale penale, contro decisioni procedurali prese nel contesto dell'indagine nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 che il Governo andò a vuoto ad indicare quale le particolari decisioni, separatamente da che di 23 settembre 2005, i richiedenti avrebbero dovuto impugnare. Come riguarda questa decisione seconda, la Corte reitera che, in principio, un ricorso contro una decisione per cessare procedimenti penali può offrire una salvaguardia sostanziale contro l'esercizio arbitrario del potere con l'autorità inquirente, determinato il potere di una corte per annullare tale decisione ed indicare i difetti per essere rivolto (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Trubnikov (il dec.), citato sopra). Nel corso ordinario di eventi tale ricorso sarebbe considerato perciò, una possibile via di ricorso dove l'accusa ha deciso di non investigare le rivendicazioni. Comunque, la Corte ha forte dubita che questo rimedia a sarebbe stato effettivo nella causa presente. Reitera la sua sentenza sopra che è ragionevole per presumere che l'indagine fu sospesa e riaprì su molte occasioni (vedere paragrafo 126 sopra). In simile circostanze, la Corte non è convinta, che un ricorso ad una corte che avrebbe potuto avere solamente lo stesso effetto avrebbe offerto i richiedenti qualsiasi compensano. Considera, perciò, che tale ricorso nelle particolari circostanze della causa presente sarebbe privo di qualsiasi il fine. La Corte trova che i richiedenti non furono obbligati per perseguire che via di ricorso e che questo margine dell'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere respinto perciò (vedere Khatsiyeva ed Altri c. la Russia, n. 5108/02, § 151 17 gennaio 2008).
129. Nella luce del precedente, e deducendo inferenze dal rifiuto del Governo per presentare l'archivio di indagine penale, la Corte conclude che le autorità andarono a vuoto ad eseguire un'indagine completa ed effettiva nelle circostanze che circondano le morti dei cinque parenti dei richiedenti attinenti. In prospettiva di questa sentenza, la Corte non lo considera necessario esaminare la questione come a se il risarcimento assegnò ai primi tre richiedenti in collegamento con le morti dei loro membri di famiglia era “adeguato”, come, nell'assenza di un'indagine effettiva in quelle morti, i richiedenti attinenti non furono riconosciuti compensazione sufficiente in riguardo delle violazioni addotto di Articolo 2 della Convenzione ed ancora possono chiedere di essere “le vittime” al riguardo, nella conformità con Articolo 34 della Convenzione.
130. La Corte respinge perciò l'eccezione del Governo in questo riguardo e costatazione che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione sotto il suo capo procedurale.
2. Insuccesso addotto nel proteggere il diritto alla vita
(a) Osservazioni delle parti
(i) I richiedenti attinenti
131. I richiedenti attinenti indicarono che il Governo aveva ammesso che l'attacco coi vigori di aria federali su, o nel vicinato di, il villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye) 12 settembre 1999 aveva risultato, in particolare, nelle morti di OMISSIS ed OMISSIS-la moglie del primo richiedente e figli; OMISSIS-la madre del secondo richiedente, sorella del tredicesimo richiedente e figlia del venti-secondo richiedente; ed OMISSIS-la madre del terzo richiedente. I richiedenti attinenti dibatterono inoltre che il Governo chiaramente era andato a vuoto a conto per quelle morti. In particolare, loro non avevano presentato qualsiasi informazioni o documenti che indicano l'identità del personale militare coinvolsero nella pianificazione e condotta del particolare attacco, la misura a che quelli che personale era stato addestrato, la base legale per l'operazione e la maniera nella quale era stato progettato e controllato, le misure prese per minimizzare il rischio alle vite di civili durante che operazione, e le specifiche istruzioni date ai piloti degli aerei di SU-25 che avevano bombardato il villaggio.
132. I richiedenti attinenti sostennero che il modo dove era stata progettata l'operazione di 12 settembre 1999, controllato e condusse aveva costituito una violazione chiara del diritto alla vita di membri di famiglia loro. Loro insisterono che le autorità avevano saputo, o avrebbe dovuto sapere, della presenza di civili in Kogi (Runnoye) al tempo attinente. Inoltre, la scelta di vuole dire con le autorità chiaramente era incorso urto della Convenzione “la proporzionalità severa” la prova-il vigore letale usato chiaramente era stato sproporzionato allo scopo perseguito coi vigori militari e federali, siccome aveva il villaggio infatti stato sottoposto a bombardamento indiscriminato.
133. I richiedenti attinenti contestarono inoltre come completamente inattendibile l'argomento del Governo all'effetto che l'attacco aereo era stato necessario per sopprimere l'attività penale di gruppi armati ed illegali ed ostacolare attacchi terroristi progettò presumibilmente con loro. Loro indicarono che il Governo non aveva prodotto qualsiasi prova documentaria che conferma la presenza di qualsiasi gruppi armati ed illegali in Kogi (Runnoye) di fronte all’attacco o che qualsiasi combattenti illegali erano stati uccisi o erano stati catturati o di qualsiasi la proprietà di combattenti distrusse come un risultato quel l’attacco.
134. I richiedenti attinenti indicarono anche che il Governo non aveva indicato se gli abitanti di un villaggio erano stati avvertiti in anticipo dell'attacco, o se le autorità avevano valutato debitamente il bisogno per l'uso di arma indiscriminate all'interno di un'area popolata.
135. Infine, i richiedenti attinenti addussero che la struttura legale riguardo all'uso di vigore ed arma da fuoco con personale militare in Russia, mentre essendo vago ed inadeguato, non prevedere per le salvaguardie sufficienti per ostacolare la privazione arbitraria della vita e soddisfare il requisito di protezione “con legge” del diritto a vita garantita con Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
(ii) Il Governo
136. Il Governo dibatté che la privazione delle vite dei parenti dei richiedenti attinenti come un risultato dell'uso di vigore letale era stata giustificata per i fini di Articolo 2 § 2 (un) e (b) della Convenzione. In particolare, il Governo affermò che 12 settembre 1999 i vigori di aria federali avevano compiuto una punta di spill’attacco missile su fattoria n. 2 dello Shelkovskiy State fattoria nel villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye), dove, secondo le loro informazioni, combattenti illegali erano stati localizzati. Il Governo si riferì alle sentenze dell'indagine nazionale all'effetto che le azioni degli ufficiali militari che avevano ordinato un sciopero sulla base dei combattenti illegali erano state giustificate nelle circostanze, dato che gruppi armati ed illegali stavano mostrando resistenza armata e violenta alle autorità, posando così un pericolo a residenti locali e le altre persone ed all'interesse pubblico. Nell'osservazione del Governo che pericolo non poteva essere eliminato con qualsiasi altro vuole dire, e, in particolare, era impossibile per usare truppe basi nel vicinato di Kogi (Runnoye). I piloti, per la loro parte avevano agito in ottemperanza severa con l’ordine dei suoi superiori che stava legando su loro. Il Governo insistette che i membri delle Forze Armate federali, sia ufficiali imponenti ed i loro subalterni, aveva agito nella piena ottemperanza con legislazione nazionale e regolamentazioni per garantire la sicurezza della popolazione civile, così come quelli relativo all'uso di vigore letale.
137. Il Governo presentò inoltre che le autorità inquirenti avevano esaminato le questioni relativo alla pianificazione e controllo dell'operazione in oggetto e non avevano trovato qualsiasi le violazioni in quel riguardo a. In particolare, era stato stabilito che quando progettando l'attacco aereo nel vicinato del villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye) gli ufficiali imponenti avevano avuto “informazioni affidabili e sufficienti” sull'ubicazione della base terrorista e sulla concentrazione di combattenti illegali a che base e la preparazione con loro di attacchi di terrorista di grande potenza. Il Governo addusse che era stato chiaro nelle circostanze della causa che obiettivi militari erano stati situati vicino a Kogi (Runnoye), la loro designazione ed il grado di pericolo per i quali loro avevano posato, inter alia, residenti della Repubblica vicina di Dagestan e, di conseguenza, il bisogno per la loro distruzione era stato ovvio.
(b) la valutazione della Corte
138. La Corte reitera che Articolo 2 che salvaguarda il diritto alla vita e set fuori le circostanze dove la privazione della vita può essere giustificata, classifica come una delle disposizioni più fondamentali nella Convenzione da che in tempo di pace che nessuna derogazione è permessa sotto Articolo 15. Le situazioni dove la privazione della vita può essere giustificata è esauriente e deve essere interpretata attentamente. L'uso di vigore che può dare luogo alla privazione della vita deve essere nessuno più che “assolutamente necessario” per il conseguimento di uno del set di fini fuori in Articolo 2 § 2 (a), (b) e (c). Questo termine indica che una prova più severa e più irresistibile della necessità deve avere un lavoro che questo normalmente applicabile quando determinando se azione Statale è “necessario in una società democratica” sotto divide in paragrafi 2 di Articoli 8 a 11 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, il vigore usato deve essere severamente proporzionato al conseguimento degli scopi permessi. Nella luce dell'importanza della protezione riconosciuta con Articolo 2, la Corte deve sottoporre privazioni della vita allo scrutinio più accurato, particolarmente dove vigore letale ed intenzionale è usato, mentre non solo prendendo nell'esame le azioni di agenti Statali che davvero amministrano il vigore ma anche tutte le circostanze circostanti incluso simile questioni come la pianificazione e controllo delle azioni sotto esame (vedere McCann ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 27 settembre 1995, §§ 146-50 Serie A n. 324; Andronicou e Constantinou c. la Cipro, 9 ottobre 1997, § 171 Relazioni 1997-VI; ed Oğur, citato sopra, § 78).
139. Oltre ad esponendo fuori le circostanze quando la privazione della vita può essere giustificata, Articolo 2 implica un dovere primario sullo Stato per garantire il diritto alla vita con fissando in posto una struttura legale ed amministrativa appropriata che definisce le circostanze limitate nelle quali ufficiali di legge-esecuzione possono usare vigore ed arma da fuoco, nella luce degli standard internazionali ed attinenti (vedere Makaratzis c. la Grecia [GC], n. 50385/99, §§ 57-59 ECHR 2004-XI, e Nachova ed Altri c. la Bulgaria [GC], N. 43577/98 e 43579/98, § 96 ECHR 2005-VII). Inoltre, la legge nazionale regola le operazioni di polizia che devono garantire un sistema di salvaguardie adeguate ed effettive contro l'arbitrarietà e l'abuso di vigore ed anche contro incidente evitabile (vedere Makaratzis, citato sopra, § 58). In particolare, agenti di legge-esecuzione devono essere addestrati per valutare se o c'è non una necessità assoluta di usare arma da fuoco, non solo sulla base della lettera delle regolamentazioni attinenti ma anche con dovuto riguardo ad alla pre-eminenza di riguardo per la vita umana come un valore fondamentale (vedere Nachova ed Altri, citato sopra, § 97).
140. Nella presente causa causa, è stato ammesso dal Governo che cinque residenti di Gekhi-OMISSIS -furono uccisi come un risultato di un attacco missilistico del 12 settembre 1999 da due SU-25 aerei militare alle forze aeree federali. La responsabilità dello Stato è impegnata perciò, e è per lo Stato a conto per le morti delle cinque persone summenzionate. È per lo Stato per dimostrare notevolmente che il vigore usò coi membri delle Forze Armate federali si potrebbe dire che sia stato assolutamente necessario, e perciò severamente proporzionato al conseguimento di uno degli scopi esposto fuori in paragrafo 2 di Articolo 2.
141. Il Governo dibatté che l'uso di vigore letale nella causa presente era stato giustificato sotto Articolo 2 § 2 (a) e (b) della Convenzione. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi prova affidabile che qualsiasi la violenza illegale fu minacciata o probabilmente, o che il vigore letale fu usato in un tentativo di effettuare un arresto legale di qualsiasi la persona, la Corte ha certa dubita che si possa dire che le disposizioni summenzionate siano applicabili. In qualsiasi l'evento, presumendo anche che si può dire che l'uso di vigore letale nella causa presente abbia perseguito, qualsiasi degli scopi summenzionati, la Corte non considera, che il Governo ha reso conto in modo appropriato in merito aòl'uso di questa forza che dà luogo alle morti dei cinque residenti di Kogi (Runnoye).
142. In questo collegamento, la Corte prima nota di tutti che la sua capacità di valutare le circostanze che circondano le morti dei parenti dei richiedenti attinenti, incluso il legale o struttura regolatore in posto, la pianificazione e controllo dell'operazione in oggetto e le azioni dei membri delle Forze Armate federali che davvero amministrarono il vigore, è impedito severamente con la svogliatezza manifesta del Governo rispondente per cooperare con la Corte nella causa presente ed il loro insuccesso per presentare qualsiasi documenti o informazioni riguardo agli eventi sotto la considerazione.
143. In particolare, la Corte nota che, mentre chiedendo che i membri delle Forze Armate federali coinvolsero nell'incidente di 12 settembre 1999-sia gli ufficiali imponenti in accusa dell'operazione ed i piloti degli aerei di SU-25 che presero parte nell'attacco-aveva agito nella piena ottemperanza con legislazione nazionale e regolamentazioni per garantire la sicurezza della popolazione civile, così come quelli relativo all'uso di vigore letale, il Governo rispondente andò a vuoto ad offrire una copia di qualsiasi atto così legale o regolamentazioni, o anche più specificamente indicare gli strumenti legali ai quali loro si riferirono. Questo ha impedito alla Corte del valutare se una struttura legale ed appropriata riguardo all'uso di vigore letale con personale militare era a posto e, in tal caso, se contenne le salvaguardie chiare per ostacolare privazione arbitraria della vita e soddisfare il requisito di protezione “con legge” del diritto a vita garantita con Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
144. La Corte gli ulteriori costatazione inaccettabile l'insuccesso del Governo per prevedere qualsiasi informazioni significativa e prova di documentario come alla pianificazione ed esecuzione dell'attacco aereo di 12 settembre 1999 e le azioni dei piloti in che parteciparono quel l'attacco. Loro facevano nessuno più che si riferisca alle conclusioni delle autorità inquirenti nazionali in una decisione di 23 settembre 2005 per cessare i procedimenti penali riguardo all'incidente di 12 settembre 1999. In particolare, secondo il Governo, le azioni degli ufficiali imponenti che avevano ordinato un sciopero aereo su Kogi (Runnoye) era stato giustificato, siccome loro avevano “affidabile e sufficiente” informazioni sull'ubicazione nel vicinato di che villaggio di combattenti illegali e numerosi che stavano preparando presumibilmente attacchi di terrorista di grande potenza e perciò avevano posato un pericolo che non poteva essere eliminato con qualsiasi altro vuole dire, in particolare con usando truppe basi. Le azioni dei piloti erano state giustificate anche, nella prospettiva del Governo, siccome loro avevano agito facendo seguito all’ordine vincolante dei suoi superiori.
145. La Corte riguarda i chiarimenti avanzati col Governo come inadeguato e poco convincente. Prima di tutti, la Corte è scettica dell'argomento del Governo riguardo alla presenza di combattenti illegali nel vicinato di Kogi (Runnoye) al tempo attinente come, separatamente dall'affermare in modo assente che le informazioni a che effetto era stato “affidabile e sufficiente”, il Governo non produsse nessuna prova per corroborare quel l'asserzione.
146. Inoltre, presumendo anche che le autorità nazionali e competenti avevano informazioni a disposizione loro come all'ubicazione di una base terrorista nel vicinato di Kogi (Runnoye), il Governo andò a vuoto a dimostrare che il grado necessario di cura era stato esercitato nel valutare che informazioni e nel preparare l'operazione di 12 settembre 1999 in tale modo come evitare o minimizzare, alla più grande misura possibile, rischi di perdita delle vite, sia di persone a chi le misure furono dirette e di civili, e minimizzare il ricorso a vigore letale (vedere McCann, citato sopra, §§ 194 e 201). In particolare, in finora come il Governo si appellato su Articolo 2 § 2 (b) della Convenzione, la Corte considera lo spiegamento dell'aviazione militare dotato di arma pesanti per essere, in se stesso grezzamente sproporzionato al fine di effettuare l'arresto legale di una persona. L'argomento dei richiedenti all'effetto che il Governo non aveva prodotto prova che in oggetto qualsiasi combattente era stato catturato come un risultato dell'attacco è di attinenza diretta.
147. Nella misura in cui Governo invocò Articolo 2 § 2 (un) della Convenzione, chiedendo che il vigore letale era usato in difesa di persone dalla violenza illegale, la Corte nota di tutto gli argomento di richiedenti che rimase incontrastato col Governo prima che le autorità più probabilmente erano consapevoli, o in qualsiasi l'evento, sarebbe dovuto essere consapevole, della presenza di una popolazione civile in Kogi (Runnoye). Con questo in mente, la Corte è prevista con la scelta delle autorità russe di vuole dire nella causa presente per il conseguimento del fine indicato col Governo.
148. Non trova soddisfacente l'argomento del Governo che loro non potessero raggiungere lo scopo in oggetto con qualsiasi altro vuole dire e, in particolare, con usando truppe basi, siccome il Governo andò a vuoto a spiegare questa dichiarazione in qualsiasi il dettaglio, affitti presentare da solo qualsiasi prova documentaria in appoggio di sé. La Corte gli ulteriori rifiuti come poco convincente le asserzioni del Governo all'effetto che l’attacco ha compiuto coi vigori di aria federali nel vicinato di Kogi (Runnoye) era di un “la punta di spillo” la natura e che fu diretto contro obiettivi militari, la loro designazione ed il grado di pericolo che è stato “ovvio”, nell'osservazione del Governo. Il Governo andò a vuoto a chiamare qualsiasi di quegli obiettivi. Inoltre, le loro dichiarazioni non sono corroborate con qualsiasi la prova e contraddice la descrizione particolareggiata dell'incidente data coi richiedenti ed i risultati ufficialmente registrati dell'attacco che attesta le morti di cinque civili-tre donne e due figli minori - e la distruzione di approssimativamente trenta alloggi che sono pressoché il villaggio intero (vedere divide in paragrafi 19, 20 e 30 sopra). Contro questo sfondo, la Corte non può, ma conviene coi richiedenti che il loro villaggio di casa faceva infatti venga a bombardamento indiscriminato coi vigori di aria federali sotto.
149. Non sembra inoltre che le autorità avevano considerato a del tutto comprensivamente i limiti e costrizioni sull'uso di arma indiscriminate all'interno di un'area popolata (vedere Isayeva c. la Russia, n. 57950/00, § 189 24 febbraio 2005). Non c'è anche prova che a qualsiasi stadio dell'operazione qualsiasi misure furono prese per per evitare, o almeno minimizzare, il rischio alle vite dei residenti di Kogi (Runnoye). In particolare, non sembra che le autorità presero qualsiasi passi con una prospettiva ad informando in anticipo gli abitanti di un villaggio dell'attacco ed a garantendo la loro evacuazione. In queste circostanze, la Corte non può, ma conclude che le autorità andarono a vuoto ad esercitare cura appropriata nell'organizzazione e controllo dell'operazione di 12 settembre 1999.
150. In somma, la Corte considera, che il bombardamento indiscriminato di un villaggio abitò con civili-donne e figli che sono fra il loro numero-era manifestamente sproporzionato al conseguimento del fine sotto Articolo 2 § 2 (un) invocò col Governo. Trova perciò che lo Stato rispondente fallì in obbligo suo per proteggere il diritto alla vita di OMISSIS-la moglie del primo richiedente e figli; OMISSIS -la madre del secondo richiedente, sorella del tredicesimo richiedente e figlia del venti-secondo richiedente; e OMISSIS -la madre del terzo richiedente.
151. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione su quel il conto.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
152. Il primo, secondo, terzo che tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti si sono lamentati che non c'erano state finora via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive in riguardo della violazione addotto di Articolo 2 della Convenzione in come le morti dei loro parenti riguardò. Tutti i richiedenti si lamentarono anche che loro non avevano avuto via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive come riguardi la violazione addotto dei diritti sotto Articoli 3 e 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 13 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
"Ogni persona i cui i diritti e libertà riconosciuti nella Convenzione sono stati violati, ha diritto alla concessione di un ricorso effettivo dinnanzi ad un'istanza nazionale, anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone agendo nell'esercizio delle loro funzioni ufficiali. "
153. I richiedenti si riferirono alle altre cause riguardo ad eventi nella Repubblica di Cecenia durante lo stesso periodo durante il quale una violazione di Articolo 13 era stata trovata ed era stata invitata la Corte a fare una sentenza simile nella causa presente.
154. Il Governo dibatté che i richiedenti avevano avuto via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive in riguardo delle loro azioni di reclamo e che le autorità non avevano impedito loro dall'usare quelle via di ricorso. Nei particolari, penali procedimenti era stato avviato ed un'indagine nelle circostanze dell'incidente di 12 settembre 1999 era stata condotta seguente l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti ai corpi competenti. Il Governo indicò inoltre che i primi tre richiedenti avevano ottenuto il risarcimento in collegamento con le morti dei loro membri di famiglia che, nella loro prospettiva, provò che via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive erano disponibili a livello nazionale. In appoggio del loro argomento il Governo si riferì anche a decisioni prese con corti nazionali in due set non correlati di atti nei quali i rivendicatori erano stati assegnati il risarcimento in riguardo delle azioni illegali di ufficiali Statali. Il Governo non presentò copie delle decisioni di corte alle quali loro si riferirono.
A. Ammissibilità
155. La Corte reitera che, secondo la sua causa-legge, Articolo 13 fa domanda solamente, dove un individuo ha un “rivendicazione difendibile” essere la vittima di una violazione di un diritto di Convenzione. Nonostante i termini di Articolo 13 lettura letteralmente, l'esistenza di una violazione effettiva di un'altra disposizione della Convenzione (una disposizione effettiva) non è un requisito indispensabile per la richiesta dell'Articolo (vedere Boyle e Riso c. il Regno Unito, 27 aprile 1988, § 52 la Serie Un n. 131).
156. Nella presente causa causa, la Corte osserva che, come già notato in paragrafo (b) la valutazione di La Corte
114 sopra, il Governo ammise che l'attacco aereo e federale di 12 settembre 1999 aveva dato luogo alle morti di cinque residenti di Kogi (Runnoye). Loro ammisero anche inoltre, che un numero di edifici residenziali e non-residenziali era stato distrutto come un risultato di che attacco (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). Contro questo sfondo, la Corte è soddisfatta, che i richiedenti hanno una rivendicazione difendibile sotto Articoli 2, 3 e 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per il fine di Articolo 13.
157. La Corte nota perciò che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto Articolo 13 in concomitanza con Articoli 2, 3 e 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 non è mal-fondato manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Principi Generali
158. La Corte reitera che Articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello di cittadino di una via di ricorso per eseguire la sostanza dei diritti di Convenzione e le libertà in forma purchessia è probabile che sarebbero accaduti loro di essere garantiti nell'ordine legale e nazionale. L'effetto di Articolo 13 deve costringere così la disposizione di una via di ricorso nazionale a trattare con la sostanza di un “azione di reclamo difendibile” sotto la Convenzione ed accordare il sollievo appropriato, benché Stati Contraenti siano riconosciuti della discrezione come alla maniera nella quale loro si attengono coi loro obblighi di Convenzione sotto questa disposizione. La sfera dell'obbligo sotto Articolo 13 varia dipendendo dalla natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto la Convenzione. Ciononostante, la via di ricorso richiesta con Articolo 13 deve essere “effettivo” in pratica così come in legge, in particolare nel senso che il suo esercizio non deve essere impedito ingiustificabilmente con atti od omissioni delle autorità dello Stato rispondente (vedere Aksoy, citato sopra, § 95).
159. La Corte reitera inoltre che, quando un individuo formula una rivendicazione difendibile in riguardo di uccidere, tortura o la distruzione di proprietà che comporta la responsabilità dello Stato la nozione di un “via di ricorso effettiva”, nel senso di Articolo 13 della Convenzione, comporta, oltre al pagamento del risarcimento dove appropriato, un'indagine completa ed effettiva capace di condurre all'identificazione e punizione di quelli responsabile ed incluso accesso effettivo col reclamante alla procedura investigativa (vedere Kaya, citato sopra, § 107; Aksoy, citato sopra, § 98; Menteş ed Altri c. la Turchia, 28 novembre 1997, § 89 Relazioni 1997-VIII; e Çaçan c. la Turchia (il dec.), n. 33646/96, 28 marzo 2000).
2. L’applicazione alla causa presente
160. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, il Governo insistette che una varietà di via di ricorso effettive fosse stata disponibile ai richiedenti a livello nazionale. In particolare, loro aguzzarono al fatto che, nella conformità con Decreto Presidenziale n. 898 5 settembre 1995, i primi tre richiedenti avevano ricevuto il risarcimento in atti per le morti dei loro parenti. Loro dibatterono anche che i richiedenti erano stati liberi per depositare un'azione civile, sotto Articoli 1067 e 1069 del Codice civile russo, per il risarcimento per il danno inflitto sulle loro case e proprietà and/or per ottenere il risarcimento extragiudiziale su che conto come previsto per in Decreti Governativi N. 510 e 404 il 1997 e 4 luglio 2003 di 30 aprile datato rispettivamente.
(a) Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 2
161. La Corte non trova l'argomenti convincendo del Governo. In particolare, in finora come il Governo si appellato sulla sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Nogayskiy di 18 marzo 2005, siccome sostenuto con la Corte Suprema della Repubblica di 13 luglio 2005 Dagestan col quale i primi tre richiedenti furono assegnati il risarcimento per le morti dei loro membri di famiglia (vedere divide in paragrafi 70-71 sopra), non considera che questa via di ricorso può essere riguardata come effettivo per il fine di Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 2 della Convenzione, nonostante la sua conseguenza positiva per i primi tre richiedenti nella forma di un'assegnazione finanziaria. Che assegnazione fu basata su Decreto Presidenziale n. 898 5 settembre 1995 che purché per un pagamento di grumo-somma di un importo fisso a parenti di ogni individuo uccisi come un risultato delle ostilità nella Repubblica di Cecenia, senza distinguere fra morti inflisse con individui privati e quelli causarono con agenti Statali (vedere paragrafo 86 sopra). Quando assegnando il risarcimento, la Corte distrettuale chiaramente affermò che il suo pagamento non era dipendente sulla costituzione di un collegamento causale fra il danno causato e le azioni dello Stato. È perciò chiaro che i procedimenti in oggetto era incapace di creazione qualsiasi sentenze significative come ai perpetratore dell'aggressione fatale, ed ancora meno per stabilire la loro responsabilità (vedere, in un contesto simile, Khashiyev ed Akayeva c. la Russia, N. 57942/00 e 57945/00, § 121 24 febbraio 2005).
162. La Corte nota inoltre che, come sé ha sostenuto su molte occasioni, in circostanze dove, come nella causa presente, l'indagine penale nelle morti era inefficace e l'efficacia di qualsiasi l'altra via di ricorso che è potuta esistere fu minata di conseguenza, lo Stato è andato a vuoto nel suo obbligo sotto Articolo 13 della Convenzione. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione in riguardo delle violazioni summenzionate di Articolo 2 della Convenzione riguardo alle morti del primo, secondo, terzi, tredicesimo ed i membri di famiglia di venti-secondo richiedenti.
(b) Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
163. Riguardo alle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 13 in collegamento con l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera, alla luce dei principi riaffermati nel paragrafo 159 sopra, che la sola via di ricorso nazionale potenzialmente effettiva nelle circostanze sarebbe stata un'indagine penale adeguata. In questo collegamento si riferisce alla sua sentenza sopra riguardo all'inefficacia dell'indagine sulle morti dei cinque residenti di Kogi (Runnoye). la Corte costata che questo è anche vero riguardo all'indagine sulla distruzione delle case e delle proprietà dei richiedenti, dato che tutti quei reati furono investigati all'interno dello stesso set di procedimenti penali.
164. Considera inoltre che, similmente al suo giudizio reso nel paragrafo 162 sopra riguardo all'esistenza di vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione, in assenza di qualsiasi risultato significativo dell'indagine sulla distruzione dei loro alloggi e proprietà, la loro rivendicazione civile per danni a questo conto non avrebbe avuto proprio nessuna prospettiva di successo. Effettivamente, l’Articolo 1069 del Codice civile russo che stabilisce le norme del risarcimento per danni inflitti da rappresentanti dello Stato e che sarebbe stato applicabile se i richiedenti avessero introdotto procedimenti civili come suggerito dal Governo, prevede che gli agenti Statali sono responsabili solamente per danni causati dalle loro azioni illegali od omissioni di atti (vedere paragrafo 84 sopra). Nelle circostanze della presente causa, dove, come menzionato dal Governo, l'indagine sull'attacco è terminata con una decisione del 23 settembre 2005 che affermava che le azioni dei membri delle Forze Armate federali furono giustificate, la rivendicazione civile dei richiedenti per danni sarebbe stata condannata ad insuccesso. In appoggio di questo giudizio, la Corte si riferisce anche alla pratica delle corti russe che hanno rifiutato costantemente di assegnare qualsiasi risarcimento per danni causati dalle forze federali durante il conflitto nella Repubblica di Cecenia affermando, in particolare, che le azioni di queste utlime erano state legali siccome delle operazioni anti-terrorismo nella regione era state avviate con decreti presidenziali e governativi attinenti che non erano giudicati incostituzionale (vedere paragrafi 89-91 sopra). Tenendo questo in mente, la Corte respinge l'argomento del Governo che era aperto ai richiedenti introdurre una rivendicazione civile per il risarcimento a riguardo del loro alloggio perduto e delle loro proprietà, siccome il diritto in oggetto era illusorio e privo di sostanza. Insomma, la Corte trova la via di ricorso sotto esame inadeguata ed inefficace, dato che chiaramente era incapace di portare all'identificazione ed alla punizione dei responsabili, o equivalente ad una qualsiasi assegnazione finanziaria nelle circostanze della presente causa.
165. Riguardo all'argomento del Governo per cui i richiedenti avrebbero potuto ricevere il risarcimento extragiudiziale per la loro proprietà perduta, la Corte nota in primo luogo che il Decreto Governativo n. 510 del 30 aprile 1997, a cui ha fatto riferimento il Governo riguarda il pagamento del risarcimento a riguardo di proprietà che erano state distrutte prima del 12 dicembre 1994 (vedere paragrafo 87 sopra), ed è perciò chiaramente irrilevante nella causa presente. È anche dubbioso che il Decreto Governativo n. 404 del 4 luglio 2003 che riconobbe il diritto al risarcimento ai residenti permanenti della Repubblica di Cecenia (vedere paragrafo 88 sopra), può essere applicato alla situazione dei richiedenti, dato che dopo l'attacco la maggior parte di loro lasciarono permanentemente la regione (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). In qualsiasi caso, presumendo anche che ai richiedenti venga concesso un risarcimento extragiudiziale sotto questo ultimo decreto come suggerito dal Governo, è chiaro dallo strumento legale attinente che il risarcimento in oggetto è pagato senza riguardo alle particolari circostanze nelle quali fu persa la proprietà, vale a dire, irrispettoso del fatto se gli agenti Statali erano stati responsabili per la distruzione. Il valore della proprietà perduta non è preso inoltre, in considerazione, poiché l'importo complessivo pagato per l’alloggio perduto e le altre proprietà non può eccedere RUB 350,000 (circa EUR 9,000). In simili circostanze, la Corte non è persuasa, che il risarcimento a cui ha fatto riferimento il Governo può essere considerato una via di ricorso effettiva per la violazione addotta.
166. Alla luce delle considerazioni precedenti, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo nella misura in cui riguarda l'insuccesso addotto dei richiedenti nell' esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali disponibili a riguardo delle loro azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e costata che i richiedenti non avevano vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo della violazione addotta dei loro diritti garantiti dalle disposizioni di Convenzione summenzionate. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione a quel conto.
(c) Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 3
167. Infine, avendo riguardo ad alle sue conclusioni in paragrafi 162 e 166 sopra, la Corte trova che i richiedenti non avevano via di ricorso effettive come riguardi la loro azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione, e perciò l'eccezione del Governo su che conto dovrebbe essere respinto. Comunque, considera che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con Articolo 3 della Convenzione non solleva un problema separato nelle circostanze della causa presente, e non c'è perciò nessun bisogno di esaminarlo.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
168. Tutti i richiedenti si lamentarono sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che le loro case e le loro proprietà erano state distrutte dalle forze armate federali, col risultato che loro erano stati costretti a lasciare il loro villaggio di residenza ed erano divenuti rifugiati. Quelle disposizioni, nelle parti attinenti, recitano come segue:
Articolo 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
169. I richiedenti si riferirono ai certificati del 24 dicembre 2007 (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra) per corroborare la loro asserzione che loro erano stati proprietari degli alloggi e delle dépendance che erano state distrutte, affermando che tutti gli altri documenti che confermavano il loro titolo sulle proprietà in oggetto erano stati persi durante il bombardamento.
170. Il Governo ammise che l'attacco del 12 settembre 1999 aveva dato luogo alla distruzione di numerosi edifici residenziali e non-residenziali nel villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye). Allo stesso tempo addusse che l'indagine nazionale sull’attacco aveva stabilito che quegli edifici erano appartenuti allo Stato e che i richiedenti li avevano mantenuti ai termini di un contratto d'affitto, e che avrebbero potuto lamentarsi solamente perciò sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per il danno inflitto sul loro effetti personali.
171. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che l'interferenza addotta coi diritti dei richiedenti garantiti dall’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dal’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 era legale, siccome le operazioni di anti terrorismo sul territorio della Repubblica di Cecenia, nel contesto di cui era stato compiuto l’attacco del 12 settembre 1999 erano state eseguite sulla base dell’Atto di Soppressione del Terrorismo del 25 luglio 1998 e “ delle regolamentazioni attinenti dei corpi Statali.” Insistette inoltre che l’attacco che aveva dato luogo al danno o alla distruzione delle case dei richiedenti e delle proprietà era stato necessario per sopprimere l'attività criminale dei membri dei gruppi armati illegali ed ostacolare gli attacchi terroristici che stavano preparando. Infine, il Governo presentò che i richiedenti avrebbero potuto ottenere il risarcimento per il danno addotto in procedimenti civili.
A. Ammissibilità
172. La Corte costata che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivi. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
173. La Corte osserva all'inizio che il Governo contestò i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti sugli alloggi e le dépendance che erano stati coinvolti nell'attacco aereo federale del 12 settembre 1999 affermando che la proprietà in oggetto erano appartenute allo Stato. La Corte osserva che il Governo non produsse prove documentarie in appoggio del suo argomento, mentre i richiedenti, da parte loro presentarono certificati emessi dall'amministrazione di distretto che confermavano il loro titolo sugli edifici distrutti (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra). La Corte considera che i richiedenti non possono essere costretti proprio ad addurre qualsiasi altro documento che provi il loro titolo sulla proprietà in oggetto, siccome è molto probabile che, come asserito dai richiedenti qualsiasi simile documento sia stato distrutto insieme con la loro proprietà durante l'attacco. In simili circostanze, la Corte trova stabilito che i richiedenti erano i giusti proprietari degli alloggi e dépendance nel villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye) al tempo attinente.
174. La Corte nota inoltre che il Governo ammise che l'attacco aereo federale del 12 settembre 1999 aveva dato luogo alla distruzione di un numero di edifici residenziali e non-residenziali nel villaggio di Kogi (Runnoye). È perciò chiaro che c'era stata un'interferenza coi diritti dei richiedenti garantiti dall’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte deve ora soddisfarsi che questa interferenza soddisfece il requisito della legalità, intraprese uno scopo legittimo ed era proporzionata allo scopo perseguito.
175. Come riguardi la legalità dell'interferenza in oggetto, il Governo si riferì alla Soppressione di Atto di Terrorismo ed innominato “regolamentazioni attinenti di corpi Statali” come una base legale per l'interferenza addotto.
176. La Corte reitera, come ha già notato in cause riguardo al conflitto nella Repubblica di Cecenia che l’ Atto di Soppressione del Terrorismo e, in particolare, la sezione 21 che solleva gli agenti Statali che partecipano ad un'operazione di anti terrorismo da qualsiasi responsabilità per danni causati a inter alia, “altri interessi protetti giuridicamente”, pur investendo di ampi poteri gli agenti Statali all'interno della zona dell'operazione di anti terrorismo , non definisce con chiarezza sufficiente la sfera di quei poteri e il metodo del loro esercizio in modo da riconoscere una protezione individuale adeguata contro l'arbitrarietà (vedere Khamidov c. Russia, n. 72118/01, § 143 ECHR 2007-XII (estratti). Il riferimento del Governo a questo Atto non può sostituire la specifica autorizzazione di un'interferenza coi diritti di un individuo sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, delimitando l'oggetto e la sfera di questa interferenza e configurata in conformità con le disposizioni legali attinenti. Le disposizioni dell'Atto summenzionato non saranno costruite così in modo da creare un'esenzione per qualsiasi genere di limitazione di diritti personali per un periodo indefinito di tempo e senza predisporre confini chiari per le azioni delle forze di sicurezza (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Imakayeva c. Russia, n. 7615/02, § 188 ECHR 2006-XIII (estratti).
177. Similmente, nella presente causa la Corte considera che lo strumento legale in oggetto, formulato in termini vaghi e generali, non può servire come base legale sufficiente per un’interferenza drastica come la distruzione dell'alloggio e delle proprietà di un individuo e. Osserva inoltre che il Governo non presentò qualsiasi documento, come un ordine, istruzione o regolamentazione che autorizzava specificamente i membri delle Forze Armate federali ad infliggere danni sulle proprietà dei richiedenti, incluso le loro case, né ha fornito nessun dettaglio a riguardo di tale documento, se ce ne fosse stato uno.
178. La Corte conclude così, nella prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra e in assenza di una decisione individualizzata od ordine che chiaramente indicava i motivi e le condizioni per infliggere danni alla proprietà dei richiedenti, incluso il loro alloggio e contro cui si sarebbe potuto fare ricorso presso una corte sostenendo che l'interferenza coi diritti dei richiedenti non era “legale”, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Nella prospettiva di questo giudizio la Corte non considera necessario esaminare se l'interferenza in oggetto intraprese uno scopo legittimo ed era proporzionata a quello scopo.
179. Trova così che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa della distruzione delle proprietà dei richiedenti, incluso il loro alloggio, nell'attacco aereo federale del 12 settembre 1999.
V. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 3 DELLA CONVENZIONE
180. Tutti i richiedenti si lamentarono che loro avevano sofferto dell'angoscia mentale e grave e l'angoscia in collegamento con l'attacco sul loro villaggio, le morti dei loro vicini parenti e la distruzione dei loro alloggi e l'altra proprietà. Loro si appellarono su Articolo 3 della Convenzione che legge siccome segue:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamenti o punizioni inumani o degradanti .”
181. I richiedenti si riferirono alle cause di Selçuk ed Asker c. la Turchia (24 aprile 1998, Relazioni 1998-II), Yöyler c. la Turchia (n. 26973/95, 24 luglio 2003) ed Ayder ed Altri c. la Turchia (n. 23656/94, 8 gennaio 2004) in che la Corte aveva trovato una violazione di Articolo 3 su conto della distruzione delle case dei richiedenti di fronte ai loro occhi. I richiedenti dibatterono che la loro sofferenza morale era stata anche più profondo che che nelle cause turche, determinato che loro avevano testimoniato alla distruzione delle loro case durante un attacco di bombardamento. Loro contesero anche che loro si erano lamentati ripetutamente dell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 ai vari corpi Statali che, comunque, non era riuscito a trattare adeguatamente con le loro azioni di reclamo. Rimase poco chiaro a loro se le autorità avevano preso qualsiasi passi nel collegamento con quelle azioni di reclamo separatamente dallo spedire un investigatore che aveva intervistato gli abitanti di un villaggio ed aveva preso fotografie del villaggio distrutto.
182. Il Governo dibatté che l'indagine non aveva stabilito che i richiedenti erano stati sottoposti a trattamento inumano o degradante proibito con Articolo 3 della Convenzione e che i richiedenti avevano a nessun tempo presentato qualsiasi simile azioni di reclamo alle autorità nazionali.
A. Ammissibilità
183. La Corte costata che questa parte della richiesta non è mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile su qualsiasi gli altri motivi. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
184. La Corte ha osservato su molte occasioni che Articolo 3 custodisce uno dei valori fondamentali di società democratica. Anche nel più difficile di circostanze, come la lotta contro il terrorismo o malavita la Convenzione proibisce in termini tortura assoluta o trattamento inumano o degradante o punizione. Diversamente dalla maggior parte delle clausole effettive della Convenzione e di Protocolli Numero 1 e 4, Articolo 3 non costituisce disposizione eccezioni e nessuna derogazione da sé è anche lecito sotto Articolo 15 nell'evento di un'emergenza pubblica che minaccia la vita della nazione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Aksoy, citato sopra, § 62). Mal-trattamento deve raggiungere un minimo livello della gravità se è incorrere all'interno della sfera di Articolo 3. La valutazione di questo minimo è relativa: dipende da tutte le circostanze della causa, come la durata del trattamento il suo and/or fisico effetti mentali e, in delle cause, il sesso, età e stato di salute della vittima (vedere, fra le altre autorità, l'Irlanda c. il Regno Unito, citato sopra, § 162).
185. Come riguarda azioni di reclamo di sofferenza morale portata sotto Articolo 3 della Convenzione con parenti di vittime di operazioni di sicurezza eseguiti con le autorità, la Corte ha adottato un approccio restrittivo, mentre affermando che mentre un membro di famiglia di un “sparì persona” può chiedere di essere una vittima di contrario di trattamento ad Articolo 3 (vedere Kurt c. la Turchia, 25 maggio 1998, §§ 130-34 Relazioni 1998-III), lo stesso principio non farebbe domanda a situazioni di solito dove la persona presa in custodia è stata trovata più tardi morta (vedere, per esempio, Tanlı c. la Turchia, n. 26129/95, § 159 ECHR 2001-III; Yasin Ateş c. la Turchia, n. 30949/96, § 135 31 maggio 2005; e Bitiyeva ed Altri c. la Russia, n. 36156/04, § 106 23 aprile 2009). In simile cause la Corte normalmente ha limitato le sue sentenze ad Articolo 2. D'altra parte la Corte ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 3 su conto della sofferenza mentale sopportato con richiedenti come un risultato degli atti di vigori di sicurezza che avevano bruciato completamente le loro case e proprietà di fronte ai loro occhi (vedere Selçuk ed Asker, citato sopra, §§ 77-80; Yöyler, citato sopra, §§ 74-76; ed Ayder ed Altri, citato sopra, §§ 109-11).
186. Al giorno d'oggi la causa, la Corte ha stabilito sopra che i richiedenti vennero ad un attacco di bombardamento indiscriminato durante il quale furono distrutte le loro case e proprietà sotto ed i parenti del primo, secondo, terzo tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti furono uccisi (vedere divide in paragrafi 148, 150 e 179 sopra). La Corte senza dubbio ha che i richiedenti sopportarono la sofferenza mentale e profonda su conto di tutti questi eventi. Il suo compito è accertare se che subendo ha una dimensione capace di portarlo all'interno della sfera di Articolo 3.
187. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota in primo luogo, che, come lontano come la distruzione delle proprietà dei richiedenti incluso il loro alloggio riguardò, la causa presente è distinguibile dalle cause turche assegnate a coi richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 185 sopra). In particolare, nella causa di Selçuk ed Asker la Corte aveva riguardo ad alla maniera nella quale erano state distrutte le case dei richiedenti, e vale a dire al fatto che l'esercizio era stato premeditato ed era stato eseguito sprezzantemente e senza riguardo per i sentimenti dei richiedenti le cui proteste erano state ignorate (vedere Selçuk ed Asker, citato sopra, § 77), e, con questo in mente, fondò che gli atti dei vigori di sicurezza avevano corrisposto “trattamento inumano” all'interno del significato di Articolo 3 della Convenzione. Una linea simile di ragionare sembra essere implicita nelle cause di Yöyler ed Ayder ed Altri. Si può presumere perciò ragionevolmente che nelle cause citate la sicurezza costringe scottato le case dei richiedenti e proprietà con una prospettiva a provocandoli sofferenza mentale che ha abilitato la Corte per trovare una violazione di Articolo 3 su quel il conto.
188. Al giorno d'oggi causa, comunque la Corte non ha nessuna prova per essere in grado giungere alla stessa conclusione. È vero che, siccome è stato trovato sopra, l'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 non fu progettato adeguatamente e controllato (vedere paragrafo 149 sopra) ma non si può dire proprio che questo attacco abbia avuto come il suo fine che sottopone i richiedenti a trattamento inumano, ed in particolare, provocandoli la sofferenza morale. La Corte accetta che i richiedenti hanno potuto soffrire dell'angoscia considerevole come un risultato della distruzione delle loro case e proprietà nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999. Comunque, nella luce del precedente, e tenendo presente anche che già ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 su che conto, la Corte non è capace di trovare una violazione di Articolo 3 della Convenzione nelle circostanze della causa presente, in finora come l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti della distruzione delle loro case e proprietà riguarda.
189. Come riguardi la sofferenza morale sopportò col secondo, terzo tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti a causa delle morti di loro parente prossimo, la Corte osserva che, siccome può essere accertato dai fatti, questi richiedenti non testimoniarono all'uccisione dei loro parenti ma fondò fuori sulle morti seconde dopo l'attacco, quando i corpi furono trovati. Nell'opinione della Corte, questa situazione è piuttosto simile a che di richiedenti dopo cui parenti sono stati trovati morti stato stato preso in custodia con agenti Statali, dove la Corte ha concluso che una sentenza di una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione basterebbe. Perciò, mentre senza dubbio avendo come alla sofferenza profonda causò al secondo, terzo, tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti con le morti dei loro parenti la Corte non trova nessuna violazione di Articolo 3 su che conto, determinato che già ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione nei suoi aspetti effettivi e procedurali.
190. D'altra parte la Corte non può giungere alla stessa conclusione come riguardi il primo richiedente che testimoniò all'uccisione della sua famiglia intera. La Corte ha riguardo ad all'osservazione del primo richiedente all'effetto che lui non è capace di richiamare molto ore più tardi gli eventi dopo le morti dei suoi membri di famiglia sino a, ed essere testimone oculare dichiarazioni all'effetto che il primo richiedente è sembrato essere stato in un stato di colpo profondo dopo che i suoi parenti erano stati uccisi (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). La Corte non lo trova non plausibile che, essendo stato un testimone oculare alle morti istantanee dei suoi due giovani figli e sua moglie, il primo richiedente esperimentò un colpo di simile intensità del quale lui soffrì da una perdita provvisoria di memoria. La Corte considera inoltre che la sofferenza sopportò col primo richiedente era di simile gravità per gli atti delle autorità che danno luogo alle morti dei membri di famiglia del primo richiedente per essere categorizzato come trattamento inumano all'interno del significato di Articolo 3.
191. In somma, i costatazione di Corte che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 3 della Convenzione su conto della sofferenza morale sopportati col primo richiedente come un risultato delle morti di sua moglie e due figli e che non c'è stata finora nessuna violazione della disposizione in come le azioni di reclamo fu presentato con gli altri richiedenti.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
192. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno patrimoniale
1. I richiedenti
193. I richiedenti chiesero i vari importi indicati in Annettono II, importo totale 6,315,510.96 euro (EUR). Loro si riferirono alle loro dichiarazioni prodotte alla Corte, dove ognuno di loro descrisse in dettaglio, ed indicò il valore di, la proprietà che era stata distrutta durante l'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 ed era stata chiesta il risarcimento per che proprietà, così come per la perdita di utili ed i costi di affittare alloggio alternativo e cibo che compra dopo l'attacco di 12 settembre 1999. I primi tre richiedenti chiesero anche rimborso di spese in cui loro erano incorsi in collegamento con la sepoltura dei loro parenti.
194. Ognuno dei richiedenti affermati, in particolare, che, prima dell'incidente in oggetto, suo o la sua famiglia era cresciuta raccolti, parte di che, in importi che variano fra 35,000 rubli russi (RUB) e RUB 40,000 per ogni richiedente per anno, era stato tenuto per il consumo personale, mentre l'eccedenza era stata venduta ed era stata generata un profitto annuale di RUB 50,000 a RUB 70,000 per ogni richiedente. I richiedenti elencarono inoltre il numero esatto di qualche genere di bestiame sollevato con ognuno di loro di fronte agli eventi di 12 settembre 1999, descrisse i raccolti nel giardino, diede il numero esatto di qualche genere di albero nel frutteto e purché il valore totale di tutti questa proprietà fra la quale variò RUB 256,000 e RUB 390,000. Ognuno dei richiedenti seguì a descrivere l'alloggio, mentre indicando la sua area di superficie, e dépendance possedettero con suo o la sua famiglia di fronte all'attacco e purché il loro valore, variando fra RUB 640,000 e RUB 920,000. I richiedenti elencarono anche il loro effetti personali della famiglia, mentre indicando il loro valore complessivo fra il quale variò RUB 190,000 e RUB 420,000. I richiedenti indicarono poi l'importo di reddito ricevuto con loro nel 1998 dalla vendita dei loro raccolti, variando fra RUB 22,000 e RUB 56,000, e variando da RUB 256,000 a RUB 390,000 dalla vendita del loro bestiame.
195. I richiedenti menzionarono inoltre i vari importi di affitto che attualmente loro stavano pagando ogni mese, variando fra RUB 500 e RUB 1,000, ed indicò le somme complessive, mentre variando fra RUB 38,000 e RUB 75,000 che loro pagavano in affitto dal 1999 sino al tempo dell'osservazione delle loro rivendicazioni alla Corte. Loro indicarono anche i vari importi pagati fin da 1999 per cibo, vestiti e le utilità.
196. In appoggio della loro rivendicazione, i richiedenti si appellarono sui certificati di 24 dicembre 2007 (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra) e gli altri documenti. In particolare, i richiedenti presentarono certificati emessi col capo dell'amministrazione del Distretto di Shelkovskiy della Repubblica di Cecenia 27 dicembre 2007 in riguardo di ognuno di loro. Ogni certificato attestò che, prima di 12 settembre 1999, il richiedente attinente aveva risieduto in fattoria n. 2 dello Shelkovskiy State la fattoria (il villaggio di Kogi) ed aveva avuto in proprietà un alloggio, dépendance, giardino, frutteto, bestiame bovino e pollame. I certificati diedero inoltre una descrizione, ed indicò il valore, della proprietà perduta dei richiedenti così come il reddito annuale medio dalla vendita dei raccolti dei richiedenti e bestiame ed il reddito ricevuta nel 1998. Siccome può essere accertato, tutti che informazioni sono prese parola per parola dalle dichiarazioni dei richiedenti presentò alla Corte (vedere divide in paragrafi 194-195 sopra).
197. Un certificato emise 22 gennaio 2008 col Proprietà Comitato dell'amministrazione del Distretto di Shelkovskiy attestato che il prezzo medio di un alloggio con annette nel distretto nel 1999 vario fra RUB 500,000 e RUB 900,000. Un altro certificato emesso con la stessa autorità sulla stessa data confermata che il valore medio di effetti personali della famiglia di un abitante di un villaggio nel distretto in 1999 variati fra RUB 250,000 e RUB 400,000.
198. Un certificato emise 22 gennaio 2008 col Terra Comitato dell'amministrazione del Distretto di Shelkovskiy affermato che il prezzo medio di un'area di terra che misura 150 a 200 metri di piazza nel distretto nel 1999 corrispose a fra RUB 40,000 e RUB 70,000.
199. Un certificato della stessa data emesso col Settore per l'Agricoltura dell'amministrazione del Distretto di Shelkovskiy indicata che il valore annuale e medio dei raccolti dal giardino di un abitante di un villaggio di distretto del totale di RUB 50,000 a RUB 70,000, e che il reddito annuale medio dalla vendita di simile raccolti corrisposta ad una somma da RUB 30,000 a RUB 50,000. In un certificato 27 gennaio 2008 datò il Settore dell'Agricoltura del Distretto di Nogayskiy della Repubblica di Dagestan si riferito alle stesse cifre con riguardo ad al Distretto di Nogayskiy. Un altro certificato emesso con l'autorità seconda sulla stessa data elencò prezzi approssimati per vari generi di bestiame nel distretto nel 1999.
200. In un certificato di 28 gennaio 2008 la giunta comunale di uno dei villaggi nel Distretto di Nogayskiy affermato che in 1999 aree di terra che misura approssimativamente 100 metri di piazza che a che tempo aveva avuto un valore di mercato di RUB 20,000 a RUB 30,000, era stato assegnato esente da spese. Un certificato emise sulla stessa data con un'autorità di inventario del Distretto di Nogayskiy confermata che il prezzo medio di un alloggio con annette in che distretto in 2008 variati fra RUB 500,000 e RUB 900,000.
201. I primi tre richiedenti si riferirono anche a certificati di 25 dicembre 2007 emessi con le giunte comunali dei villaggi nelle quali loro ora stavano vivendo, mentre conferma che loro erano incorsi in spese nell'importo di RUB 160,000, RUB 80,000 e RUB rispettivamente 88,000 per la sepoltura dei loro membri di famiglia uccisa 12 settembre 1999.
2. Il Governo
202. Il Governo contestò la rivendicazione dei richiedenti sotto questo capo come non comprovato e senza sostegno con qualsiasi documenti affidabili. Loro affermarono che i certificati si appellarono su coi richiedenti non poteva essere considerato prova che attesta il vero danno patrimoniale.
3. La valutazione della Corte
203. La Corte reitera che ci deve essere un collegamento causale e chiaro fra il danno patrimoniale chiesto coi richiedenti e la violazione della Convenzione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Çakıcı c. la Turchia [GC], n. 23657/94, § 127 ECHR 1999-IV). Ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 2 su conto delle morti dei parenti del primo, secondo, terzo, tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti ed una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 su conto della distruzione di tutta i proprietà di richiedenti durante l'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 coi vigori federali. La Corte senza dubbio ha che c'è un collegamento diretto fra quelle violazioni e le perdite patrimoniali addotte coi richiedenti.
204. Osserva inoltre che per provare la loro rivendicazione come alla quantità e valore della loro proprietà perduta i richiedenti si appellarono su un numero di certificati emesso con le autorità del Distretto di Shelkovskiy della Repubblica di Cecenia e le autorità del Distretto di Nogayskiy della Repubblica di Dagestan (vedere divide in paragrafi 196-201 sopra). La Corte nota che è solamente i certificati di 27 dicembre 2007 quel elencò le proprietà distrutte dei richiedenti ed indicò il loro valore. Gli altri documenti offrirono informazioni di riferimento riguardo ai prezzi medi di articoli attinenti di proprietà al tempo di materiale.
205. Come riguardi i certificati di 27 dicembre 2007, la Corte osserva che questi documenti, benché emise più di otto anni dopo l'attacco, descrive le proprietà distrutte dei richiedenti in dettaglio, mentre indicando, in particolare, l'area di superficie esatta di alloggi loro, ed il numero esatto di qualche genere di bestiame, alberi di frutta e così su. Nell'assenza di riferimenti in questi certificati a qualsiasi fonte affidabile per quelle descrizioni, è più che probabilmente che loro furono basati solamente sulle proprie osservazioni dei richiedenti siccome reso alla Corte. In simile circostanze, la Corte non è convinta, che questi certificati possono notificare come prova affidabile che conferma la quantità della proprietà perduta dei richiedenti ed il suo valore esatto per abilitarlo per fare una valutazione degli importi per essere assegnato.
206. D'altra parte la Corte riconosce le difficoltà pratiche per i richiedenti per ottenere documenti relativo alla loro proprietà distrutta e lo considera appropriato assegnare importi uguali i richiedenti su una base equa, prendendo in informazioni di conto sui prezzi medi degli articoli attinenti di proprietà al tempo di materiale siccome riflesso nei documenti presentati coi richiedenti (vedere divide in paragrafi 197-201 sopra). In questo collegamento, la Corte respinge, l'argomento del Governo che i certificati addotti non può essere considerato prova affidabile che davvero conferma la misura del danno incorsa in coi richiedenti, siccome il Governo non contestò l'autenticità dei documenti, o gli importi indicarono therein, e non suggerì qualsiasi metodi alternativi di valutare il danno inflissero.
207. In finora come i richiedenti chiese il risarcimento per i loro alloggi distrutti e dépendance, la Corte si riferisce in primo luogo alla sua sentenza sopra nella quale ha accettato che i richiedenti possedettero gli alloggi nei quali loro stavano vivendo (vedere paragrafo 173 sopra). Sé ulteriore prende conto del certificato attinente di 22 gennaio 2008, mentre affermando che nel 1999 il prezzo medio di un alloggio con annette nel Distretto di Shelkovskiy variato fra RUB 500,000 (verso EUR 12,000) e 900,000 (verso EUR 22,000). Gli importi indicati non sembrano eccessivi o irragionevole. Con questo in mente, ed avendo riguardo alla Corte assegna EUR 20,000 ad ognuno di loro in riguardo dei loro alloggi distrutti che prendono in considerazione il tempo in oggetto il quale è passato fin dagli eventi alla parte attinente delle rivendicazioni dei richiedenti.
208. D'altra parte la Corte non è capace di accettare la rivendicazione dei richiedenti riguardo al risarcimento per aree di terra. Presumendo anche che i richiedenti avevano titolo alle aree di terra, non c'è prova che le autorità li ostruirono dall'usare quelle aree. Effettivamente, è chiaro dai fatti della causa che del tempo dopo l'attacco alcuni dei richiedenti ritornarono al villaggio e ristabilirono là (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte non fa assegnazione su quel il conto.
209. I richiedenti presentarono anche una rivendicazione per il risarcimento per il loro effetti personali della famiglia perduto, bestiame e raccolti. Vedendo che il Governo non contestò l'esistenza di simile proprietà di fronte all'attacco, la Corte lo trova ragionevole presumere che i richiedenti possedettero la proprietà in oggetto. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi indipendente e prova inoppugnabile come alla quantità ed il valore esatto di che proprietà, sulla base di principi dell'equità e prendendo in considerazione i certificati attinenti che indicano il valore medio di proprietà di che genere, la Corte lo considera ragionevole assegnare ognuno dei richiedenti EUR 18,000 su quel il conto.
210. Come riguardi la rivendicazione dei richiedenti per il risarcimento per il loro reddito perduto, la Corte osserva che i certificati di 27 dicembre 2007 sono i documenti soli che confermano che i richiedenti ricevettero un po' di reddito dal coltivare. La Corte già ha notato comunque, sopra che questi documenti sembrano essere stati basati completamente sulle proprie osservazioni dei richiedenti e perciò non possono notificare come prova affidabile in appoggio della loro rivendicazione nella sua parte attinente. I richiedenti non addussero qualsiasi gli altri documenti, come, per esempio, la loro dichiarazione dei redditi, capace di confermare che la loro agricoltura era a del tutto proficuo, ed attestando l'importo di qualsiasi simile profitto. La Corte riconosce che è probabile che sia difficile in pratica per i richiedenti ottenere documenti relativo alle loro attività di agricoltura di fronte all'attacco. Ciononostante, nell'assenza di qualsiasi documenti affidabili che confermano che quelle attività portarono i richiedenti traggono profitto, la Corte considera che qualsiasi assegnazione che riguarda il loro reddito perduto sarebbe speculativa. Respinge perciò questa parte della rivendicazione dei richiedenti (vedere Khamidov, citato sopra, § 197).
211. Similmente, la Corte trova la rivendicazione dei richiedenti per rimborso dei costi di alloggio alternativo non comprovato, siccome i richiedenti non corroborarono la loro rivendicazione con qualsiasi documenti affidabili, come contratti di contratto d'affitto che confermano che loro pagarono qualsiasi affitto a tutti ed indicando il suo importo e la durata del contratto d'affitto (vedere, con contrasto, Khamidov, citato sopra, § 186). In simile circostanze, la Corte non fa assegnazione su quel il conto.
212. Infine, in finora come i primi tre richiedenti chiese il risarcimento per spese funebri, la Corte lo trova ragionevole presumere che alcune spese sopportarono in collegamento con la sepoltura dei parenti di questi richiedenti. Nell'assenza di qualsiasi informazioni affidabili come la Corte lo considera appropriato assegnare EUR 3,000 al primo richiedente ed EUR 1,000 ad ognuno del secondo e terzi richiedenti su all'importo esatto di quelle spese, quel il conto.
213. Avendo riguardo ad alle considerazioni sopra, la Corte assegna EUR 41,000 al primo richiedente, EUR 39,000 ad ognuno del secondo e terzi richiedenti, EUR 38,000 ad ognuno del quarto a nono, undicesimo a sedicesimo, diciottesimo a ventunesimo, e venti-terzo a venti-settimo richiedenti, EUR 38,000 ad OMISSIS che intraprese la richiesta presente sul conto del decimo richiedente EUR 38,000 ad OMISSIS che intraprese la richiesta presente sul conto del diciassettesimo richiedente ed EUR 38,000 ad OMISSIS che intraprese la richiesta presente sul conto del venti-secondo richiedente in riguardo di danno patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questi importi.
B. Danno non-patrimoniale
214. I richiedenti chiesero anche il risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale, mentre affermando che nell'attacco di 12 settembre 1999 il primo a terzo, tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti avevano perso i loro membri di famiglia e tutti i richiedenti aveva perso le loro case e proprietà ed era stato costretto per lasciare il loro villaggio di casa. I richiedenti affermarono che loro avevano sofferto del dolore emotivo e grave, paura, l'angoscia e l'angoscia su conto di quegli eventi ed in prospettiva dell'insuccesso delle autorità debitamente investigare la questione. I richiedenti chiesero gli importi seguenti sotto questo capo:
(i) EUR 120,000 per il primo richiedente,
(l'ii) EUR 120,000 per il secondo, tredicesimo e ventiduesimo richiedenti congiuntamente,
(l'iii) EUR 120,000 per il terzo richiedente, e
(l'iv) EUR 25,000 per ognuno dei richiedenti rimanenti.
215. Il Governo non fece particolari commenti a questo riguardo.
216. La Corte osserva che ha trovato una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione su conto dell'uccisione in un attacco aereo e federale dei parenti del primo, secondo, terzo, tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti e l'insuccesso delle autorità russe eseguire un'indagine effettiva in quelle morti. Ha trovato inoltre una violazione di Articoli 8 e 13 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 su conto della distruzione in che attacco di tutte i case di richiedenti e proprietà e l'assenza di via di ricorso nazionali ed effettive. Ha trovato anche una violazione di Articolo 3 su conto della sofferenza mentale sopportato col primo richiedente a causa delle morti di sua moglie e due figli di fronte ai suoi occhi. I richiedenti hanno dovuto soffrire dell'angoscia e hanno dovuto angosciare come un risultato di tutti queste circostanze che non possono essere compensate con una sentenza mera di una violazione. Avendo riguardo ad a queste considerazioni, e prendendo in considerazione le assegnazioni ricevette coi primi tre richiedenti al livello nazionale (vedere divide in paragrafi 67-71 sopra), la Corte lo considera appropriato assegnare, su una base equa, EUR 120,000 al primo richiedente, EUR 30,000 al secondo richiedente, EUR 60,000 al terzo richiedente, EUR 15,000 al tredicesimo richiedente, EUR 10,000 ad ognuno del quarto a nono, undicesimo, dodicesimo decimoquarto a sedicesimo, diciottesimo a ventunesimo e venti-terzo a venti-settimo richiedenti EUR 10,000 ad OMISSIS che intraprese la richiesta presente sul conto del decimo richiedente EUR 10,000 ad OMISSIS che intraprese la richiesta presente sul conto del diciassettesimo richiedente ed EUR 15,000 ad OMISSIS che intraprese la richiesta presente sul conto del venti-secondo richiedente più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questi importi.
C. Richiesta di restituzione di diritti
217. I richiedenti chiesero anche un ordine per la restituzione dei loro alloggi e capanne.
218. Il Governo non fece commenti su questo punto.
219. La Corte reitera che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione le sue conseguenze in tale modo come ripristinare il più lontano possibile la situazione che esiste di fronte alla violazione (restitutio in integrum). Comunque, se restitutio in integrum è in pratica impossibile, gli Stati rispondenti sono gratis per scegliere i mezzi da che cosa loro si atterranno con una sentenza nella quale la Corte ha trovato una violazione, e la Corte non farà ordini conseguenti o dichiarazioni dichiaratorie in questo riguardo a. Incorre al Comitato di Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa, mentre agendo Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione sotto, soprintendere ad ottemperanza in questo riguardo (vedere Selçuk ed Asker, citato sopra, § 125, e Yöyler, citato sopra, § 124).
D. Costi e spese
220. Il richiedente chiese 8,720.47 Regno Unito controlla il peso genuino (GBP-verso EUR 10,200) per le parcelle e costi loro erano incorsi in di fronte alla Corte. Questi importi inclusero GBP 4,916 per la Sig. Filippo Liscivia, un avvocato del Centre dell'Avvocatura dei Diritti umani europeo GBP 175 per costi amministrativi e GBP 3,629.47 per traduzione di documenti. Loro presentarono fatture da traduttori.
221. Il Governo non fece particolari commenti su questo punto.
222. La Corte reitera che costa e spese non saranno assegnate sotto Articolo 41 a meno che è stabilito che loro davvero e necessariamente erano incorsi in, e sarà stato anche ragionevole come a quantum (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-XI). La Corte, avendo riguardo ad ai documenti presentati coi richiedenti, è soddisfatto che la loro rivendicazione fu provata. Nota inoltre che questa causa è stata piuttosto complessa, mentre comporta un grande numero di richiedenti, e lavoro di ricerca richiesto. Avendo riguardo ad all'importo di ricerca e preparazione eseguito coi rappresentanti dei richiedenti, la Corte non trova, l'importo chiese di essere eccessivo.
223. In queste circostanze, la Corte assegna l'importo complessivo di EUR 10,200 i richiedenti, meno EUR 850 già ricevette con modo di patrocinio gratuito dal Consiglio dell'Europa, insieme con qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti. L'importo assegnato in riguardo di costi e spese sarà direttamente pagabile ai rappresentanti.
E. Interesse di mora
224. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Congiunge ai meriti le eccezioni del Governo riguardo all'esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali e lo status di vittima dei primi tre richiedenti e li respinge;
2. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione su conto dell'insuccesso delle autorità per eseguire un'indagine adeguata ed effettiva nelle circostanze che circondano le morti di OMISSIS;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 2 della Convenzione come riguardi le morti di OMISSIS;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13, presa in concomitanza con Articolo 2 della Convenzione in riguardo del primo, secondo, terzi, tredicesimo e venti-secondo richiedenti, ed una violazione di Articolo 13 presa in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in riguardo di tutti i richiedenti;
6. Sostiene che nessun problema separato deriva Articolo 13 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con Articolo 3 della Convenzione sotto;
7. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in riguardo di tutti i richiedenti;
8. Sostiene che non c'è stata come lontano come il secondo nessuna violazione di Articolo 3 della Convenzione a venti-settimo richiedenti riguarda;
9. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 3 della Convenzione su conto della sofferenza mentale sopportato col primo richiedente a causa delle morti di sua moglie e due figli;
10. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data sulla quale la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti:
(i) EUR 41,000 (quarantuno mila euro) al primo richiedente, EUR 39,000 (trenta-nove mila euro) ad ognuno del secondo e terzi richiedenti, EUR 38,000 (trentotto mila euro) ad ognuno del quarto a nono, undicesimo a sedicesimo, diciottesimo a ventunesimo e venti terzo a venti-settimo richiedenti EUR 38,000 (trentotto mila euro) ad OMISSIS, EUR 38,000 (trentotto mila euro) ad OMISSIS, ed EUR 38,000 (trentotto mila euro) ad OMISSIS tutti questi importi per essere convertito in rubli russi al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo, in riguardo di danno patrimoniale;
(l'ii) EUR 120,000 (cento e venti mila euro) al primo richiedente, EUR 30,000 (trenta mila euro) al secondo richiedente, EUR 60,000 (sessanta mila euro) al terzo richiedente, EUR 15,000 (quindici mila euro) al tredicesimo richiedente, EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euro) ad ognuno del quarto a nono, undicesimo, dodicesimo quattordicesimo a sedicesimo, diciottesimo a ventunesimo e venti-terzo a venti-settimo richiedenti EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euro) ad OMISSIS, EUR 10,000 (dieci mila euro) ad OMISSIS, ed EUR 15,000 (quindici mila euro) ad OMISSIS, tutti questi importi per essere convertito in rubli russi al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo, in riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(l'iii) EUR 9,350 (nove mila trecento e cinquanta euro), essere convertito in libbre di Regno Unito genuino al tasso applicabile alla data di accordo e pagato nel conto bancario dei rappresentanti dei richiedenti nel Regno Unito, in riguardo di costi e spese;
(l'iv) qualsiasi tassa, incluso tassa valore-aggiunta che può essere a carico dei richiedenti sugli importi sopra;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;
11. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 marzo 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Nina Vajić
Cancelliere Presidentessa


ANNESSO I
Lista dei richiedenti
OMISSIS
ANNESSO II
La rivendicazione dei richiedenti per danno patrimoniale
No Nome Casa e dépendance Perdite dirette, RUB Perdita di profitto, RUB Altre spese, RUB Sommi, RUB Sommi, EUR
Terra Totale di bestiame Raccolti Effetti personali Affitto Cibo Funebre
Giardino Frutteto
1 OMISSIS 800,000 70,000 304,300 45,000 300,000 380,000 3,909,300 163,400 2,066,700 160,000 8,198,700 226,678.79
2 OMISSIS 730,000 70,000 246,900 37,000 260,000 364,000 7,726,200 530,800 3,223,200 80,000 13,268,100 366,838.27
3 OMISSIS 810,000 70,000 290,400 32,000 390,000 383,000 4,743,000 182,952 2,232,000 88,000 9,221,352 254,953.22
4 OMISSIS 730,000 70,000 197,000 32,000 342,000 270,000 5,871,800 224,400 2,206,600 9,943,800 274,927.56
5 . OMISSIS 810,000 70,000 300,600 41,000 326,000 320,000 6,457,500 225,400 3,062,700 11,613,200 321,083.36
6 . OMISSIS 810,000 70,000 254,500 45,000 348,000 308,000 2,696,900 97,400 1,549,600 6,179,400 170,848.91
7 . OMISSIS 890,000 70,000 393,100 46,000 312,000 348,000 3,434,400 254,400 4,536,800 10,284,700 284,352.81
8 . OMISSIS 850,000 70,000 334,600 35,000 310,000 335,000 6,251,000 191,400 3,520,300 11,897,300 328,938.20
9 . OMISSIS 680,000 70,000 334,850 35,000 362,000 310,000 4,610,200 156,400 1,838,900 8,577,350 237,137.76
10 OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 381,100 38,000 355,000 330,000 5,317,600 179,400 1,618,400 9,129,500 252,413.68
11 OMISSIS 640,000 70,000 235,150 39,000 360,000 320,000 3,685,200 181,680 1,992,000 7,523,030 207,997.78
12 OMISSIS 640,000 186,500 39,000 360,000 320,000 947,200 132,000 531,200 3,155,900 87,254.76
13 OMISSIS 720,000 70,000 265,900 31,000 360,000 330,000 4,408,800 211,728 2,745,600 9,143,028 252,787.71
14 . OMISSIS 680,000 70,000 212,900 34,000 330,000 420,000 2,988,000 110,000 830,000 4,927,900 136,247.26
15 OMISSIS 770,000 70,000 364,150 37,000 300,000 360,000 4,546,100 159,400 2,232,700 8,839,350 244,391.58
16 OMISSIS 910,000 70,000 244,600 42,000 280,000 340,000 4,941,900 172,400 2,745,500 10,656,400 294,629.63
17 OMISSIS 880,000 70,000 577,800 44,000 310,000 350,000 1,787,100 195,000 655,500 4,869,400 134,629.85
18 . OMISSIS 760,000 70,000 385,850 28,000 290,000 320,000 2,085,000 80,320 1,320,500 5,339,670 147,631.94
19 . OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 320,500 35,000 315,000 330,000 2,118,200 80,400 987,700 5,096,800 140,917.03
20 OMISSIS 910,000 70,000 244,600 42,000 280,000 340,000 4,941,900 172,400 2,745,500 10,656,400 294,629.63
21 OMISSIS 760,000 70,000 179,400 32,000 295,0000 190,000 486,200 98,000 159,800 2,270,400 62,772.33
22 OMISSIS 730,000 70,000 246,900 37,000 260,000 364,000 7,726,200 530,800 3,223,200 80,000 13,268,100 366,838.27
23 OMISSIS 920,000 70,000 353,200 39,000 256,000 330,000 6,031,200 213,400 2,979,700 11,192,500 309,451.79
24 . OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 361,000 45,000 324,000 342,000 3,486,600 163,880 2,223,00 7,855,480 217,189.40
25 OMISSIS 840,000 70,000 296,100 39,000 328,000 310,000 8,398,400 281,400 3,851,200 14,414,100 398,523.04
26 . OMISSIS 830,000 70,000 228,100 36,000 316,000 280,000 452,100 170,400 1,616,600 3,999,200 110,570.44
27 OMISSIS 745,000 70,000 240,300 40,000 330,000 280,000 6,699.200 178,400 2,883,200 13,171,400 364,164.69




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 27/07/2021.