Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GERA DE PETRI TESTAFERRATA BONICI GHAXAQ v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, 34, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 26771/07/2011
STATO: Malta
DATA: 05/04/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 13 ; Pecuniary damage - reserved ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF GERA DE PETRI TESTAFERRATA BONICI GHAXAQ
v. MALTA
(Application no. 26771/07)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
5 April 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq v. Malta,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
Joseph Zammit Mckeon, ad hoc judge,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 15 March 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 26771/07) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Maltese national, OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 28 June 2007.
2. The applicant was represented by Dr I. R., a lawyer practising in Valletta. The Maltese Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Dr S. C., Attorney General.
3. The applicant alleged that the length of her proceedings had been excessive, and that she had suffered a breach of her property rights as a consequence of the first taking of her property and the lack of an effective remedy in this respect.
4. On 3 November 2009 the Court declared the application partly inadmissible and decided to communicate the complaint concerning the length of proceedings and the lack of an effective remedy in respect of the first taking of the applicant’s property, to the Government. It also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. Mr V. De Gaetano, the judge elected in respect of Malta, was unable to sit in the case (Rule 28 of the Rules of Court). The President of the Chamber accordingly appointed Mr Joseph Zammit McKeon to sit as an ad hoc judge (Rule 29 § 1(b)).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1949 and lives in Balzan, Malta.
A. Background of the case
7. The applicant is the owner of a property, known as Palazzo Bonici, in Valetta. She partly owns some of the ground floor shops, and entirely owns the house, from the rest of the ground floor and the basement to the top floors.
8. The property had been damaged during the Second World War and the applicant’s ancestors, from whom she inherited the property, had on 11 January 1945 applied to the War Damage Commission to obtain the necessary funding to have the property restored. At the time, the building consisted of a large eighteenth century town house including a few rooms on the ground floor which were rented out as shops. Between 1945 and 1950 the War Damage Commission had paid out a sum corresponding to EUR 1,307, for the premises excluding the shops in respect of which no amount had been paid as a consequence of undefined claims. According to the applicant the sums awarded covered expenses for required temporary works to secure the premises, as had originally been claimed, and not the entire works to repair the whole of the property. While the Government contended that, despite the payments, the building was left in a state of neglect, the domestic courts acknowledged that the applicant had attempted to reconstruct the damaged area (page 21 of the Constitutional Court judgment of 8 January 2007)
9. In 1958 the then Colonial Government issued an order taking control of the property under title of possession and use, that is, a forced temporary taking of property subject to the payment of annual compensation, known as a “recognition rent”, to the owners.
10. Despite this order, the applicant’s ancestors refused to hand over the keys of the building. Thus, the property was left unused until 1972 when the building was forced open by the Government, by which time it had deteriorated considerably.
11. In 1972 the Government commenced works to repair the property with a view to using it as a cafeteria and offices in conjunction with the Manoel Theatre situated nearby. The Government evicted the tenants of the shops on the ground floor which had been leased on the basis of controlled rents, and a hall in the upper floors was converted into a performance hall for small audiences. Subsequently a theatre restaurant was housed in the basement of the building and another floor was added to house the foundation for Maltese patrimony “Fondazzjoni Patrimonju Malti”, a Government foundation promoting national heritage, which also serves as a commercial company dealing in publications.
12. On 5 August 1976 the Government issued a “notice to treat” by which the owner was informed that the compensation offered by way of recognition rent amounted to 210 Maltese Liras (MTL – approximately 490 euros (EUR)). The amount was based on the 1914 rental value (according to rent laws relating to renting of residences – not commercial premises – in force at the time) increased by 40 % to allow for inflation. By a judicial letter of 1976 the applicant’s ancestors rejected the offer and in the same year the Commissioner of Lands instituted compensation proceedings before the Land Arbitration Board (“LAB”). These proceedings were suspended sine die on 10 October 1996 (see Annex A for a detailed chronological list of hearings in the proceedings). Pending these proceedings, the applicant inherited the property of which she gained possession by public deed on 26 March 1990. The applicant submitted that even if these proceedings had been concluded, the LAB would have been unable to establish a fair rent reflecting market values, since it was bound by law to assess rent on the basis of 1914 rental values.
13. After repairing the property the Government allocated it and entrusted its management to the Manoel Theatre Management Committee (“MTMC”), the organ of the Ministry of Culture and Education which administers the Manoel Theatre. It rented the property to a number of commercial entities, including offices, cafeterias, reception halls, a restaurant and a publishing house. According to the Government, the economic income received by the MTMC per year amounted to approximately EUR 13,000 and the Government had spent EUR 735,115 restoring the building and meeting its maintenance costs.
B. Proceedings before the Civil Court in its constitutional jurisdiction
14. In 1996 the applicant instituted constitutional redress proceedings in which she brought complaints under Articles 6 and 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention. She complained that the property, estimated at the time to be worth MTL 880,000 (approximately EUR 2,050,000), was not used for a public purpose, that she had not been offered fair compensation, that the proceedings pending before the LAB were taking an unreasonably long time to be decided and that she had been discriminated against vis-à-vis other property owners who, unlike her, had their properties expropriated by outright purchase and not subject to the less favourable forced rents. She requested the court to grant adequate redress and to award damages.
15. On 18 January 1999 the Civil Court (First Hall) found for the applicant. It declared the taking null and void, as the property was not being used for a public purpose, and therefore contrary to the Convention. It further found a violation of the applicant’s right to a fair hearing within a reasonable time. It considered that the period to be taken into account started running on 25 February 1958, the date when the applicant’s right to compensation arose, and had not yet ended forty years later. It noted that it had taken the Government eighteen years to issue a “notice to treat” without which compensation proceedings could not be initiated. This, together with the lack of initiative of the Commissioner of Lands to pursue those proceedings, was enough to allow it to conclude that the applicant had suffered a serious prejudice, incompatible with Article 6 of the Convention, over the forty years during which she had been left without compensation. It declared that it was not necessary to examine the Article 14 complaint. The issue of payment of damages in respect of the violation of Article 6 (which depended on the value of the property) was reserved.
C. Proceedings before the Constitutional Court
16. The Government appealed against the above-mentioned judgment.
17. The applicant submitted that during the proceedings, lasting eight years, the judges were replaced several times and there had been numerous adjournments (see Annex B for a detailed chronological list of hearings in the proceedings).
18. On 8 January 2007 the Constitutional Court upheld the first-instance judgment in part. It held that there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention, in that a proper balance had not been preserved between the private interest and the public need. While it was true that the commercial purposes of the taking appeared to have superseded the original purpose, it was in the light of the compensation offered to the applicant (EUR 490 yearly rent for a property valued at approximately EUR 1,863,500) and the fact that she had been deprived of her property for nearly fifty years, that she had been made to bear a disproportionate burden. The fact that the property had been refurbished by the State had little bearing on this conclusion, although it could be relevant in determining the compensation terms. It declared the Governor’s declaration of 1958 null and void and ordered the Government to release the property. The Constitutional Court, however, found that there had not been a violation of Article 6 in respect of the length of the proceedings. It was true that the proceedings had been lengthy, the “notice to treat” having been issued only eighteen years after the taking of the property and the proceedings before the LAB having not yet been concluded. However, the court noted that the time to be considered started running after the Convention took effect in respect of Malta, namely on 30 April 1987 (when Malta introduced the right of individual petition) and the applicant had failed to submit evidence of what had caused the delay after 1987. As to the Article 14 complaint, the court held that it had been misconceived, since the first-instance court had not examined it. As to the adequacy of compensation, it confirmed that the release of the property was an adequate remedy for the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention, and the reservation of the issue of compensation by the first court was related to the Article 6 complaint, which had not been upheld on appeal. However, it reserved any rights the applicant might wish to assert in respect of compensation for the “possession and use” of the premises during the relevant period.
D. The circumstances after the Constitutional Court judgment
19. On an unspecified date following this judgment, the applicant obtained an eviction order against the Government. However, prior to its enforcement, on 22 January 2007, the Government issued a fresh order, this time under title of public tenure in accordance with the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance (“the Ordinance”). Included in the taking were a number of shops and offices adjacent to Palazzo Bonici, of which the applicant owned an undivided share together with third parties. The Government offered an annual recognition rent of MTL 21,000 (approximately EUR 49,000), basing it on section 22 (11) (c) of the Ordinance (see “Relevant Domestic Law” below), without indicating what portion of this amount was due for the applicant’s house, of which she was the sole owner.
According to an architect’s valuation, the present day rental value of Palazzo Bonici, excluding the other adjacent property, amounts to MTL 110,000 (approximately EUR 256,000) per year. The market value in the case of sale is estimated to be MTL 2,200,000 (approximately EUR 5,125,000); the Government, however, estimate it to be only MTL 1,500,000 (approximately EUR 3,494,000).
E. Ordinary Proceedings
20. On an unspecified date, the applicant lodged ordinary proceedings (327/07 - ATB 10), complaining that the new taking of the property under public tenure had been unlawful, as it was not permissible under the Land Acquisition Ordinance to take property by means of public tenure if it was not already being used by the Government.
21. At the request of the Government the eviction order was suspended pending the outcome of those proceedings.
22. On the date of introduction of this application the proceedings were still pending. The Civil Court, in its ordinary jurisdiction, gave judgment in the case on 11 November 2008. The latter held that the taking of the property by public tenure had been ultra vires and was therefore null and void. An appeal was lodged on 19 November 2008 and the case is still pending.
F. The second constitutional proceedings
23. On an unspecified date the applicant lodged further constitutional redress proceedings (23/07 - ATB 10 A), claiming that the taking of the property under public tenure breached Articles 6 and 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention.
24. She claimed that the taking had not been in the public interest as the property was mainly being used for commercial purposes in relation to the Theatre, even though the Government had at their disposal other properties in the vicinity which could have served the same purpose. She also claimed that the inadequate compensation offered by the Government was arbitrary and not in accordance with the law. Compensation for the taking of a property under public tenure had to be calculated on the basis of section 27 (13) of the Ordinance and not section 22 (11) (c), which applied where property taken under “public tenure” was converted by absolute purchase (see the Relevant Domestic Law below). Although it could be supposed that the Government’s offer amounted to more than what was applicable by law, it did not reflect the real current market value, since the calculations had been based on rental values applicable in 1939. Even assuming that the offer comprised compensation for Palazzo Bonici alone and not the adjacent properties, it still represented a fifth of its real value on the market; therefore, it did not constitute adequate compensation and the applicant was being made to bear an excessive burden. She further claimed that the decision to take her property under public tenure had been arbitrary and discriminatory. At the time only four other properties had been taken under this title, as opposed to outright purchase. All the properties had already been in the possession of the Government under a different title and were all related to slum clearance and housing projects, unlike the applicant’s. Finally, she complained that the taking was in breach of Article 6, in that she was not given a fair hearing within a reasonable time, as she had no real and effective possibility of having the value of her property determined by a court. Notwithstanding the Constitutional Court judgment in her favour, in these circumstances the applicant remained without an effective remedy.
25. These proceedings are still pending.
G. The compensation proceedings
1. Compensation for damage arising from the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
26. On 15 January 2007 the applicant requested the Civil Court (First Hall) to determine the claim (537/1996) for the compensation due for the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in accordance with Article 235 of the Code of Organisation and Civil Procedure (“COCP”). On 29 November 2007 the Civil Court (First Hall) rejected the applicant’s claim. It held that the Civil Court had only reserved the matter of compensation in relation to Article 6, of which no violation had been found by the Constitutional Court, which had also found that declaring the taking null and void was a sufficient remedy for the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Thus, the Constitutional Court’s judgment of 8 January 2007 had been final, the applicant’s claims having been decided in their entirety, except for the reservation in respect of payment due for the possession and use of the land for the relevant period, which was subject to ordinary civil remedies. In consequence Article 235 of the COCP did not apply to the present case.
27. That finding was confirmed on appeal by a judgment of the Constitutional Court of 29 February 2008.
2. Compensation for damage arising from the possession and use of the premises
28. On 6 December 2007 the applicant instituted proceedings against the Commissioner of Lands (1281/07) for damage arising from the loss of possession and use of the premises in the light of the Constitutional Court’s judgment of 8 January 2007 finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. On 10 June 2010, the court having established that such a decision had not been taken by any other court and that the domestic courts had particularly stated that such a measure had to be sought before the ordinary domestic civil courts, took cognisance of the case and ordered the submission of the relevant evidence.
29. The proceedings are still pending.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
30. Section 22 (11) of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance, Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta, reads as follows:
“The compensation due for the acquisition by absolute purchase of any land, and the sum to be deposited in accordance with this article shall be:
...
(c) in the case of conversion from public tenure into absolute purchase a sum arrived at by the capitalisation at the rate of one point four per centum of the annual recognition rent due under the provisions of this Ordinance.”
Section 27 of the Ordinance relates to the assessment of compensation by the Land Arbitration Board. Subsection 13, reads as follows:
“The compensation in respect of the acquisition of any land held by way of public tenure shall be equal to the acquisition rent assessable in respect thereof in accordance with the provisions contained in subarticles (2) to (12), inclusive, of this article, increased (a) by forty per centum (40%) in the case of an old urban tenement and (b) by twenty per centum (20%) in the case of agricultural land.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
31. The applicant complained that the proceedings relating to the first taking of her property had not been decided within a reasonable time as required by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal ...”
32. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
33. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ observations
34. The applicant submitted that the proceedings she had been required to undertake had not been decided within a reasonable time. The property was taken in 1958 and the Government only initiated compensation proceedings eighteen years later, in 1976. Pending the outcome of those proceedings, which she did not consider effective, as they could never have resulted in an adequate award of compensation, the applicant instituted constitutional redress proceedings in 1996, which were concluded in 1999 at first instance and in 2007 on an appeal filed by the Government. Subsequently, the taking having been found to be null and void, proceedings before the LAB became in her view superfluous and were abandoned. Thus, after fifty years, during which Malta was under the protection of the Convention (prior to Malta’s ratification, the United Kingdom had extended the protection of the Convention also to Maltese territory), the applicant had still not been awarded compensation for the taking.
35. The applicant submitted that she could not be penalised for having requested a suspension pending the outcome of other cases, relevant to her own, which had eventually been decided in favour of the claimants. Indeed, she had no control over the unreasonable delay of other courts in hearing parallel cases. This only went to prove that the length of proceedings was an endemic problem. Similarly, it had been appropriate to re-suspend proceedings before the LAB pending the outcome of the constitutional redress proceedings, since the LAB could establish compensation due only for lawful takings, a matter which was being contested before the constitutional jurisdictions. Moreover, she had had a right to bring constitutional proceedings and submit all the relevant evidence supporting her case at that stage, especially since it related to the intensification of the commercial use of the premises, a matter crucial to her submissions. It was the fact that it had taken the court two years to disallow the request that had contributed to the delay and not the actual request. Lastly, after fifty years the applicant still remained without compensation and was still instituting proceedings to obtain it.
36. The Government submitted that the delay had to be calculated only post 1987, when the right of individual petition entered into force in Malta. They further submitted that the applicant and/or her ancestors had requested adjournments or not attended hearings seven times during the proceedings before the LAB. Moreover, the applicant gained possession of the property at issue on 26 March 1990 following her ancestor’s death in 1988, and it had taken her eight years to file the necessary documents to enable her to continue in her deceased ancestor’s stead, namely, until 9 May 1996. Subsequently, on 10 October 1996 she requested the case to be adjourned sine die pending the outcome of her constitutional case and another, in the Government’s view, unrelated case. The latter case was still pending to date and consequently the Government could not request the resumption of the case that, according to them, was still pending before the LAB; the former proceedings, namely, her constitutional claims, which had been instituted on 14 March 1996, were decided at first instance on 18 January 1999 and at second instance on 8 January 2007. This delay on appeal had been due to the applicant’s request that fresh evidence be produced (see Annex B). As to any other proceedings, the Government submitted that the applicant should not have persisted in pursuing compensation as the Constitutional Court had held that it had not been due. Lastly, the Government concluded that, overall, the length of the proceedings had been due to the applicant and/or her ancestors’ behaviour.
2. The Court’s assessment
37. The Court notes that the taking of the property took place in 1958. The Government did not institute the relevant compensation proceedings before the LAB for eighteen years. They eventually began in 1976 and were suspended sine die on 10 October 1996 according to the applicant, and remain pending to date according to the Government. Meanwhile, constitutional redress proceedings started in 1996 and were concluded in 1999 at first instance and on 8 January 2007 on appeal.
38. The Court observes that in the absence of an express limitation, the Maltese declaration of 30 April 1987 is retrospective and the Court is therefore competent to examine facts which occurred between 1967 the date of ratification and 1987 the date on which the State’s declaration under former Article 25 became effective (see Bezzina Wettinger and Others v. Malta, no. 15091/06, § 54, 8 April 2008). As to the antecedent period, even though the Convention was applicable to Maltese territory, this had its basis in the United Kingdom’s Convention obligations. The present complaint is directed against the Maltese Government. Thus, the Court can only take into consideration the period which has elapsed since the Convention entered into force in respect of Malta (1967), although it will have regard to the stage reached in the proceedings by that date (see, for example, Humen v. Poland [GC], no. 26614/95, §§ 58-59, 15 October 1999). Moreover, since the applicant has continued the proceedings as heir, she can complain of the entire length of the proceedings (see Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, § 113, ECHR 2006-; and Bezzina Wettinger, cited above, § 67).
39. In the present case, the proceedings at issue, once undertaken, lasted more than thirty years at three levels of jurisdiction.
40. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see, among many other authorities, Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-VII).
41. The Court observes that the applicant’s case was not particularly complex; before the LAB it was restricted to determining the amount of compensation for the property which had been taken from the applicant, and before the constitutional jurisdictions the applicant was complaining about the proportionality of the measure and the unreasonable delay before the LAB. The Court further finds that the issue at stake in the proceedings could, in principle, be regarded as of importance to the applicant.
42. The Government argued that the delay in the proceedings was attributable to the applicant’s and/or her ancestors’ absences and requests for adjournments, particularly, the requests to adjourn the proceedings pending the outcome of other cases which the Government deemed irrelevant.
43. The Court does not find it necessary to determine whether any other proceedings may have been of relevance or not to the decision to be taken by the LAB, as the fact that the LAB granted the adjournments for this purpose presupposes that the LAB found them to be relevant. However, the latter decision did not release the domestic authorities from their obligation to examine the case within a reasonable time. The LAB remained responsible for the conduct of the proceedings before it and ought therefore to have weighed the advantages of the continued adjournments pending the outcome of other cases against the requirement of promptness (see, mutatis mutandis, Šilih v. Slovenia [GC], no. 71463/01, § 205, 9 April 2009 and Konig v. Germany, Commission decision, 28 June 1978, § 104). Moreover, the Court notes that, apart from the adjournments pending the outcome of other cases, the LAB adjourned the case repeatedly, and on at least sixteen occasions the case was adjourned either because members of the LAB were unable or failed to attend, or because the Board was not appointed, or because no chambers were available. Meanwhile the applicant’s legal counsel failed to appear three times and requested four adjournments (see Annex A).
44. As to the actual constitutional redress proceedings, the Court notes that they lasted nearly three years at first instance and eight years on appeal. As to the appeal, even assuming that some of the delay was attributable to the applicant, it took the Constitutional Court four years to hear the evidence, then one and a half years to deliver a decree rejecting the applicant’s request to submit fresh evidence, and subsequently another one and a half years to deliver judgment (See Annex B). No explanation has been given in relation to these periods of delay.
45. In the light of the above, the Court considers that in the instant case the overall length of the proceedings was excessive and failed to meet the “reasonable time” requirement.
46. There has accordingly been a breach of Article 6 § 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
47. The applicant complained of a violation of her property rights. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s objection based on lack of victim status
48. The Government submitted that the Constitutional Court’s judgment finding a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 for the lack of proportionality of the impugned measure deprived the applicant of victim status. Indeed, the fact that the Constitutional Court held that the Government’s declaration was null and void constituted substantial compensation because the Government were thereby constrained to acquire the premises afresh at a cost of approximately EUR 49,000 per year. Moreover, the Constitutional Court reserved the applicant’s right to claim compensation for the occupation of the premises and in fact the applicant instituted proceedings in this connection which are still pending, together with those before the LAB, which are intended to fix the rent for the said occupation.
49. The applicant submitted that she was still a victim of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 as the Constitutional Court had not granted her compensation for either non-pecuniary or pecuniary damage. The fact that she was still pursuing proceedings in this connection did not alter her victim status, as it was unreasonable to expect persons still to seek compensation after pursuing all the relevant proceedings over numerous years. Indeed the Constitutional Court could not have known that the Government would resort to taking the land again. Thus, any future payments, which, to date, had not been paid, and which according to the applicant did not amount to adequate rent, could not be considered as the compensation intended by the Constitutional Court. The applicant further submitted that it was paradoxical that in the proceedings before the domestic courts during which she was seeking compensation the Government were arguing that the Constitutional Court had ruled out the possibility of compensation and that before this Court they were arguing exactly the opposite. Moreover, the fact that the Government regained possession by means of another title rendered the Constitutional Court judgment totally unenforceable.
50. The Court reiterates that an applicant is deprived of his or her status as a victim if the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded appropriate and sufficient redress for, a breach of the Convention (see, for example, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-193, ECHR 2006-...).
51. As regards the first condition, namely, the acknowledgement of a violation of the Convention, the Court considers that the Constitutional Court’s finding amounted to a clear acknowledgment that there had been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention.
52. With regard to the second condition, namely, appropriate and sufficient redress, the Court must ascertain whether the measures taken by the authorities, in the particular circumstances of the instant case, afforded the applicant appropriate redress in such a way as to deprive her of her victim status. The Court notes that the Constitutional Court ordered the release of the property but awarded no compensation for the violation found. However, it reserved the applicant’s right to claim the rent due for the relevant period from the ordinary domestic courts.
53. The Court, therefore, observes that after thirty years of proceedings the Constitutional Court, having established that the amount offered by the State had not been proportionate to the impugned measure, failed to determine the amount of rent due. In fact, four years later, these proceedings are still pending (at least before the ordinary jurisdictions if not before the LAB) and the rent payable to the applicant has not yet been established (see paragraphs 28 and 29 above). Moreover, the Constitutional Court failed to grant any compensation for non-pecuniary damage which would generally be required when an individual was deprived of, or suffered an interference with, his or her possessions, contrary to the Convention. Indeed, in the present case the violation persisted for forty years after the Convention came into force in respect of Malta. Thus, the Court considers that, quite apart from the issue of the subsequent taking, in the circumstances of the present case, the order for the release of the property coupled with the applicant’s reserved right to bring further proceedings for compensation, half a century after the taking, did not offer sufficient relief to the applicant, who continues to suffer the consequences of the breach of her rights (see, mutatis mutandis, Dolneanu v. Moldova, no. 17211/03, § 44, 13 November 2007).
54. In consequence, the Government’s objection is dismissed.
2. Other points on admissibility
55. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
56. The applicant submitted that, as established by the domestic courts, there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention because she had been made to bear a disproportionate burden having regard to the amount of compensation payable, even though this had not been finally determined by the LAB.
57. In their fresh observations on the merits of the complaint, the Government conceded that there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as held by the Constitutional Court.
58. The Court reiterates that any interference with property must, in addition to being lawful, also satisfy the requirement of proportionality. As the Court has repeatedly stated, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52 and Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999-VII).
59. Having regard to the finding of the Constitutional Court relating to Article 1 of Protocol No.1 (see paragraph 18 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to re-examine in detail the merits of the complaint. It follows that, as established by the domestic courts, in the light of the compensation offered to the applicant and the fact that she was deprived of her property for nearly fifty years, she was made to bear a disproportionate burden.
60. There has accordingly been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
61. The applicant also complains that she did not have an effective remedy in respect of the violation of her property rights. She invokes Article 13 of the Convention, which provides as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
62. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
63. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
64. The applicant submitted that the remedy provided by the constitutional proceedings would only have been effective when coupled with a reservation of her right to seek damages if the property had been effectively returned to her and not taken afresh under a new title.
65. The Government submitted that the constitutional redress proceedings were an effective remedy. The annulment of the expropriation was the most radical remedy possible, and opened the way for the applicant to acquire a high compensatory rent for the retention of the property by the Government. Moreover, the Constitutional Court judgment reserved the applicant’s right to institute ordinary proceedings to obtain the relevant compensation for the period for which the property had been taken under title of possession and use.
66. The Court reiterates that the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law (see, for example, İlhan v. Turkey [GC], no. 22277/93, § 97, ECHR 2000-VII). The term “effective” is also considered to mean that the remedy must be adequate and accessible (see Paulino Tomás v. Portugal (dec.), no. 58698/00, ECHR 2003-XIII). However, the Court recalls that the effectiveness of a remedy within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant (see Sürmeli v. Germany [GC], no. 75529/01, § 98, ECHR 2006-VII) and the mere fact that an applicant’s claim fails is not in itself sufficient to render the remedy ineffective (Amann v. Switzerland, [GC], no. 27798/95, §§ 88-89, ECHR 2002-II).
67. Firstly, the Court notes that in its partial decision of 3 November 2009 it considered that the applicant’s complaint that the taking of the property for the second time suspended the enforcement of the judgment of 8 January 2007 was indissociably linked to the applicant’s claims then and currently pending before the domestic courts and therefore rejected the complaint for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. In consequence, the fact that the property was taken afresh by the Government cannot have any bearing on the examination under Article 13 of the effectiveness of the constitutional redress proceedings in the present case. Although the applicant’s submissions under Article 13 mainly related to this aspect, namely, the non-enforcement of the judgment, the complaint had originally been based on the lack of compensation awarded by the Constitutional Court.
68. The Court notes that a remedy was in principle provided under Maltese law, which enabled the applicant to raise with the national courts her complaint of the violation of her Convention right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions. She pursued constitutional proceedings before the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional jurisdiction and, on appeal, before the Constitutional Court.
69. The Court observes that the Constitutional Court could have made an award of non-pecuniary damage and there was no limit on the amount of compensation which could be granted to an applicant for such a violation. The fact that no such award was made resulted from the exercise by the domestic court judges of their discretion as to what constituted appropriate redress in the circumstances of the applicant’s case. Thus, the mere fact that they did not award compensation for non-pecuniary damage, deeming that the release of the property was in itself sufficient, did not render the remedy in itself ineffective. Furthermore, no other evidence has been provided to show that the remedy at issue could be considered ineffective.
70. In the light of the foregoing, the Court finds that it has not been shown that the constitutional remedy was ineffective.
71. Accordingly, there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention in the present case.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
72. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
73. The applicant claimed EUR 926,812.10 and EUR 5,620,797.13, respectively, in respect of pecuniary damage for (i) loss of rent from the date of the Constitutional Court judgment onwards as a consequence of the failure to enforce the judgment; and (ii) loss of rent for the period during which the owners were deprived of the possession of their property, which currently consisted of four floors and a basement, together amounting to approximately 1,800 square metres. From 1958 to 2006 the rent was calculated on the basis of the rental value in an open market together with 8 % interest. She submitted that in the event that the Court considered the latter claim to be premature in view of the fact that proceedings were still pending three years after the constitutional court judgment, she should be permitted to reserve the right to make the claim at a later stage. She further reserved her right to claim compensation for the value of the property which had never been returned to her, a matter which was still before the domestic courts. Lastly, she claimed EUR 100,000 for non-pecuniary damage in respect of the violations of Articles 6 and 13 and Article 1 of Protocol No.1.
74. The Government submitted that the applicant’s claim for the value of the property on grounds of non-enforcement and for loss of rent from the date of the Constitutional Court judgment onwards was subject to pending domestic proceedings and for this reason the complaints in this connection had been declared inadmissible by the Court in its decision of 3 November 2009. As to her claim regarding rent for the period during which the owners were deprived of the possession of their property, the matter was also still pending before the domestic court and therefore the claim was premature. No other compensation for non-pecuniary damage was due, particularly because any delay in assessing compensation was attributable to the applicant.
75. The Court reiterates that it rejected the applicant’s complaint of non-enforcement of the judgment of 8 January 2007 for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in its decision of 3 November 2009. In consequence the claim in respect of pecuniary damage arising from loss of rent from the date of the Constitutional Court judgment onwards and that for compensation for the value of the property which was never returned to her cannot be entertained.
76. As to the amount of rent for the period during which the owners were deprived of the possession and use of their property, a matter which had been reserved by the Constitutional Court and which is currently pending before the domestic courts, the Court considers that, having examined the circumstances of the case, the question of compensation for pecuniary damage in this respect is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicant (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
77. The Court awards the applicant EUR 25,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
78. The applicant also claimed EUR 3,169.61, attaching a bill of costs, for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and EUR 6,224.23 for those incurred before the Court.
79. The Government submitted that according to the domestic courts’ judgments at various levels of jurisdiction most of the costs were to be borne by the Government; the relevant costs to be paid by the applicant amounted to EUR 1,454.19 only. As to the costs incurred before this Court, the Government argued that they were excessive and should not exceed EUR 3,000.
80. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case the Court did not find a violation of Article 13, but found, however, a violation of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the latter having already been established by the domestic courts. The Court, moreover, accepts the Government’s argument in relation to the costs in the domestic proceedings. Thus, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 5,000 to cover the costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
81. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the remainder of the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
5. Holds that, as far as the financial award to the applicant for pecuniary damage resulting from the violation found in the present case is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in part, namely in so far as it relates to the amount of rent for the period during which the owners were deprived of the possession and use of their property, that is until 2007;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which this judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Section the power to fix the same if need be;
6. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention,
i) EUR 25,000 (twenty–five thousand euros) plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
ii) EUR 5,000 (five-thousand euros) in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
7. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 5 April 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President


ANNEX A
The proceedings before the LAB - Application number 28/76
Commissioner of Lands vs Alfio Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq
09.04.1976 Application filed by CoL in the Registry
14.05.1976 Reply filed by the respondent in the Registry
17.05.1976 First Hearing: legal counsel for respondent requested an adjournment awaiting judgment in the case ‘Carmela Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ pending in front of the Court of Appeal. Adjourned.
11.10.1976 Board ordered adjournment.
08.11.1976 Board ordered adjournment.
10.01.1977 Board ordered adjournment.
15.04.1977 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
03.06.1977 Board ordered adjournment.
20.06.1977 Board ordered adjournment
02.12.1977 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
07.04.1978 Board ordered adjournment.
30.06.1978 Board ordered adjournment.
01.12.1978 Board ordered adjournment.
05.02.1979 Board not appointed. Adjourned.
05.03.1979 Board ordered adjournment.
12.03.1979 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
28.05.1979 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
08.10.1979 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
10.12.1979 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
14.04.1980 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
06.10.1980 Case in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’ still pending. Adjourned.
01.12.1979 Board ordered adjournment.
02.03.1981 Awaiting judgment in the names ‘Commissioner of Lands vs Attard’. Adjourned.
13.07.1981 Board ordered adjournment.
11.01.1982 Board ordered adjournment.
16.04.1982 Board ordered adjournment.
04.06.1982 Case adjourned.
04.10.1982 Member of the Board unable to attend. Adjourned.
07.01.1983 Note filed by Dr Goffredo Randon renouncing to defence of Respondent. Awaiting judgment in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’. Respondent to inform the Board about the legal counsel. Adjourned.
25.02.1983 Chairman of the Board unable to attend. Adjourned.
27.05.1983 Awaiting judgment in the names ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’. Adjourned.
04.11.1983 Board ordered adjournment.
23.03.1984 Board ordered adjournment.
22.06.1984 Board ordered adjournment.
26.10.1984 Board ordered adjournment.
25.01.1985 Board ordered adjournment.
26.04.1985 Board ordered adjournment.
11.10.1985 Board ordered adjournment.
10.01.1986 Chairman sitting in other Court. Adjourned.
06.06.1986 No chambers available. Adjourned.
10.10.1986 Member of the Board unable to attend sitting. Adjourned.
19.01.1987 Member of the Board did not attend sitting. Adjourned.
06.05.1987 Board ordered adjournment.
08.10.1987 Member of the Board did not attend sitting. Adjourned.
11.02.1988 Member of the Board did not attend sitting. Adjourned.
23.06.1988 Case adjourned for evidence to be produced by respondent. Adjourned.
10.11.1988 Legal counsel to respondent did not attend. Adjourned to the ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’ following death of respondent. Adjourned.
16.03.1989 Board ordered adjournment.
30.03.1989 Board ordered adjournment.
20.04.1989 Member of the Board did not attend sitting. Adjourned.
08.05.1989 Awaiting judgment in the case ‘Mercieca vs Commissioner of Lands’. Adjourned.
02.10.1989 Board ordered adjournment.
09.10.1989 Parties did not attend sitting. Adjourned
27.11.1989 Respondent requested an adjournment. Adjourned.
19.02.1990 Respondent did not attend sitting. Adjourned.
07.05.1990 Board not appointed. Adjourned.
09.07.1990 Board not appointed. Adjourned.
12.11.1990 Chairman of Board sitting in another Court. Adjourned.
04.03.1991 Legal Counsel for respondent informed board that constitutional proceedings were going to be instituted. Case adjourned.
06.05.1991 Chairman of Board sitting in another court. Adjourned.
24.06.1991 Chairman of Board sitting in another court. Adjourned.
25.11.1991 Member of the Board did not attend sitting. Adjourned.
17.02.1992 Legal Counsel for respondent requested an adjournment for finalization of ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’. Adjourned.
18.05.1992 Respondent requested Board adjournment and that submissions in cases 26/76 and 27/76 apply to this case.
12.10.1992 Board ordered adjournment.
07.12.1992 Applicant requested that cases continue to be heard. Respondent requested an adjournment. Adjourned.
08.02.1993 Board not appointed. Adjourned.
12.04.1993 Case adjourned.
26.04.1993 Chairman unable to attend sitting. Adjourned.
28.06.1993 Board ordered adjournment.
02.07.1993 Board ordered adjournment
05.07.1993 Respondent requested an adjournment. Adjourned.
06.12.1993 Legal Counsel for respondent informed board that there is possibility of settlement out of court. Adjourned for possible settlement out of court. Adjourned.
22.02.1994 Adjourned for possible settlement out of court.
08.04.1994 Adjourned for possible settlement out of court.
10.06.1994 Adjourned for ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’
13.10.1994 Adjourned.
09.02.1995 Adjourned for ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’
06.04.1995 Adjourned for ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’.
13.06.1995 Adjourned for ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’.
09.10.1995 Adjourned for ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’.
05.02.1996 Adjourned.
11.04.1996 Adjourned for ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’.
09.05.1996 Adjourned for the parties to indicate evidence.
27.06.1996 Adjourned for remaining evidence of the parties.
10.10.1996 Case adjourned sine die awaiting judgments in the constitutional applications in the names ‘Jensen et vs Commissioner of Land’ (application number 543/96 and ‘Agnese Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq vs AG et’ (application number 537/96)
ANNEX B
Constitutional Redress proceedings
Agnes Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq vs AG et – 537/96
25.03.1996 First Hearing - Adjourned for evidence.
24.04.1996 Board informed that Manoel Theatre Committee filed an application for joinder in the suit, adjourned.
03.06.1996 Court ordered Manoel Theatre Committee to bring evidence relative to distinct judicial personality and evidence of leases with third parties, adjourned.
26.06.1996 Adjourned to for cross examination of witnesses tendering their evidence at this sitting
09.06.1996 Legal Council to the parties could not attend sitting, adjourned.
06.11.1996 Witnesses tendered evidence, adjourned
11.12.1996 Case adjourned for evidence
12.02.1997 Case adjourned for oral submissions
05.03.1997 Case adjourned for oral submissions
24.03.1997 Oral submissions, adjourned for decree
02.07.1997 Court needs more time to decree, adjourned
04.07.1997 Decree by the Court, adjourned for continuation
03.11.1997 Evidence tendered, adjourned for applicant’s evidence
10.12.1997 Evidence tendered, adjourned for applicant’s evidence
16.02.1998 Evidence tendered, adjourned for applicant to conclude
11.03.1998 Evidence tendered for respondent’s evidence
27.03.1998 Respondent authorised to produce evidence by affidavit, adjourned for cross examination and respondent’s evidence
29.05.1998 Respondent authorised to file affidavits till 24 June 1998, adjourned for cross examinations and oral submissions
26.06.1998 Case adjourned for judgment, written submissions to be filed by applicant till 14 August 1998 and by respondent till the 30 September 1998
18.01.1999 First Hall delivered its judgment
25.01.1999 Appeal filed
01.02.1999 Case appointed in front of Constitutional Court
03.11.1999 Written submissions filed by Prof Refalo, adjourned
26.01.2000 Court ordered adjournment
05.04.2000 Oral submissions, adjourned for continuation
19.06.2000 Prof Refalo requested an adjournment, adjourned.
09.10.2000 Court ordered adjournment
11.12.2000 Note filed by respondent, adjourned for final oral submissions
31.01.2001 Court ordered adjournment
04.04.2001 Adjourned for applicants to examine reply of respondent and for continuation
18.06.2001 Prof Refalo requested an adjournment, adjourned for continuation
29.10.2001 Court ordered adjournment
18.02.2002 Court ordered adjournment
15.04.2002 Court ordered adjournment
12.06.2002 Prof Refalo requested that fresh evidence be produced, Court requested Prof Refalo to make this request by means of an application, adjourned for final oral submissions
11.11.2002 Prof Refalo informed Court that his client’s application was served on the Government days prior to the sitting and that the period fixed for reply was still running, adjourned.
19.02.2003 Adjourned for oral submissions
07.04.2003 Oral submissions on request to produce fresh evidence, adjourned for decree
03.10.2003 Court ordered adjournment
10.10.2003 Court needs more time for decree, adjourned
16.12.2003 Court needs more time for decree, adjourned
27.02.2004 Court needs more time for decree, adjourned
30.06.2004 Court needs more time for decree
29.10.2004 Court needs more time for decree
16.12.2004 Court needs more time for decree
28.01.2005 Court needs more time for decree
25.02.2005 Decree read in open court, adjourned for oral submissions
18.04.2005 Oral submissions, adjourned for further oral submissions
13.06.2005 Further oral submissions, adjourned for judgment
04.11.2005 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
12.12.2005 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
30.03.2006 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
26.05.2006 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
07.07.2006 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
13.10.2006 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
20.11.2006 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
27.11.2006 Court needs more time for judgment, adjourned
08.01.2007 Constitutional Court delivered judgment.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 13; danno patrimoniale - riservato; danno Non - patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA GERA DE PETRI TESTAFERRATA BONICI GHAXAQ
C. MALTA
(Richiesta n. 26771/07)
SENTENZA
(i meriti)
STRASBOURG
5 aprile 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq c. Malta,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki Ljiljana Mijović, Päivi Hirvelä Ledi Bianku, Zdravka Kalaydjieva giudici, Giuseppe Zammit Mckeon ad giudice di hoc,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato il 15 marzo 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 26771/07) contro la Repubblica di Malta depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino maltese, OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), il 28 giugno 2007.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato da Dr I. R., un avvocato che pratica a Valletta. Il Governo maltese (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Dr S. C., Procuratore Generale.
3. Il richiedente addusse che la lunghezza dei suoi procedimenti era stata eccessiva, e che aveva sofferto di una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà come conseguenza della prima presa della sua proprietà e la mancanza di una via di ricorso effettiva a questo riguardo.
4. Il 3 novembre 2009 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente inammissibile e decise di comunicare l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla lunghezza dei procedimenti e la mancanza di una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo della prima presa della proprietà del richiedente, al Governo. Decise anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 1).
5. Il Sig. De di V. Gaetano, il giudice eletto a riguardo di Malta, non era in grado di riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28 dell’Ordinamento di Corte). Il Presidente della Camera nominò di conseguenza il Sig. Giuseppe Zammit McKeon per riunirsi come giudice ad hoc (Articolo 29 § 1(b)).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1949 e vive a Balzan, Malta.
A. Background della causa
7. Il richiedente è il proprietario di una proprietà, noto come Palazzo Bonici, a Valetta. Possedeva parzialmente alcuni dei negozi del pianterreno, e possedeva completamente la casa, dal resto del pianterreno e della cantina ai piani superiori
8. La proprietà era stata danneggiata durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale e gli antenati del richiedente, da cui ereditò la proprietà, l’11 gennaio 1945 avevano fatto domanda alla Commissione dei Danni della Guerra per ottenere i fondi necessari far ristrutturare la proprietà. Al tempo, l'edificio consisteva in un grande palazzo di abitazioni del diciottesimo secolo che includeva alcune stanze a pianterreno che furono affittate come negozi. Fra il 1945 ed il 1950 la Commissione dei Danni della Guerra aveva pagato una somma corrispondente a EUR 1,307, per i locali ad esclusione dei negozi a riguardo dei quali nessun importo era stato pagato come conseguenza di rivendicazioni indefinite. Secondo il richiedente le somme assegnate a copertura delle spese per i lavori provvisori richiesti per ristrutturare i locali, come era stato chiesto originalmente, e non per gli interi lavori di riparazione dell'intera proprietà. Mentre il Governo contese che, nonostante i pagamenti, l'edificio fu lasciato in un stato di negligenza, le corti nazionali ammisero che il richiedente aveva tentato di ricostruire l'area danneggiata (pagina 21 della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale dell’ 8 gennaio 2007)
9. Nel 1958 l’allora Governo Coloniale emise un ordine che prendeva il controllo della proprietà sotto un titolo di proprietà ed uso che è una presa provvisoria forzata della proprietà soggetta al pagamento del risarcimento annuale, noto come “affitto di riconoscimento”, ai proprietari.
10. Nonostante questo ordine, gli antenati del richiedente rifiutarono di consegnare le chiavi dell'edificio. Così, la proprietà fu lasciata non utilizzata fino al 1972 quando l'edificio fu aperto tramite forzatura dal Governo e a quel tempo si era notevolmente deteriorato.
11. Nel 1972 il Governo ha cominciato dei lavori per riparare la proprietà nella prospettiva di usarla come mensa ed uffici in concomitanza col Teatro di Manoel situato vicino. Il Governo sfrattò gli inquilini dei negozi al pianterreno che era stato affittato sulla base di affitti controllati, ed una sala nei piano superiori fu convertita in una sala per performance a pubblico ridotto . Successivamente un ristorante del teatro fu sistemato nella cantina dell'edificio ed un altro piano fu aggiunto per ospitare la fondazione del patrimonio maltese “Fondazzjoni Patrimonju Malti”, una fondazione Statale che promuoveva l’eredità nazionale che serviva anche come una società commerciale che aveva a che fare con pubblicazioni.
12. Il 5 agosto 1976 il Governo emise un “avviso per trattare” con cui il proprietario fu informato che il risarcimento offerto tramite affitto di riconoscimento corrispondeva a 210 Lire maltesi (MTL- approssimativamente 490 euro (EUR)). L'importo era basato sul valore di affitto del 1914 (secondo le leggi di affitto relative all’affitto di residenze-locali non commerciali-in vigore al tempo) aumentato entro 40% per dare spazio all'inflazione. Con una lettera giudiziale dl 1976 gli antenati del richiedente respinsero l'offerta e lo stesso anno il Commissario Fondiario avviò dei procedimenti di risarcimento di fronte al Consiglio dell'Arbitrato del Terreno (“LAB”). Questi procedimenti furono sospesi sine die il 10 ottobre 1996 (vedere Annesso A per una lista cronologica e particolareggiata delle udienze nei procedimenti). Essendo ancora pendenti questi procedimenti, il richiedente ereditò la proprietà della quale guadagnò possesso tramite atto pubblico 26 marzo 1990. Il richiedente presentò che anche se questi procedimenti fossero stati conclusi, il LAB non sarebbe stato capace di stabilire un equocanone che rifletteva il valore di mercato, poiché era vincolato dalla legge per valutare l’affitto sulla base dei valori di affitto del1914 .
13. Dopo avere riparato la proprietà il Governo l'assegnò ed affidò la sua gestione al Comitato per la Gestione del Teatro Manoel (“MTMC”), l'organo del Ministero della Cultura e dell’Istruzione che amministrano il Teatro Manoel. Affittò la proprietà ad un numero di entità commerciali, incluso uffici, mense, sale di ricevimento, un ristorante ed una casa editrice. Secondo il Governo, il reddito economico ricevuto dal MTMC all’ anno corrispondeva a circa EUR 13,000 ed il Governo aveva speso EUR 735,115 per ristruttura l'edificio e soddisfare le sue spese di manutenzione.
B. Procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Civile nella sua giurisdizione costituzionale
14. Nel 1996 il richiedente avviò dei procedimenti costituzionali di compensazione nei quali introdusse azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6 e 14 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione. Si lamentò che la proprietà, valutata al tempo per valere MTL 880,000 (circa EUR 2,050,000), non era usata per uno scopo di pubblica utilità, che non gli era stato offerto un risarcimento equo che i procedimenti pendenti di fronte al LAB stavano impiegando un tempo irragionevolmente lungo per una decisione e che era stato discriminato vis-à-vis agli altri proprietari di proprietà a cui , diversamente da lui, erano state espropriate le loro proprietà tramite acquisto completo e non erano soggetti ad affitti forzati meno favorevoli. Richiese alla corte che gli venisse accordata una compensazione adeguata e gli venissero assegnati i danni.
15. Il 18 gennaio 1999 la Corte Civile (First Hall) si espresse a favore del richiedente. Dichiarò la presa priva di valore legale, siccome la proprietà non era usata per uno scopo di pubblica utilità, e perciò contraria alla Convenzione. Trovò inoltre una violazione del diritto del richiedente ad un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole. Considerò che il periodo da prendere in considerazione cominciava a decorrere dal 25 febbraio 1958, la data in cui il diritto del richiedente al risarcimento sorse, e non era terminato ancora quaranta anni più tardi. Notò che c’erano voluti diciotto anni per il Governo per emettere un “avviso per trattare” senza che non potessero essere iniziati procedimenti di risarcimento. Questo, insieme con la mancanza di iniziativa del Commissario Fondiario per intraprendere quei procedimenti, era abbastanza per permetterle di concludere che il richiedente aveva sofferto di un pregiudizio serio, incompatibile con l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione, durante il corso dei quaranta anni durante i quali era stato lasciato senza il risarcimento. Dichiarò che non era necessario esaminare l’azione di reclamo sotto l'Articolo 14. Il problema del pagamento di danni a riguardo della violazione dell’ Articolo 6 (che dipendeva dal valore della proprietà) fu riservato.
C. Procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale
16. Il Governo fece ricorso contro la sentenza summenzionata.
17. Il richiedente presentò che durante i procedimenti, che durarono otto anni, i giudici furono sostituiti molte volte e c’ erano stati numerosi aggiornamenti (vedere Annesso B per una lista cronologica e particolareggiata delle udienze nei procedimenti).
18. L’ 8 gennaio 2007 la Corte Costituzionale sostenne in parte la sentenza di prima - istanza. Sostenne che c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione, in quanto non era stato preservato un equilibrio corretto fra l'interesse privato ed il bisogno pubblico. Mentre era vero che i fini commerciali della presa sembrarono avere sostituito il fine originale, era alla luce del risarcimento proposto al richiedente (EUR 490 affitto annuale per una proprietà valutata circa EUR 1,863,500) ed il fatto che era stato privato della sua proprietà da quasi cinquanta anni che gli era stato fatto sopportare un carico sproporzionato. Il fatto che la proprietà era stata messa a nuovo dallo Stato aveva poco determinante su questa conclusione, benché potesse essere attinente nel determinare i termini del risarcimento. Dichiarò la dichiarazione del Governatore del 1958 priva di valore legale ed ordinò al Governo di rilasciare la proprietà. Comunque, la Corte Costituzionale trovò che non c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 a riguardo della lunghezza dei procedimenti. Era vero che i procedimenti erano stati lunghi, l’ “avviso per trattare” era stato emesso solamente diciotto anni dopo la presa della proprietà ed i procedimenti di fronte al LAB non erano stati ancora conclusi. Comunque, la corte notò che il tempo da considerare cominciò a decorrere dopo che la Convenzione prese effetto a riguardo di Malta, vale a dire il 30 aprile 1987 (quando Malta introdusse il diritto di ricorso individuale) ed il richiedente non era riuscito a presentare prova del fatto che aveva provocato il ritardo dopo il 1987. In merito all' azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14, la corte sostenne che era stato giudicata male, poiché la corte di prima - istanza non l'aveva esaminata. In merito all'adeguatezza del risarcimento, confermò, che il rilascio della proprietà era una via di ricorso adeguata per la violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione, e la riserva del problema del risarcimento da parte della prima corte era riferita all' azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 che non era stata sostenuta su ricorso. Comunque, riservò qualsiasi diritto che probabilmente il richiedente avesse desiderato asserire a riguardo del risarcimento per il “possesso e l’ uso” dei locali durante il periodo attinente.
D. Le circostanze dopo la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale
19. In una data non specificata in seguito a questa sentenza, il richiedente ottenne un ordine di sfratto contro il Governo. Il 22 gennaio 2007, il Governo emise comunque, un nuovo ordine prima della sua esecuzione, questa volta sotto il titolo di tenuta pubblica in conformità con l'Ordinanza (“l'Ordinanza”) di Acquisizione del Terreno (Scopi di pubblica utilità). Incluso nella presa c’era un numero di negozi ed uffici adiacenti a Palazzo Bonici del quale il richiedente possedeva una quota indivisa insieme con terze parti. Il Governo offrì un riconoscimento di affitto annuale di MTL 21,000 (verso EUR 49,000), basandolo sulla sezione 22 (11) (c) dell'Ordinanza (vedere “Diritto nazionale Attinente” sotto), senza indicare quale porzione di questo importo era dovuto per l'alloggio del richiedente di cui era il solo proprietario.
Secondo la valutazione di un architetto, l’odierno valore di affitto del Palazzo Bonici, escludendo l'altra proprietà adiacente ammonta a MTL 110,000 (circa EUR 256,000) all’ anno. Il valore di mercato di vendita nella causa è valutato a MTL 2,200,000 (circa EUR 5,125,000); il Governo, comunque lo valuta solamente a MTL 1,500,000 (vcircaerso EUR 3,494,000).
E. Procedimenti Ordinari
20. In una data non specificata, il richiedente depositò procedimenti ordinari (327/07 - ATB 10), lamentandosi che la nuova presa della proprietà sotto la tenuta pubblica era stata illegale, in quanto non era lecito sotto l'Ordinanza dell'Acquisizione del Terreno prendere una proprietà tramite tenuta pubblica se già non veniva usata dal Governo.
21. Su richiesta del Governo l'ordine di sfratto fu sospeso mentre erano pendenti quei procedimenti.
22. Nella data di introduzione di questa richiesta i procedimenti erano ancora pendenti. La Corte Civile, nella sua giurisdizione ordinaria rese una sentenza nella causa l’11 novembre 2008. Quest’ultima sostenne che la presa della proprietà tramite tenuta pubblica era stata ultra vires ed era stata perciò priva di valore legale. Un ricorso fu depositato il 19 novembre 2008 e la causa è ancora pendente.
F. I secondi procedimenti costituzionali
23. In una data non specificata il richiedente depositò ulteriori procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali (23/07 - ATB 10 A), rivendicando che la presa della proprietà sotto la tenuta pubblica violava gli Articoli 6 e 14 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione.
24. Disse che la presa non era stata nell'interesse pubblico siccome stava usando la proprietà principalmente a fini commerciali in relazione al Teatro, anche se il Governo aveva a sua disposizione altre proprietà nelle vicinanze che avrebbero potuto servire lo stesso fine. Disse anche che il risarcimento inadeguato offerto dal Governo era arbitrario e non in conformità con la legge. Il risarcimento per la presa di una proprietà sotto tenuta pubblica doveva essere calcolato sulla base della sezione 27 (13) dell'Ordinanza e non la sezione 22 (11) (c) che si applicava dove la proprietà presa sotto la “tenuta pubblica” veniva convertita tramite acquisto assoluto (vedere il Diritto nazionale Attinente sotto). Benché si potrebbe supporre che l'offerta del Governo corrispose a più di ciò che era applicabile per legge, non rifletteva il vero valore di mercato corrente, poiché i calcoli erano stati basati sui valori di affitto applicabili nel 1939. Presumendo anche che l’offerta comprendeva il risarcimento per il Palazzo Bonici da solo e non le proprietà adiacenti, ancora rappresentava un quinto del suo vero valore sul mercato; perciò, non costituiva un risarcimento adeguato ed al richiedente era stato fatto sopportare un carico eccessivo. Affermò inoltre che la decisione di prendere la sua proprietà sotto la tenuta pubblica era stata arbitraria e discriminatoria. Al tempo solamente quattro altre proprietà erano state prese sotto questo titolo, come opposto all’ acquisto completo. Tutte le proprietà erano già state in possesso del Governo sotto un titolo diverso ed erano tutte collegate a sistemazione di quartieri periferici ed a progetti di abitativi, diversamente dal richiedente. Infine, si lamentò che la presa era in violazione dell’ Articolo 6, in quanto non gli fu data un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole, siccome non aveva nessuna vera ed effettiva possibilità di ottenere il valore della sua proprietà da parte di una corte. In queste circostanze il richiedente rimase senza una via di ricorso effettiva nonostante la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale a suo favore.
25. Questi procedimenti sono ancora pendenti.
G. I procedimenti di risarcimento
1. Il risarcimento per danno che sorge dalla violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
26. Il 15 gennaio 2007 il richiedente richiese alla Corte Civile (First Hall) di determinare la rivendicazione (537/1996) per il risarcimento a causa della violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in conformità con l’Articolo 235 del Codice di Organizzazione e Procedura Civile (“COCP”). Il 29 novembre 2007 la Corte Civile (First Hall) ha respinto la rivendicazione del richiedente. Sostenne che la Corte Civile aveva riservato la questione del risarcimento solamente in relazione all’ Articolo 6 di cui nessuna violazione era stata trovata dalla Corte Costituzionale che aveva trovato anche che dichiarare la presa priva di valore legale era una via di ricorso sufficiente per la violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Così, la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale dell’ 8 gennaio 2007 era stata definitiva, le rivendicazioni del richiedente erano state decise nella loro interezza, a parte la riserva a riguardo del pagamento dovuto per la proprietà e l’ uso del terreno per il periodo attinente che era soggetto a vie di ricorso civili ordinarie. Di conseguenza l’Articolo 235 del COCP non si applicava alla presente causa.
27. Questo giudizio fu confermato su ricorso con una sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 29 febbraio 2008.
2. Il risarcimento per danno che sorge dalla proprietà e l’ uso dei locali
28. Il 6 dicembre 2007 il richiedente avviò procedimenti contro il Commissario Fondiario (1281/07) per danno che sorge dalla perdita di proprietà ed uso dei locali alla luce della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale dell’ 8 gennaio 2007 che trovava una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Il 10 giugno 2010, la corte avendo stabilito che tale decisione non era stata presa da qualsiasi altra corte e che le corti nazionali avevano affermato particolarmente che tale misura doveva essere chiesta di fronte alle corti civili nazionali ordinarie, prese giurisdizione della causa ed ordinò l'osservazione delle prove attinenti.
29. I procedimenti sono ancora pendenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
30. La Sezione 22 (11) dell’ Ordinanza di Acquisizione del Terreno (Scopi di pubblica utilità), Capitolo 88 delle Leggi di Malta recita come segue:
“Il risarcimento dovuto per l'acquisizione tramite acquisto assoluto di qualsiasi terreno, e la somma da depositare in conformità con questo articolo sarà:
...
(c) nel caso di conversione da tenuta pubblica in acquisto assoluto una somma a cui si arriva tramite capitalizzazione al tasso di un punto quattro per centum del riconoscimento annuale d’affitto dovuto sotto le disposizioni di questa Ordinanza.”
La Sezione 27 dell'Ordinanza si riferisce alla valutazione del risarcimento col Consiglio dell'Arbitrato del Terreno. La Sottosezione 13, recita come segue:
“Il risarcimento a riguardo dell'acquisizione di qualsiasi terreno posseduto tramite tenuta pubblica sarà uguale all'affitto di acquisizione imponibile a riguardosi cui in conformità con le disposizioni contenute nei sub articoli da (2) a (12), incluso, di questo articolo, aumentato (a) fino al quaranta per centum (40%) nel caso di un vecchio casamento urbano e (b) fino al venti per centum (20%) in caso di terren.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
31. Il richiedente si lamentò che i procedimenti relativi alla prima presa della sua proprietà non erano stati decisi all'interno di un termine ragionevole come richiesto dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ….”
32. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
33. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
34. Il richiedente presentò che i procedimenti che era stata costretta ad impegnare non erano stati decisi all'interno di un termine ragionevole. La proprietà fu presa nel 1958 ed il Governo ha iniziato solamente diciotto anni più tardi dei procedimenti di risarcimento, nel 1976. In pendenza del risultato di quei procedimenti che non considerava effettivi, siccome non avrebbero mai potuto dare luogo ad un'assegnazione adeguata del risarcimento, il richiedente avviò dei procedimenti costituzionali di compensazione nel 1996 che furono conclusi nel 1999 per la prima istanza ed nel 2007 su un ricorso registrato dal Governo. Successivamente, la presa era stata trovata priva di valore legale, i procedimenti di fronte al LAB divennero nella sua prospettiva superflui e furono abbandonati. Così, dopo cinquanta anni durante i quali Malta era sotto la protezione della Convenzione (prima della ratifica di Malta, il Regno Unito aveva prolungato anche la protezione della Convenzione al territorio maltese), al richiedente non era stato ancora assegnato il risarcimento per la presa.
35. Il richiedente presentò di non poter essere penalizzata per avere richiesto una sospensione mentre il risultato di altre cause era pendente, attinenti alla sua propria, che era stata decisa infine a favore dei rivendicatori. Non aveva effettivamente il controllo sul ritardo irragionevole di altre corti nell’ ascolto di cause parallele. Questo provò solamente che la lunghezza dei procedimenti era un problema indigeno. Similmente, era stato appropriato sospendere nuovamente i procedimenti di fronte al LAB essendo pendente il risultato dei procedimenti di compensazione costituzionali, poiché il LAB avrebbe potuto stabilire il risarcimento dovuto solamente per le prese legali, una questione che era in corso di contestazione di fronte alle giurisdizioni costituzionali. Inoltre, aveva avuto diritto ad introdurre procedimenti costituzionali e a presentare tutte le prova attinenti a sostegno della sua causa a questo stadio, specialmente dal momento che si riferivano all'intensificazione dell'uso commerciale dei locali, una questione cruciale alle sue osservazioni. Era il fatto che la corte aveva impiegato due anni a respingere la richiesta che aveva contribuito al ritardo e non la richiesta effettiva. Dopo cinquanta anni il richiedente rimaneva ancora infine, senza risarcimento ed ancora stava avviando procedimenti per ottenerlo.
36. Il Governo presentò che il ritardo doveva essere calcolato solamente dopo il 1987, quando il diritto di ricorso individuale entrò in vigore a Malta. Presentò inoltre che il richiedente e/o i suoi antenati avevano richiesto aggiornamenti o non avevano frequentato udienze sette volte durante i procedimenti di fronte al LAB. Inoltre, il richiedente guadagnò proprietà della proprietà in questione il26 marzo 1990 in seguito alla morte del suo antenato nel 1988, e aveva impiegato otto anni per registrare i documenti necessari per permettergli di continuare al posto del suo antenato deceduto, vale a dire sino al 9 maggio 1996. Il 10 ottobre 1996 richiese successivamente, che la causa venisse aggiornata sine die essendo pendente il risultato della sua causa costituzionale ed un’ altra, nella prospettiva del Governo causa non correlata. Quest’ultima causa era ancora pendente ad oggi e di conseguenza il Governo non poteva richiedere la riapertura della causa che, secondo loro, era ancora pendente di fronte al LAB; i precedenti procedimenti, vale a dire le sue rivendicazioni costituzionali che erano state avviate il 14 marzo 1996 furono decise il 18 gennaio 1999 in prima istanza ed in seconda istanza l’8 gennaio 2007. Questo ritardo sul ricorso era dovuto alla richiesta del richiedente che nuove prove venissero prodotte (vedere Annesso B). In merito a qualsiasi altro procedimento, il Governo presentò che il richiedente non avrebbe dovuto persistere nell'intraprendere il risarcimento siccome la Corte Costituzionale aveva sostenuto che non era dovuto. Infine, il Governo concluse che, nell’insieme, la lunghezza dei procedimenti era dovuta dal comportamento richiedente e/o dei suoi antenati.
2. La valutazione della Corte
37. La Corte nota che la presa della proprietà ebbe luogo nel 1958. Il Governo non avviò i procedimenti di risarcimento attinenti di fronte al LAB per diciotto anni. Loro cominciarono infine nel 1976 e furono sospesi sine die il 10 ottobre 1996 secondo il richiedente, e rimangono attualmente pendenti secondo il Governo. Nel frattempo, dei procedimenti costituzionali di compensazione cominciarono nel 1996 e furono conclusi nel 1999 in prima istanza e l’8 gennaio 2007 su ricorso.
38. La Corte osserva che in assenza di una limitazione espressa, la dichiarazione maltese del 30 aprile 1987 è retrospettiva e la Corte è perciò competente per esaminare i fatti che accaddero fra il 1967 la data di ratifica ed il 1987 la data in cui la dichiarazione dello Stato sotto l’ex Articolo 25 divenne effettiva (vedere Bezzina Wettinger ed Altri c. Malta, n. 15091/06, § 54 dell’8 aprile 2008). In merito al periodo antecedente, anche se la Convenzione era applicabile al territorio maltese, questo aveva la sua base negli obblighi della Convenzione del Regno Unito. La presente azione di reclamo è diretta contro il Governo maltese. La Corte così può prendere in esame solamente il periodo che è passato da quando la Convenzione entrò in vigore a riguardo si Malta (1967), benché avrà riguardo allo stadio a cui sono giunti i procedimenti entro questa data (vedere, per esempio, Humen c. Polonia [GC], n. 26614/95, §§ 58-59 del 15 ottobre 1999). Inoltre, poiché il richiedente ha continuato i procedimenti come erede, può lamentarsi dell’ intera lunghezza dei procedimenti (vedere Cocchiarella c. Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, § 113 ECHR 2006 -; e Bezzina Wettinger, citata sopra, § 67).
39. Nella presente causa, i procedimenti in questione, una volta impegnato, durò più di trenta anni per tre livelli di giurisdizione.
40. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti deve essere valutata alla luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento ai seguenti criteri: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e delle autorità attinenti e cosa era in gioco per il richiedente nella controversia (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Frydlender c. Francia [GC], n. 30979/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-VII).
41. La Corte osserva che la causa del richiedente non era particolarmente complessa; di fronte al LAB fu restretto per determinare l'importo del risarcimento per la proprietà che era stata presa dal richiedente, e di fronte alle giurisdizioni costituzionali il richiedente si lamentava della proporzionalità della misura e del ritardo irragionevole di fronte al LAB. La Corte costata ulteriormente che il problema in gioco nei procedimenti poteva, in principio, essere riguardato come importante per richiedente.
42. Il Governo dibatté che il ritardo nei procedimenti era attribuibile alle assenze del richiedente e/o dei suoi antenati ed alle richieste per aggiornamenti, in particolare le richieste per aggiornare i procedimenti essendo pendente il risultato di altre cause che il Governo riteneva irrilevanti.
43. La Corte non trova necessario determinare se qualsiasi altro procedimento abbia potuto essere di attinenza o meno alla decisione da prendere da parte del LAB, siccome il fatto che il LAB accordò gli aggiornamenti a questo fine presuppone che il LAB li abbia trovati attinenti. Comunque, quest’ultima decisione non sollevava le autorità nazionali dal loro obbligo di esaminare la causa all'interno di un termine ragionevole. Il LAB rimaneva responsabile per la condotta dei procedimenti di fronte a sé e avrebbe perciò dovuto mettere sulla bilancia i vantaggi dei continui aggiornamenti essendo pendete il risultato di altre cause ed il requisito della prontezza (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Šilih c. Slovenia [GC], n. 71463/01, § 205, 9 aprile 2009 e Konig c. Germania, decisione di Commissione, 28 giugno 1978 § 104). Inoltre, la Corte nota che, il LAB aggiornò ripetutamente separatamente dagli aggiornamenti essendo pendente il risultato di altre cause, la causa, e in almeno sedici occasioni la causa fu aggiornata perché uno dei membri del LAB non era in grado o non riusciva ad essere presente, o perché il Consiglio non era stato nominato, o perché nessuno camera era disponibile. Nel frattempo il consiglio legale del richiedente andò a vuoto nel comparire tre volte e richiese quattro aggiornamenti (vedere Annesso A).
44. In merito ai procedimenti costituzionali di compensazione ed effettivi, la Corte nota, che loro durarono quasi tre anni per la prima istanza ed otto anni su ricorso. In merito al ricorso, presumendo anche che del ritardo fosse stato attribuibile al richiedente, la Corte Costituzionale impiegò quattro anni per ascoltare le prove, poi un anno e mezzo per consegnare un decreto che respingeva la richiesta del richiedente per presentare nuove prove, e successivamente un altro anno e mezzo per consegnare la sentenza (Vedere Annesso B). Nessun chiarimento è stato dato in relazione a questi periodi di ritardo.
45. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte considera, che nella presente causa la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti era eccessiva e non riusciva a soddisfare il requisito “del termine ragionevole”.
46. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
47. Il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. Si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'eccezione del Governo basata sulla mancanza di status di vittima
48. Il Governo presentò che la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale che trovava una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 per mancanza di proporzionalità della misura contestata spogliò il richiedente dello status di vittima. Effettivamente, il fatto che la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che la dichiarazione del Governo era priva di valore legale costituiva il risarcimento sostanziale perché il Governo fu costretto con ciò ad acquisire da capo i locali ad un costo di circa EUR 49,000 l’ anno. Inoltre, la Corte Costituzionale riservò il diritto del richiedente di chiedere il risarcimento per l'occupazione dei locali ed infatti il richiedente avviò procedimenti in questo collegamento che sono ancora pendenti, insieme con quelli di fronte al LAB che si intende fissino l'affitto per la detta occupazione.
49. Il richiedente presentò che era ancora vittima di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 siccome la Corte Costituzionale non aveva accordato il suo risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale o patrimoniale. Il fatto che ancora stava intraprendendo dei procedimenti in questo collegamento non altera il suo status di vittima, siccome era irragionevole aspettarsi ancora che delle persone chiedano il risarcimento dopo avere intrapreso tutti i procedimenti attinenti durante il corso di numerosi anni. Effettivamente la Corte Costituzionale non poteva sapere che il Governo sarebbe ricorso a riprendere di nuovo la terra. Così qualsiasi futuro pagamento che, ad oggi, non era stato pagato, e che secondo il richiedente non corrispondeva ad un affitto adeguato, non poteva essere considerato come il risarcimento proposto dalla Corte Costituzionale. Il richiedente presentò inoltre che era paradossale che nei procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali durante i quali stava chiedendo il risarcimento il Governo dibatteva che la Corte Costituzionale aveva deciso la possibilità del risarcimento e che di fronte a questa Corte stava dibattendo precisamente l'opposto. Inoltre, il fatto che il Governo riguadagnò proprietà tramite un altro titolo rese la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale totalmente non eseguibile.
50. La Corte reitera che un richiedente è privato del suo status come vittima se le autorità nazionali hanno ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconosciuto una compensazione appropriata e sufficiente per una violazione della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, §§ 178-193 ECHR 2006 -...).
51. Come riguardo alla prima condizione, vale a dire il riconoscimento di una violazione della Convenzione, la Corte considera che la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale corrispose ad un riconoscimento chiaro che c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione.
52. Riguardo alla seconda condizione, vale a dire compensazione appropriata e sufficiente, la Corte deve accertare se le misure prese dalle autorità, in particolari circostanze della presente causa hanno riconosciuto al richiedente la compensazione appropriata in modo tale da spogliarla del suo status di vittima. La Corte nota che la corte Costituzionale ordinò la liberazione della proprietà ma non assegnò nessun risarcimento per la violazione trovata. Comunque, riservò il diritto del richiedente per chiedere l'affitto dovuto per il periodo attinente dalle corti nazionali ordinarie.
53. La Corte, perciò osserva che dopo trenta anni di procedimenti la Corte Costituzionale, avendo stabilito che l'importo offerto dallo Stato non era stato proporzionato alla misura contestata, non è riuscita a determinare l'importo dell’ affitto dovuto. Infatti, questi procedimenti sono ancora pendenti quattro anni più tardi, (almeno di fronte alle giurisdizioni ordinarie se non di fronte al LAB) e l'affitto pagabile al richiedente non è stato ancora stabilito (vedere paragrafi 28 e 29 sopra). Inoltre, la Corte Costituzionale andò a vuoto nell’ accordare qualsiasi risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale che generalmente sarebbe richiesto quando un individuo è stato privato della sua proprietà, o ha sofferto di un'interferenza con la sua proprietà, contrariamente alla Convenzione. Effettivamente, nella presente causa la violazione ha persistito per quaranta anni dopo che la Convenzione entrò in vigore a riguardo di Malta. Così, la Corte considera che, piuttosto separatamente dal problema della susseguente presa, nelle circostanze della presente causa l'ordine per la liberazione della proprietà accoppiata col diritto riservato del richiedente di introdurre ulteriori procedimenti per il risarcimento, mezzo secolo dopo la presa, non offre un sollievo sufficiente al richiedente che continua a soffrire delle conseguenze della violazione dei suoi diritti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Dolneanu c. Moldavia, n. 17211/03, § 44 13 novembre 2007).
54. Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo è respinta.
2. Altri punti su ammissibilità
55. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
56. Il richiedente presentò che, come stabilito dalle corti nazionali, c'era stata una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione perché aveva dovuto sopportare un carico sproporzionato avendo riguardo all'importo del risarcimento pagabile, anche se questo non era stato determinato infine dal LAB.
57. Nelle sue nuove osservazioni sui meriti dell'azione di reclamo, il Governo ammise, che c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione come sostenuto dalla Corte Costituzionale.
58. La Corte reitera che qualsiasi interferenza con la proprietà deve, oltre ad essere legale, anche soddisfare il requisito della proporzionalità. Come ha affermato ripetutamente la Corte, deve essere previsto un equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, essendo la ricerca per tale equilibrio equo inerente all'intero della Convenzione. L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardata sopporta un carico individuale eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 Serie A n. 52 e Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 78 ECHR 1999-VII).
59. Avendo riguardo alla sentenza della Corte Costituzionale relativa all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario riesaminare in dettaglio i meriti dell'azione di reclamo. Ne segue che, come stabilito dalle corti nazionali, alla luce del risarcimento proposta al richiedente ed al fatto che fu privato della sua proprietà per quasi cinquanta anni, gli fu fatto sopportare un carico sproporzionato.
60. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
61. Il richiedente si lamenta anche di non aver avuto una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo della violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. Invoca l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
62. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
63. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
64. Il richiedente presentò che la via di ricorso prevista dai procedimenti costituzionali sarebbe stata effettiva solamente quando abbinata ad una riserva del suo diritto di chiedere i danni se la proprietà gli fosse stata effettivamente restituita e non fosse stata presa da capo sotto un nuovo titolo.
65. Il Governo presentò che i procedimenti costituzionali di compensazione erano una via di ricorso effettiva. L'annullamento dell'espropriazione era la via di ricorso più integrale possibile, ed apriva il modo per il richiedente per acquisire un alto affitto compensativo per la ritenuta della proprietà da parte del Governo. Inoltre, la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale riservò il diritto del richiedente di avviare procedimenti ordinari per ottenere il risarcimento attinente per il periodo per il quale la proprietà era stata presa sotto titolo di proprietà ed uso.
66. La Corte reitera che la via di ricorso richiesta dall’ Articolo 13 deve essere “effettiva” in pratica così come in diritto (vedere, per esempio, İlhan c. Turchia [GC], n. 22277/93, § 97 ECHR 2000-VII). Si considera anche che il termine “effettivo” voglia dire, che la via di ricorso deve essere adeguata ed accessibile (vedere Paulino Tomás c. Portogallo (dec.), n. 58698/00, ECHR 2003-XIII). Comunquela Corte richiama che l'efficacia di una via di ricorso all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 13 non dipende dalla certezza di un risultato favorevole per il richiedente (vedere Sürmeli c. Germania [GC], n. 75529/01, § 98 ECHR 2006-VII) ed il mero fatto che gli errori di rivendicazione di un richiedente non sono di per sé sufficienti per rendere la via di ricorso inefficace (Amann c. Svizzera, [GC], n. 27798/95, §§ 88-89 ECHR 2002-II).
67. In primo luogo, la Corte nota che nella sua decisione parziale del 3 novembre 2009 considerò che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente per cui la presa della proprietà per la seconda volta sospese l'esecuzione della sentenza dell’ 8 gennaio 2007 era in modo indissociabile collegata allora ed attualmente alle rivendicazioni del richiedente pendenti di fronte alle corti nazionali e perciò respinse l'azione di reclamo per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. Di conseguenza, il fatto che la proprietà fu presa da capo dal Governo non può avere qualsiasi ripercussione sull'esame sotto l’Articolo 13 dell'efficacia dei procedimenti costituzionali di compensazione nella causa presente. Benché le osservazioni del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 si riferiscono principalmente a questo aspetto, vale a dire alla non-esecuzione della sentenza, l'azione di reclamo era stata basata originalmente sulla mancanza del risarcimento assegnato dalla Corte Costituzionale.
68. La Corte nota che una via di ricorso era in principio prevista sottola legge maltese che abilitava il richiedente a sollevare presso le corti nazionali la sua azione di reclamo della violazione del suo diritto di Convenzione al godimento tranquillo della proprietà. Intraprese dei procedimenti costituzionali di fronte alla Corte Civile (First Hall) nella sua giurisdizione costituzionale e, su ricorso, di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale.
69. La Corte osserva che la Corte Costituzionale avrebbe potuto fare un'assegnazione per danno non-patrimoniale e non c'era limite sull'importo del risarcimento che avrebbe potuto essere accordato ad un richiedente per tale violazione. Il fatto che nessuna simile assegnazione fu fatta risultava dall'esercizio da parte dei giudici delle corte nazionali della loro discrezione in merito a ciò che costituiva una compensazione appropriata nelle circostanze della causa del richiedente. Così, il mero fatto che loro non assegnarono alcun risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale, ritenendo che la liberazione della proprietà era di per sé sufficiente, non rende la via di ricorso di per sé inefficace. Inoltre, nessuna altra prova è stata offerta per mostrare che la via di ricorso in questione potrebbe essere considerato inefficace.
70. Alla luce del precedente, la Corte costata che non è stato mostrato che la via di ricorso costituzionale era inefficace.
71. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione nella causa presente.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
72. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
73. Il richiedente chiese EUR 926,812.10 ed EUR 5,620,797.13, rispettivamente a riguardo del danno patrimoniale per (i) perdita di affitto dalla data della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale in avanti come conseguenza dell'insuccesso nell’esecuzione della sentenza; e (ii) perdita di affitto per il periodo durante il quale i proprietari furono privati del possesso della loro proprietà che consisteva attualmente di quattro piani ed una cantina corrispondente insieme ad approssimativamente 1,800 metri quadrati. Dal 1958 al 2006 l'affitto fu calcolato sulla base del valore di affitto in un mercato aperto insieme all’ 8% di interesse. Presentò che nel caso in cui la Corte avesse considerato quest’ultima rivendicazione prematura nella prospettiva del fatto che i procedimenti erano ancora pendenti tre anni dopo la sentenza della corte costituzionale, dovrebbe esserle permesso di riservare il diritto di fare la rivendicazione ad uno stadio successivo. Riservò inoltre il suo diritto a chiedere il risarcimento per il valore della proprietà che non gli era mai stata restituita, una questione che ancora era di fronte alle corti nazionali. Infine, chiese EUR 100,000 per danno non-patrimoniale a riguardo delle violazioni degli Articoli 6 e 13 e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1.
74. Il Governo presentò che la rivendicazione del richiedente per il valore della proprietà per i motivi di non-esecuzione e per perdita di affitto dalla data della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale in avanti era soggetto a procedimenti nazionali pendenti e per questa ragione le azioni di reclamo in questo collegamento erano state dichiarate inammissibili dalla Corte nella sua decisione del 3 novembre 2009. In merito alla sua rivendicazione riguardo all’ affitto per il periodo durante il quale i proprietari furono privati del possesso della loro proprietà, anche questa questione era ancora pendente di fronte alla corte nazionale e perciò la rivendicazione era prematura. Nessun altro risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale era dovuto, in particolare perché qualsiasi ritardo nel valutare il risarcimento era attribuibile al richiedente.
75. La Corte reitera che respinse l'azione di reclamo del richiedente di non-esecuzione della sentenza del 8 gennaio 2007 per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali nella sua decisione del 3 novembre 2009. Di conseguenza la rivendicazione a riguardo del danno patrimoniale che sorge dalla perdita di affitto dalla data della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale in avanti e che per il risarcimento per il valore della proprietà che non gli fu mai restituita non può essere accolta.
76. In merito all'importo dell’ affitto per il periodo durante il quale i proprietari furono privati della proprietà e dell’ uso della loro proprietà, una questione che era stata riservata dalla Corte Costituzionale e che è attualmente pendente di fronte alle corti nazionali, la Corte considera che, avendo esaminato le circostanze della causa, la questione del risarcimento per danno patrimoniale in questo riguardo non è pronta per decisione. Questa questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e la susseguente procedura fissata, avendo dovuto riguardo a qualsiasi accordo a cui potrebbero giungere il Governo rispondente ed il richiedente (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
77. La Corte assegna EUR 25,000 al richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
78. Il richiedente chiese anche EUR 3,169.61, allegando una nota spese, per i costi e spese incorsi di fronte alle corti nazionali ed EUR 6,224.23 per quelli incorsi di fronte alla Corte.
79. Il Governo presentò che secondo i giudizi delle corti nazionali ai vari livelli di giurisdizione la maggior parte dei costi doveva essere sopportata dal Governo; i costi attinenti da pagare da parte del richiedente corrisposero solamente a EUR 1,454.19. In merito ai costi incorsi di fronte a questa Corte, il Governo dibatté, che erano eccessivi e non avrebbero dovuto eccedere EUR 3,000.
80. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte,ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa la Corte non trovò una violazione dell’Articolo 13, ma trovò, comunque, una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, quest’ultima essendo già stata stabilita dalle corti nazionali. La Corte, inoltre accetta l'argomento del Governo in relazione ai costi nei procedimenti nazionali. Così, avuto riguardo ai documenti in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 5,000 per coprire i costi sotto tutti i capi.
C. Interesse di mora
81. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara il resto della richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che, nella misura in cui si parla dell'assegnazione finanziaria al richiedente per danno patrimoniale che è il risultato della violazione trovata nella presente causa la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione e di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione in parte, vale a dire nella misura in cui si riferisce all'importo dell’affitto per il periodo durante cui i proprietari furono privati della proprietà e dell’ uso della loro proprietà cioè sino al 2007;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui questa sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Sezione il potere per all’occorrenza;
6. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitivo in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione
i) EUR 25,000 (venticinque mila euro) più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale;
ii) EUR 5,000 (cinque-mila euro) a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
7. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 5 aprile 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente


ANNESSo A
I procedimenti di fronte al LAB – Richiesta numero 28/76
Commissario Fodiario vs Alfio Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq

09.04.1976 richiesta registrata da CoL presso la Cancelleria
14.05.1976 replica registrata dal convenuto presso la Cancelleria
17.05.1976 prima udienza: consiglio legale per il convenuto richiesto un aggiornamento in attesa di nella causa ‘Carmela Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' pendente di fronte alla Corte d'appello. Aggiornato.
11.10.1976 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
08.11.1976 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
10.01.1977 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
15.04.1977 causa a nome ‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
03.06.1977 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
20.06.1977 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento
02.12.1977 causa a nome ‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
07.04.1978 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
30.06.1978 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
01.12.1978 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
05.02.1979 Consiglio non nominò. Aggiornato.
05.03.1979 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
12.03.1979 causa a nome‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
28.05.1979 causa a nome‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
08.10.1979 causa a nome‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
10.12.1979 causa a nome‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
14.04.1980 causa a nome‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
06.10.1980 causa a nome‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario ' ancora pendente. Aggiornata.
01.12.1979 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
02.03.1981 sentenza pendente a nome Commissario Fodiario ‘vs di Terre Attard '. Aggiornata.
13.07.1981 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
11.01.1982 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
16.04.1982 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
04.06.1982 causa aggiornata.
04.10.1982 membro del Consiglio non in grado di presenziare. Aggiornato.
07.01.1983 nota registrata dal Dr Goffredo Randon che rinuncia alla difesa del Convenuto. Sentenza pendente a nome ‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario '. Convenuto per informare il Consiglio del consiglio legale. Aggiornata.
25.02.1983 Presidente del Consiglio non in grado di presenziare. Aggiornata.
27.05.1983 sentenza pendente a nome ‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario '. Aggiornata.
04.11.1983 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
23.03.1984 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
22.06.1984 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
26.10.1984 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
25.01.1985 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
26.04.1985 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
11.10.1985 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
10.01.1986 Presidente che si riunisce in un altra Corte. Aggiornato.
06.06.1986 nessuno camera disponibile. Aggiornato.
10.10.1986 membro del Consiglio non in grado di frequentare la seduta. Aggiornato.
19.01.1987 membro del Consiglio non ha frequentato la seduta. Aggiornato.
06.05.1987 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
08.10.1987 membro del Consiglio non ha frequentato la seduta. Aggiornato.
11.02.1988 membro del Consiglio non frequentò seduta. Aggiornato.
23.06.1988 causa aggiornata per la produzione di prove da parte del convenuto. Aggiornato.
10.11.1988 consigliere legale del convenuto non ha frequentato. Aggiornato al ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’ in seguito alla morte del convenuto. Aggiornato.
16.03.1989 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
30.03.1989 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
20.04.1989 membro del Consiglio non frequentò la seduta. Aggiornata.
08.05.1989 sentenza pendente nella causa ‘Mercieca vs Commissario Fondiario '. Aggiornata.
02.10.1989 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
09.10.1989 parti non frequentarono la seduta. Aggiornato
27.11.1989 convenuto richiese un aggiornamento. Aggiornata.
19.02.1990 convenuto non frequentò la seduta. Aggiornata.
07.05.1990 Consiglio non nominato. Aggiornato.
09.07.1990 Consiglio non nominato. Aggiornato.
12.11.1990 Presidente del Consiglio che si riunisce in un'altra Corte. Aggiornato.
04.03.1991 Consulente legale per il convenuto informato che procedimenti costituzionali stavano per essere avviati. Causa aggiornata.
06.05.1991 Presidente del Consiglio che si riunisce in un'altra corte. Aggiornato.
24.06.1991 Presidente di Consiglio che si riunisce in un'altra corte. Aggiornato.
25.11.1991 membro del Consiglio non frequentò la seduta. Aggiornato.
17.02.1992 Consulente legale per l convenuto richiese un aggiornamento per finalizzazione ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’.Aggiornato.
18.05.1992 convenuto richiese aggiornamento del Consiglio e che le osservazioni nelle cause 26/76 e 27/76 si applicassero a questa causa.
12.10.1992 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
07.12.1992 richiedente richiese che le cause continuano ad essere ascoltate. Convenuto richiese un aggiornamento. Aggiornato.
08.02.1993 Consigliere non nominato. Aggiornato.
12.04.1993 causa aggiornata.
26.04.1993 Presidente incapace di frequentare la seduta. Aggiornata.
28.06.1993 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento.
02.07.1993 Consiglio ordinò aggiornamento
05.07.1993 convenuto richiese un aggiornamento. Aggiornato.
06.12.1993 Consulente legale per il convenuto ha informato che c'è possibilità di accordo fuori dalla corte. Aggiornato per possibile accordo fuori dalla corte. Aggiornato.
22.02.1994 aggiornamento per possibile accordo fuori dalla corte.
08.04.1994 aggiornamento per possibile accordo fuori dalla corte.
10.06.1994 aggiornarono per ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’
13.10.1994 aggiornamento.
09.02.1995 aggiornamento per ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’' '
06.04.1995 aggiornamento per ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’' '.
13.06.1995 aggiornamento per ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’' '.
09.10.1995 aggiornamento per ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’' '.
05.02.1996 aggiornamento.
11.04.1996 aggiornamento per ‘legittimazzjoni ta’ l-atti’' '.
09.05.1996 aggiornamento per le parti per indicare le prove.
27.06.1996 aggiornamento per le prove rimanenti delle parti.
10.10.1996 causa in pendenza aggiornata sine die sentenze nelle richieste costituzionali a nome ‘Jensen et vs Commissario Fondiario ' (applicazione numero 543/96 e ‘Agnese Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq vs l'et di AG ' (richiesta numero 537/96)
ANNESSO B
Procedimenti di Compensazione costituzionali
Agnes Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq vs l'et di AG-537/96
25.03.1996 prima udienza - Aggiornata per prove.
24.04.1996 Consiglio informò che Comitato del Teatro Manoel introdusse una richiesta per riunione nell'abito, aggiornato.
03.06.1996 ordine della corte al Comitato del Teatro Manoel di portare prove relative alla distinta personalità giudiziale e prove di contratti d'affitto con terze parti, aggiornato.
26.06.1996 aggiornarono a per esame incrociato dei testimoni che prove in questa seduta
09.06.1996 Consigliere legale alle parti non poteva frequentare la seduta, aggiornata.
06.11.1996 testimoni offrirono prove, aggiornata
11.12.1996 causa aggiornata per prove
12.02.1997 causa aggiornata per osservazioni orali
05.03.1997 causa aggiornata per osservazioni orali
24.03.1997 osservazioni orali, aggiornate per decreto
02.07.1997 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decretare, aggiornata
04.07.1997 decreto della Corte, aggiornato per continuazione
03.11.1997 prove fornite, aggiornata per la prova del richiedente
10.12.1997 prove fornite, aggiornata per la prova del richiedente
16.02.1998 prova prove fornite, aggiornata per la conclusione del richiedente
11.03.1998 prove fornite, aggiornata per la prova del convenuto
27.03.1998 convenuto autorizzato a produrre prove per affidavit, aggiornato per esame dell'accusa e della prove del convenuto
29.05.1998 convenuto autorizzato a presentare affidavit fino al 24 giugno 1998, aggiornata per esame dell'accusa e delle osservazioni orali
26.06.1998 causa aggiornata per giudizio, osservazioni scritte da introdurre da parte del richiedente fino al 14 agosto 1998 e da parte del convenuto fino al 30 settembre 1998
18.01.1999 prima Sala consegnò la sua sentenza
25.01.1999 ricorso introdotto
01.02.1999 causa nominata di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale
03.11.1999 osservazioni scritte introdotte da dal Prof Refalo, aggiornata
26.01.2000 aggiornamento di ordine della corte
05.04.2000 osservazioni orali, aggiornate per la continuazione
19.06.2000 Prof Refalo richiese un aggiornamento, aggiornato.
09.10.2000 aggiornamento di ordine della corte
11.12.2000 note introdotte dal convenuto, aggiornato per osservazioni orali definitive
31.01.2001 aggiornamento dell’ ordine della corte
04.04.2001 aggiornamento perché richiedenti possano esaminare la replica del convenuto e per la continuazione
18.06.2001 Prof Refalo richiese un aggiornamento, aggiornato per continuazione
29.10.2001 aggiornamento di ordine della corte
18.02.2002 aggiornamento di ordine della corte
15.04.2002 aggiornamento di ordine della corte
12.06.2002 Prof Refalo richiese che nuove prove venissero prodotte, la Corte richiese al Prof Refalo di fare questa richiesta tramite una richiesta, aggiornata per osservazioni orali definitive
11.11.2002 Prof Refalo informò la Corte che la richiesta del suo cliente era stata notificata allo Stato giorni prima della seduta e che il periodo fissato per la replica era ancora scaduto, aggiornato.
19.02.2003 aggiornamento per osservazioni orali
07.04.2003 osservazioni orali sulla richiesta di produrre nuove prove, aggiornata per decreto
03.10.2003 aggiornamento dell’ ordine della corte
10.10.2003 la corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto, aggiornata
16.12.2003 la corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto, aggiornata
27.02.2004 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto, aggiornata
30.06.2004 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto
29.10.2004 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto
16.12.2004 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto
28.01.2005 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per decreto
25.02.2005 decreto letto in corte aperta, aggiornata per osservazioni orali
18.04.2005 osservazioni orali, aggiornate per ulteriori osservazioni orali
13.06.2005 ulteriori osservazioni orali, aggiornate per sentenza
04.11.2005 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornò
12.12.2005 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
30.03.2006 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
26.05.2006 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
07.07.2006 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
13.10.2006 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
20.11.2006 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
27.11.2006 corte ha bisogno di più tempo per sentenza, aggiornata
08.01.2007 la Corte costituzionale consegnò la sentenza.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.