Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BREZOVEC v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, P1-1

NUMERO: 13488/07/2011
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 29/03/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF BREZOVEC v. CROATIA
(Application no. 13488/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
29 March 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Brezovec v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Anatoly Kovler, President,
Nina Vajić,
Peer Lorenzen,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
George Nicolaou,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Julia Laffranque, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 March 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 13488/07) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, Mr I. B. (“the applicant”), on 10 January 2007.
2. The applicant was represented by OMISSIS advocates practising in Karlovac. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that by refusing his claim for the purchase of the flat at issue the domestic authorities had violated his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
4. On 25 November 2008 the President of the First Section decided to communicate the complaint concerning the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1941 and lives in Vojnić.
6. In 1980 the applicant became the holder of a specially protected tenancy (stanarsko pravo) of a flat in Vojnić. He lived in the flat with his family until 1 October 1991 when Vojnić was occupied. He then fled the occupying forces and went to live in Karlovac.
7. The applicant found a job in Karlovac and, as an internally displaced person, on 30 January 1992 he was awarded a flat there on a temporary basis. In July 1996 the competent authorities terminated his status as an internally displaced person. Following a civil action by Mr T.M., the applicant was forced to leave the flat in Karlovac on 21 January 1999.
8. The applicant claimed that – following the military operation “Storm” by which Croatia regained control of almost its entire territory in August 1995 – on 8 October 1995 he had visited Vojnić, where he had found the flat in respect of which he had the specially protected tenancy uninhabitable and in a very bad state of repair. This had been confirmed on 4 March 1996 by the findings of the Commission for the Assessment of War Damage. He further submitted that he had immediately commenced rebuilding work on the flat with a view to moving into it.
9. However, on 23 August 1996, while the applicant was working in Karlovac, the local authorities, accompanied by the police, entered into the flat, made a list of personal belongings, changed the locks and gave the keys of the flat to a certain Z.H., a local policeman. Five days later the Commission for Temporary Takeover and Use of Certain Property of the Municipality of Vojnić (Komisija za privremeno preuzimanje i korištenje određene imovine Općine Vojnić – “the Sequestration Commission”) issued a decision letting the flat to Z.H. and his family on a temporary basis.
10. On 20 December 1996 the applicant and his wife made a request for the purchase of the flat to the Municipality of Vojnić. In doing so they relied on the Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act, which entitled holders of specially protected tenancies of flats in social or state ownership to purchase their flats under favourable conditions (see paragraph 29 below). They received no reply.
11. On 7 August 1998 the Ministry of Reconstruction and Development (Ministarstvo razvitka i obnove) adopted a decision letting the flat to Z.H. and his family for their use.
12. On 16 October 2000 the Municipality of Vojnić issued a decision allowing the applicant to live in the flat. The applicant has been living in the flat ever since.
13. Meanwhile, on 12 May 2000, the applicant and his wife brought a civil action against the State in the Vojnić Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Vojniću) with a view to obtaining a judgment which would allow them to purchase the flat in accordance with the Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act. On 9 January 2001 the court dismissed their action. It found that the applicant's flat was owned by the State and not the Municipality of Vojnić and that therefore the plaintiffs should have directed their request for its purchase to the State and not to the Municipality. Following an appeal by the applicant and his wife, on 26 September 2001 the Karlovac County Court (Županijski sud u Karlovcu) quashed the first-instance judgment and remitted the case. It found, inter alia, that the fact that the plaintiffs had made their request for the purchase of the flat to the Municipality and not the State should not have been held against them.
14. In the resumed proceedings, on 11 September 2003 the Vojnić Municipal Court again dismissed the plaintiffs' action. The court first determined, as a preliminary issue, whether the plaintiffs had retained their specially protected tenancy of the flat in Vojnić, the existence of that tenancy being a statutory precondition for buying the flat under the Sale to Occupier Act. In this respect the court found that: (a) the plaintiffs had left the flat in October 1991 and (b) in the period between 5 August 1995, when Vojnić was liberated, and 23 August 1996, when the flat was awarded to Z.H., they had been living in Karlovac and had only occasionally visited and used the flat in Vojnić. That being so, the court concluded that since they had not used their flat permanently for living purposes, the plaintiffs' specially protected tenancy had been terminated. Consequently, they were not entitled to purchase the flat in question.
15. On 18 February 2004 the Karlovac County Court dismissed the plaintiffs' appeal and upheld the first-instance judgment, which thereby acquired the force of res judicata. Relying on the finding of the first-instance court that the plaintiffs had left the flat in 1991 and had not used it in the period between 5 August 1995 and 23 August 1996, the second-instance court expressly referred to section 2 of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory (see paragraph 19 below) in holding that the plaintiffs' specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege because after the Act's entry into force they had not used their flat for a period longer than ninety days. As a result, they had no right to purchase it.
16. The applicant then lodged a constitutional complaint alleging, inter alia, infringements of his constitutional rights to equality before the law, to property and to a fair hearing.
17. On 29 June 2006 the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) dismissed the constitutional complaint and served its decision on the applicant on 20 July 2006. The relevant part of the Constitutional Court's decision reads as follows:
“The [ordinary] courts established that the flat at issue in Vojnić had on 28 August 1996 been awarded to [Z.H.] for temporary use, and that the plaintiffs had in the period between August 1995 and 28 August 1996 only occasionally visited the flat, which could not be considered use of the flat. The first-instance court therefore dismissed the plaintiff's action in accordance with section 2 of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory, according to which the specially protected tenancy of flats located in the previously occupied, now liberated, territory of the Republic of Croatia was to be terminated by the operation of law if the holder of the specially protected tenancy left the flat and did not use it for a period exceeding 90 days following the Act's entry into force. The court established that the complainant had not used the flat between August 1995 and 28 August 1996 and that his specially protected tenancy had [therefore] been terminated by the operation of law. Given that his specially protected tenancy had been terminated by the operation of law after 5 January 1996, the complainant could no longer be considered the holder of a specially protected tenancy and therefore was not entitled to make a request for the purchase of the flat.
The County Court found that the first-instance judgment was correct and had been rendered on the basis of correctly and completely established facts and the correct application of the substantive law.
Assessing the arguments raised in the constitutional complaint in the light of Article 14 paragraph 2 of the Constitution, the Constitutional Court has found that the complainant's constitutional right to equality before the law was not breached by the contested judgments.
The legal views expressed in the contested judgments are based on the correct application of the relevant substantive law and on the constitutionally acceptable interpretation of that law. The Constitutional Court finds that the [ordinary] courts, relying on the facts established in the proceedings, gave reasons for their views expressed in the contested decisions, which undoubtedly do not result from the arbitrary interpretation or application of the relevant substantive law.
...
The content of the constitutional right to a fair hearing guaranteed by Article 29 paragraph 1 of the Constitution is limited to procedural guarantees of a fair hearing. Therefore, assessing the arguments raised in the constitutional complaint in the light of that constitutional right, as well as other constitutional rights guaranteed by Article 29 of the Constitution, the Constitutional Court examines possible procedural breaches in the proceedings before the courts and, on that basis and looking at the proceedings as a whole, ascertains whether the proceedings were conducted in a manner which secured a fair hearing to the complainant.
Having examined the contested decisions and the first-instance case file, the Constitutional Court finds that the complainant's constitutional right guaranteed by Article 29 paragraph 1 of the Constitution has not been breached.
As regards the complainant's argument concerning the breach of the constitutional right of ownership guaranteed by Article 48 paragraph 1 of the Constitution, it has to be noted that the Constitutional Court, on the basis of Article 48 of the Constitution, protects the right of ownership at the constitutional level in such a manner that it prevents restriction or taking of that right by the state authorities, unless a restriction or taking is provided for by law.
The Constitutional Court finds that the contested judgments are based on the relevant legislation and are well reasoned, and that the complainant's right of ownership guaranteed by Article 48 of the Constitution has not been breached.”
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitution
18. The relevant provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia, nos. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998 (consolidated text), 113/2000, 124/2000 (consolidated text), 28/2001 and 41/2001 (consolidated text), 55/2001 (corrigendum) and 76/2010) read as follows:
Article 14(2)
“All shall be equal before the law.”
Article 29(1)
“In the determination of his rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial court established by law.”
Article 48(1)
“The right of ownership shall be guaranteed.”
B. The Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory
1. Relevant provisions
19. The Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory (Zakon o davanju u najam stanova na oslobođenom teritoriju, Official Gazette no. 73/95), which was in force between 27 September 1995 and 5 August 1998 provided, in its relevant part, as follows:
Section 1(1)
“This Act regulates the lease of flats of which the specially protected tenancy ... has been terminated pursuant to the provisions of this Act, and which are located in the previously occupied, now liberated, territory of the Republic of Croatia.”
Section 2(1)
“The specially protected tenancy of the flats referred to in section 1 of this Act shall be terminated by the operation of law [i.e. ex lege] if the holder of the specially protected tenancy leaves the flat and does not use it for a period exceeding 90 days following this Act's entry into force.”
Section 3(1) and (2)
“(1) Flats referred to in section 1 of this Act which are in state ownership shall be let by the Ministry of Reconstruction and Development.
(2) Other flats [i.e. those in social ownership] shall be let by the [Sequestration] Commission established on the basis of the Temporary Takeover and Administration of Certain Property Act.”
Section 4(2) and (3)
“(2) The Ministry of Reconstruction and Development or the [Sequestration] Commission shall issue a decision ... on the lease of a flat.
(3) Against the Commission's decision referred to in the preceding paragraph one may lodge an appeal to the [competent] Ministry ... within eight days.
(4) The appeal does not suspend the enforcement of the decision.”
2. The case-law of the Constitutional Court
20. On 3 June 2003 the Constitutional Court adopted a decision in case no. U-III-1701/2000 (published in Official Gazette no. 122/2003 of 30 July 2003) where the complainant, the holder of the specially protected tenancy of a flat in Benkovac, brought an action against the local authorities in order to be allowed to purchase the flat in question. The second-instance court ruled against him, finding that his specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege because he had left the flat in 1991 when the town had come under the control of the occupying forces, and had returned to it only after the expiry of the time-limit set forth in section 2(1) of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory. It found that he was therefore not entitled to purchase the flat at issue. The Constitutional Court ruled for the complainant and quashed the contested judgment. In so doing it held as follows:
“... [T]he Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory refers to persons who left the previously occupied territory of the Republic of Croatia after the liberation in 1995.
The complainant did not leave Benkovac after its liberation in 1995 but was expelled therefrom in 1991. Therefore, in the view of the Constitutional Court, the complainant does not belong to the category of persons to which the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory applies.
The second-instance court erroneously applied to the complainant's particular legal situation ... the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory. Consequently, that court wrongly held in the contested judgment that the complainant's specially protected tenancy of the flat in Benkovac was terminated by the operation of section 2(1) of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory after the expiry of the ninety-day time-limit following its entry into force (that is, on 5 January 1996).
For these reasons, the complainant's constitutional right to equality before the law guaranteed by Article 14 paragraph 2 of the Constitution, as well as his constitutional right to a fair hearing guaranteed by Article 29 paragraph 1 of the Constitution, was violated by the contested judgment.”
21. On 9 December 2004 the Constitutional Court adopted a decision in case no. U-III-1451/2004 (published in Official Gazette no. 187/2004 of 29 December 2004) where the complainant, the holder of the specially protected tenancy of a flat in Petrinja, brought an action against the local authorities in order to be allowed to purchase the flat in question. The ordinary courts ruled against her, finding that her specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege because she had left the flat and gone to live abroad in August 1995 when the Croatian authorities regained control of Petrinja following the military operation “Storm”, and had returned to Croatia only in 2001, that is, after the expiry of the time-limit set forth in section 2(1) of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory. It found that she was therefore not entitled to purchase the flat at issue. The Constitutional Court firstly referred to its interpretation of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory provided in decision no. U-III-1701/2000 of 3 June 2003 (see the preceding paragraph), according to which that Act applied:
“... to persons who left the previously occupied territory of the Republic of Croatia after the liberation in 1995.”
Having established that the complainant had indeed left her flat in Petrinja in August 1995 and had returned to Croatia only in 2001, the Constitutional Court dismissed her constitutional complaint.
22. On 6 May 2005 the Constitutional Court adopted a decision in case no. U-III-2174/2002 (published in Official Gazette no. 65/2005 of 25 May 2005) where the complainant, the holder of the specially protected tenancy of a flat in Pakrac, brought an action against the local authorities in order to be allowed to purchase the flat in question. The ordinary courts ruled against her, finding that her specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege because she had left the flat in 1991 when Pakrac had come under the control of the occupying forces, and had returned to it only in spring 1996, that is, after the expiry of the time-limit set forth in section 2(1) of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory. They found that she was therefore not entitled to purchase the flat at issue. The Constitutional Court ruled for the complainant and quashed the contested judgments of the ordinary courts. In so doing it held as follows:
“... [T]he Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory refers to persons who left the previously occupied territory of the Republic of Croatia after the liberation in 1995.
The complainant left the flat in Pakrac in August 1991. Therefore, in the view of the Constitutional Court, the complainant does not belong to the category of persons to which the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory applies.
The [ordinary] courts erroneously applied to the complainant's particular legal situation ... the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory. Consequently, the [ordinary] courts in the contested judgments wrongly held that the complainant's specially protected tenancy of the flat in Pakrac was terminated by the operation of section 2(1) of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory after the expiry of the ninety-day time-limit following its entry into force (that is, 5 January 1996).
For these reasons, the complainant's constitutional right to equality before the law guaranteed by Article 14 paragraph 2 of the Constitution, as well as his constitutional right to a fair hearing guaranteed by Article 29 paragraph 1 of the Constitution ..., was violated by the contested judgments.”
C. The Housing Act
1. Relevant provisions
23. The Housing Act (Zakon o stambenim odnosima, Official Gazette nos. 51/1985, 42/1986, 22/1992 and 70/1993), which was in force between 25 December 1985 and 5 November 1996 provided, in its relevant part, as follows:
Section 97
“1. The provider of the flat may terminate the specially protected tenancy... [inter alia] if the tenant does not pay the rent or the utility charges for three consecutive months, or for three months over the last twelve months.
2. Termination of the specially protected tenancy for the reasons enunciated in paragraph 1 may be effected if the tenant does not pay the rent or the utility charges due... within a reasonable time after being warned by registered mail to do so.”
Section 99
“1. A specially protected tenancy may be terminated if the tenant [...] ceases to occupy the flat for an uninterrupted period exceeding six months.
2. A specially protected tenancy shall not be terminated under the provisions of paragraph 1 of this section in respect of a person who does not use the flat on account of undergoing medical treatment, performance of military service or other justified reasons.
3. It shall also be considered that the flat has not been used for an uninterrupted period when the tenant only occasionally visits the flat ...”
24. Under section 105(1) the provider of the flat had to bring a civil action in order to terminate the specially protected tenancy.
2. The case-law of the Supreme Court
25. In its decision no. Rev-616/1988 of 11 October 1988 the Supreme Court interpreted section 99 of the Housing Act in the following way:
“The specially protected tenancy is not lost ex lege by the mere fact of non-use of the flat for a period exceeding six months. Rather, that is a ground for termination of a specially protected tenancy that can be terminated only by the provider of the flat.”
26. The tenancy was terminated as soon as the court's judgment upholding the claim of the provider of the flat became res judicata (see, inter alia, the Supreme Court's decision no. Rev-1009/1993-2 of 15 June 1994).
27. In a series of decisions (for example, in cases nos. Rev-152/1994-2 of 23 February 1994, Rev-1780/1996-2 of 10 March 1999, Rev-1606/00-2 of 1 October 2003, Rev-998/03-2 of 4 December 2003, and Rev-590/03-2 of 17 December 2003) starting with decision no. Rev-155/1994-2 of 16 February 1994, the Supreme Court interpreted another aspect of section 99(1) of the Housing Act as follows:
“The fact that a flat that is not being used by its tenant is illegally occupied by a third person does not, per se, make the non-use [of the flat by the tenant] justified. In other words, if the tenant fails to take the appropriate steps to regain possession of the flat within the statutory time-limits set forth in section 99(1) of the Housing Act ..., then the [illegal occupation of the flat by a third person] is not an obstacle to the termination of the specially protected tenancy.”
D. The Lease of Flats Act
28. The Lease of Flats Act (Zakon o najmu stanova, Official Gazette no. 91/1996 of 28 October 1996), which entered into force on 5 November 1996, abolished the specially protected tenancy as such (section 30 paragraph 1) but provided that proceedings instituted under the Housing Act should be concluded under the provisions of that Act (section 52 paragraph 1).
E. The Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act
29. The Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, Official Gazette no. 27/91 with subsequent amendments – “the Sale to Occupier Act”), which entered into force on 19 June 1991, entitled the holder of the specially protected tenancy of a flat in social or state ownership to purchase it from the provider of the flat under favourable conditions.
30. Section 4(2) provided that a written request for the purchase of a flat had to be made within one year of the date of the Act's entry into force (this time-limit was by subsequent amendments to the Act extended until 31 December 1996 for the flats located on the liberated territory).
F. The Civil Procedure Act
31. The relevant part of the Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parničnom postupku, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 and 35/1991, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia nos. 53/1991, 91/1992, 58/1993, 112/1999, 88/2001, 117/2003, 88/2005, 2/2007, 84/2008 and 123/2008) provides as follows:
Reopening of proceedings following a final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom
Section 428a
“(1) When the European Court of Human Rights has found a violation of a human right or fundamental freedom guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms or additional protocols thereto ratified by the Republic of Croatia, a party may, within thirty days of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights becoming final, file a petition with the court in the Republic of Croatia which adjudicated in the first instance in the proceedings in which the decision violating the human right or fundamental freedom was rendered, to set aside the decision by which the human right or fundamental freedom was violated.
(2) The proceedings referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall be conducted by applying, mutatis mutandis, the provisions on the reopening of proceedings.
(3) In the reopened proceedings the courts are required to respect the legal opinions expressed in the final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
32. The applicant complained that in refusing his claim to purchase the flat the domestic authorities had infringed his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
33. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
34. The Government disputed the admissibility of this complaint on three grounds. They argued that it is incompatible ratione temporis and ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention, and that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies.
1. Compatibility ratione temporis and ratione materiae
(a) The arguments of the parties
(i) The Government
35. The Government, firstly, argued that the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was incompatible ratione temporis because he had lost his specially protected tenancy before the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia.
36. The Government explained that, unlike in the Blečić and Mrkić cases (see Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, ECHR 2006-III, and Mrkić v. Croatia (dec.), no. 7118/03, 8 June 2006), where the judgments terminating the specially protected tenancy, based on section 99 of the Housing Act, had had a constitutive effect, the court judgments in the instant case had been of a declaratory nature because they had been based on the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory, which had provided for ex lege termination of the specially protected tenancy if its holder had not used the flat for a period exceeding ninety days following the Act's entry into force. Therefore, the applicant in the present case had lost his specially protected tenancy by the operation of law on 5 January 1996, that is, before the Convention had entered into force in respect of Croatia on 5 November 1997. In other words, the applicant's tenancy had not been terminated by the subsequent court judgments applying the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory, but ipso jure, when the period of ninety days following the Act's entry into force had expired.
37. The Government further argued that the complaint was incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention. Relying on the Gaćeša case (see Gaćeša v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43389/02, 1 April 2008), they averred that the applicant's right to purchase the flat was a “claim” rather than an “existing possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and the Court's case-law. However, in their view, the applicant could not have had a legitimate expectation that his claim would be granted, that is, that he would have become the owner of the flat, as he had lost his specially protected tenancy ex lege before making the request for the purchase of the flat.
(ii) The applicant
38. The applicant submitted that under the case-law of the Constitutional Court the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory applied only to those persons who had left the previously occupied territory of Croatia after the liberation in 1995 (see paragraphs 20-22 above). Since he had left Vojnić in 1991 in order to flee the occupying forces and had returned in October 1995, the legislation in question could not have applied to him and his specially protected tenancy could not have been terminated ex lege. That being so, and given that he had made the request for the purchase of the flat within the time-limit stipulated in section 4(2) of the Sale to Occupier Act (see paragraphs 10 and 30 above), he had had a legitimate expectation that his claim for the purchase of the flat would be granted.
(b) The Court's assessment
39. The Court reiterates that an applicant may allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or claims that are sufficiently established to be regarded as “assets”. Where, as in the present case, a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, it may be regarded as an “asset” only if there is a sufficient basis for that interest in national law (for example, where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it), that is, when the claim is sufficiently established to be enforceable (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, §§ 48-49 and 52, ECHR 2004-IX, and Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301-B).
40. The Court notes that persons wishing to purchase a flat under the Sale to Occupier Act had to satisfy two conditions: (a) they had to submit their request for purchase of the flat within the time-limit fixed in section 4(2) of that Act, and (b) they had to be holders of the specially protected tenancy of the flat they wanted to buy, that is, their tenancy should not have been terminated before the expiry of that time-limit (see paragraphs 29-30 above).
41. Turning to the present case, the Court first notes that the domestic courts dismissed the applicant's claim for purchase of the flat because they found that his specially protected tenancy – the existence of which was a statutory precondition for buying the flat under the Sale to Occupier Act – had been terminated. In particular, the second-instance court, in its judgment of 18 February 2004, expressly referred to section 2 of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory and held that the applicant's specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege because after the Act's entry into force he had not used his flat for a period longer than ninety days (see paragraph 15 above).
42. However, the Court further notes that in its decisions nos. U-III-1701/2000 of 3 June 2003, U-III-1451/2004 of 9 December 2004 and U-III-2174/2002 of 6 May 2005 the Constitutional Court held that the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory applied only to those holders of a specially protected tenancy who had left the previously occupied territory of Croatia after the liberation in 1995 (see paragraphs 20-22 above). Having found in two of those cases (no. U-III-1701/2000 of 3 June 2003 and no. U-III-2174/2002 of 6 May 2005) that the complainants, who were the holders of a specially protected tenancy, had left that territory in 1991, the Constitutional Court held that the Act in question could not be applied to them (see paragraphs 20 and 22 above).
43. Having regard to the fact that the domestic courts established that the applicant had left Vojnić on 1 October 1991 (see paragraphs 14-15 above), the Court is of the view that he was entitled to consider, in the light of the case-law of the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 20-22 above), that he retained his specially protected tenancy because the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory, according to the interpretation provided by that court, did not apply to him.
44. Furthermore, given that the applicant made the request for the purchase of the flat on 20 December 1996 (see paragraph 10 above), that is, within the statutory time-limit set forth in section 4(2) of the Sale to Occupier Act (see paragraph 30 above), it follows that all the conditions for acquiring the right to purchase the flat were met in the applicant's case.
45. The Court therefore considers that, in contrast to the Gaćeša case relied on by the Government (see Gaćeša, cited above), on the day of the Convention's entry into force in respect of Croatia on 5 November 1997, the applicant's claim to purchase the flat in the present case had a sufficient basis in national law to qualify as an “asset” and therefore a “possession” protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
46. It follows that the Government's objections as to incompatibility ratione temporis and ratione materiae must be dismissed.
2. Non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
(a) The arguments of the parties
47. The Government noted that the applicant had argued that he was unable to use the flat in question, inter alia, because Z.H. had broken into it. However, they pointed out that the applicant had not availed himself of any remedies in order to challenge Z.H.'s right to use the flat in question and/or to seek his eviction.
48. The applicant replied that he had not been a party to the administrative proceedings leading to the decision of 28 August 1996 (see paragraph 9 above) whereby the Sequestration Commission had let the flat to Z.H. and his family on a temporary basis. That decision had never been served on him and therefore he had not been able to use any remedies against it.
(b) The Court's assessment
49. The Court reiterates that the domestic courts found that the applicant's specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege by the application of section 2(1) of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory because had not used the flat at issue in the period between 5 August 1995 and 23 August 1996 (see paragraph 15 above), that is, in the period before the local authorities had entered into his flat on the last-mentioned date and allocated it to Z.H. on 28 August 1996 (see paragraph 9 above). The Court therefore does not see how resorting to available domestic remedies with a view to contesting Z.H.'s right to use the flat and/or seeking his eviction could have prevented or remedied the termination of the applicant's specially protected tenancy.
50. It follows that the Government's objection concerning non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must also be dismissed.
51. The Court further notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It also notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Whether there was an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of “possessions”
52. Relying on their above argument that the applicant's specially protected tenancy had been terminated ex lege before the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia, (see paragraph 36), the Government submitted that the subsequent domestic court judgments refusing his claim to purchase the flat could not have amounted to an interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions because at the time they were rendered he did not have a sufficient proprietary interest to constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
53. The applicant did not make any specific comments on this issue. However, it follows from his submissions that he considered that there had been an interference with his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
54. In the light of its above finding that the applicant's claim for the purchase of the flat was sufficiently established to qualify as an “asset” attracting the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 39-46 above), the Court considers that the refusal of the domestic courts to grant that claim undoubtedly constituted an interference with his right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. This interference occurred on 18 February 2004 when the Karlovac County Court upheld the first-instance judgment of the Vojnić Municipal Court of 11 September 2003, which thereby acquired the force of res judicata.
55. The Court must further examine whether that interference was justified, that is, whether it was provided for by law, whether it was in the public or general interest and whether it was proportional.
2. Whether the interference was “provided for by law”
(a) The arguments of the parties
(i) The Government
56. The Government submitted that it was undisputed that the domestic courts' decisions were based on law, in particular the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory.
57. They further argued that in its decision of 29 June 2006, delivered following the applicant's constitutional complaint, the Constitutional Court had not departed from the previous case-law established by its decision U-III-1701/2000 of 3 June 2003 (see paragraph 20 above). In the last-mentioned decision the Constitutional Court had also held that the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory, including section 2 of that Act, which had provided for the ex lege termination of specially protected tenancies, applied to all persons who had left the previously occupied territory of Croatia after its liberation in 1995, that is, to those holders of a specially protected tenancy who had not used their flats for a period exceeding ninety days following the Act's entry into force. In the present case, the Constitutional Court had found that the applicant had not used the flat in Vojnić in the period between August 1995 and August 1996, that is, after the liberation of the previously occupied territory. Therefore, the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory was applicable to him. The Constitutional Court had taken the same view in its decision no. U-III-1451/2004, by which it had dismissed a constitutional complaint in a case that was factually and legally identical to that of the applicant (see paragraph 21 above).
(ii) The applicant
58. The applicant reiterated his arguments (see paragraph 38 above) that the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory could not be applied to him.
(b) The Court's assessment
59. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II). In this connection, the Court agrees with the Government that the decisions of the domestic courts in the present case had a legal basis in domestic law as their refusal to grant the applicant's claim for purchase of the flat was based on section 2 of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory.
60. However, the Court further reiterates that the existence of a legal basis is not in itself sufficient to satisfy the principle of lawfulness. When speaking of “law”, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 alludes to a concept which comprises statutory law as well as case-law and implies qualitative requirements, notably those of accessibility and foreseeability (see, for example, Mullai and Others v. Albania, no. 9074/07, § 113, 23 March 2010; Špaček, s.r.o. v. the Czech Republic, no. 26449/95, § 54, 9 November 1999; and Carbonara and Ventura v. Italy, no. 24638/94, § 64, ECHR 2000-VI).
61. In this connection, the Court first notes that the application by the ordinary courts of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory to the applicant's case was not in line with the interpretation and practice of the Constitutional Court, according to which that Act could not be applied to situations similar to that of the applicant (see paragraphs 20 and 22 above).
62. The Court further notes that, following the applicant's constitutional complaint, the Constitutional Court had an opportunity to quash the judgments of the ordinary courts, which were contrary to its previous decisions. However, it did not do so. Instead, it dismissed the applicant's constitutional complaint.
63. Therefore, in the applicant's case not only the judgments of the ordinary courts but also the decision of the Constitutional Court itself were contrary to that court's earlier case-law.
64. At this juncture the Court finds it appropriate to address the Government's argument that in dismissing the applicant's constitutional complaint the Constitutional Court did not depart from its previous case-law established in decisions nos. U-III-1701/2000 of 3 June 2003, U-III-1451/2004 of 9 December 2004 and U-III-2174/2002 of 6 May 2005. The Court notes that in those decisions the Constitutional Court clearly stated that the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory applied only to those holders of a specially protected tenancy who had left the previously occupied territory of Croatia after August 1995. Therefore, in two of those cases the Constitutional Court held that the legislation in question could not be applied to the complainants, as they had left their flats before 1995. It thus allowed their constitutional complaints (see paragraphs 20 and 22 above). In the remaining case it dismissed the constitutional complaint because it found that the complainant in that case, unlike the applicant in the present case, had left her flat in August 1995 (see paragraph 21 above). Having regard to the fact that in the applicant's case the ordinary courts established that the applicant had left Vojnić on 1 October 1991 (see paragraphs 14-15 above), which finding was not contested by the Constitutional Court, the Court does not find that his case was different from those mentioned above. Accordingly, the Court cannot accept the Government's argument that the Constitutional Court's decision in the applicant's case was consistent with that court's previous case-law.
65. The Court further notes that in its decision dismissing the applicant's constitutional complaint the Constitutional Court did not attempt to distinguish the applicant's case from its previous decisions, nor did it indicate its intention to depart from its interpretation of the Act on the Lease of Flats on the Liberated Territory. What is more, the Government did not furnish any relevant decisions that would indicate a change in the Constitutional Court's practice or otherwise enable the Court to ascertain why the applicant's case was decided differently. Therefore, it cannot be discerned whether in the applicant's case the Constitutional Court simply neglected its previous jurisprudence or whether it consciously departed from it and, if so, why.
66. The Court has already held, in the context of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, that the Contracting States have an obligation to organise their legal system so as to avoid the adoption of discordant judgments (see Vrioni and Others v. Albania, no. 2141/03, § 58, 24 March 2009, and Mullai and Others, cited above, § 86), and that conflicting decisions in similar cases stemming from the same court which, in addition, is the court of last resort in the matter, may, in the absence of a mechanism which ensures consistency, breach the principle of legal certainty inherent in that Article (see, for example, Beian v. Romania (no. 1), no. 30658/05, §§ 36-39, ECHR 2007-XIII; Tudor Tudor v. Romania, no. 21911/03, § 29, 24 March 2009; and Iordan Iordanov and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 23530/02, §§ 47-53, 2 July 2009).
67. The Court has also held that where such manifestly conflicting decisions interfere with the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions and no reasonable explanation is given for the divergence, such interferences cannot be considered lawful for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention because they lead to an inconsistent case-law which lacks the required precision to enable individuals to foresee the consequences of their actions (see Carbonara and Ventura, cited above, § 65; Mullai and Others, cited above, §§ 115-117; and Saghinadze and Others v. Georgia, no. 18768/05, §§ 116-118, 27 May 2010).
68. Having regard to the foregoing considerations, it follows that the impugned interference in the form of the Vojnić Municipal Court's judgment of 11 September 2003 was not foreseeable for the applicant who, relying on the existing case-law of the Constitutional Court, could reasonably have expected that his claim for the purchase of the flat would be granted. The interference was therefore incompatible with the principle of lawfulness and hence contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. This finding makes it unnecessary to examine whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the applicant's fundamental rights.
There has, accordingly, been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
69. The applicant further complained under Article 8 of the Convention that by breaking into his flat and letting it to Z.H. the domestic authorities had violated his right to respect for his home. Article 8 of the Convention reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for ... his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
70. In so far as the applicant may be understood to complain about the actual entering into his flat on 23 August 1996 and the decision of the Sequestration Commission of 28 August 1996 (see paragraph 9 above) whereby it let the flat to Z.H., the Court notes that these events took place before the Convention entered into force in respect of Croatia on 5 November 1997.
71. To the extent that the applicant complains of the decision of the Ministry of Reconstruction and Development of 7 August 1998 (see paragraph 11 above), the Court notes that the applicant could have challenged it before the Administrative Court, but he did not do so.
72. It follows that this complaint is, in its respective aspects, inadmissible as incompatible ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies under Article 35 § 1 thereof and must therefore be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLES 6 § 1 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION
73. Lastly, the applicant complained under Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention that he had not had access to a court nor an effective remedy in order to challenge the forcible entry into his flat or the domestic authorities' decisions of 28 August 1996 and 7 August 1998 to let his flat to Z.H. Articles 6 and 13 read as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 13
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
74. The Court refers to its above findings (see paragraphs 70-72), according to which the applicant's complaint under Article 8 of the Convention is inadmissible as incompatible ratione temporis and for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. It follows that in so far as the applicant's complaints under Article 6 § 1 and 13 concern the alleged lack of access to a court and an effective remedy in respect of the break-in of his flat on 23 August 1996, and the decision of the Sequestration Commission of 28 August 1996, they are also inadmissible as incompatible ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention. To the extent that these complaints concern the decision of the Ministry of Reconstruction and Development of 7 August 1998 they are inadmissible as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. They must therefore be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
75. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
76. In his application form the applicant claimed 50,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage and EUR 1,200 in respect of costs and expenses. However, he did not submit a just satisfaction claim, nor did he resubmit (even by referring to them) the claims made in the application form within the time-limit fixed for submission of his Article 41 claims, that is, within the time-limit for submission of his observations (Rule 60 § 3 of the Rules of Court). The applicant failed to (re)submit the just satisfaction claims within the time allowed even though he was reminded that he had to do so even if he had indicated his wishes concerning just satisfaction at an earlier stage of the proceedings.
77. The Government noted that the applicant had not submitted a claim for just satisfaction in his observations but they nevertheless contested the claims made in the application form.
78. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences. If national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI). In this connection, the Court notes that the applicant can now file a petition under section 428a of the Civil Procedure Act (see paragraph 31 above) with the Vojnić Municipal Court for the reopening of the civil proceedings in respect of which the Court has found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
79. Given the nature of the applicant's complaint and the reasons for which it has found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the Court considers that in the present case the most appropriate form of redress would be to reopen the proceedings complained of in due course (see, mutatis mutandis, Trgo v. Croatia, no. 35298/04, § 75, 11 June 2009, and Vrbica v. Croatia, no. 32540/05, §§ 83-85, 1 April 2010).
80. Having regard to the foregoing, and given that the applicant did not submit a claim for just satisfaction at the time prescribed, the Court considers that there is no call to award him any sum on that account.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 March 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Anatoly Kovler
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA BREZOVEC C. CROAZIA
(Richiesta n. 13488/07)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
29 marzo 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Brezovec c. Croazia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Anatoly Kovler, Presidente, Nina Vajić il Pari Lorenzen, Khanlar Hajiyev, Giorgio Nicolaou, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Julia Laffranque, giudici,
e da Søren Nielsen, Sezione Cancelliere,
Avendo deliberato in privato l’8 marzo 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 13488/07) contro la Repubblica di Croazia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino croato, Sig. I. B. (“il richiedente”), il 10 gennaio 2007.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dai difensori OMISSIS che praticano a Karlovac. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che rifiutando la sua rivendicazione per l'acquisto dell'appartamento in questione le autorità nazionali avevano violato il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
4. Il 25 novembre 2008 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di comunicare l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1941 e vive a Vojnić.
6. Nel 1980 il richiedente divenne il possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto (stanarsko pravo) di un appartamento a Vojnić. Lui visse nell'appartamento con la sua famiglia fino al 1 ottobre 1991 quando Vojnić fu occupata. Lui abbandonò poi le forze occupanti ed andò a vivere a Karlovac.
7. Il richiedente trovò un lavoro a Karlovac e, come deportato internamente, il 30 gennaio 1992 gli è stato assegnato là un appartamento su base provvisoria. Nel luglio 1996 le autorità competenti terminarono il suo status come deportato internamente. In seguito ad un'azione civile da parte del Sig. T.M., il richiedente fu costretto a lasciare l'appartamento a Karlovac il 21 gennaio 1999.
8. Il richiedente chiese che-in seguito all'operazione militare “Storm” con cui Croazia riguadagnò il controllo di quasi il suo intero territorio nell’ agosto 1995-l’8 ottobre 1995 aveva visitato Vojnić, dove aveva trovato l'appartamento a riguardo del quale aveva un affitto specialmente protetto inabitabile ed in uno cattivo stato in quanto all’abitabilità. Questo era stato confermato il 4 marzo 1996 con le sentenze della Commissione per la Valutazione dei Danni di Guerra. Lui presentò inoltre che lui immediatamente aveva cominciato dei lavori di ricostruzione nell'appartamento nella prospettiva di trasferirvisi.
9. Comunque, il 23 agosto 1996, mentre il richiedente stava lavorando a Karlovac, le autorità locali accompagnate dalla polizia, entrarono nell'appartamento e fecero una lista di oggetti personali, cambiò le serrature e diede le chiavi dell'appartamento ad un certo Z.H., un poliziotto locale. Cinque giorni più tardi la Commissione per il Rilevamento Provvisorio e l’Uso di Certe Proprietà del Municipio di Vojnić (Komisija za privremeno preuzimanje i korištenje određene imovine Općine Vojnić-“la Commissione di Sequestro”) emise una decisione con cui si affittava l'appartamento a Z.H. e alla sua famiglia su base provvisoria.
10. Il 20 dicembre 1996 il richiedente e sua moglie presentarono istanza di acquisto dell'appartamento al Municipio di Vojnić. Nel fare così loro si appellarono all’Atto sugli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) che dava il titolo ai possessori di affitti specialmente protetti di appartamenti in proprietà sociale o statale di acquistare i loro appartamenti sotto condizioni favorevoli (vedere paragrafo 29 sotto). Loro non ricevettero replica.
11. Il 7 agosto 1998 il Ministero della Ricostruzione e dello Sviluppo ((Ministarstvo razvitka i obnove) adottò una decisione con cui si affittava l'appartamento a Z.H. e alla sua famiglia per il loro uso.
12. Il 16 ottobre 2000 il Municipio di Vojnić emise una decisione che permetteva il richiedente di vivere nell'appartamento. Il richiedente sta vivendo sin da allora nell'appartamento.
13. Nel frattempo, il richiedente e sua moglie introdussero un'azione civile contro lo Stato presso la Corte Municipale di Vojnić il 12 maggio 2000, (Općinski sud u Vojniću) nella prospettiva di ottenere una sentenza che avrebbe concesso loro di acquistare l'appartamento in conformità con l'Atto sugli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante). Il 9 gennaio 2001 la corte respinse la loro azione. Trovò che l'appartamento del richiedente era posseduto dallo Stato e non dal Municipio di Vojnić e che perciò i querelanti avrebbero dovuto dirigere la loro richiesta per il suo acquisto allo Stato e non al Municipio. In seguito ad un ricorso da parte del richiedente e di sua moglie, Il 26 settembre 2001 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Karlovac (Županijski sud u Karlovcu) annullò la sentenza di prima - istanza e rinviò la causa. Trovò, inter alia che il fatto che i querelanti avevano presentato la loro richiesta d’acquisto dell'appartamento al Municipio e non allo Stato non avrebbe dovuto essere sostenuto contro loro.
14. In procedimenti ricominciati, l’11 settembre 2003 la Corte Municipale di Vojnić respinse di nuovo l'azione dei querelanti. La corte prima determinò, come questione pregiudiziale, se i querelanti avevano mantenuto il loro affitto specialmente protetto dell'appartamento a Vojnić, essendo l'esistenza di quell’ affitto un requisito indispensabile legale per comprare l'appartamento sotto l’ Atto di Vendita all’ Occupante. A questo riguardo la corte ha trovato che: (a) i querelanti avevano lasciato l'appartamento nell’ ottobre 1991 e (b) nel periodo fra il 5 agosto 1995, quando Vojnić fu liberata, e il 23 agosto 1996, quando l'appartamento fu assegnato a Z.H., loro stavano vivendo a Karlovac ed avevano fatto visita e utilizzato solamente di quando in quando l'appartamento a Vojnić. Che essendo così, la corte concluse che poiché loro non avevano usato permanentemente il loro appartamento per viverci, l'affitto specialmente protetto dei querelanti era stato terminato. Di conseguenza, non era concesso loro acquistare l'appartamento in oggetto.
15. Il 18 febbraio 2004 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Karlovac respinse il ricorso dei querelanti e sostenne la sentenza di prima - istanza che con ciò acquisì la forza di res judicata. Appellandosi alla sentenza della corte di prima - istanza i querelanti avevano lasciato l'appartamento nel 1991 e non l'avevano usato nel periodo fra il 5 agosto 1995 e il 23 agosto 1996, la corte di seconda-istanza si riferì espressamente alla sezione 2 dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto degli Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato (vedere paragrafo 19 sotto) nel sostenere che l'affitto specialmente protetto dei querelanti era stato terminato ex lege perché dopo l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto loro non usavano il loro appartamento da un periodo più lungo di novanta giorni. Di conseguenza, loro non avevano, nessun diritto di acquistarlo.
16. Il richiedente depositò poi un azione di reclamo costituzionale adducendo, inter alia, violazioni dei suoi diritti costituzionali all'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge, alla proprietà ed ad un'udienza corretta.
17. Il 29 giugno 2006 la Corte Costituzionale (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) respinse l'azione di reclamo costituzionale e notificò la sua decisione al richiedente il 20 luglio 2006. La parte attinente della decisione della Corte Costituzionale si legge come segue:
“Le corti [ordinarie] stabilirono che l'appartamento in questione a Vojnić era stato assegnato il 28 agosto a [Z.H.] per uso provvisorio, e che i querelanti avevano visitato l’appartamento solamente di quando in quando nel periodo fra l’agosto 1995 e il 28 agosto 1996 e non poteva essere considerato come uso dell'appartamento. La corte di prima - istanza respinse perciò l'azione del querelante in conformità con la sezione 2 dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto degli Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato secondo il quale l'affitto specialmente protetto di appartamenti localizzati nel territorio ex occupato, ora liberato, della Repubblica della Croazia sarebbe stato terminato con l'operazione di legge se il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto avesse lasciato l'appartamento e non l’avesse usato per un periodo eccedente i 90 giorni in seguito all'entrata in vigore dell'Atto. La corte stabilì che il reclamante non aveva usato l'appartamento fra l’agosto 1995 e il 28 agosto 1996 e che il suo affitto specialmente protetto era stato [perciò] terminato con l'operazione di legge. Dato che il suo affitto specialmente protetto era stato terminato con l'operazione di legge dopo il 5 gennaio 1996, il reclamante non avrebbe più potuto essere considerato il possessore di un affitto specialmente protetto e perciò non gli poteva essere concesso di costituire una richiesta d’acquisto dell'appartamento.
L'Organo giudiziario locale trovò che la sentenza di prima - istanza aveva ragione ed era stata resa correttamente sulla base di fatti completamente stabiliti e l’applicazione corretta del diritto sostanziale.
Valutando gli argomenti sollevati nell'azione di reclamo costituzionale alla luce dell’ Articolo 14 paragrafo 2 della Costituzione, la Corte Costituzionale ha trovato che il diritto costituzionale del reclamante all'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge non fu violato dalle sentenze contestate.
Le prospettive legali espresse nelle sentenze contestate sono basate sull’applicazione corretta del diritto sostanziale attinente e sull'interpretazione costituzionalmente accettabile di quella legge. la Corte Costituzionale costata che le corti [ordinarie], appellandosi a questi fatti, stabiliti nei procedimenti, diedero ragioni per le loro prospettive espresse nelle decisioni contestate che indubbiamente non sono il risultato dell'interpretazione o dell’applicazione arbitraria del diritto sostanziale attinente.
...
Il contenuto del diritto costituzionale ad un'udienza corretta garantita dall’ Articolo 29 paragrafo 1 della Costituzione è limitato a garanzie procedurali di un'udienza corretta. Perciò, valutando gli argomenti sollevati nell'azione di reclamo costituzionale alla luce di quel diritto costituzionale, così come gli altri diritti costituzionali garantiti dall’ Articolo 29 della Costituzione, la Corte Costituzionale esamina le possibili violazioni procedurali nei procedimenti di fronte alle corti e, su questa base e guardando i procedimenti nell'insieme, accerta se i procedimenti furono condotti in una maniera che garantiva un'udienza corretta al reclamante.
Avendo esaminato le decisioni contestate e l'archivio della causa di prima – istanza la Corte Costituzionale costata che il diritto costituzionale del reclamante garantito dall’ Articolo 29 paragrafo 1 della Costituzione non è stato violato.
Riguardo all'argomento del reclamante riguardo alla violazione del diritto costituzionale di proprietà garantito dall’Articolo 48 paragrafo 1 della Costituzione, si doveva notare che la Corte Costituzionale, sulla base dell’ Articolo 48 della Costituzione protegge il diritto di proprietà a livello costituzionale modo tale da ostacolare o di prevenire la restrizione di questo diritto da parte delle autorità statali, a meno che una restrizione o un ostacolo venga previsto dalla legge.
La Corte Costituzionale costata che le sentenze contestate sono basate sulla legislazione attinente e sono ragionate bene, e che il diritto di proprietà del reclamante garantito dall’ Articolo 48 della Costituzione non è stato violato.”
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Costituzione
18. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione della Repubblica della Croazia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Croazia, N. 56/1990, 135/1997 8/1998 (testo consolidato), 113/2000, 124/2000 (testo consolidato), 28/2001 e 41/2001 (testo consolidato), 55/2001 (corrigendum) e 76/2010) recita come segue:
Articolo 14(2)
“Tutti saranno uguali di fronte alla legge.”
Articolo 29(1)
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti ed obblighi o di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro lui, ad ognuno è concesso un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole da parte di una corte indipendente ed imparziale stabilita dalla legge.”
Articolo 48(1)
“Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito.”
B. L'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto degli Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato
1. Disposizioni attinenti
19. L'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato (Zakon o davanju u najam stanova na oslobođenom teritoriju, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 73/95) che era in vigore fra il27 settembre 1995 e il 5 agosto 1998 prevede, nella sua parte attinente, come segue:
Sezione 1(1)
“Questo Atto regola il contratto d'affitto di appartamenti il cui affitto specialmente protetto... è stato terminato facendo seguito alle disposizioni di questo Atto, e che sono localizzati nel territorio ex occupato, ora liberato, della Repubblica della Croazia.”
Sezione 2(1)
“L'affitto specialmente protetto degli appartamenti a cui si fa riferimento nella sezione 1 di questo Atto sarà terminato con operazione di legge [cioé. ex lege] se il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto lascia l'appartamento e non lo usa per un periodo eccedente i 90 giorni in seguito all'entrata in vigore di questo Atto.”
Sezione 3(1) e (2)
“(1) gli appartamenti a cui si fa riferimento nella sezione 1 di questo Atto che sono di proprietà statale e saranno affittati dal Ministero di Ricostruzione e Sviluppo.
(2) gli altri appartamenti [cioè. quelli in proprietà sociale] saranno affittati dalla Commissione [di Sequestro] stabilita sulla base dell’Atto sul Rilevamento Provvisorio e l’ Amministrazione di Certe Proprietà.”
Sezione 4(2) e (3)
“(2) il Ministero della Ricostruzione e dello Sviluppo o la Commissione [di Sequestro] emetterà una decisione... sul contratto d'affitto di un appartamento.
(3) contro la decisione della Commissione a cui si fa riferimento nel paragrafo precedente può depositare un ricorso al Ministero [competente] ... entro otto giorni.
(4) il ricorso non sospende l'esecuzione della decisione.”
2. La giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale
20. Il 3 giugno 2003 la Corte Costituzionale adottò una decisione nella causa n. U-III-1701/2000 (pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 122/2003 30 luglio 2003) dove il reclamante, il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto di un appartamento a Benkovac introdusse un'azione contro le autorità locali perché gli fosse concesso di acquistare l'appartamento in oggetto. La corte di seconda - istanza si espresse contro lui, trovando che il suo affitto specialmente protetto era stato terminato ex lege perché aveva lasciato l'appartamento nel 1991 quando la città era divenuta sotto il controllo delle forze occupanti, ed era ritornato solamente in questo dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite stabilita nella sezione 2(1) dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato. Trovò che non gli era concesso perciò acquistare l'appartamento in questione. La Corte Costituzionale decise a favore del reclamante ed annullò la sentenza contestata. Nel fare così sostenne come segue:
“... [L’]Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato si riferisce a persone che lasciarono l’ex territorio occupato della Repubblica della Croazia dopo la liberazione nel 1995.
Il reclamante non lasciò Benkovac dopo la sua liberazione nel 1995 ma fu espulso da questo nel 1991. Nella prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale, il reclamante non appartiene perciò, alla categoria di persone a cu si applica l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato.
La corte di seconda - istanza applicò erroneamente alla particolare situazione legale del reclamante... l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato. Di conseguenza, questa corte ha sostenuto erroneamente nella sentenza contestata che l'affitto specialmente protetto del reclamante dell'appartamento a Benkovac è stato terminato con l'operazione della sezione 2(1) dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite di novanta - giorni seguenti la sua entrata in vigore (cioè, il 5 gennaio 1996).
Per queste ragioni, il diritto costituzionale del reclamante ad uguaglianza di fronte alla legge garantito dall’ Articolo 14 paragrafo 2 della Costituzione, così come il suo diritto costituzionale ad un'udienza corretta garantito dall’ Articolo 29 paragrafo 1 della Costituzione, fu violato dalla sentenza contestata.”
21. Il 9 dicembre 2004 la Corte Costituzionale adottò una decisione nella causa n. U-III-1451/2004 (pubblicata sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 187/2004 il 29 dicembre 2004) dove il reclamante, il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto di un appartamento a Petrinja introdusse un'azione contro le autorità locali perché gli fosse concesso di acquistare l'appartamento in oggetto. Le corti ordinarie decisero contro lui, trovando che l’ affitto specialmente protetto era stato terminato ex lege perché aveva lasciato l'appartamento ed era andata a vivere all'estero nell’ agosto 1995 quando le autorità croate riguadagnarono il controllo di Petrinja in seguito all'operazione militare “Storm”, ed era ritornato solamente in Croazia nel 2001, cioè dopo che la scadenza del tempo-limite fu stabilita nella sezione 2(1) dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato. Trovò che non gli era concesso perciò acquistare l'appartamento in questione. La Corte Costituzionale si riferì in primo luogo alla sua interpretazione dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato previsto nella decisione n. U-III-1701/2000 del 3 giugno 2003 (vedere paragrafo precedente) secondo cui questo Atto si applica:
“... a persone che lasciarono il prima territorio occupato della Repubblica della Croazia dopo la liberazione nel 1995.”
Avendo stabilito che il reclamante aveva lasciato davvero il suo appartamento a Petrinja nell’ agosto 1995 ed era ritornato solamente in Croazia nel 2001, la Corte Costituzionale respinse la sua azione di reclamo costituzionale.
22. Il 6 maggio 2005 la Corte Costituzionale adottò una decisione nella causa n. U-III-2174/2002 (pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 65/2005 del 25 maggio 2005) dove il reclamante, il possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto di un appartamento a Pakrac introdusse un'azione contro le autorità locali perché gli venisse concesso di acquistare l'appartamento in oggetto. Le corti ordinarie decisero contro lui, trovando che l’ affitto specialmente protetto era stato terminato ex lege perché aveva lasciato l'appartamento nel 1991 quando Pakrac era divenuto sotto il controllo delle forze occupanti, ed era ritornato solamente in questo nella primavera 1996, cioè, dopo che la scadenza del tempo-limite fu stabilita nella sezione 2(1) dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato. Loro trovarono che non gli era concesso perciò acquistare l'appartamento in questione. La Corte Costituzionale decise per il reclamante ed annullò le sentenze contestate delle corti ordinarie. Nel fare così sostenne come segue:
“... [L’]Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato si riferisce a persone che lasciarono l’ex territorio occupato della Repubblica della Croazia dopo la liberazione nel 1995.
Il reclamante lasciò l'appartamento a Pakrac nell’ agosto 1991. Nella prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale, il reclamante non appartiene perciò, alla categoria di persone a cui si applica l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato.
La corte [ordinaria] ha applicato erroneamente alla particolare situazione legale del reclamante... l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato. Di conseguenza, le corti [ordinarie] nelle sentenze contestate hanno sostenuto erroneamente che l'affitto specialmente protetto del reclamante dell'appartamento a Pakrac fu terminato con l'operazione della sezione 2(1) dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite dei novanta - giorni seguenti la sua entrata in vigore (cioè, il 5 gennaio 1996).
Per queste ragioni, il diritto costituzionale del reclamante all’uguaglianza di fronte alla legge garantito dall’ Articolo 14 paragrafo 2 della Costituzione, così come il suo diritto costituzionale ad un'udienza corretta garantito dall’ Articolo 29 paragrafo 1 della Costituzione..., fu violato dalle sentenze contestate.”
C. L' Atto sull’Alloggio
1. Disposizioni attinenti
23. L' Atto sull’Alloggio (Zakon o stambenim odnosima, Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 51/1985, 42/1986 22/1992 e 70/1993) che era in vigore fra il 25 dicembre 1985 e il 5 novembre 1996 prevedeva, nella sua parte attinente, scome segue:
Sezione 97
“1. Il fornitore dell'appartamento può terminare l'affitto specialmente protetto... [inter alia] se l'inquilino non paga l'affitto o gli oneri di utilizzo per tre mesi consecutivi, o per tre mesi durante il corso degli ultimi dodici mesi.
2. La conclusione dell'affitto specialmente protetto per le ragioni enunciate nel paragrafo 1 si può effettuare se l'inquilino non paga l'affitto o gli oneri di utilizzo dovuti... all'interno di un termine ragionevole dopo essere stato avvertito di fare così tramite raccomandata.”
Sezione 99
“1. Un affitto specialmente protetto può essere terminato se l'inquilino [...] cessa di occupare l'appartamento per un periodo ininterrotto che eccede i sei mesi.
2. Un affitto specialmente protetto non sarà terminato sotto le disposizioni del paragrafo 1 di questa sezione a riguardo di una persona che non usa l'appartamento per poter subire un trattamento medico, per adempimento del servizio militare o altre ragioni giustificate.
3. Si considererà anche che l'appartamento non è usato per un periodo ininterrotto quando l'inquilino visita l'appartamento solamente di quando in quando...”
24. Sotto la sezione 105(1) il fornitore dell'appartamento doveva introdurre un'azione civile per terminare l'affitto specialmente protetto.
2. La giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema
25. Nella sua decisione n. Rev-616/1988 dell’ 11 ottobre 1988 la Corte Suprema ha interpretato la sezione 99 dell'Atto sull’ Alloggio nel seguente modo:
“L'affitto specialmente protetto non è perso ex lege per il mero fatto del non-uso dell'appartamento per un periodo che eccede i sei mesi. Piuttosto, è una base per la conclusione di un affitto specialmente protetto che può essere terminato solamente dal fornitore dell'appartamento.”
26. L'affitto fu terminato appena la sentenza della corte che sosteneva la rivendicazione del fornitore dell'appartamento divenne res judicata (vedere, inter alia, la decisione della Corte Suprema n. Rev-1009/1993-2 del 15 giugno 1994).
27. In una serie di decisioni (per esempio, nelle cause N. Rev-152/1994-2 del 23 febbraio 1994, Rev-1780/1996-2 del 10 marzo 1999, Rev-1606/00-2 del 1 ottobre 2003, Rev-998/03-2 del 4 dicembre 2003, ed Rev-590/03-2 del 17 dicembre 2003) cominciando dalla decisione n. Rev-155/1994-2 del 16 febbraio 1994, la Corte Suprema interpretò un altro aspetto della sezione 99(1) dell' Atto sull’Alloggio come segue:
“Il fatto che un appartamento che non è stato usato dal suo inquilino è occupato illegalmente da un terza persona non rende, per se, il non uso [dell'appartamento da parte dell'inquilino] giustificato. In altre parole, se l'inquilino non riesce a prendere i passi appropriati per riguadagnare la proprietà dell'appartamento all'interno dei tempo-limite legale stabilito nella sezione 99(1) dell' Atto sull’Alloggio..., allora l’ [occupazione illegale dell'appartamento da parte di un terza persona] non è un ostacolo alla conclusione dell'affitto specialmente protetto.”
D. L’atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti
28. L’atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti (Zakon o najmu stanova, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 91/1996 del 28 ottobre 1996) che entrò in vigore il 5 novembre 1996 abolì l'affitto specialmente protetto come tale (sezione 30 paragrafo 1) ma prevedeva che i procedimenti avviati sotto l' Atto sull’Alloggio avrebbero dovuto essere conclusi sotto le disposizioni di questo Atto (sezione 52 paragrafo 1).
E. L'Atto sugli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante)
29. L’Atto sugli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 27/91 con susseguenti emendamenti -“l’atto sulla Vendita ad Occupante”) che entrò in vigore il 19 giugno 1991 diede il titolo al possessore dell'affitto specialmente protetto di un appartamento in proprietà sociale o statale di acquistarlo dal fornitore dell'appartamento sotto condizioni favorevoli.
30. La Sezione 4(2) prevedeva che una richiesta scritta per l'acquisto di un appartamento doveva essere fatta entro un anno dalla data dell'entrata dell'Atto in vigore (questo tempo-limite fu prolungato con susseguenti emendamenti all'Atto fino al 31 dicembre 1996 per gli appartamenti localizzati sul territorio liberato).
F. L’ Atto di Procedura Civile
31. La parte attinente dell’Atto di Procedura Civile ((Zakon o parničnom postupku, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista dell'Iugoslavia N. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 e 35/1991, ed Ufficiale Pubblicano della Repubblica di Croazia N. 53/1991, 91/1992 58/1993, 112/1999 88/2001, 117/2003 88/2005, 2/2007 84/2008 e 123/2008) prevede come segue:
Riapertura di procedimenti in seguito ad una definitivo sentenza della Corte europea dei Diritti umani a Strasburgo che trova una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o di una libertà
Sezione 428a
“(1) quando la Corte europea dei Diritti umani ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano o di una libertà fondamentale garantita dalla Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali o dei protocolli supplementari ratificati dalla Repubblica della Croazia, una parte può, entro trenta giorni da quando la sentenza della Corte europea dei Diritti umani diviene definitiva, introdurre un ricorso presso la corte nella Repubblica della Croazia che aggiudicò in prima istanza nei procedimenti in cui la decisione che violava il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale fu resa, accantonare la decisione con cui il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale fu violata.
(2) i procedimenti a cui si far riferimento nel paragrafo 1 di questa sezione saranno condotti applicando, mutatis mutandis, le disposizioni sulla riapertura dei procedimenti.
(3) nei procedimenti riaperti le corti sono costrette a rispettare le opinioni giuridiche espresse nella sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani che trova una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o di una libertà.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
32. Il richiedente si lamentò che nel rifiutare la sua rivendicazione per l’acquisto dell'appartamento le autorità nazionali avevano infranto il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
33. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
34. Il Governo contestò l'ammissibilità di questa azione di reclamo per tre motivi. Dibattè che è incompatibile ratione temporis e ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione, e che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali.
1. Compatibilità Temporis di ratione e ratione materiae
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
(i) Il Governo
35. Il Governo, in primo luogo dibatté che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 era incompatibile ratione temporis perché lui aveva perso il suo affitto specialmente protetto prima dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Croazia.
36. Il Governo spiegò che, diversamente dalla causa Blečić e la causa Mrkić (vedere Blečić c. Croazia [GC], n. 59532/00, ECHR 2006-III, e Mrkić c. Croazia (dec.), n. 7118/03, 8 giugno 2006), dove le sentenze che terminavano l'affitto specialmente protetto, basato sulla sezione 99 dell'Atto sull’Alloggio, aveva avuto un effetto costitutivo, le sentenze di corte nella presente causa erano state di natura dichiaratoria perché loro erano state basate sull'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato tramite il quale aveva previsto la conclusione ex lege dell'affitto specialmente protetto se il suo possessore non usava l'appartamento da un periodo eccedente i novanta giorni seguenti l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto. Perciò, il richiedente nella presente causa aveva perso il suo affitto specialmente protetto con l'operazione di legge il 5 gennaio 1996, cioè, prima che la Convenzione era entrata in vigore a riguardo della Croazia il 5 novembre 1997. In altre parole, l'affitto del richiedente non era stato terminato con le susseguenti sentenze di corte applicando l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato, ma ipso jure, quando il periodo di novanta giorni seguenti l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto era scaduto.
37. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che l'azione di reclamo era incompatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione. Appellandosi alla causa di Gaćeša (vedere Gaćeša c. Croazia (dec.), n. 43389/02, 1 aprile 2008), asserì che il diritto del richiedente di acquistare l'appartamento era una “rivendicazione” piuttosto che una “proprietà esistente” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e la giurisprudenza della Corte. Nella sua prospettiva, il richiedente non poteva avere comunque, un'aspettativa legittima che la sua rivendicazione sarebbe stata accordata, cioè, che lui sarebbe divenuto il proprietario dell'appartamento, siccome lui aveva perso il suo affitto specialmente protetto ex lege prima di fare la richiesta di acquisto dell'appartamento.
(ii) Il richiedente
38. Il richiedente presentò che sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato si applica solamente a quelle persone che avevano lasciato l’ex territorio occupato della Croazia dopo la liberazione nel 1995 (vedere paragrafi 20-22 sopra). Poiché lui aveva lasciato Vojnić nel 1991 per abbandonare le forze occupanti ed era ritornato nell’ ottobre 1995, la legislazione in oggetto non poteva applicarsi a lui ed il suo affitto specialmente protetto non poteva essere terminato ex lege. Essendo così, e dato che lui aveva fatto la richiesta d'acquisto dell'appartamento all'interno del tempo-limite convenuto nella sezione 4(2) dell’ Atto sulla Vendita ad Occupante (vedere paragrafi 10 e 30 sopra), lui aveva avuto un'aspettativa legittima che la sua rivendicazione per l'acquisto dell'appartamento sarebbe stata accordata.
(b) la valutazione della Corte
39. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nella misura in cui le decisioni contestate si riferisce alla sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato di quella disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistente” o rivendicazioni che sono sufficientemente stabilite da essere riguardate come “ beni.” Dove, come nella causa presente, un interesse di proprietà riservato è nella natura di una rivendicazione, può essere riguardato come un “bene” solamente se c'è una base sufficiente per questo interesse in diritto nazionale (per esempio, dove è stabilito nella giurisprudenza delle corti nazionali che lo confermano), cioè, quando la rivendicazione è stabilita sufficientemente da essere esecutiva (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, §§ 48-49 e 52, ECHR 2004-IX, e Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 Serie A n. 301-B).
40. La Corte nota che le persone che desiderano acquistare un appartamento sotto l’ Atto sulla Vendita ad Occupante dovevano soddisfare due condizioni: (a) loro dovevano presentare la loro richiesta per l’acquisto dell'appartamento all'interno del tempo-limite fissato nella sezione 4(2) di questo Atto, e (b) loro dovevano essere possessori dell'affitto specialmente protetto dell'appartamento che volevano comprare, cioè, il loro affitto non avrebbe dovuto essere terminato prima della scadenza di questo tempo-limite (vedere paragrafi 29-30 sopra).
41. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte prima nota che le corti nazionali respinsero la rivendicazione del richiedente per l’acquisto dell'appartamento perché loro trovarono che il suo affitto specialmente protetto - l'esistenza di cui era un requisito indispensabile legale per comprare l'appartamento sotto l’ Atto sulla Vendita ad Occupante -era stato terminato. In particolare, la corte di seconda - istanza , nella sua sentenza del 18 febbraio 2004 si riferì espressamente alla sezione 2 dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato e sostenne che l'affitto specialmente protetto del richiedente era stato terminato ex lege perché dopo l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto lui non usava il suo appartamento da un periodo più lungo di novanta giorni (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra).
42. La Corte nota inoltre comunque, che nelle sue decisioni N. U-III-1701/2000 del 3 giugno 2003, U-III-1451/2004 del 9 dicembre 2004 ed U-III-2174/2002 del 6 maggio 2005 che la Corte Costituzionale ha sostenuto che l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato si applicava solamente a quei possessori di un affitto specialmente protetto che avevano lasciato l’ex territorio occupato della Croazia dopo la liberazione nel 1995 (vedere paragrafi 20-22 sopra). Avendo trovato in due di quelle cause (n. U-III-1701/2000 del 3 giugno 2003 e n. U-III-2174/2002 del 6 maggio 2005) che i reclamanti che erano i possessori di un affitto specialmente protetto avevano lasciato quel territorio nel 1991, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che l'Atto in oggetto non poteva essere applicato a loro (vedere paragrafi 20 e 22 sopra).
43. Avendo riguardo al fatto che le corti nazionali stabilirono che il richiedente aveva lasciato Vojnić il 1 ottobre 1991 (vedere paragrafi 14-15 sopra), la Corte è della prospettiva che a lui è stato concesso di considerare, alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafi 20-22 sopra), che lui manteneva il suo affitto specialmente protetto perché l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato, secondo l'interpretazione prevista da questa corte, non si applicava a lui.
44. Inoltre, dato che il richiedente fece la richiesta d'acquisto dell'appartamento il 20 dicembre 1996 (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra), cioè, all'interno del tempo-limite legale stabilito nella sezione 4(2) dell’Atto sulla Vendita ad Occupante (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra), ne segue che tutte le condizioni per acquisire il diritto di acquistare l'appartamento furono soddisfatte nella causa del richiedente.
45. La Corte considera perciò che, in contrasto alla causa Gaćeša a cui ha fatto appello il Governo (vedere Gaćeša, citata sopra), nel giorno dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Croazia il 5 novembre 1997, la rivendicazione del richiedente per acquistare l'appartamento nella presente causa aveva una base sufficiente in legge nazionale per qualificarlo come “bene” e perciò “proprietà” protetta dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
46. Ne segue che le eccezioni del Governo in merito all’ incompatibilità ratione temporis e ratione materiae devono essere respinte.
2. Il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
47. Il Governo notò che il richiedente aveva dibattuto di non essere stato in grado di usare l'appartamento in oggetto, inter alia, perché Z.H. aveva irrotto in questo. Comunque, indicò che il richiedente non si era giovato di nessuna via di ricorso per impugnare il diritto di Z.H.' all’uso dell'appartamento in oggetto e/o per chiedere il suo sfratto.
48. Il richiedente rispose che lui non era stata una parte ai procedimenti amministrativi che hanno condotto alla decisione del 28 agosto 1996 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra) con cui la Commissione di Sequestro aveva affittato l'appartamento a Z.H. e alla sua famiglia su una base provvisoria. Questa decisione non gli era mai stata notificata e perciò lui non era stato in grado usare qualsiasi via di ricorso contro questa.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
49. La Corte reitera che le corti nazionali trovarono che l'affitto specialmente protetto del richiedente era stato terminato ex lege con l’applicazione della sezione 2(1) dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato perché non aveva usato l'appartamento in questione nel periodo fra il 5 agosto 1995 e il 23 agosto 1996 (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra), cioè, nel periodo prima che le autorità locali erano entrate nel suo appartamento nell’ultima data menzionata e l'avevano assegnato a Z.H. il 28 agosto 1996 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). La Corte non vede perciò come ricorrendo a vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili nella prospettiva di contestare il diritto di Z.H. di usare l’appartamento e/o chiedere il suo sfratto avrebbe potuto ostacolare o avrebbe potuto rimediare alla conclusione dell'affitto specialmente protetto del richiedente.
50. Ne segue che anche l'eccezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
51. La Corte nota inoltre che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota anche che non è inammissibile per nessun altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Se c'era un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della “proprietà”
52. Appellandosi al suo argomento sopra per cui l'affitto specialmente protetto del richiedente era stato terminato ex lege prima dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Croazia, (vedere paragrafo 36), il Governo presentò che le susseguenti sentenze delle corti nazionali e che rifiutavano la sua rivendicazione per acquistare l'appartamento non potevano corrispondere ad un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà perché al tempo in cui furono rese lui non aveva un interesse di proprietà riservato e sufficiente per costituire una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
53. Il richiedente non fece nessun commento specifico su questo problema. Comunque, segue dalle sue osservazioni che lui ha considerato che c'era stata un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
54. Alla luce della sua sentenza sopra per cui la rivendicazione del richiedente per l'acquisto dell'appartamento è stata stabilita sufficientemente da qualificarsi come un “bene” attirando la protezione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafi 39-46 sopra), la Corte considera che il rifiuto delle corti nazionali di accordare la richiesta ha indubbiamente costituito un'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Questa interferenza accadde il 18 febbraio 2004 quando l'Organo giudiziario locale di Karlovac sostenne la sentenza di prima- istanza della Corte Municipale di Vojnić dell’ 11 settembre 2003 con cui acquisì forza di res judicata.
55. La Corte deve esaminare inoltre se questa interferenza era giustificata, cioè, se era prevista dalla legge, se era nell'interesse pubblico o generale e se era proporzionale.
2. Se l'interferenza era “prevista dalla legge”
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
(i) Il Governo
56. Il Governo presentò che era incontrastato che le decisioni delle corti nazionali furono basate sulla legge, in particolare l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato.
57. Dibatté inoltre che nella sua decisione del 29 giugno 2006, consegnata in seguito all'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente, la Corte Costituzionale non si era scostata dalla precedente giurisprudenza stabilita con la sua decisione U-III-1701/2000 del 3 giugno 2003 (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Nell’ultima decisione menzionata la Corte Costituzionale aveva sostenuto anche che l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato, inclusa la sezione 2 di questo Atto per il quale aveva previsto la conclusione ex lege di affitti specialmente protetti, si applicava a tutte le persone che avevano lasciato l’ex territorio occupato della Croazia dopo la sua liberazione nel 1995, cioè, a quei possessori di un affitto specialmente protetto che non usavano i loro appartamenti da un periodo che eccedeva i novanta giorni seguenti l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto. Nella presente causa, la Corte Costituzionale aveva trovato che il richiedente non aveva usato l'appartamento a Vojnić nel periodo fra l’agosto 1995 e l’ agosto 1996, cioè, dopo la liberazione dell’ex territorio occupato. Perciò, l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato era applicabile a lui. La Corte Costituzionale aveva preso la stessa prospettiva nella sua decisione n. U-III-1451/2004 con cui aveva respinto un'azione di reclamo costituzionale in una causa che era effettivamente e giuridicamente identica a quella del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra).
(ii) Il richiedente
58. Il richiedente reiterò i suoi argomenti (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra) per cui l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato non si poteva applicare a lui.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
59. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II). In questo collegamento, la Corte si confà col Governo che le decisioni delle corti nazionali nella presente causa hanno avuto una base legale in diritto nazionale siccome il loro rifiuto di ammettere il ricorso del richiedente per l’acquisto dell'appartamento fu basato sulla sezione 2 dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato.
60. La Corte reitera inoltre comunque, che l'esistenza di una base legale non è di per sé sufficiente per soddisfare il principio della legalità. Parlando di “diritto”, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 allude ad un concetto che comprende il diritto legale così come la giurisprudenza ed implica requisiti qualitativi, in particolare quelli dell'accessibilità e della prevedibilità (vedere, per esempio, Mullai ed Altri c. Albania, n. 9074/07, § 113 23 marzo 2010; Špaček, s.r.o. c. Repubblica ceca, n. 26449/95, § 54 9 novembre 1999; e Carbonara e Ventura c. Italia, n. 24638/94, § 64 ECHR 2000-VI).
61. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota prima, che l’applicazione da parte delle corti ordinarie dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato alla causa del richiedente non era in linea con l'interpretazione pratica della Corte Costituzionale secondo cui questo Atto non poteva essere applicato a situazioni simili a quella del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 20 e 22 sopra).
62. La Corte nota inoltre che, in seguito all'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente, la Corte Costituzionale aveva l'opportunità di annullare le sentenze delle corti ordinarie che erano contrarie alle sue decisioni precedenti. Comunque, non fece così. Invece, respinse l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente.
63. Perciò, nella causa del richiedente non solo le sentenze delle corti ordinarie ma anche la decisione della Corte Costituzionale stessa era contraria a alla precedente giurisprudenza della corte.
64. In questa connessione la Corte trova appropriato rivolgersi all'argomento del Governo per cui nel respingere l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente la Corte Costituzionale non ha abbandonato la sua precedente giurisprudenza stabilita nelle decisioni N. U-III-1701/2000 del 3 giugno 2003, U-III-1451/2004 del 9 dicembre 2004 e U-III-2174/2002 del 6 maggio 2005. La Corte nota che in quelle decisioni la Corte Costituzionale chiaramente affermò che l'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato si applicava solamente a quei possessori di un affitto specialmente protetto che avevano lasciato l’ex territorio occupato della Croazia dopo l’agosto 1995. In due di quelle cause la Corte Costituzionale sostenne perciò, che la legislazione in oggetto non poteva essere applicata ai reclamanti, siccome loro avevano lasciato i loro appartamenti prima del 1995. Accolse così le loro azioni di reclamo costituzionali (vedere paragrafi 20 e 22 sopra). Nella causa rimanente respinse l'azione di reclamo costituzionale perché trovò che il reclamante in quella causa, diversamente dal richiedente nella presente causa aveva lasciato il suo appartamento nell’ agosto 1995 (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra). Avendo riguardo al fatto che nella causa del richiedente le corti ordinarie stabilirono che il richiedente aveva lasciato Vojnić il 1 ottobre 1991 (vedere paragrafi 14-15 sopra) costatazione che non fu contestata dalla Corte Costituzionale, la Corte non trova che la sua causa era diversa da quelle menzionati sopra. Di conseguenza, la Corte non può accettare l'argomento del Governo per cui la decisione della Corte Costituzionale nella causa del richiedente era coerente con la precedente giurisprudenza di corte.
65. La Corte nota inoltre che nella sua decisione che respinge l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente la Corte Costituzionale non tentò di distinguere la causa del richiedente dalle sue decisioni precedenti, né indicò la sua intenzione di abbandonare la sua interpretazione dell'Atto sul Contratto d'affitto di Appartamenti sul Territorio Liberato. In più, il Governo non fornì nessuna decisione attinente che avrebbe indicato un cambio nella pratica della Corte Costituzionale o altrimenti avrebbe permesso alla Corte di accertare perché la causa del richiedente fu decisa differentemente. Perciò, non si può discernere se nella causa del richiedente la Corte Costituzionale trascurò semplicemente la sua giurisprudenza precedente o se abbandonò consapevolmente questa e, in tal caso, perché.
66. La Corte già ha sostenuto, nel contesto di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, gli Stati Contraenti hanno l’ obbligo di organizzare il loro ordinamento giuridico così da evitare l'adozione di sentenze discordi (vedere Vrioni ed Altri c. Albania, n. 2141/03, § 58, 24 marzo 2009, e Mullai ed Altri, citata sopra, § 86), e che delle decisioni contraddittorie in cause simili che scaturiscono dalla stessa corte che, inoltre, è il tribunale di ultima istanza nella questione, in assenza di un meccanismo che assicura consistenza, violano il principio della certezza legale inerente in questo Articolo (vedere, per esempio, Beian c. Romania (n. 1), n. 30658/05, §§ 36-39 ECHR 2007-XIII; Tudor Tudor c. Romania, n. 21911/03, § 29 del 24 marzo 2009; ed Iordan Iordanov ed Altri c. Bulgaria, n. 23530/02, §§ 47-53 2 luglio 2009).
67. La Corte ha sostenuto anche che dove così manifestamente delle decisioni contraddittorie interferiscono col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà e nessun chiarimento ragionevole è dato per la divergenza, simile interferenze non possono essere considerate legali ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione perché loro conducono ad una giurisprudenza incoerente mancando la precisione richiesta per permettere agli individui di prevedere le conseguenze delle loro azioni (vedere Carbonara e Ventura, citata sopra, § 65; Mullai ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 115-117; e Saghinadze ed Altri c. Georgia, n. 18768/05, §§ 116-118 del 27 maggio 2010).
68. Avendo riguardo alle considerazioni precedenti, segue, che l'interferenza contestata nella forma della sentenza della Corte Municipale Vojnić dell’ 11 settembre 2003 non era prevedibile per il richiedente che, appellandosi alla giurisprudenza esistente della Corte Costituzionale, si sarebbe potuto ragionevolmente aspettare che il suo ricorso per l'acquisto dell'appartamento sarebbe stato ammesso. L'interferenza era perciò incompatibile col principio della legalità e quindi contravvenne all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Questa sentenza non rende necessario esaminare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali del richiedente.
C’è stata, di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
69. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione che irrompendo nel suo appartamento ed affittandolo a Z.H. le autorità nazionali avevano violato il suo diritto al rispetto per la sua dimora. L’Articolo 8 della Convenzione recita come segue:
ARTICOLO 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della (…), della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
70. Nella misura in cui si può capire il richiedente che si lamenta dell’irruzione effettiva nel suo appartamento il 23 agosto 1996 e della decisione della Commissione di Sequestro del 28 agosto 1996 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra) con cui fu affittato l'appartamento a Z.H., la Corte nota che questi eventi ebbero luogo prima dell’ entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Croazia il 5 novembre 1997.
71. Nella misura in cui il richiedente si lamenta della decisione del Ministero di Ricostruzione e dello Sviluppo del 7 agosto 1998 (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra), la Corte nota che il richiedente avrebbe potuto impugnarla di fronte alla Corte amministrativa, ma lui non fece così.
72. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è, nei suoi rispettivi aspetti, inammissibile come incompatibile ratione temporis con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e per il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 a riguardo e deve essere respinto perciò facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4.
III. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTI DEGLI ARTICOLI 6 § 1 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
73. Il richiedente si lamentò infine, sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione di non aver avuto accesso ad una corte né una via di ricorso effettiva per impugnare l’ entrata forzata nel suo appartamento o le decisioni delle autorità nazionali del28 agosto 1996 e 7 agosto 1998 per affittare il suo appartamento a Z.H. Gli articoli 6 e 13 recitano come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ....”
Articolo 13
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
74. La Corte si riferisce alle sue costatazioni sopra (vedere paragrafi 70-72) secondo cui l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione è inammissibile come incompatibile ratione temporis e per il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. Ne segue che nella misura in cui le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 e 13 riguardano la mancanza addotta di accesso ad una corte ed una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo dell'irruzione nel suo appartamento del 23 agosto 1996, e la decisione della Commissione di Sequestro del 28 agosto 1996, loro sono anche inammissibili come incompatibili ratione temporis con le disposizioni della Convenzione. Nella misura in cui misura queste azioni di reclamo concernono la decisione del Ministero di Ricostruzione e Sviluppo del 7 agosto 1998 loro sono manifestamente inammissibili come mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Loro devono essere respinte perciò facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
75. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
76. Nel suo modulo di domanda il richiedente chiese 50,000 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale ed EUR 1,200 a riguardo di costi e spese. Comunque, lui non presentò una rivendicazione di soddisfazione equa, né ripresentò (anche riferendosi a loro) le rivendicazioni fatte nel modulo di domanda all'interno del tempo-limite fissato per l’osservazione del suo Articolo 41 rivendicazioni che sono all'interno del tempo-limite per osservazione delle sue osservazioni (Articolo 60 § 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte). Il richiedente fallì nel ripresentare che la richiesta di soddisfazione equa all'interno del tempo concesso anche se gli era stato ricordato che doveva fare così anche se lui aveva indicato i suoi desideri riguardanti la soddisfazione equa ad uno stadio precedente dei procedimenti.
77. Il Governo notò che il richiedente non aveva presentato una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa nelle sue osservazioni ma contestò ciononostante le rivendicazioni fatte nel modulo di richiesta.
78. La Corte reitera che una sentenza che trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente l’obbligo legale di porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione delle sue conseguenze. Se il diritto nazionale non concede- o concede solamente una riparazione parziale, l’Articolo 41 conferisce potere alla Corte per riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come le sembra essere più appropriato (vedere Iatridis c. la Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 32-33 ECHR 2000-XI). In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che il richiedente ora può introdurre un ricorso sotto la sezione 428a dell’Atto sulla Procedura Civile (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra) presso la Corte Municipale di Vojnić per la riapertura dei procedimenti civili a riguardo di cui la Corte ha trovato una violazione dell Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
79. Data la natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente e le ragioni per cui ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, la Corte considera che nella presente causa la forma più appropriata di compensazione sarebbe riaprire i procedimenti di cui ci si lamentava nel dovuto corso (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Trgo c. Croazia, n. 35298/04, § 75, 11 giugno 2009, e Vrbica c. Croazia, n. 32540/05, §§ 83-85 del 1 aprile 2010).
80. Avendo riguardo a ciò che precede, e dato che il richiedente non ha presentato una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa nel tempo prescritto, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnargli nessuna somma a questo riguardo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 marzo 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Anatoly Kovler
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 11/07/2020.