Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF POTOMSKA AND POTOMSKI v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 33949/05/2011
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 29/03/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (Non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction - reserved
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF POTOMSKA AND POTOMSKI v. POLAND
(Application no. 33949/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
29 March 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Potomska and Potomski v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 March 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 33949/05) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Polish nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 22 August 2005.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by Ms K. W.-K., a lawyer practising in Koszalin. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicants alleged a breach of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
4. On 27 August 2009 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1937 and 1939 and live in Darłowo. They are a married couple.
A. Facts prior to 10 October 1994
6. On 25 November 1970 the Board of the Sławno District National Council (Prezydium Powiatowej Rady Narodowej) informed the Board of the Darłowo Municipal National Council (Prezydium Gromadzkiej Rady Narodowej) that pursuant to the decision of the Minister of Municipal Economy (Minister Gospodarki Komunalnej) of 25 September 1970 a cemetery located in Rusko was to be closed. The closure was to be carried out on the basis of the 1959 Cemeteries Act.
7. On 12 September 1973 the Sławno District National Council issued a preliminary decision in which the applicants were informed of the conditions subject to which they could build a house on plot no. 59 located in Darłowo Municipality, Rusko settlement.
8. On 15 March 1974 the Head of Darłowo Municipality (Naczelnik Gminy) issued a decision in which he named OMISSIS as the buyer of plot no. 59, owned by the State Land Fund (Państwowy Zasób Ziemi).
9. On 14 November 1974 the applicants bought from the State a plot of land with a surface area of 12 acres. The plot, no. 59, was classified as farming land. The applicants intended to build a house and a workshop on it.
10. On 4 May 1987 the Koszalin Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments (Wojewódzki Konserwator Zabytków) issued a decision adding the applicants' property to the register of historic monuments (rejestr zabytków) on the grounds that a Jewish cemetery had been established on it at the beginning of the nineteenth century. It was one of the few remnants of the former Jewish culture in the region. The Inspector found that the layout of the cemetery was discernible and that certain parts of the cemetery were intact (the foundations of a house of prayer, a stone wall and some gravestones). The applicants were advised as to the scope of their obligations deriving from the 1962 Protection of the Cultural Heritage and Museums Act (ustawa o ochronie dóbr kultury i o muzeach). They were prohibited from developing their property unless they obtained a permit from the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments. The applicants did not appeal against the decision.
11. On 30 May 1988 the applicants requested the Governor of Koszalin to offer them an alternative plot of land on which they could construct a house. On 15 June 1988 the Koszalin Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments requested the Mayor of Darłowo to grant the applicants' request. On 5 July 1988 the Mayor of Darłowo informed the applicants that the exchange of plots requested by them would be possible only in the event of the Mayor receiving a subsidy from the Governor of Koszalin.
12. On 30 September 1988 Darłowo Municipality adopted a local development plan. The plan provided that the applicants could build a house on their property (zabudowa zagrodowa).
13. On 28 January 1991 the Mayor of Darłowo (Burmistrz) requested the Koszalin Governor's Office to expropriate the applicants' plot. On 12 March 1991 the Koszalin Governor's Office transmitted that request to the Koszalin District Office (Urząd Rejonowy) as the competent authority in the matter.
14. On 4 May 1992 the Governor of Koszalin requested the Koszalin Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments to apply to the Head of the Koszalin District Office (Kierownik Urzędu Rejonowego) to institute expropriation proceedings pursuant to section 46(2)(2) of the 1985 Land Administration and Expropriation Act. The Governor considered that expropriation and payment of compensation would enable the applicants to buy another plot for the construction of their house.
15. On 14 May 1992 the Regional Inspector requested the Head of the Koszalin District Office to institute expropriation proceedings in respect of the applicants' property. On 14 August 1992 the Head of the District Office decided to discontinue the proceedings, finding that no entity was interested in purchasing the cemetery. The Head of the District Office further found that the applicants, who had been aware in 1974 that they were purchasing a Jewish cemetery, were obliged to protect the site until they could find an entity interested in its purchase. The applicants appealed and requested that the issue be resolved. They stated that they were not interested in the maintenance and protection of the site.
16. On 2 October 1992 the Governor of Koszalin quashed the decision and remitted the case. He held that the lower authority had to examine a number of issues, in particular whether the property could be expropriated following negotiations with the applicants. No information was provided to the Court about the follow-up to that decision.
B. Facts after 10 October 1994
17. On 13 February 1995 the applicants requested the Head of the Koszalin District Office to provide Darłowo Municipality with an alternative plot of land which could then be offered to the applicants. On 7 March 1995 the Koszalin District Office replied that it did not have any such plots. On 25 April 1995 the Head of the District Office informed the applicants that it did not have any plot which could be the subject of an exchange. He further advised them to lodge a request with the Mayor of Darłowo.
18. On an unspecified date in 2000 the applicants wrote to the Minister of Culture and National Heritage about the problem with their property. Their letter was dealt with by the National Inspector of Historic Monuments.
19. On 1 August 2000 the National Inspector informed the applicants that the SÅ‚awno District Office (starostwo powiatowe) was the competent authority to deal with the matter. Furthermore, the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments could request the SÅ‚awno District Office to commence expropriation proceedings under sections 33 and 34(1) of the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act. They were informed that section 33 of that Act provided that a monument of particular historic, scientific or artistic value could be acquired by the State if the public interest so required. The National Inspector informed the applicants that the former Jewish cemetery in Rusko belonged to that category of monuments, being one of the few remnants of Jewish culture in the Middle Pomerania Region. The applicants were advised to contact the SÅ‚awno District Office as the representative of the State Treasury, whose duty it was to resolve their problem.
20. On 17 October 2000 Darłowo Municipality informed the applicants that there was no legal basis for the municipality to acquire their plot or to offer them another plot in exchange. They were further informed that they could request the Mayor of Sławno District (Starosta powiatu) to expropriate their land pursuant to the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act. A request could also have been submitted by the Regional Inspector.
21. On 26 January 2001 the Koszalin Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments requested the Mayor of Sławno District to initiate expropriation proceedings. The Regional Inspector stated that in 1974 the applicants had bought the property as a construction plot. Subsequently, following the 1987 listing decision, the applicants had been prevented from developing their land in any manner. The Regional Inspector expressed the opinion that the expropriation of the plot and its ensuing transfer to the Jewish community would be consistent with the provisions of the 1997 Act on Relations between the State and the Jewish Community (ustawa o stosunku Państwa do gmin wyznaniowych żydowskich) and the policy concerning the Jewish monuments agreed between Poland and Israel.
22. On 23 September 2002 the applicants informed the Mayor of Darłowo that they would be prepared to exchange their plot for a plot situated in Bobolin or Dąbki.
23. On 24 March 2003 Darłowo Municipality requested the Sławno District Office to provide it with a plot of land which would in turn enable the municipality to arrange for an exchange of plots with the applicants.
24. On 19 May 2003 the Sławno District Office informed the Mayor of Darłowo that the State Treasury's Property Resources did not have plots situated in Bobolin suitable for such an exchange. However, there was one plot in Dąbki that could be exchanged. By a letter of 14 July 2003 the Mayor of Darłowo informed the Sławno District Office that Mr Potomski had refused to exchange his plot for the plot situated in Dąbki. He further requested the District Office to initiate expropriation proceedings with a view to resolving the issue of the applicants' plot.
25. On 7 August 2003 the Mayor of Darłowo again requested the Sławno District Office to commence expropriation proceedings with a view to resolving the applicants' case. It reminded the District Office that in accordance with section 6 of the 1997 Land Administration Act the protection of properties classified as part of the cultural heritage was in the public interest. The Mayor also noted that the 1987 decision unambiguously excluded any development of the applicants' plot.
26. On 14 August 2003 the SÅ‚awno District Office informed the applicants of the possibility of exchanging their plot of land for a plot situated in Rusko, the village where they lived. The proposed plot was designated in the local development plan for housing and services. They were further informed that in the event of a refusal on their part the only solution would be the institution of expropriation proceedings at the request of the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments. However, that procedure could be set in motion only if the Inspector had secured a subsidy from the Governor for the purpose. Accordingly, the applicants were informed that it was not possible to specify when their case might be finally resolved.
27. By a letter of 22 August 2003 the applicants refused the exchange, stating that the proposed plot did not satisfy their expectations. They expressed their preference for expropriation.
28. On 30 September 2003 the Mayor of SÅ‚awno District informed the Regional Inspector that the negotiations concerning the exchange of plots had failed. In his view, the only solution to the problem consisted in expropriation of the applicants' property in accordance with the Land Administration Act 1997, and having regard to its section 6(5). Under the 1962 Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act the expropriation could be requested by the regional inspector or the district Mayor. However, the district Mayor did not have the necessary funds to pay compensation in the event of expropriation. Consequently, he informed the Regional Inspector that he could institute the expropriation proceedings only once the Inspector had secured an amount corresponding to the appropriate level of compensation.
29. On an unspecified date the Union of Jewish Communities in Poland (Związek Gmin Wyznaniowych Żydowskich w RP) requested the Regulatory Commission (Komisja Regulacyjna ds. Gmin wyznaniowych żydowskich) to transfer ownership of the property owned by the applicants to it on the grounds that the land had formerly been used as a Jewish cemetery. On 30 March 2005 the Commission discontinued the proceedings concerning that application as the property in question had been owned by private individuals (the applicants).
30. In April 2005 the Governor of the Zachodniopomorski Region (Wojewoda Zachodniopomorski) informed the Mayor of SÅ‚awno District that it would not be possible to grant a subsidy with a view to purchasing the applicants' property. On 14 October 2005 the Mayor of SÅ‚awno District apprised the applicants of that decision. He informed them that there was no possibility as matters stood of resolving the issue of their property.
II. RELEVANT LAW
A. The Council of Europe Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, adopted on 3 October 1985
31. Poland signed this Convention on 18 March 2010 but has not yet ratified it. The relevant parts of the Convention provide:
Article 3
“Each Party undertakes:
1. to take statutory measures to protect the architectural heritage;
2. within the framework of such measures and by means specific to each State or region, to make provision for the protection of monuments, groups of buildings and sites.”
Article 4
“Each Party undertakes:
...
2. to prevent the disfigurement, dilapidation or demolition of protected properties. To this end, each Party undertakes to introduce, if it has not already done so, legislation which:
...
(d) allows compulsory purchase of a protected property.”
B. Protection of monuments
32. At the material time issues relating to protection of the country's heritage were regulated by the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act of 15 February 1962 (Ustawa o ochronie dóbr kultury – “the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act”). A decision on listing a real property in the register of historic monuments was taken, in principle, by the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments (section 14(1)). Following such a decision no work could be carried out on the historic monument unless a permit was granted by the regional inspector (section 21). Section 25 of the Act imposed various obligations on the owners of listed monuments; in particular a duty to protect them against any damage.
Section 33 provides, in so far as relevant:
“...ownership of a monument of particular historic, scientific or artistic value may be acquired by the State with a view to making it accessible to the general public where the public interest so requires.”
Section 34 provided that the acquisition of ownership took place at the request of the district Mayor or the regional inspector, in accordance with the Land Administration Act 1997.
33. On 17 November 2003 the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act was repealed and the Protection and Conservation of Monuments Act of 23 July 2003 (Ustawa o ochronie zabytków i opiece nad zabytkami) came into force. In contrast to the former Act, section 50(4) of the Protection and Conservation of Monuments Act provides that immovable monuments may be expropriated at the request of a regional inspector only where there is a risk of irreversible damage to the monument.
C. Expropriation of land
34. From 29 April 1985 to 1 January 1998 the rules governing the administration of land held by the State Treasury and the municipalities were laid down in the Land Administration and Expropriation Act of 29 April 1985 (“the Land Administration Act 1985”).
On 1 January 1998 the Land Administration Act 1985 was repealed and the Land Administration Act of 21 August 1997 (Ustawa o gospodarce nieruchomościami – “the Land Administration Act 1997”) came into force.
Section 6(5) of the Act, which was introduced by the Protection and Conservation of Monuments Act, stipulates that the protection of real properties classified as monuments within the meaning of the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act is a public-interest aim.
Under section 112 of that Act, expropriation consists in taking away, by virtue of an administrative decision, ownership or other rights in rem. Expropriation can be carried out where public-interest aims cannot be achieved without restriction of those rights and where it is impossible to acquire those rights by way of a civil-law contract. Section 113(1) stipulates that expropriation can only be carried out for the benefit of the State Treasury or the local municipality.
Section 114(1) of the Act provides that the institution of expropriation proceedings is to be preceded by negotiations on acquisition of the property under a civil-law contract between the State, represented by the district Mayor, and the owner. In the framework of those negotiations the State may propose an alternative property to the owner.
Section 115(1) of the Act stipulates that expropriation proceedings for the benefit of the State Treasury are to be instituted of the latter's own motion. The expropriation proceedings for the benefit of the local municipality are instituted at the request of the latter. Only where the request is submitted by the local municipality does refusal take the form of an administrative decision (decyzja; section 115(4)).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
35. The applicants complained that they had been prevented from developing their land following the listing decision of 4 May 1987. They further complained that the authorities had failed to expropriate their land or to provide them with an alternative plot on which they could construct their house as originally intended. They did not invoke any provision of the Convention.
36. In their observations of 29 March 2010 the applicants further alleged a breach of Article 13 in that they had been deprived of the right to an effective remedy in respect of the decisions given in their case. No expropriation proceedings had been instituted and the applicants had not received any redress. Their requests concerning the property had either been redirected to a different authority or had produced responses citing a lack of financial resources or lack of a legal basis for resolving the case.
37. The Court considers that the thrust of the applicants' grievances concerns the interference with the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. It is therefore appropriate to examine their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Compatibility ratione temporis
38. The Government submitted that the complaint was compatible ratione temporis only in so far as it concerned facts and decisions after 10 October 1994, the date on which Protocol No. 1 to the Convention became binding on Poland.
39. The applicants argued that the Government's responsibility was engaged in the period following 10 October 1994 on account of omissions which occurred after that date.
40. The Court's jurisdiction ratione temporis covers only the period after the ratification of the Convention or its Protocols by the respondent State. From the ratification date onwards, all the State's alleged acts and omissions must conform to the Convention or its Protocols and subsequent facts fall within the Court's jurisdiction even where they are merely extensions of an already existing situation (see Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão and Others v. Portugal, nos. 29813/96 and 30229/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-I).
41. Accordingly, the Court is competent to examine the facts of the present case for their compatibility with the Convention only in so far as they occurred after 10 October 1994, the date of ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Poland. It may, however, have regard to the facts prior to ratification inasmuch as they could be considered to have created a situation extending beyond that date or may be relevant for the understanding of facts occurring after that date (see Broniowski v. Poland (dec.) [GC], no. 31443/96, § 74, ECHR 2002-X). The Court further observes that the applicants' complaint is not directed against a single measure or decision taken before, or even after, 10 October 1994 but refers to their continued inability to develop their property or have it expropriated.
2. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
42. The Government claimed that the applicants had not exhausted domestic remedies as they had failed to lodge an appeal against the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments' decision of 4 May 1987 with the Minister of Culture.
43. The applicants disagreed. They admitted that they had not appealed against the Inspector's decision but stressed that there had been no legal grounds for mounting a successful challenge. They had not contested the fact that the plot had been previously used as a cemetery and that some tombs had been discovered.
44. The Court notes that the Government did not suggest that the Inspector's decision had been unlawful or indicate on what grounds it could have been challenged. In the circumstances of the case, and bearing in mind in particular that the applicants did not contest the nature of the property as a historical monument, the Court finds that an appeal would not have resulted in a different decision. Accordingly, and without prejudice to the question whether the examination of the Government's plea falls within its temporal jurisdiction, the Court dismisses the Government's objection.
45. Secondly, the Government pleaded non-exhaustion of domestic remedies since the applicants had not taken advantage of the possibility offered by the local authorities of exchanging the plot.
46. The applicants submitted that the first plot located in DÄ…bki did not correspond to the value or the attractiveness of their plot. The plot they had been offered consisted of fields and swamps and could not be used without restrictions. The applicants considered the proposal as an inadequate attempt to satisfy their claim. The refusal to accept the plot was thus fully justified. The applicants could not be considered to have been obliged to accept any plot merely because the State did not have other properties at its disposal. Furthermore, the Government had not provided any valuation of the property in dispute or the property offered to the applicants, and thus it had not been possible to objectively assess the offer. In respect of the second plot, the applicants stated that it was unsatisfactory and that they could not accept it.
47. In so far as the Government's objection relates to the applicants' refusal to accept the exchange of plots, the Court observes that this issue is linked to the Court's assessment of compliance with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The Court accordingly joins this part of the Government's plea of inadmissibility on the ground of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies to the merits of the case.
48. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The applicants' submissions
49. The applicants argued that they had not been aware that the property in dispute had been used as a Jewish cemetery. Mr P. had come to Rusko from Germany in 1945 and since his arrival the property at issue had not been used as a cemetery and the authorities had done everything possible to eliminate any signs that it had been ever used for burying the dead. The authorities had taken a decision to close the cemetery (the fence and the chapel had been dismantled) and the land had been designated as a building plot (rural housing area). Even if the applicants had known that the property had been used as a cemetery, it could not automatically be inferred that it could not be used for development. In any event, the applicants' knowledge was irrelevant since what mattered was the designation of the property as determined in the local development plan. When buying the property, the applicants had been aware of its designation for rural housing development. They assumed that between 25 November 1970, when the local authorities decided to close the cemetery, and the date of purchase in 1974 the cemetery had already been closed. Furthermore, the applicants had not known about the Jewish tombstones present on the site, since at the time of purchase the tombstones had been covered by trees, shrubs and brushwood.
50. The applicants contested the argument that they had already known in 1974 that it would be impossible to build on the property. They submitted that in the 1970s and 1980s many cemeteries left by the Germans had been built over, and the simple fact that properties had been previously used as cemeteries did not exclude them from development. From the day on which their property was listed in the heritage register in 1987, the applicant had been unable to take any action to develop the property as they would not have obtained the requisite permit. At the time, they had had investment plans consisting of building a house together with a locksmith's workshop. The decision of 4 May 1987 had put an end to those plans.
51. The applicants argued that they had been deprived of the right to make full use of the property and had not obtained appropriate redress, in the form of either compensation or an alternative plot. They had been unable to use the property for the purpose it had been purchased for. It had been bought “for the construction of a house combined with a service workshop”, as confirmed in the applicant's requests of 23 July 1973 and 11 August 1973.
52. It was right for the Government to protect the cultural heritage, but the applicants should have been provided with just redress. The costs of protection of the heritage had been borne only by the applicants and thus an excessive burden had been imposed on them. That state of affairs had persisted after 10 October 1994, the date relevant for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
53. The Government had not instituted expropriation proceedings after 10 October 1994 with a view to resolving the issue and providing redress to the applicants, and had thus avoided their financial responsibility for the property repurchase. The fact that no valuation of the property at issue had been provided indicated that the aim of the proceedings had not been the genuine settlement of the case. The authorities' efforts had failed owing to the lack of resources for repurchase of the property. The applicants argued that they had undertaken a series of legal measures in order to obtain appropriate redress, but to no avail.
54. The applicants had a right to expect that a plot offered in exchange would be fit for purpose and would provide them with adequate redress, and would not merely constitute an attempt by the Government to avoid their financial responsibility for protection of the heritage. The various authorities had shifted responsibility for the situation between themselves, without securing adequate compensation to the applicants. The failure to complete the domestic proceedings had resulted from the lack of financial resources for awarding compensation or offering a satisfactory alternative property. The Government bore the responsibility for the failure to expropriate the land belonging to the applicants, who had expressed their interest in having the property expropriated and handed over either to the State or to the Union of Jewish Communities.
2. The Government's submissions
55. The Government admitted that in the instant case there had been interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. It clearly followed from the domestic courts' case-law that a decision whereby a property was added to the list of historic monuments constituted such interference. However, the interference had been prescribed by law, namely section 14 of the Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act and had pursued a legitimate aim (the protection of historic monuments). The grounds for the listing decision were explained therein and had therefore been known to the applicants.
56. The Government submitted that both the public authorities and the applicant had been aware that the property at issue had previously been used as a Jewish cemetery. In their view, the formal decision on the closure of the cemetery which had been given on 25 September 1970 merely meant that the cemetery could no longer be used as a burial place. The applicants had been aware of the decision of 25 September 1970 and it could be assumed that they had been aware of the location of the Jewish cemetery. Moreover, the current pictures of their plot clearly showed that there were many remains of Jewish graves on it and it had to be assumed that they had been visible at the time when the applicants bought the property. In the light of the above information there could be no doubt that the applicants had bought an old Jewish cemetery and that they had been perfectly aware of it. The applicants had not displayed due diligence when buying the plot and the Government could not now bear any responsibility for the decisions taken by the applicants in the 1970s.
57. The Government admitted that on 12 September 1973 the Sławno District National Council had issued a preliminary decision known as an “information decision” informing the applicants under what conditions they could construct a house on plot no. 59. However, owing to the passage of time it was difficult to say what kind of documents had constituted the basis for the issuing of the decision. In addition, the decision had been subject to the fulfilment of certain additional conditions specified in the law. The applicants had not submitted any documents proving that they had fulfilled those conditions.
58. Furthermore, the applicants had not taken advantage of the possibility offered by the authorities to exchange the plot at issue for another plot offered by the SÅ‚awno District Office. They had been informed that in the event of refusing the second exchange proposal the only solution would be the expropriation of their property; this, however, was conditional on the grant of a subsidy by the authorities. The Government maintained that the applicants had been informed that because financial resources were limited it was impossible to say when their case might be resolved. In their view, by refusing the exchange the applicants had accepted that the expropriation could not be carried out until such time as the appropriate financial resources were available; they should therefore bear the consequences of their decisions.
59. The Government further stressed that according to the notarial deed the applicants had paid 462 Polish zlotys for the plot. As indicated by the Central Statistics Office, average remuneration in the year 1974 had amounted to 3,185 Polish zlotys. Hence, the amount paid by the applicants for their plot amounted to one-fifth of average remuneration at the relevant time. The Government also stressed that in the period between the purchase of the property by the applicants and the date of the listing decision the applicants had not taken any steps to achieve the purpose for which they had allegedly bought the plot.
60. In the Government's view, the authorities had done more to improve the applicants' situation than they had been obliged to. The applicants had knowingly bought the remains of an old Jewish cemetery and even in 1974 it had been quite obvious that they would not be able to build anything on the visible remains of the cemetery. The authorities had undertaken numerous measures with a view to exchanging the applicants' plot for another one but their proposals had been disregarded. In conclusion, the Government argued that the applicants' complaint was manifestly ill-founded or, alternatively, that there had been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
3. The Court's assessment
(a) Nature of the interference
61. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which guarantees the right to the protection of property, contains three distinct rules: “the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest ... The three rules are not, however, 'distinct' in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule” (see, as a recent authority with further references, Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 62, ECHR 2007-...).
62. In the present case the Government admitted that there had been interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions (see paragraph 55 above) and the Court cannot discern any reason to hold otherwise.
The applicants complained of the effects which stemmed from the decision of 4 May 1987 listing their property in the register of historic monuments, and in particular of the effective prohibition on building a house with a workshop on the property as originally intended. Furthermore, they alleged that in the period following the decision at issue the authorities had failed to expropriate the property or to offer them a suitable property in exchange.
63. The Court notes that the 1987 listing decision did not deprive the applicants of their possessions but subjected the use of those possessions to significant restrictions; hence, it may be regarded as a measure to control the use of property (see SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy v. France (dec.), no. 61093/00, ECHR 2005-XIII (extracts)). However, the applicants' complaint also relates to the authorities' prolonged failure to expropriate the property or to provide them with an alternative property. Having regard to the different facets of the applicants' complaint, the Court considers that it should examine the situation complained of under the general rule established in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Skibińscy v. Poland, no. 52589/99, § 80, 14 November 2006).
64. It was common ground that the interference at issue had been provided for by law, namely the relevant provisions of the 1962 Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act. Similarly, it was not disputed that the interference had pursued a legitimate aim, namely the protection of the country's cultural heritage. The Court reiterates that the conservation of the cultural heritage and, where appropriate, its sustainable use, have as their aim, in addition to the maintenance of a certain quality of life, the preservation of the historical, cultural and artistic roots of a region and its inhabitants. As such, they are an essential value, the protection and promotion of which are incumbent on the public authorities (see SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy, cited above; Debelianovi v. Bulgaria, no. 61951/00, § 54, 29 March 2007; and Kozacıoğlu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, § 54, ECHR 2009-...). In this connection the Court refers to the Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage of Europe, which sets out tangible measures, specifically with regard to the architectural heritage (see paragraph 31 above).
(b) Proportionality of the interference
65. Any interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must achieve a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 69, Series A no. 52). In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measures applied by the State, including measures depriving a person of his of her possessions. In each case involving the alleged violation of that Article the Court must, therefore, ascertain whether by reason of the State's action or inaction the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden (see, amongst other authorities, The former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, §§ 89-90, ECHR 2000-XII; Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, § 73; Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 150, ECHR 2004-V; and Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 93, ECHR 2005-VI).
66. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. That assessment may involve not only the relevant compensation terms – if the situation is akin to the taking of property – but also the conduct of the parties, including the means employed by the State and their implementation. In that context, it should be stressed that uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State's conduct. Indeed, where an issue in the general interest is at stake, it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § §§ 110 in fine, 114 and 120 in fine, ECHR 2000-I; Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine, no. 48553/99, §§ 97-98, ECHR 2002-VII; Broniowski, cited above, § 151; and Plechanow v. Poland, no. 22279/04, § 102, 7 July 2009).
67. With particular reference to the control of the use of property and therefore interference with proprietary rights, the State has a wide margin of discretion as to what is “in accordance with the general interest”, particularly where environmental and cultural heritage issues are concerned (see, mutatis mutandis, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], cited above, § 112; Kozacıoğlu v. Turkey [GC], cited above, § 53; and Yildiz and Others v. Turkey (dec.), no. 37959/04, 12 January 2010). Moreover it must not be assumed that every listing of property after its purchase by an individual amounts to a violation of the third rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, or that once a property is listed the owner is invariably entitled to some form of compensation (see, mutatis mutandis, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 79, ECHR 2007-X; and Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 91, ECHR 2010-...). Property, including privately owned property, has also a social function which, given the appropriate circumstances, must be put into the equation to determine whether the “fair balance” has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the individual's fundamental rights. Consideration must be given in particular to whether the applicant, on acquiring the property, knew or should have reasonably known about the restrictions on the property or about possible future restrictions (see Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 1), 25 October 1989, §§ 60-61, Series A no. 163; Łącz v. Poland (dec.), no. 22665/02, 23 June 2009), the existence of legitimate expectations with respect to the use of the property or acceptance of the risk on purchase (see Fredin v. Sweden (no. 1), 18 February 1991, § 54, Series A no. 192), the extent to which the restriction prevented use of the property (see Katte Klitsche de la Grange v. Italy, 27 October 1994, § 46, Series A no. 293-B; SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy v. France (dec.), cited above), and the possibility of challenging the necessity of the restriction (see Phocas v. France, 23 April 1996, § 60, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-II; Papastavrou and Others v. Greece, no. 46372/99, § 37, ECHR 2003-IV).
68. The Government placed emphasis on the fact that the applicants had been aware that they had bought a former Jewish cemetery and that even at the time of the transaction they had known that they would not be able to build on the plot. However, on the basis of the material in its possession, the Court stresses that the authorities took a formal decision to close the cemetery in 1970. Subsequently, the plot was classified as farming land and sold to the applicants on 14 November 1974. The authorities were aware of the applicants' intention to build a house and workshop on the property, as the applicants had expressed their intentions in their two requests in 1973. In addition, on 12 September 1973 the authorities issued a preliminary decision specifying the conditions attaching to the construction of a house. In this connection the Court observes that it is not disputed that the applicants bought farming land with a view to building a house on it and that the authorities apparently did not object to that intention at the relevant time. The applicants also submitted that according to the local development plan in force at the relevant time plot no. 59 had been designated for rural housing development; the Government did not contest that argument. Furthermore, it emerges from the Koszalin Regional Inspector's request to the Mayor of SÅ‚awno District that the authorities considered the applicants to have bought a building plot (see paragraph 21 above).
69. The Court considers that the main issue in the case concerns the legal effects on the status of the applicants' property flowing from the Regional Inspector's decision of 4 May 1987. On the basis of that decision the applicants' real property was added to the register of historic monuments, on the grounds that a Jewish cemetery had formerly been located on the plot. That cemetery was one of the few remnants of Jewish culture in the Middle Pomerania Region. Subsequently, the authorities declared that the former cemetery belonged to the category of monuments which were of particular historic, scientific or artistic value (see paragraph 19 above).
70. The 1987 decision resulted in a number of far-reaching restrictions on the use of the property by the applicants, as provided by the 1962 Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act and subsequently the 2003 Protection and Conservation of Monuments Act. The applicants were under an obligation to preserve the historical monument and protect it from damage. They were prohibited from carrying out any work on the monument unless they obtained a permit from the Regional Inspector. The Court notes that since the entire plot at issue was classified as a historic monument there was no possibility for the applicants to develop even part of their property (contrast SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy, cited above). This was confirmed by the Koszalin Regional Inspector in his letter of 26 January 2001 addressed to the Mayor of SÅ‚awno District (see paragraph 21 above).
71. In order to assess whether a fair balance was struck in the case, the Court needs to examine what measures counterbalancing the interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions were available to the applicants. The Court considers that in the circumstances of the case the most fitting measure would have been expropriation with payment of compensation or offer of a suitable alternative property.
72. The Court notes that the domestic law provided for a particular arrangement with regard to the expropriation of properties which were listed and which the domestic authorities considered as monuments of particular cultural significance. In accordance with sections 33 and 34 of the 1962 Protection of the Cultural Heritage Act, which were in force until 16 November 2003, a monument of particular historic, scientific or artistic value could be acquired by the State if the public interest so required. The expropriation was to be carried out at the request of the district Mayor or the regional inspector in accordance with the 1997 Land Administration Act. Thus, the expropriation could be carried out only at the request of the public authorities or of their own motion, and the applicants did not have any formal involvement in that procedure. The applicants' role in the process was limited to submitting requests to initiate expropriation proceedings. These requests had no binding effect on the authorities and the latter enjoyed complete discretion in this regard. The above-mentioned arrangements were even further restricted with the entry into force of the Protection and Conservation of Monuments Act on 17 November 2003, which specified that immovable monuments could be expropriated at the request of a regional inspector only where there was a risk of irreversible damage to the monument. Having regard to the above, the Court finds that as the applicants had no right to compel the State to carry out the expropriation, their position vis-à-vis the authorities was clearly disadvantageous.
73. The first request to expropriate the applicants' property made by the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments in 1992 produced no result. During the period falling within the Court's temporal jurisdiction, in 2001 the Regional Inspector requested the Mayor of Sławno to expropriate the applicants' property, apparently to no avail (see paragraph 21 above). In 2003, following the unsuccessful negotiations on the exchange of plots, the Mayor of Sławno District informed the Regional Inspector of Historic Monuments that expropriation proceedings could be instituted on condition that the Regional Inspector could secure a subsidy for that purpose. The district Mayor declared that he did not have sufficient funds to pay compensation to the applicants and therefore, for practical reasons, decided not to institute expropriation proceedings. In this connection the Court reiterates that a lack of funds cannot justify the authorities' failure to remedy the applicants' situation (see, mutatis mutandis, Prodan v. Moldova, no. 49806/99, § 61, ECHR 2004-III (extracts); Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 70, ECHR 2009-...; and Polańscy v. Poland, no. 21700/02, § 75, 7 July 2009).
74. The Court reiterates that the genuine, effective exercise of the right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not depend merely on the State's duty not to interfere, but may give rise to positive obligations (see Öneryıldız v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004-XII; Broniowski, cited above, § 143; and Plechanow v. Poland, cited above, § 99). Such positive obligations may entail the taking of measures necessary to protect the right to property, particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant may legitimately expect from the authorities and his effective enjoyment of his possessions, even in cases involving litigation between private entities. This means, in particular, that States are under an obligation to provide a judicial mechanism for settling effectively property disputes and to ensure compliance of those mechanisms with the procedural and material safeguards enshrined in the Convention. This principle applies with all the more force when it is the State itself which is in dispute with an individual (see Anheuser-Busch Inc., cited above, § 83, and Plechanow v. Poland, cited above, § 99).
75. In the context of restrictions on the development of land resulting from a development plan, the availability of a claim to have the property purchased by the authorities is a relevant factor to consider (see Phocas v. France, cited above, § 60). In the present case, the domestic law did not provide a procedure by which the applicants could assert before a judicial body their claim for expropriation and require the authorities to purchase their property (see, mutatis mutandis, Skibińscy v. Poland, cited above, §§ 34-39 and 94-95, 14 November 2006, concerning owners who were threatened with expropriation of their property at an undetermined point in the future). Consequently, the Court finds that the applicants were deprived of any means of compelling the State authorities to expropriate their property (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 56, ECHR 1999-V). In the assessment of the proportionality of the measures complained of, the lack of such a procedure weighs considerably against the authorities.
76. The Court observes that the expropriation procedure was regulated by the 1985 Land Administration and Expropriation Act and subsequently by the 1997 Land Administration Act which came into force on 1 January 1998. Section 114 of the 1997 Land Administration Act stipulated that the institution of expropriation proceedings should be preceded by negotiations on acquisition of the property by agreement between the State and the owner. In the framework of those negotiations the State could propose an alternative property to the owner.
77. In this connection, the Court observes that the applicants' first request to be provided with an alternative plot was made in 1995 to the Head of the Koszalin District Office, the authority competent in the matter at the material time. However, the request was to no avail. In 2002 the applicants expressed their willingness to resolve the matter by means of an exchange of land. In 2003, seeking to resolve the situation, the authorities twice offered the applicants an alternative property. However, the applicants refused both offers, considering that the plots did not match their expectations. Specifically, in respect of the first plot the applicants argued that it did not correspond to the value of their property and consisted of fields and swamps. The Court notes the applicants' argument that the Government did not provide a valuation of their property or the two alternative properties. It does appear that no such valuation was provided by the Mayor of SÅ‚awno District, the competent authority in the matter of expropriation, an omission which arguably prevented the applicants from making an objective assessment of the offers. Furthermore, the Court notes that the domestic law did not compel them to accept an offer of alternative property even if it matched in value the original plot.
78. More generally, the Court observes that in the event of a dispute as to the suitability of a property offered in lieu by the authorities in the framework of pre-expropriation negotiations, a procedural mechanism should have been available to resolve such dispute, and thus to ensure that a fair balance was struck between the competing interests (see, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 221, ECHR 2006-VIII where the Court noted the lack of any procedure or statutory mechanism enabling landlords to mitigate or compensate for losses incurred in connection with the maintenance or repairs of property). In those circumstances, the Court considers that the applicants could not have been blamed for refusing both offers, as it appears that they had no guarantee that their interests would be sufficiently protected. Having regard to the above, the Court finds that the Government's objection as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies on the ground of the applicants' refusal to accept the alternative plots should be rejected.
79. Furthermore, the Court observes that the interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions began on 4 May 1987 and has apparently persisted to the present day. The considerable length of time for which the applicants have had to put up with the interference at issue is another element in the Court's assessment of the proportionality of the measures complained of. In addition, the applicants' situation was compounded by the state of uncertainty in which they found themselves, in view of the continued impossibility of developing their property or having it expropriated.
80. Having regard to all the foregoing factors, the Court finds that the fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the right of property was upset and that the applicants had to bear an excessive burden.
There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
81. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
82. With regard to pecuniary damage, the applicants claimed 10,000 Polish zlotys (PLN) per year since 1987, the year in which the authorities had decided to list their property in the register of monuments (in total 230,000 PLN). The estimated amount consisted of possible benefits that could have been obtained from the property if it had been turned into a locksmith's workshop as the applicants had originally intended. Currently, in view of their age, further benefits could have been obtained from leasing the land or using the property for residential purposes.
83. The applicants also claimed 100,000 PLN in respect of non-pecuniary damage on account of the distress they had suffered because of the consideration of their case over many years. In this regard they referred to their advanced age, their loss of trust in the authorities and the absence of effective procedures in their case.
84. The Government, having argued that the applicants' complaints were manifestly ill-founded or, alternatively, that there had been no violation, submitted that their claims in respect of both heads of damage were irrelevant.
85. In the circumstances of the case and having regard to the parties' submissions, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention as regards pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage is not ready for decision and reserves it, due regard being had to the possibility that an agreement between the respondent State and the applicants may be reached (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
86. The applicants were paid EUR 850 in legal aid by the Council of Europe. They did not file a claim for costs and expenses.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Joins to the merits the Government's preliminary objection regarding the applicants' refusal to accept alternative plots and declares the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and dismisses the above-mentioned objection;
3. Holds that as far as any pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 March 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Eccezione preliminare congiunta a meriti e respinta (Non - esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione di P1-1; soddisfazione Equa - riservata
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA POTOMSKA E POTOMSKI C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 33949/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
29 marzo 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Potomska e Potomski c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki, Ljiljana Mijović, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Nebojša Vučinić, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato 8 marzo 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 33949/05) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini polacchi, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), il 22 agosto 2005.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stata accordato il patrocinio gratuito furono rappresentati dalla Sig.ra K. W. - K., un avvocato che pratica a Koszalin. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. I richiedenti addussero una violazione del diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
4. Il 27 agosto 2009 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti nacquero nel 1937 e 1939 e vivono a Darłowo. Loro sono una coppia sposata.
A. Fatti prima del 10 ottobre 1994
6. Il 25 novembre 1970 il Consiglio del Consiglio Nazionale del Distretto di Sławno (Prezydium Powiatowej Rady Narodowej) ha informato il Consiglio del Consiglio Nazionale e Municipale di Darłowo (Prezydium Gromadzkiej Rady Narodowej) che facendo seguito alla decisione del Ministro dell’ Economia Municipale (Ministro Gospodarki Komunalnej) del 25 settembre 1970 un cimitero localizzato a Rusko sarebbe stato chiuso. La chiusura sarebbe stata eseguita sulla base dell'Atto dei Cimiteri del 1959.
7. Il 12 settembre 1973 il Consiglio Nazionale del Distretto di Sławno emise una decisione preliminare nella quale i richiedenti furono informati delle condizioni soggetti alle quali loro avrebbero potuto costruire un alloggio sull’ area n. 59 localizzata nel Municipio di Darłowo, territorio di Rusko.
8. Il 15 marzo 1974 il Capo del Municipio di Darłowo (Naczelnik Gminy) emise una decisione nella quale lui chiamò OMISSIS come acquirente dell’ area n. 59, posseduta dal Fondo Terriero Statale (Państwowy Zasób Ziemi).
9. Il 14 novembre 1974 i richiedenti comprarono dallo Stato un'area di terreno con un'area di superficie di 12 acri. L'area, n. 59, fu classificata come terreno coltivabile. I richiedenti intendevano costruire un alloggio ed un'officina su questo.
10. Il 4 maggio 1987 l'Ispettore Regionale di Monumenti Storici di Koszalin (Wojewódzki Konserwator Zabytków) emise una decisione che aggiungeva la proprietà dei richiedenti sul registro dei monumenti storici (rejestr zabytków) per i motivi che un cimitero ebreo era stato stabilito su questa all'inizio del diciannovesimo secolo. Era uno dei pochi resti dell’ex cultura ebrea nella regione. L'Ispettore trovò che la configurazione del cimitero era discernibile e che le certe parti del cimitero erano intatte (le fondamenta di un edificio di preghiera, un muro di pietra e delle pietre tombali). I richiedenti furono messi al corrente in merito alla sfera dei loro obblighi derivanti dall’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale e dei Musei del 1962 (ustawa o ochronie dóbr kultury i o muzeach). Fu proibito loro di sviluppare la loro proprietà a meno che non ottenssero una licenza dall'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici. I richiedenti non fecero appello contro la decisione.
11. Il 30 maggio 1988 i richiedenti richiesero al Governatore di Koszalin di offrire loro un'area alternativa di terreno sulla quale loro avrebbero potuto costruire un alloggio. Il 15 giugno 1988 l’Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici di Koszalin richiese al Sindaco di Darłowo di accordare la richiesta dei richiedenti. Il 5 luglio 1988 il Sindaco di Darłowo ha informato i richiedenti che il cambio delle aree richiesto da loro sarebbero stato possibile solamente nel caso in cui il Sindaco ricevesse un sussidio dal Governatore di Koszalin.
12. Il 30 settembre 1988 il Municipio di Darłowo adottò un piano di sviluppo locale. Il piano prevedeva che i richiedenti avrebbero potuto costruire un alloggio sulla loro proprietà (zabudowa zagrodowa).
13. Il 28 gennaio 1991 il Sindaco di Darłowo (Burmistrz) richiese all'Ufficio del Governatore di Koszalin di espropriare l'area dei richiedenti. Il 12 marzo 1991 l'Ufficio del Governatore di Koszalin trasmise questa richiesta alll’Uffico del Distretto di Koszalin (Urząd Rejonowy) come l'autorità competente nella questione.
14. Il 4 maggio 1992 il Governatore di Koszalin richiese all’ Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici di Koszalin di richiedere al Capo dell’Uffico del Distretto di Koszalin (Kierownik Urzędu Rejonowego) di avviare dei procedimenti di espropriazione facendo seguito alla sezione 46(2)(2) dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1985 ed all’ Atto sull’ Espropriazione. Il Governatore considerò che l'espropriazione ed il pagamento del risarcimento avrebbero permesso ai richiedenti di comprare un'altra area per la costruzione del loro alloggio.
15. Il 14 maggio 1992 l'Ispettore Regionale richiese al Capo dell’Ufficio del Distretto di Koszalin di avviare dei procedimenti di espropriazione a riguardo della proprietà dei richiedenti. Il 14 agosto 1992 il Capo dell'Ufficio del Distretto decise di cessare i procedimenti, trovando che nessuna entità era interessata ad acquistare il cimitero. Il Capo dell'Ufficio del Distretto trovò inoltre che i richiedenti che erano stati consapevoli nel 1974 di acquistare un cimitero ebreo, erano obbligati a proteggere il luogo affinché potessero trovare un'entità interessata al suo acquisto. I richiedenti fecero appello e richiesero che il problema venisse risolto. Loro affermarono di non essere stati interessati al mantenimento ed alla protezione del luogo.
16. Il 2 ottobre 1992 il Governatore di Koszalin annullò la decisione e rinviò la causa. Lui sostenne che l'autorità più bassa doveva esaminare un numero di problemi, in particolare se la proprietà avrebbe potuto essere espropriata in seguito a negoziazioni da parte dei richiedenti. Nessuna informazione fu offerta alla Corte in merito al seguito di quella decisione.
B. Fatti dopo il 10 ottobre 1994
17. Il 13 febbraio 1995 i richiedenti richiesero all’Ufficio del Capo del Distretto del Koszalin di fornire al Municipio di Darłowo un'area alternativa di terreno che avrebbe potuto essere proposta poi ai richiedenti. Il 7 marzo 1995 L’Ufficio del Distretto di Koszalin rispose che non aveva nessuna area di questo tipo. Il 25 aprile 1995 il Capo dell'Ufficio di Distretto informò i richiedenti che non aveva nessuna area che avrebbe potuto essere la materia di un scambio. Lui consiglio loro inoltre di depositare una richiesta presso il Sindaco di Darłowo.
18. In una data non specificata nel 2000 i richiedenti scrissero al Ministro della Cultura e dell’Eredità Cittadina del problema della loro proprietà. La loro lettera fu data all'Ispettore Nazionale dei Monumenti Storici.
19. Il 1 agosto 2000 l'Ispettore Nazionale informò i richiedenti che l’ Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno (starostwo powiatowe) era l'autorità competente per trattare con la questione. Inoltre, l'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici avrebbe potuto richiedere all’ Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno di cominciare dei procedimenti di espropriazione sotto le sezioni 33 e 34(1) dell’ Atto sulla Protezione dell’Eredità Culturale. Loro furono informati che la sezione 33 di questo Atto prevedeva che un monumento di particolare valore storico, scientifico o artistico avrebbe potuto essere acquisito dallo Stato se l'interesse pubblico richiedeva così. L'Ispettore Nazionale informò i richiedenti che il l’ex cimitero ebreo a Rusko apparteneva a questa categoria di monumenti, essendo uno dei pochi resti della cultura ebrea nella Regione della Media Pomerania. Ai richiedenti fu consigliato di contattare l’Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno come il rappresentante della Tesoreria Statale il cui dovere era chiarire il loro problema.
20. Il1 7 ottobre 2000 il Municipio di Darłowo informò richiedenti che non c'era base legale per il municipio per acquisire la loro area od offrire loro un'altra area in cambio. Furono inoltre informati di poter richiedere al Sindaco del Distretto di Sławno (Starosta powiatu) di espropriare il loro terreno facendo seguito all’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale. Una richiesta avrebbe potuto essere presentata anche dall'Ispettore Regionale.
21. Il 26 gennaio 2001 l’Ispettore Regionale di Monumenti Storici di Koszalin richiese al Sindaco di Distretto di Sławno di iniziare dei procedimenti di espropriazione. L'Ispettore Regionale affermò che nel 1974 i richiedenti avevano comprato la proprietà come un'area di costruzione. Successivamente, in seguito alla decisione della lista del 1987, ai richiedenti era stato impedito di sviluppare il loro terreno in qualsiasi maniera. L'Ispettore Regionale espresse l'opinione che l'espropriazione dell'area ed il suo conseguente trasferimento alla comunità ebrea sarebbe stato in armonia coi regolamenti dell'Atto del 1997 sulle Relazioni fra lo Stato e la Comunità ebrea (ustawa o stosunku Państwa do gmin wyznaniowych żydowskich) e la politica riguardo ai monumenti ebrei concordati fra Polonia e Israele.
22. Il 23 settembre 2002 i richiedenti informarono il Sindaco di Darłowo che loro sarebbero stati pronti a scambiare la loro area con un'area situata a Bobolin o a Dąbki.
23. Il 24 marzo 2003 il Municipio di Darłowo richiese all’ Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno di offrire loro un'area di terreno che a sua volta avrebbe permesso al municipio di programmare un cambio di aree coi richiedenti.
24. Il 19 maggio 2003 l’Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno informò il Sindaco di Darłowo che le Risorse delle Proprietà della Tesoreria Statale non avevano aree situate a Bobolin appropriate per tale scambio. C'era comunque, un'area a Dąbki che avrebbe potuto essere scambiata. Con una lettera del 14 luglio 2003 il Sindaco di Darłowo informò l’Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno che il Sig. P. aveva rifiutato di scambiare la sua area per l'area situata a Dąbki. Lui richiese inoltre all'Ufficio di Distretto di iniziare procedimenti di espropriazione nella prospettiva di chiarire il problema dell'area dei richiedenti.
25. Il 7 agosto 2003 il Sindaco di Darłowo richiese di nuovo all’Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno di cominciare dei procedimenti di espropriazione nella prospettiva di chiarire la causa dei richiedenti. Ricordò all'Ufficio di Distretto che in conformità con la sezione 6 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione del Terreno del 1997 la protezione della proprietà classificata come parte dell'eredità culturale era nell'interesse pubblico. Il Sindaco notò anche che la decisione del 1987 escludeva inequivocabilmente qualsiasi sviluppo dell'area dei richiedenti.
26. Il 14 agosto 2003 l’Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno informò i richiedenti della possibilità di scambiare la loro area di terreno per un'area situata a Rusko, il villaggio dove loro vivevano. L'area proposta fu designata nel piano di sviluppo locale per alloggi e servizi. Loro si informarono inoltre che nel caso di un rifiuto da parte loro la sola soluzione sarebbe stata l'istituzione di procedimenti di espropriazione su richiesta dell'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici. Comunque, questa procedura avrebbe potuto essere messa in opera solamente se l'Ispettore avesse garantito un sussidio dal Governatore per questo fine. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti furono informati che non era possibile specificare quando sarebbe stato probabile che la loro causa venisse risolta infine.
27. Con una lettera del 22 agosto 2003 i richiedenti rifiutarono lo scambio, affermando che l'area proposta non soddisfaceva le loro aspettative. Loro espressero la loro preferenza per l'espropriazione.
28. Il 30 settembre 2003 il Sindaco del Distretto di Sławno informò l'Ispettore Regionale che le negoziazioni riguardo allo scambio delle aree erano andate a vuoto. Nella sua prospettiva, la sola soluzione al problema consisteva nell'espropriazione della proprietà dei richiedenti in conformità con l’Atto sull’ Amministrazione del Terreno del 1997, ed avendo riguardo alla sua sezione 6(5). Sotto l’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale del 1962 l'espropriazione avrebbe potuto essere richiesta dall'ispettore regionale o dal Sindaco di distretto. Comunque, il Sindaco di distretto non aveva i finanziamenti necessari per pagare il risarcimento nel caso dell'espropriazione. Di conseguenza, lui informò l'Ispettore Regionale di poter avviare i procedimenti di espropriazione solamente una volta che l'Ispettore avesse garantito un importo corrispondente al livello appropriato del risarcimento.
29. In una data non specificata l'Unione delle Comunità ebree in Polonia (Związek Gmin Wyznaniowych Żydowskich w RP) richiese alla Commissione Regolatrice (Komisja Regulacyjna ds. Gmin wyznaniowych żydowskich) di trasferire il possesso della proprietà posseduta dai richiedenti a lei per i motivi che il terreno era usato precedentemente come cimitero ebreo. Il 30 marzo 2005 la Commissione cessò i procedimenti riguardanti questa richiesta siccome la proprietà in oggetto era stata posseduta da individui privati (i richiedenti).
30. Nell’ aprile 2005 il Governatore della Regione di Zachodniopomorski (Wojewoda Zachodniopomorski) informò il Sindaco di Distretto di Sławno che non sarebbe stato possibile accordare un sussidio nella prospettiva di acquistare la proprietà dei richiedenti. Il 14 ottobre 2005 il Sindaco di Distretto di Sławno informò i richiedenti di quella decisione. Lui li informò che non c'era possibilità in merito alla questione di chiarire il problema della loro proprietà.
II. LEGGE ATTINENTE
A. Il Consiglio della Convenzione dell’ Europa per la Protezione dell'Eredità Architettonica dell'Europa, adottata il 3 ottobre 1985
31. La Polonia firmò questa Convenzione il 18 marzo 2010 ma non l'ha ancora ratificata. Le parti attinenti della Convenzione prevedono:
Articolo 3
“Ciascuna Parte si prende carico si:
1. prendere misure legali per proteggere l'eredità architettonica;
2. all'interno della struttura di simili misure e tramite mezzi specifici ad ogni Stato o regione, di fare delle disposizioni per la protezione di monumenti gruppi di edifici e luoghi.”
Articolo 4
“Ciascuna Parte si prende carico si:
...
2. ostacolare la deformazione, lo sfacelo o la demolizione di proprietà protette. A questo fine, ogni Parte si impegna ad introdurre, se non lo ha già fatto,una legislazione che:
...
(d) concede l’acquisto obbligatorio di una proprietà protetta.”
B. Protezione dei monumenti
32. Al tempo attinente i problemi relativi alla protezione dell'eredità del paese erano regolati dall’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale del 15 febbraio 1962 (Ustawa od ochronie dóbr kultury-“l’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale”). Una decisione di inserire un bene immobiliare nel registro dei monumenti storici veniva presa, in principio dall'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici (sezione 14(1)). In seguito a questa decisione nessun lavoro avrebbe potuto essere eseguito sul monumento storico a meno che una licenza non venisse accordata dall'ispettore regionale (sezione 21). La Sezione 25 dell'Atto imponeva i vari obblighi sui proprietari di monumenti elencati; in particolare un dovere di proteggerli contro qualsiasi danno.
La Sezione 33 prevede, nella parte attinente:
“... la proprietà di un monumento di particolare valore storico, scientifico o artistico può essere acquisita dallo Stato nella prospettiva di renderla accessibile al pubblico generale dove l'interesse pubblico richiede così.”
La Sezione 34 prevedeva che l'acquisizione della proprietà avesse luogo su richiesta del Sindaco di distretto o dell'ispettore regionale, in conformità con l’Atto sull’ Amministrazione del Terreno del 1997.
33. Il 17 novembre 2003 l’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale fu abrogato e l’Atto sulla Protezione e la Conservazione dei Monumenti del 23 luglio 2003 (Ustawa o ochronie zabytków i opiece nad zabytkami) entrò in vigore. In contrasto all'Atto precedente, la sezione 50(4) dell’Atto sulla Protezione e la Conservazione dei Monumenti prevedeva che i monumenti immobili possono essere espropriati solamente su richiesta di un ispettore regionale dove c'è un rischio di danno irreversibile al monumento.
C. L'Espropriazione del terreno
34. Dal 29 aprile 1985 al 1 gennaio 1998 gli articoli che disciplinavano l'amministrazione del terreno posseduto dalla Tesoreria Statale e dai municipi furono stabiliti nell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione del Terreno e nell’ Atto sull’ Espropriazione del 29 aprile 1985 (“l’Atto sull’ Amministrazione del Terreno del 1985”).
Il 1 gennaio 1998 l’Atto sull’ Amministrazione del Terreno del 1985 fu abrogato e l'Atto dell'Amministrazione del Terreno del 21 agosto 1997 (Ustawa o gospodarce nieruchomościami -“l’Atto sull’Amministrazione del Terreno del 1997”) entrò in vigore.
La Sezione 6(5) dell'Atto che fu introdotto dall’Atto sulla Protezione e la Conservazione dei Monumenti conviene che la protezione di vere proprietà classificate come monumenti all'interno del significato dell’ Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale è un scopo di interesse pubblico.
Sotto la sezione 112 di questo Atto, l'espropriazione consiste nel portare via, in virtù di una decisione amministrativa, la proprietà o gli altri diritti in rem. L'espropriazione può essere eseguita dove degli scopi di interesse pubblico non possono essere realizzati senza restrizione di quei diritti e dove è impossibile acquisire quei diritti tramite un contratto di diritto civile. La Sezione 113(1) conviene che l'espropriazione può essere eseguita solamente a beneficio della Tesoreria Statale o del municipio locale.
La Sezione 114(1) dell'Atto prevedeva che si sarebbe proceduto all'istituzione di procedimenti di espropriazione tramite negoziazioni sull'acquisizione della proprietà sotto un contratto di diritto civile fra lo Stato, rappresentato dal Sindaco di distretto ed il proprietario. Nella struttura di quelle negoziazioni lo Stato può proporre una proprietà alternativa al proprietario.
La Sezione 115(1) dell'Atto conviene che procedimenti di espropriazione a beneficio della Tesoreria Statale saranno avviati su istanza di quest’ultima. I procedimenti di espropriazione a beneficio del municipio locale sono avviati su richiesta della seconda. Solamente dove la richiesta è presentata sal municipio locale il rifiuto prende forma di una decisione amministrativa ( decyzja; sezione 115(4)).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
35. I richiedenti si lamentarono di essere stato impedito loro di sviluppare il loro terreno in seguito alla decisione di classificazione del 4 maggio 1987. Loro si lamentarono inoltre che le autorità erano andate a vuoto nell’ espropriare il loro terreno od offrire loro un'area alternativa sulla quale loro avrebbero potuto costruire il loro alloggio come intendevano fare originalmente. Loro non invocarono nessun provvedimento della Convenzione.
36. Nelle loro osservazioni del 29 marzo 2010 i richiedenti addussero inoltre una violazione dell’Articolo 13 in quanto erano stati privati del diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo delle decisioni date nella loro causa. Nessun procedimento di espropriazione era stato avviato ed i richiedenti non avevano ricevuto nessuna compensazione. Le loro richieste riguardo alla proprietà o erano state ricolte ad un'autorità diversa o avevano prodotto risposte che citavano una mancanza di risorse finanziarie o una mancanza di una base legale per chiarire la causa.
37. La Corte considera che il cuore delle lamentele dei richiedenti riguarda l'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. È perciò appropriato esaminare le loro azioni di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Compatibilità ratione Temporis
38. Il Governo presentò che l'azione di reclamo era compatibile ratione temporis solamente nella misura in cui riguardava i fatti e le decisioni dopo il 10 ottobre 1994, la data in cui il Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione divenne vincolante per la Polonia.
39. I richiedenti dibatterono che la responsabilità del Governo fu impegnata nel periodo seguente il 10 ottobre 1994 a causa di omissioni che accaddero dopo quella data.
40. La giurisdizione ratione temporis della Corte copre solamente il periodo dopo la ratifica della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli da parte dello Stato rispondente. Da quella data di ratifica in avanti, tutti gli atti ed omissioni addotti dello Stato devono adattarsi alla Convenzione o ai suoi Protocolli e i fatti susseguenti rientrano all'interno della giurisdizione della Corte anche quando sono soltanto proroghe di una situazione già esistente (vedere Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão ed Altri c. Portogallo, N. 29813/96 e 30229/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-io).
41. Di conseguenza, la Corte è competente per esaminare i fatti della presente causa per la loro compatibilità con la Convenzione solamente nella misura in cui accaddero dopo il 10 ottobre 1994, la data di ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Polonia. Comunque, si può avere riguardo ai fatti prima della ratifica poiché si potrebbe considerare che loro abbiano creato una situazione che si prolunga oltre questa data o possono essere attinente per la comprensione dei fatti che accaddero dopo quella data (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia (dec.) [GC], n. 31443/96, § 74 ECHR 2002-X). La Corte osserva inoltre che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti non è diretta contro una sola misura o decisione presa prima, o anche dopo, il 10 ottobre 1994 ma si riferisce alla loro incapacità continuata di sviluppare la loro proprietà o di farla espropriare.
2. L'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
42. Il Governo affermò che i richiedenti non avevano esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali siccome loro non erano riusciti a depositare un ricorso contro la decisione dell'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici del 4 maggio 1987 presso il Ministro della Cultura.
43. I richiedenti non furono d'accordo. Loro ammisero di non aver fatto appello contro la decisione dell'Ispettore ma sottolinearono che non c'erano stati motivi legali per introdurre una richiesta che avrebbe avuto successo. Loro non avevano contestato il fatto che l'area prima era usata come un cimitero e che alcune tombe erano state scoperte.
44. La Corte nota che il Governo non suggerì che la decisione dell'Ispettore era stata illegale o aveva indicato su quali motivi avrebbe potuto essere impugnata. Nelle circostanze della causa, e tenendo presente in particolare che i richiedenti non contestarono la natura della proprietà come monumento storico, la Corte costata che un ricorso non avrebbe dato luogo ad una decisione diversa. Di conseguenza, e senza pregiudizio per la questione se l'esame della dichiarazione del Governo rientra all'interno della sua giurisdizione temporale, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo.
45. In secondo luogo, il Governo rivendicò il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali poiché i richiedenti non avevano preso vantaggio dalla possibilità offerta dalle autorità locali di scambiare l'area.
46. I richiedenti presentarono che la prima area localizzata a Dąbki non corrispondeva al valore o all'attrattiva della loro area. L'area che era stata offerta loro consisteva di campi e paludi e non poteva essere usata senza restrizioni. I richiedenti considerarono la proposta come un tentativo inadeguato di soddisfare la loro rivendicazione. Il rifiuto di accettare questa area era così giustificato pienamente. Non si poteva considerare che i richiedenti fossero obbligati ad accettare qualsiasi area soltanto, perché lo Stato non aveva altre proprietà a sua disposizione. Inoltre, il Governo non aveva previsto qualsiasi valutazione della proprietà in controversia o della proprietà proposta ai richiedenti, e così non era stato possibile valutare obiettivamente l'offerta. A riguardo della seconda area, i richiedenti affermarono, che era insoddisfacente e che loro non avevano potuta accettarla.
47. Nella misura in cui l'eccezione del Governo si riferisce al rifiuto dei richiedenti di accettare lo scambio delle aree, la Corte osserva che questo problema è collegato alla valutazione della Corte dell’ottemperanza coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. La Corte si unisce di conseguenza a questa parte della dichiarazione del Governo dell'inammissibilità sulla base del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali ai meriti della causa.
48. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni dei richiedenti
49. I richiedenti dibatterono di non essere stati consapevoli che la proprietà in controversia era usata come cimitero ebreo. Il Sig. P. era venuto a Rusko dalla Germania nel 1945 e fin dal suo arrivo la proprietà in questione non era usata come cimitero e le autorità avevano fatto tutto possibile per eliminare qualsiasi segnale che fosse mai stata usata seppellire i morti. Le autorità avevano preso una decisione di chiudere il cimitero (il recinto e la cappella erano stati smantellati) e il terreno era stato designato come un'area edificabile (area di alloggi rurale). Anche se i richiedenti avevano saputo che la proprietà era usata come cimitero, non si poteva dedurre automaticamente che non si poteva usare per uno sviluppo. In qualsiasi caso, la conoscenza dei richiedenti era irrilevante poiché ciò che importava era la designazione della proprietà come determinata nel piano di sviluppo locale. Comprando la proprietà, i richiedenti erano stati consapevoli della sua designazione per lo sviluppo di alloggi rurali. Loro presunsero che fra il 25 novembre 1970, quando le autorità locali decisero di chiudere il cimitero, e la data di acquisto nel 1974 il cimitero era già stato chiuso. Inoltre, i richiedenti non avevano visto le lapidi ebree presenti sul luogo, poiché al tempo dell’ acquisto le lapidi erano coperte da alberi, arbusti e sottobosco.
50. I richiedenti contestarono l'argomento per cui loro avevano già conosciuto nel 1974 che sarebbe stato impossibile costruire sulla proprietà. Loro presentarono che negli anni settanta si era costruito su molti cimiteri lasciati dai tedeschi, ed il semplice fatto che la proprietà prima era usata come cimitero non la escludeva dallo sviluppo. Dal giorno in cui la loro proprietà fu elencata sul registro dell’ eredità nel 1987, i richiedenti erano incapaci di prendere qualsiasi azione per sviluppare la proprietà siccome non avrebbero ottenuto la licenza richiesta. Al tempo, loro avevano piani d’investimento consistenti nella costruzione di un edificio d’ alloggio insieme con l'officina di un fabbro. La decisione del 4 maggio 1987 aveva posto fine a quei piani.
51. I richiedenti dibatterono di essere stati privati del diritto di avvalersi pienamente della proprietà e non avevano ottenuto compensazione appropriata, nella forma del risarcimento o con un'area alternativa. Loro non erano stati capaci di usare la proprietà al fine per cui era stata acquistata. Era stata comprata “per la costruzione di un alloggio combinata con un'officina di servizi”, come confermato nelle richieste del richiedente del 23 luglio 1973 e dell’11 agosto 1973.
52. Era corretto per il Governo proteggere l'eredità culturale, ma ai richiedenti si sarebbe dovuto fornire una compensazione equa. I costi di protezione dell'eredità erano stati sopportati solamente dai richiedenti e così un carico eccessivo era stato imposto su di loro. Questo stato degli affari aveva persistito dopo il 10 ottobre 1994, la data attinente ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
53. Il Governo non aveva avviato procedimenti di espropriazione dopo il 10 ottobre 1994 nella prospettiva di chiarire il problema ed offrire una compensazione ai richiedenti, ed aveva evitato così la loro responsabilità finanziaria per il riacquisto della proprietà. Il fatto che nessuna valutazione della proprietà in questione era stato previsto indicava che lo scopo dei procedimenti non era stato l'accordo genuino della causa. Gli sforzi delle autorità erano andati a vuoto a causa della mancanza di risorse per il riacquisto della proprietà. I richiedenti dibatterono che loro avevano intrapreso una serie di misure legali per ottenere compensazione appropriata, ma inutilmente.
54. I richiedenti avevano diritto ad aspettarsi che l'area offerta loro in cambio sarebbe fosse appropriato per fine e avrebbe offerto loro una compensazione adeguata, e non avrebbe costituito soltanto un tentativo da parte del Governo per evitare la loro responsabilità finanziaria per la protezione dell'eredità. Le varie autorità avevano spostato la responsabilità per la situazione fra loro, senza garantire il risarcimento adeguato ai richiedenti. L'insuccesso nel completare i procedimenti nazionali era stato il risultato della mancanza di risorse finanziarie per assegnare il risarcimento od offrire una proprietà alternativa soddisfacente. Il Governo portava la responsabilità per l'insuccesso nell’espropriare il terreno appartenente ai richiedenti che avevano espresso il loro interesse nel fare espropriare la proprietà e darla o allo Stato o all'Unione delle Comunità ebree.
2. Le osservazioni del Governo
55. Il Governo ammise che nella presente causa c’era stata interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. Chiaramente seguiva dalla giurisprudenza delle corti nazionali che una decisione con cui una proprietà è stata aggiunta alla lista di monumenti storici costituiva simile interferenza. Comunque, l'interferenza era prescritta dalla legge, vale a dire la sezione 14 dell’ Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale ed aveva intrapreso uno scopo legittimo (la protezione dei monumenti storici). I motivi per la decisione della classificazione furono spiegati in questo ed erano così conosciuti ai richiedenti.
56. Il Governo presentò che sia le autorità pubbliche che i richiedenti erano stati consapevoli che la proprietà in questione prima veniva usata come cimitero ebreo. Nella sua prospettiva, la decisione formale sulla chiusura del cimitero che era stata data soltanto il 25 settembre 1970 significava che il cimitero non avrebbe potuto più essere usato come un posto di sepoltura. I richiedenti erano consapevoli della decisione del 25 settembre 1970 e si potrebbe presumere che loro fossero stati consapevoli dell'ubicazione del cimitero ebreo. Inoltre, i tratti correnti della loro area chiaramente mostravano che c'erano molti resti di tombe ebree su questa e si doveva presumere che loro erano stati visibili al tempo in cui i richiedenti comprarono la proprietà. Alla luce delle informazioni sopra non ci può essere dubbio che i richiedenti avevano comprato un vecchio cimitero ebreo e che loro ne erano perfettamente consapevoli. I richiedenti non avevano mostrato la diligenza dovuta nel comprare l'area ed il Governo ora non poteva portare nessuna responsabilità per le decisioni prese dai richiedenti negli anni settanta.
57. Il Governo ammise che il 12 settembre 1973 il Consiglio Nazionale del Distretto di Sławno aveva emesso una decisione preliminare nota come “decisione di informazioni” che informava i richiedenti sotto quali condizioni loro avrebbero potuto costruire un alloggio sull’ area n. 59. Comunque, a causa del passaggio di tempo era difficile dire che genere di documenti avevano costituito la base per l’emissione della decisione. Inoltre, la decisione era stata soggetto all'adempimento di certe condizioni supplementari specificate nella legge. I richiedenti non avevano presentato nessun documento che provasse che loro avevano adempiuto a quelle condizioni.
58. Inoltre, i richiedenti non avevano preso vantaggio dalla possibilità offerta dalle autorità per scambiare l'area in questione con un'altra area offerta dall’Ufficio del Distretto di Sławno. Erano stati informati che in caso di rifiuto della seconda proposta di scambio la sola soluzione sarebbe stata l'espropriazione della loro proprietà; questo, comunque era condizionale alla concessione di un sussidio da parte delle autorità. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti erano stati informati che poiché le risorse finanziarie erano limitate era impossibile dire quando era probabile che la loro causa venisse risolta. Nella sua prospettiva, rifiutando lo scambio i richiedenti avevano accettato che l'espropriazione non poteva essere eseguita sino a quando le risorse finanziarie appropriate fossero state disponibili; loro avrebbero dovuto sopportare perciò le conseguenze delle loro decisioni.
59. Il Governo sottolineò inoltre che secondo l'atto notarile i richiedenti avevano pagato 462 zloty polacchi per l'area. Come indicato dall’ Ufficio Centrale di Statistica, la rimunerazione media dell’ anno 1974 corrispondeva a 3,185 zloty polacchi. Quindi, l'importo pagato dai richiedenti per la loro area corrispondeva ad un quinto della rimunerazione media al tempo attinente. Il Governo sottolineò anche che nel periodo fra l'acquisto della proprietà da parte dei richiedenti e la data della decisione di classificazione i richiedenti non avevano intrapreso nessun passo per realizzare il fine per il quale loro avevano presumibilmente comprato l'area.
60. Nella prospettiva del Governo, le autorità per migliorare la situazione dei richiedenti avevano fatto più di ciò che erano obbligate a fare. I richiedenti avevano comprato di proposito i resti di un vecchio cimitero ebreo ed anche nel 1974 era stato piuttosto ovvio che loro non sarebbero stati in grado di costruire nulla sui resti visibili del cimitero. Le autorità avevano intrapreso numerose misure nella prospettiva di scambiare l'area dei richiedenti per un altra ma le loro proposte erano state trascurate. In conclusione, il Governo dibatté, che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti era manifestamente mal-fondata o, alternativamente, che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
3. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Natura dell'interferenza
61. L’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che garantisce il diritto alla protezione della proprietà contiene tre articoli distinti: “il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti viene concesso, fra le altre cose, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale... Comunque, i tre articoli non sono 'distinti' nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo ed il terzo articolo riguardano particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo” (vedere, come recente autorità con gli ulteriori riferimenti, Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 62 ECHR 2007 -...).
62. Nella presente causa il Governo ha ammesso che c'era stata interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra) e la Corte non può discernere qualsiasi ragione di sostenere altrimenti.
I richiedenti si lamentarono degli effetti che scaturirono dalla decisione del 4 maggio 1987 che aveva messo loro proprietà nel registro dei monumenti storici, ed in particolare della proibizione effettiva di costruire un alloggio con un'officina sulla proprietà come originalmente si erano proposti di fare. Inoltre, loro addussero che nel periodo in seguito alla decisione in questione le autorità non erano riuscite ad espropriare la proprietà o ad offrire loro una proprietà appropriata in cambio.
63. La Corte nota che la decisione del 1987 non spogliò i richiedenti delle loro proprietà ma sottopose l'uso di quelle proprietà a restrizioni significative; quindi, può essere considerata una misura per il controllare dell'uso di proprietà (vedere SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy c. Francia (dec.), n. 61093/00, ECHR 2005-XIII (estratti)). L'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti si riferisce anche comunque, all'insuccesso prolungato delle autorità nell’ espropriare la proprietà o nell’ offrire loro una proprietà alternativa. Avendo riguardo alle diverse sfaccettature dell'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti, la Corte considera, che dovrebbe esaminare la situazione di cui ci si lamenta sotto la norma generale stabilita nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Skibiñscy c. Polonia, n. 52589/99, § 80 del 14 novembre 2006).
64. Era base comune che l'interferenza in questione era prevista dalla legge, vale a dire le disposizioni attinenti della Protezione dell’Atto sul'Eredità Culturale del1962 . Similmente, non si contestò che l'interferenza aveva intrapreso uno scopo legittimo, vale a dire la protezione dell'eredità culturale del paese. La Corte reitera che la conservazione dell'eredità culturale e, dove appropriato, il suo uso sostenibile, abbia come scopo, oltre al mantenimento di una certa qualità della vita la conservazione delle radici storico culturali ed artistiche di una regione e dei suoi abitanti. Come tali, sono un valore essenziale, la cui protezione e promozione spetta alle autorità pubbliche (vedere SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy, citata sopra; Debelianovi c. Bulgaria, n. 61951/00, § 54 del 29 marzo 2007; e Kozacıoğlu c. Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03, § 54 ECHR 2009 -...). In questo collegamento la Corte specificamente si riferisce alla Convenzione per la Protezione dell'Eredità Architettonica dell’ Europa che predispone delle misure tangibili riguardo all'eredità architettonica (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra).
(b) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
65. Qualsiasi interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà deve realizzare un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 69 Serie A n. 52). In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo che si cerca di perseguire con qualsiasi misura applicata dallo Stato, incluso le misure che spogliano una persona della sua proprietà. In ogni caso che coinvolge la violazione addotta di quest’ Articolo la Corte deve, perciò accertare se in ragione dell'azione dello Stato o di un omissione la persona riguardata ha ovuto sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Il Re precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, §§ 89-90 ECHR 2000-XII; Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, § 73; Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 150 il 2004-V di ECHR; e Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 93 ECHR 2005-VI).
66. Nel valutare l’ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in gioco, tenendo presente che la Convenzione è concepita per salvaguardare dei diritti che sono “pratici ed effettivi.” Deve guardare dietro alle apparenze e deve investigare le realtà della situazione di cui ci si lamenta. Questa valutazione non solo può coinvolgere il i termini del risarcimento attinente -se la situazione è simile ad una presa di proprietà - ma anche la condotta delle parti, incluso i mezzi assunti dallo Stato e la loro attuazione. In questo contesto, dovrebbe essere sottolineato che l'incertezza-sia legislativa, amministrativa o che nasce da pratiche applicate dalle autorità -è un fattore da prendere in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato. Effettivamente, dove è in gioco un problema nell'interesse generale, spetta alle autorità pubbliche agire nel dovuto tempo, in modo appropriato e coerente (vedere Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § §§ 110 in fine, 114 e 120 in fine, ECHR 2000-io; Sovtransavto Holding c. Ucraina, n. 48553/99, §§ 97-98 ECHR 2002-VII; Broniowski, citata sopra, § 151; e Plechanow c. Polonia, n. 22279/04, § 102 7 luglio 2009).
67. Col particolare riferimento al controllo dell'uso di proprietà e perciò all’ interferenza con diritti di proprietà riservati, lo Stato ha un ampio margine di discrezione in merito a ciò che è “in conformità con l'interesse generale”, in particolare nel caso in cui dei problemi di eredità ambientali e culturali sono riguardati (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Beyeler c. Italia [GC], citata sopra, § 112; Kozacıoğlu c. Turchia [GC], citata sopra, § 53; e Yildiz ed Altri c. Turchia (dec.), n. 37959/04, 12 gennaio 2010). Inoltre non si deve presumere che ogni classificazione di proprietà dopo il suo acquisto da parte di un individuo corrisponda ad una violazione della terza norma dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, o che una volta che una proprietà viene classificata al proprietario venga concessa invariabilmente una forma di risarcimento (vedere, mutatis mutandis, J A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 79 ECHR 2007-X; e Depalle c. a Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 91 ECHR 2010 -...). La proprietà, incluso la proprietà privatamente posseduta ha anche una funzione sociale che, dato le circostanze appropriate, deve essere fissata nell'equazione per determinare se l’“equilibrio equo” è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i diritti essenziali dell'individuo. Una considerazione deve essere data in particolare a se il richiedente, nell’acquisire la proprietà sapeva o avrebbe dovuto ragionevolmente conoscere le restrizioni sulla proprietà o le possibili future restrizioni (vedere Allan Jacobsson c. Svezia (n. 1), 25 ottobre 1989, §§ 60-61 Serie A n. 163; Ł ącz c. Polonia (dec.), n. 22665/02, 23 giugno 2009), l'esistenza delle aspettative legittime riguardo all'uso della proprietà o l'accettazione del rischio sull’ acquisto (vedere Fredin c. Svezia (n. 1), 18 febbraio 1991, § 54 Serie A n. 192), alla misura in cui la restrizione ostacolò l’uso della proprietà (vedere Katte Klitsche de la Grange c. Italia, 27 ottobre 1994, § 46 Serie A n. 293-B; SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy c. Francia (dec.), citata sopra), e la possibilità di impugnare la necessità della restrizione (vedere Phocas c. Francia, 23 aprile 1996, § 60 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-II; Papastavrou ed Altri c. Grecia, n. 46372/99, § 37 ECHR 2003-IV).
68. Il Governo mise enfasi sul fatto che i richiedenti erano stati consapevoli che loro avevano comprato un ex cimitero ebreo e che anche al tempo dell'operazione loro avevano saputo che loro non sarebbero stati in grado di costruire sull'area. Sulla base del materiale in suo possesso, la Corte sottolinea comunque, che le autorità presero la decisione formale di chiudere il cimitero nel 1970. Successivamente, l'area fu classificata come terreno coltivabile e venduta ai richiedenti il 14 novembre 1974. Le autorità erano consapevoli dell'intenzione dei richiedenti di costruire un alloggio ed un’officina sulla proprietà, siccome i richiedenti avevano espresso le loro intenzioni nelle loro due richieste nel 1973. Inoltre, il 12 settembre 1973 le autorità emisero una decisione preliminare che specificava le condizioni che accompagnavano la costruzione di un alloggio. In questo collegamento la Corte osserva che non è contestato che i richiedenti comprarono un terreno agricolo nella prospettiva a di edificare un alloggio su questo e che le autorità non obiettarono apparentemente a questa intenzione al tempo attinente. I richiedenti presentarono anche che secondo il piano di sviluppo locale in vigore al tempo attinente l'area n. 59 era stata designati per lo sviluppo di alloggi rurali; il Governo non contestò quell'argomento. Inoltre, emerge dalla richiesta dell’ Ispettore Regionale di Koszalin al Sindaco del Distretto di Sławno che le autorità considerarono che i richiedenti avessero comprato un area edificabile (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra).
69. La Corte considera che il problema principale nella causa concerne gli effetti legali sullo status della proprietà dei richiedenti che fluisce dalla decisione dell'Ispettore Regionale del 4 maggio 1987. Sulla base di questa decisione il bene immobile dei richiedenti è stato aggiunto sul registro dei monumenti storici, per il motivo che un cimitero ebreo era stato localizzato precedentemente sull'area. Questo cimitero era uno dei pochi resti della cultura ebrea nella Regione della Media Pomerania. Successivamente, le autorità dichiararono che l’ex cimitero apparteneva alla categoria di monumenti che erano di particolare valore storico, scientifico o artistico (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra).
70. La decisione del 1987 diede luogo ad un numero di restrizioni di vasta portata sull'uso della proprietà da parte dei richiedenti, come previsto dall’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale del 1962 e successivamente dall’Atto sulla Protezione e la Conservazione dei Monumenti del 2003. I richiedenti erano sotto l’ obbligo di preservare il monumento storico e di proteggerlo dai danni. Fu proibito loro di iniziare qualsiasi lavoro sul monumento a meno che non avessero ottenuto una licenza dall'Ispettore Regionale. La Corte nota che poiché l’area intera in questione fu classificata come un monumento storico non c'era possibilità per i richiedenti di sviluppare anche una sola parte della loro proprietà (per contrasto SCEA Ferme de Fresnoy, citata sopra). Questo fu confermato dall’ Ispettore Regionale di Koszalin nella sua lettera del 26 gennaio 2001 rivolta al Sindaco del Distretto di Sławno (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra).
71. Per valutare se un equilibrio equo fu previsto nella causa, la Corte ha bisogno di esaminare quali misure fossero disponibili ai richiedenti per controbilanciare l'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. La Corte considera che nelle circostanze della causa la misura più appropriata sarebbe stata l'espropriazione tramite pagamento del risarcimento od offerta di una proprietà alternativa appropriata.
72. La Corte nota che il diritto nazionale prevedeva una particolare disposizione riguardo all'espropriazione di proprietà che furono classificate e che le autorità nazionali considerarono come monumenti di particolare significato culturale. In conformità con le sezioni 33 e 34 dell’Atto sulla Protezione dell'Eredità Culturale del 1962 che era in vigore fino al 16 novembre 2003 che un monumento di particolare valore storico, scientifico o artistico avrebbe potuto essere acquisito dallo Stato se l'interesse pubblico avesse richiesto così. L'espropriazione verrebbe eseguita su richiesta del Sindaco di distretto o dell'ispettore regionale in conformità con l'Atto dell'Amministrazione del Terreno del 1997. Così l'espropriazione potrebbe essere eseguita solamente, su richiesta delle autorità pubbliche o di loro propria istanza, ed i richiedenti non avevano qualsiasi coinvolgimento formale in quella procedura. Il ruolo dei richiedenti nel processo fu limitato alla presentazione di richieste di iniziare procedimenti di espropriazione. Queste richieste non avevano effetto vincolante sulle autorità e quest’ultime godevano di una completa discrezione a questo riguardo. Le disposizioni summenzionate furono ristrette anche inoltre con l'entrata in vigore dell’Atto sulla Protezione e la Conservazione dei Monumenti del 17 novembre 2003 che specificò che monumenti immobili avrebbero potuto essere espropriati solamente su richiesta di un ispettore regionale dove c'era un rischio di danno irreversibile al monumento. Avendo riguardo a quanto sopra, la Corte costata che siccome i richiedenti non avevano nessun diritto di obbligare lo Stato ad eseguire l'espropriazione, la loro posizione vis-à-vis alle autorità chiaramente era svantaggiosa.
73. La prima richiesta per espropriare la proprietà dei richiedenti fatta dall'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici nel 1992 non produsse alcun risultato. Nel 2001 l'Ispettore Regionale richiese al Sindaco di Sławno di espropriare la proprietà dei richiedenti durante il periodo che rientrava all'interno della giurisdizione temporale della Corte, evidentemente inutilmente (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra). Nel 2003, in seguito alle negoziazioni senza successo sullo scambio delle aree, il Sindaco di Distretto di Sławno informò l'Ispettore Regionale dei Monumenti Storici che procedimenti di espropriazione avrebbero potuto essere avviati a condizione che l'Ispettore Regionale potesse garantire un sussidio a quel fine. Il Sindaco di distretto dichiarò che lui non aveva finanziamenti sufficienti per pagare il risarcimento ai richiedenti e perciò, per ragioni pratiche, decise di non avviare procedimenti di espropriazione. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che una mancanza di finanziamenti non può giustificare l'insuccesso delle autorità per rimediare alla situazione dei richiedenti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Prodan c. la Moldavia, n. 49806/99, § 61 ECHR 2004-III (gli estratti); Burdov c. Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 70 ECHR 2009 -...; e Polańscy c. Polonia, n. 21700/02, § 75 7 luglio 2009).
74. La Corte reitera che l’ esercizio genuino ed effettivo del diritto protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non dipende soltanto dal dovere dello Stato di non interferire, ma può generare obblighi positivi (vedere Öneryıldız c. Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134 ECHR 2004-XII; Broniowski, citata sopra, § 143; e Plechanow c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 99). Tali obblighi positivi possono comportare la presa di misure necessarie a proteggere il diritto alla proprietà, particolarmente dove c'è un collegamento diretto fra le misure che un richiedente legittimamente può aspettarsi dalle autorità ed il suo godimento effettivo delle sue proprietà, anche in casi che coinvolgono una causa fra entità private. Questo vuole dire, in particolare, che gli Stati sono sotto un obbligo di offrire un meccanismo giudiziale per stabilire efficacemente la proprietà contestata ed assicurare l’ottemperanza di quei meccanismi con le salvaguardie procedurali e materiale custodite nella Convenzione. Questo principio si applica con maggiore forza quando è lo Stato stesso che è in controversia con un individuo (vedere Anheuser-Busch Inc., citata sopra, § 83, e Plechanow c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 99).
75. Nel contesto di restrizioni sullo sviluppo del terreno che sono il risultato di un piano di sviluppo, la disponibilità di una rivendicazione per far acquistare la proprietà dalle autorità è un fattore attinente da considerare (vedere Phocas c. Francia, citata sopra, § 60). Nella presente causa, il diritto nazionale non offriva una procedura con la quale i richiedenti avrebbero potuto asserire di fronte ad un corpo giudiziale la loro rivendicazione per l'espropriazione e avrebbero potuto costringere le autorità ad acquistare la loro proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Skibińscy c. Polonia, citata sopra, §§ 34-39 e 94-95, 14 novembre 2006 riguardo a proprietari che furono minacciati di espropriazione della loro proprietà in un punto indeterminato nel futuro). Di conseguenza, la Corte trova che i richiedenti furono privati di qualsiasi mezzo per obbligare le autorità Statali ad espropriare la loro proprietà (vedere Immobiliare Saffi c. l'Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 56 il 1999-V di ECHR). Nella valutazione della proporzionalità delle misure di cui ci si lamentava, la mancanza di tale procedura pesa notevolmente contro le autorità.
76. La Corte osserva che la procedura di espropriazione fu regolata dall’Atto sull’ Amministrazione del Terreno del 1985 e dall’ Atto di Espropriazione e successivamente dall'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terreno del 1997 che entrò in vigore il 1 gennaio 1998. La Sezione 114 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione del Terreno del 1997 convenne che l'istituzione di procedimenti di espropriazione avrebbe dovuto essere preceduta da negoziazioni sull'acquisizione della proprietà tramite accordo fra lo Stato ed il proprietario. Nella struttura di quelle negoziazioni lo Stato avrebbe potuto proporre una proprietà alternativa al proprietario.
77. In questo collegamento, la Corte osserva, che la prima richiesta dei richiedenti di fornire loro un'area alternativa fu fatta nel 1995 al Capo dell’Ufficio del Distretto di Koszalin, l'autorità competente nella questione al tempo attinente. La richiesta era comunque inutile. Nel 2002 i richiedenti espressero la loro buona volontà di chiarire la questione per mezzo di uno scambio di terreno. Nel 2003, cercando di chiarire la situazione, le autorità offrirono due volte una proprietà alternativa ai richiedenti. Comunque, i richiedenti rifiutarono entrambe le offerte, considerando che le aree non erano pari alle loro aspettative. A riguardo della prima area i richiedenti specificamente dibatterono, che non corrispondeva al valore della loro proprietà e consisteva di campi e paludi. La Corte nota l'argomento dei richiedenti per cui il Governo non fornì una valutazione della loro proprietà o delle due proprietà alternative. Sembra che nessuna simile valutazione fu fornita dal Sindaco del Distretto di Sławno, l'autorità competente nella questione dell'espropriazione un'omissione che discutibilmente impedì ai richiedenti di fare una valutazione obiettiva delle offerte. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il diritto nazionale non li obbligava ad accettare un'offerta di proprietà alternativa anche se pari al valore dell'area originale.
78. Più generalmente, la Corte osserva che nel caso di una controversia in merito all'appropriatezza di una proprietà offerta in luogo dalle autorità nella struttura di negoziazioni di pre-espropriazione, un meccanismo procedurale avrebbe dovuto essere disponibile per chiarire simile controversia, e così assicurare che un equilibrio equo venisse previsto fra gli interessi in competizione (vedrtr, mutatis mutandis, Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, § 221 ECHR 2006-VIII dove la Corte notò la mancanza di una qualsiasi procedura o meccanismo legale che abilitino i padroni di casa ad attenuare o compensare delle perdite incorse in collegamento col mantenimento o la ristrutturazione della proprietà). In quelle circostanze, la Corte considera, che i richiedenti non potevano essere biasimati per avere rifiutato entrambe le offerte, siccome sembra che loro non avessero avuto nessuna garanzia che i loro interessi sarebbero stati sufficientemente protetti. Avendo riguardo a quanto sopra, la Corte costata che l'eccezione del Governo in merito all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sulla base del rifiuto dei richiedenti di accettare le aree alternative dovrebbe essere respinta.
79. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che l'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà cominciò il 4 maggio 1987 ed apparentemente persiste ad oggi. La lunghezza considerevole di tempo durante cui i richiedenti hanno dovuto avere a che fare con l'interferenza in questione è un altro elemento nella valutazione della Corte della proporzionalità delle misure di cui ci si lamentava . Inoltre, la situazione dei richiedenti fu combinata con lo stato di incertezza nel quale loro si trovarono, nella prospettiva dell'impossibilità continuata di sviluppare la loro proprietà o di farla espropriare.
80. Avendo riguardo a tutti i precedenti fattori, la Corte costata che l'equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione del diritto di proprietà è stato sconvolto e che i richiedenti dovevano sopportare un carico eccessivo.
C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
81. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
82. Riguardo al danno patrimoniale, i richiedenti chiesero 10,000 zloty polacchi (PLN) per anno fin dal 1987, l'anno in cui le autorità avevano deciso di elencare la loro proprietà nel registro dei monumenti (in totale 230,000 PLN). L'importo valutato consisteva in possibili benefici che avrebbe potuto essere ottenuti dalla proprietà se fosse stata trasformata nell'officina di un fabbro come i richiedenti si erano originalmente proposti . Nella prospettiva della loro età, ulteriori benefici avrebbero potuti essere ottenuti attualmente, affittando il terreno o utilizzando la proprietà per fini residenziali.
83. I richiedenti chiesero anche 100,000 PLN a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale a causa dell'angoscia di cui avevano sofferto a causa della considerazione della loro causa durante il corso di molti anni. A questo riguardo loro si riferirono alla loro età avanzata, alla loro perdita di fiducia nelle autorità e all'assenza di procedure effettive nella loro causa.
84. Il Governo, avendo dibattuto che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti furono manifestamente mal-fondate o, alternativamente, che non c'era stata violazione, presentò che le loro rivendicazioni a riguardo di entrambi i capi di danno erano irrilevanti.
85. Nelle circostanze della causa ed avendo riguardo alle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione riguardo al danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale non è pronta per una decisione e la riserva, avendo dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo fra lo Stato rispondente ed ai richiedenti a cui potrebbero giungere (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
B. Costi e spese
86. Ai richiedenti furono pagati EUR 850 come patrocinio gratuito dal Consiglio dell'Europa. Loro non registrarono una rivendicazione per costi e spese.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Congiunge ai meriti l'eccezione preliminare del Governo che riguarda il rifiuto dei richiedenti di accettare aree alternative e dichiara l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e respinge l'eccezione summenzionata;
3. Sostiene che per ciò che riguarda qualsiasi danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale, la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione e di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare,a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza .
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 marzo 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 11/07/2020.