Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF YILDIRIR v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41

NUMERO: 21482/03/2011
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 05/04/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage -award
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF YILDIRIR v. TURKEY
(Application no. 21482/03)
JUDGMENT
(Just satisfaction)
STRASBOURG
5 April 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Yıldırır v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Danutė Jočienė,
Ireneu Cabral Barreto,
Dragoljub Popović,
Giorgio Malinverni,
András Sajó,
Işıl Karakaş, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 15 March 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 21482/03) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Turkish national, Mr OMISSIS (“the applicant”), on 21 May 2003.
2. In a judgment delivered on 24 November 2009 (“the principal judgment”), the Court held that the failure to award any compensation to the applicant upset, to his detriment, the fair balance which has to be struck between the protection of property and the requirements of the general interest, and that there has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
3. Under Article 41 of the Convention the applicant sought just satisfaction for the finding of a violation of his rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. Since the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention was not ready for decision, the Court reserved it and invited the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months, their written observations on that issue and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement they might reach (ibid., p. 9, § 50, and point 3 of the operative provisions).
5. In the absence of a referral request by the Government, within the meaning of Article 43 § 1 the principal judgment became final on 24 February 2010.
6. The applicant and the Government each submitted observations, on 18 March 2010 and 24 June 2010 respectively.
THE LAW
7. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant
8. The applicant reiterated his claim for just satisfaction and asked the Court to award him 57,977 Turkish liras (TRL) (approximately 29,200 euros (EUR)) in respect of pecuniary damage. In this connection, the applicant provided an expert report dated 2 June 2003, which had been approved by a declaratory judgment (tespit davası kararı) of the Ankara Magistrates’ Court.
9. The applicant asked the Court to add interest to the aforementioned amounts, running from the date of introduction of his application to the Court.
(b) The Government
10. The Government submitted that the applicant’s just satisfaction claims should be dismissed, since he had failed to submit fresh claims following the delivery of the principal judgment. They also maintained that the amounts claimed by the applicant had never been brought before the domestic courts and that therefore they should be rejected by the Court.
11. The Government contended in the alternative that the amounts claimed by the applicant were excessive. They noted that while the applicant’s property had been valued at TRL 57,977 by an expert in 2003, its location was a significant factor decreasing its value. In this connection, an assessment report prepared by a civil servant working at the Kızılcahamam Municipality stated that the damage suffered by the applicant in 2003 was actually TRL 42,588.9. Furthermore, the buildings which had been demolished by the administration had been situated in a protection zone in the vicinity of the Kurtboğazı Dam, which provided drinking water to Ankara. Accordingly, if the applicant wished to sell the property in question to a third person he would not be able to sell it at current market value.
12. The Government further submitted an assessment report dated 6 May 2010 issued by the General Directorate of National Real Estate attached to the Ministry of Finance (Maliye Bakanlığı Milli Emlak Genel Müdürlüğü) (“the General Directorate”). The General Directorate had re-calculated the value of the applicant’s property in question by updating the 2003 expert report submitted by the applicant, and had found that the current value of the property was TRL 100,071.87. The Government noted that the General Directorate had used objective criteria and that the amount found was the current maximum value of the property in question, had it been possible to sell it today.
2. The Court’s assessment
13. As regards the Government’s submission that the applicant failed to submit fresh claims for just satisfaction following the adoption of the principal judgment, the Court notes that by a letter dated 18 March 2010 the applicant reiterated his claims for just satisfaction and that this letter was transmitted to the Government by the Registry’s letter dated 13 July 2010. Accordingly, the Court rejects the Government’s allegations in this subject.
14. As to the Government’s argument that the applicant failed to raise his just satisfaction claims before the domestic courts, the Court reiterates that it has already dealt with this question in the principal judgment when examining the Government’s plea on non-exhaustion and has rejected it (see pp. 5-6, §§ 29-35 of the principal judgment). It follows that this argument must also be dismissed.
15. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore, as far as possible, the situation existing before the breach (see Brumărescu v. Romania (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 28342/95, § 19, ECHR 2001-I).
16. The Contracting States parties to a case are in principle free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach. This discretion as to the manner of execution of a judgment reflects the freedom of choice attaching to the primary obligation of the Contracting States under Article 1 of the Convention to secure the rights and freedoms guaranteed. If the nature of the breach allows restitutio in integrum, it is for the respondent State to implement it. If however national law does not allow, or allows only partial, reparation to be made for the consequences of the breach, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece (Article 50), 31 October 1995, § 34, Series A no. 330-B).
17. In the principal judgment the Court found that the lack of any domestic remedy to afford the applicant redress for the loss of his property had impaired the full enjoyment of his right to property (see p. 9, § 45 of the principal judgment). Thus, in the circumstances of the present case, an award of compensation for the pecuniary loss in question seems to be the most appropriate just satisfaction for the applicant.
18. In this context, the Court reiterates that when the basis of the violation found is the lack of any compensation, rather than the inherent illegality of the taking, the compensation need not necessarily reflect the full value of the property (see I.R.S. and Others v. Turkey (just satisfaction), no. 26338/95, §§ 23-24, 31 May 2005; Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 254-259, ECHR 2006-V; and Stornaiuolo v. Italy, no. 52980/99, §§ 82-91, 8 August 2006).
19. In such cases, in determining the amount of adequate compensation, the Court must base itself on the criteria laid down in its judgments regarding Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and according to which, without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value, deprivation of property would normally constitute a disproportionate interference which could not be considered justifiable under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The provision did not, however, guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances since legitimate objectives of “public interest” may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 71, Series A no. 301-A, and Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 94, ECHR 2005-VI).
20. In view of the above, the Court notes that the applicant claimed TRL 57,977 (approximately EUR 29,000), based on an assessment report that was prepared in 2003, plus interest, to obtain the current value of the property that was demolished by the authorities. In this connection, the Government furnished a re-evaluation report which indicated that the current maximum value of the property in question was TRL 100,071.87 (approximately EUR 50,400) (see paragraph 12 above).
21. In view of the above, the Court deems it appropriate to fix a lump sum that would correspond to the applicant’s legitimate expectations of obtaining compensation for the approximate value of his house that was demolished by the authorities. It thus awards the applicant EUR 50,000 in respect of pecuniary damage.
B. Non-pecuniary damage
22. The applicant claimed TRL 100,000 (approximately EUR 46,500) for non-pecuniary damage for the stress and anxiety suffered by his family.
23. The Government stated that the finding of a violation was sufficient just satisfaction in the circumstances of the case.
24. The Court considers that the applicant must have experienced frustration and stress having regard to the nature of the breach. It therefore awards the applicant EUR 2,500 in respect of non-pecuniary damage (see Schembri and Others v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 42583/06, § 22, 28 September 2010).
C. Costs and expenses
25. The applicant did not submit any claim in respect of costs and expenses.
26. The Government asked the Court not to make an award, given the applicant’s failure to submit any claim under this title.
27. In the absence of any quantified claim, the Court makes no award under this head (Rule 60 of the Rules of Court).
D. Default interest
28. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Turkish liras at the rate applicable on the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 50,000 (fifty thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 2,500 (two thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, for costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period, plus three percentage points;
2. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 5 April 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Françoise Tulkens Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the concurring opinion of Judge Sajó is annexed to this judgment.
S.H.N.
F.T.

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE SAJÓ
In the present case, the Court deems it appropriate to fix a lump sum that would correspond to the applicant’s legitimate expectations of obtaining compensation for the approximate value of his house that was demolished by the authorities. In granting a lump sum, the Court is of the opinion that the applicant has no right to full compensation, as the guarantee of a right to full compensation in all circumstances does not necessarily apply since legitimate objectives of “public interest” may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 71, Series A no. 301-A, and Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 94, ECHR 2005-VI).
I find that the conditions for applying compensation below the full market value depend on very specific considerations which have to be narrowly construed, being exceptions to the general rule of full compensation. The existence of unique historical circumstances is present in the cases cited. There is no specific reason given for the approach taken by the Court, which grants the lump sum in view of the above-cited jurisprudence. The applicant submitted an expert’s report dated 2 June 2003, which had been approved by a declaratory judgment (tespit davası kararı) of the Ankara Magistrates’ Court. The Government submitted a re-calculation, by updating the 2003 expert’s report submitted by the applicant. Under these circumstances there is a clear basis on which to determine the full value of the property at the time of the expropriation, and inflation is properly taken care of. It is of course very fortunate that the lump sum awarded equals the actual loss; but it is very unfortunate that the impression is created that the award does not reflect the full value, or that special circumstances exist in the present case to allow a departure from awarding full compensation.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - lassegnazione
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA YILDIRIR C. TURCHIA
(Richiesta n. 21482/03)
SENTENZA
(Soddisfazione equa)
STRASBOURG
5 aprile 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Yıldırır c. la Turchia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, Danutė Jočienė, Ireneu Cabral Barreto, Dragoljub Popović, Giorgio Malinverni, András Sajó, Iþýl Karakaş, giudici,
e da Stanley Naismith, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 15 marzo 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 21482/03) contro la Repubblica di Turchia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino turco, il Sig. OMISSIS (“il richiedente”), il 21 maggio 2003.
2. In una sentenza consegnata il 24 novembre 2009 (“la sentenza principale”), la Corte sostenne che l'insuccesso nell’ assegnare qualsiasi risarcimento al richiedente sconvolse, a suo danno l'equilibrio equo che doveva essere previsto fra la protezione della proprietà ed i requisiti dell'interesse generale, e che c'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
3. Sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione il richiedente chiese la soddisfazione equa per la costatazione di una violazione dei suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. Poiché questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione non era pronta per una decisione, la Corte la riservò ed invitò il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi le loro osservazioni scritte su questo problema e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi l'accordo che avrebbero potuto raggiungere (ibid., p. 9, § 50 e punto 3 delle disposizioni operative).
5. In assenza di una richiesta di raccomandazione del Governo, all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 43 § 1 questa sentenza principale è divenuta definitiva il 24 febbraio 2010.
6. Il richiedente ed il Governo hanno presentato entrambi delle osservazioni, rispettivamente il 18 marzo 2010 e il 24 giugno 2010.
LA LEGGE
7. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. danno Patrimoniale
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
8. Il richiedente reiterò la sua rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa e chiese alla Corte di assegnargli 57,977 lire turche (TRL) (approssimativamente 29,200 euro (EUR)) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale. In questo collegamento, il richiedente ha fornito, un rapporto competente datato 2 giugno 2003 che era stato approvato con una sentenza dichiaratoria (tespit davası kararı) dei Magistrati della Corte di Ankara.
9. Il richiedente chiese alla Corte di aggiungere interesse agli importi summenzionati, a decorrere dalla data di introduzione della sua richiesta alla Corte.
(b) Il Governo
10. Il Governo presentò che la richiesta di soddisfazione equa del richiedente dovrebbe essere respinta, poiché non era riuscito a presentare delle nuove rivendicazioni in seguito alla consegna della sentenza principale. Sostenne anche che gli importi chiesti dal richiedente non erano mai stati portati di fronte alle corti nazionali e che perciò avrebbero dovuto essere respinti dalla Corte.
11. Il Governo conteso in alternativa che gli importi chiesti dal richiedente erano eccessivi. Notò che mentre la proprietà del richiedente era stata valutata a TRL 57,977 da un esperto nel 2003, la sua ubicazione era un fattore significativo che decresceva il suo valore. In questo collegamento, un rapporto di valutazione preparato da un funzionario civile che lavorava al Municipio di Kızılcahamam affermava che il danno subito dal richiedente nel 2003 davvero era TRL 42,588.9. Inoltre, gli edifici che erano stati demoliti dall'amministrazione erano stati situati in una zona di protezione nel vicinato della Diga di Kurtboğazı che offriva acqua potabile ad Ankara. Di conseguenza, se il richiedente avesse desiderato vendere la proprietà in oggetto ad un terza persona lui non sarebbe stato in grado venderla al valore di mercato corrente.
12. Il Governo presentò inoltre un rapporto di valutazione datato 6 maggio 2010 emesso dalla Generale Direzione di Beni immobili Nazionali annessa al Ministero di Finanza (Maliye Bakanlığı Milli Emlak Genel Müdürlüğü) (“la Direzione Generale”). La Direzione Generale aveva ricalcolato il valore della proprietà del richiedente in oggetto aggiornando il rapporto competente del 2003 presentato dal richiedente, ed aveva trovato che il valore corrente della proprietà era TRL 100,071.87. Il Governo notò che la Direzione Generale aveva usato criteri obiettivi e che l'importo trovato era il valore massimo corrente della proprietà in oggetto, se fosse stato possibile venderla oggi.
2. La valutazione della Corte
13. Riguardo all'osservazione del Governo per cui il richiedente non è riuscito a presentare nuove rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa in seguito all'adozione della sentenza principale, la Corte nota che con una lettera del 18 marzo 2010 il richiedente reiterò le sue rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa e che questa lettera fu trasmessa al Governo con la lettera della Cancelleria datata 13 luglio 2010. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge le dichiarazioni del Governo in questa materia.
14. In merito all'argomento del Governo per cui il richiedente non è riuscito a sollevare la sua richiesta di soddisfazione equa di fronte alle corti nazionali, la Corte reitera che ha già trattato con questa questione nella sentenza principale esaminando la dichiarazione del Governo sul non-esaurimento e l'ha respinta (vedere pp. 5-6, §§ 29-35 della sentenza principale). Ne segue che anche questo argomento deve essere respinto.
15. La Corte reitera che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione delle sue conseguenze in modo tale da ripristinare, il più possibile la situazione che esiste prima della violazione (vedere Brumărescu c. Romania (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 28342/95, § 19 ECHR 2001-I).
16. Gli Stati Contraenti parti ad una causa sono in principio liberi di scegliere i mezzi con cui si atterranno ad una sentenza in cui la Corte ha trovato una violazione. Questa discrezione in merito al metodo di esecuzione di una sentenza riflette la libertà di scelta abbinata all'obbligo primario degli Stati Contraenti sotto l’Articolo 1 della Convenzione per garantire i diritti e le libertà garantita. Se la natura della violazione permette una restitutio in integrum, spetta allo Stato rispondente implementarla. Se comunque la legge nazionale non permette, o permette che venga fatta solamente una riparazione parziale delle conseguenze della violazione, l’Articolo 41 conferisce potere alla Corte per riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come le sembra più appropriato (vedere Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. Grecia (Articolo 50), 31 ottobre 1995, § 34 Serie A n. 330-B).
17. Nella sentenza principale la Corte ha trovato che la mancanza di qualsiasi via di ricorso nazionale per riconoscere al richiedente la compensazione per la perdita della sua proprietà aveva danneggiato il pieno godimento del suo diritto alla proprietà (vedere p. 9, § 45 della sentenza principale). Così, nelle circostanze della presente causa, un'assegnazione del risarcimento per la perdita patrimoniale in oggetto sembra essere la soddisfazione equa e più appropriata per il richiedente.
18. In questo contesto, la Corte reitera, che quando la base della violazione trovata vi è la mancanza di qualsiasi risarcimento, piuttosto che l'illegalità inerente della presa il bisogno di risarcimento non riflette necessariamente il pieno valore della proprietà (vedere I.R.S. ed Altri c. Turchia (soddisfazione equa), n. 26338/95, §§ 23-24 31 maggio 2005; Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, §§ 254-259 il 2006-V di ECHR; e Stornaiuolo c. Italia, n. 52980/99, §§ 82-91 dell’8 agosto 2006).
19. In simili casi, nel determinare l'importo del risarcimento adeguato la Corte deve basarsi sul criterio posto nelle sue sentenze riguardo all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e secondo cui, senza pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente riferito al suo valore, la privazione di proprietà normalmente costituirebbe un'interferenza sproporzionata che non può essere considerata giustificabile sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Comunque, la disposizione non garantisce un diritto al pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze poiché degli obiettivi legittimi di “interesse pubblico” possono richiedere un rimborso inferiore al pieno valore di mercato (vedere I Conventi Santi c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 71 Serie A n. 301-A, e Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 94 ECHR 2005-VI).
20. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte nota, che il richiedente chiese TRL 57,977 (circa EUR 29,000), basato su un rapporto di valutazione che era preparato nel 2003, più interesse, per ottenere il valore corrente della proprietà che è stata demolita dalle autorità. In questo collegamento, il Governo fornì un rapporto di rivalutazione che indicava che il valore massimo corrente della proprietà in oggetto era TRL 100,071.87 (circa EUR 50,400) (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra).
21. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte ritiene appropriato fissare un prezzo globale che corrisponderebbe alle aspettative legittime del richiedente di ottenere il risarcimento per il valore approssimato del suo alloggio che è stato demolito dalle autorità. Assegna così EUR 50,000 al richiedente a riguardo del danno patrimoniale.
B. Danno non-patrimoniale
22. Il richiedente chiese TRL 100,000 (circa EUR 46,500) per danno non-patrimoniale per lo stress e l'ansia subiti dalla sua famiglia.
23. Il Governo affermò che la costatazione di violazione era una soddisfazione equa e sufficiente nelle circostanze della causa.
24. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto patire frustrazione e stress riguardo alla natura della violazione. Assegna perciò EUR 2,500 al richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale (vedere Schembri ed Altri c. Malta (soddisfazione equa), n. 42583/06, § 22 del 28 settembre 2010).
C. Costi e spese
25. Il richiedente non presentò qualsiasi rivendicazione a riguardo dei costi e delle spese.
26. Il Governo chiese alla Corte di non fare un'assegnazione, dato l'insuccesso del richiedente nel presentare qualsiasi richeista sotto questo titolo.
27. In assenza di qualsiasi rivendicazione quantificata, la Corte non fa assegnazione sotto questo capo (Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte).
D. Interesse di mora
28. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire in lire turche al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 50,000 (cinquanta mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 2,500 (due mila cinquecento euro ), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, per costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito, più tre punti di percentuale;
2. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 5 aprile 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Françoise Tulkens Cancelliere Presidentessa
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2dell’Ordianemnto di Corte, l'opinione concordante del Giudice Sajó è annessa a questa sentenza.
S.H.N.
F.T.

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE SAJÓ
Nella presente causa, la Corte ritiene appropriato fissare un prezzo globale che corrisponderebbe alle aspettative legittime del richiedente di ottenere il risarcimento per il valore approssimativo del suo alloggio che è stato demolito dalle autorità. Nell'accordare un prezzo globale, la Corte è dell'opinione che il richiedente non ha nessun diritto al pieno risarcimento, siccome la garanzia di un diritto al pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze non si applica necessariamente quando degli obiettivi legittimi di “interesse pubblico” possono richiedere un rimborso inferiore al pieno valore di mercato (vedere I Conventi Santi c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 71 Serie A n. 301-A, e Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 94 ECHR 2005-VI).
Io trovo che le condizioni per applicare il risarcimento sotto il pieno valore di mercato dipendono da considerazioni molto specifiche che dovevano essere costruite attentamente, essendo eccezioni alla norma generale del pieno risarcimento. L'esistenza di circostanze storiche ed uniche è presente nelle cause citate. Non c'è nessuna specifica ragione data per l'approccio preso dalla Corte che accorda il prezzo globale nella prospettiva della giurisprudenza sopra-citata. Il richiedente presentò il rapporto di un esperto datato 2 giugno 2003 che era stato approvato con una sentenza dichiaratoria (tespit davası kararı) dai Magistrati della Corte di Ankara. Il Governo presentò un ricalcolo, aggiornando il rapporto dell'esperto del 2003 presentato dal richiedente. Sotto queste circostanze c'è una base chiara su cui determinare il pieno valore della proprietà al tempo dell'espropriazione, e l'inflazione è stata accuratamente presa in considerazione. È chiaramente per fortuna che il prezzo globale assegnato uguaglia la perdita effettiva; ma è molto sfortunato che l'impressione creata è che l'assegnazione non riflette il pieno valore, o che esistono circostanze speciali nella presente causa tali da permettere di scostarsi dall'assegnazione del pieno risarcimento.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 03/08/2020.