Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BENET PRAHA, SPOL. S R.O. v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, P1-1, P1-2

NUMERO: 33908/04/2011
STATO: Repubblica Ceca
DATA: 24/02/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No violation of P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed ; Non-pecuniary damage - finding of violation sufficient
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF BENET PRAHA, SPOL. S R.O. v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC
(Applications nos. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05, 29402/05 and 33571/06)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
24 February 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of BENet Praha, spol. s r.o. v. the Czech Republic,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Dean Spielmann, President,
Elisabet Fura,
Karel Jungwiert,
Boštjan M. Zupančič,
Ann Power,
Ganna Yudkivska,
Angelika Nußberger, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 February 2011,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in five applications (nos. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05, 29402/05 and 33571/06) against the Czech Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by OMISSIS (“the applicant company”), on 17 September 2004, 1 March 2005, 11 July 2005, 11 August 2005 and 15 August 2006, respectively.
2. The applicant company was represented by Mr P. K., a lawyer practising in Prague. The Czech Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V. A. Schorm, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicant company alleged, in particular, violations of its right to property under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and to a fair trial under Article 6 of the Convention.
4. On 10 September 2007 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the applications to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the applications at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant, OMISSIS., is a limited liability company incorporated under Czech law with its registered seat in Prague.
6. Between 1994 and 1997 the applicant company dealt in ferrous alloys.
7. In April 2001 customs authorities initiated a set of administrative proceedings against the applicant company in order to check the accuracy of the customs debt (concerning customs plus VAT) the company had paid during the aforementioned period of time.
8. Simultaneously, criminal proceedings were instituted against a person, who was a manager (jednatel) of the applicant company during that period of time, on suspicion of tax evasion while he was managing the applicant company. According to the Government the damage caused to the State exceeded 200,000,000 Czech korunas (CZK; 7,770,000 euros (EUR)).
9. Within the framework of the criminal proceedings a search of the applicant company’s premises was carried out on 24 April 2001. Cash in several currencies in the total amount of approximately CZK 20,000,000 (EUR 770,000) and several documents such as financial files, books of accounts and business documents were seized. According to the applicant company these documents and most of the cash have not yet been returned to it.
10. On 25 and 27 April 2001 the prosecuting authorities seized all of the applicant company’s assets deposited on its five bank accounts on the suspicion that they constituted profits from the criminal activities of the former manager. The applicant company’s bank accounts contained at that time funds equivalent to CZK 98,458,516 (EUR 3,786,866). The seizure orders, which were notified to the applicant company on 8 October 2001, did not specify what assets had been seized, nor to what amount. This was remedied on 28 November 2001 by the Prague High Prosecutor (vrchní státní zástupce) who amended the original decisions by writing in the sums to be seized. While doing so, he froze all assets deposited on the applicant company’s accounts on that day, which included payments which had come in after 25 April 2001 and 27 April 2001 respectively. The applicant company’s assets amounting to CZK 101,909,105 (EUR 3,919,580) were thus seized.
11. Simultaneously with the criminal investigation, the customs and tax administrative proceedings resulted in the delivery of numerous payment orders assessing duty payable by the applicant company. With all of its assets frozen, the applicant company requested the prosecuting authorities on a number of occasions to lift the seizure in order to discharge these duties, but only few of these requests were granted. Its appeals did not suspend the effect of those orders payable within thirty days of delivery. Consequently, the company had to take out a loan, among other measures adopted to overcome this situation, and avoid insolvency, as it was obliged to pay under these orders a sum totalling CZK 55,000,000 (EUR 2,115,385).
12. Between 2004 and 2005, upon the applicant company’s appeals, all of the payment orders and other decisions adopted by tax and customs authorities imposing the duties on the applicant company were quashed as unlawful either by superior authorities or administrative courts. The tax proceedings were discontinued and sums paid by the applicant company upon the orders reimbursed accordingly.
13. The former manager has been prosecuted for acts committed in his capacity as the manager of the applicant company and in the context of its business activities. On 4 June 2009 the former manager was acquitted by Prague Municipal Court (městský soud) from some of the charges, and on 30 April 2010 Prague High Court (vrchní soud) upheld that judgment. The investigation concerning other charges is apparently still pending. During the investigation the prosecuting authorities, inter alia, collected over 100,000 pages of documentary evidence, interviewed several hundred witnesses, including homeless persons with unknown whereabouts whose names the accused had allegedly used in sham transactions to evade customs and other duties, and requested legal assistance from the competent authorities of sixteen countries.
Application no. 33908/04
14. In December 2001 the Frýdek-Místek Customs Office (celní úřad) ordered the applicant company to pay customs duties in the amount of CZK 280,672 (EUR 9,955).
15. In May and June 2002 the Prague 4 Customs Office ordered the applicant company to pay customs duties of CZK 3,361,940 (EUR 119,242).
16. On 6 June 2002 the High Prosecutor granted the applicant company’s request for the seizure to be lifted for the sum of CZK 280,672.
17. On 5, 17 and 21 June 2002 respectively, the applicant company requested the High Prosecutor to lift the seizure in order to enable it to pay the customs duties ordered in May and June 2002.
18. On 11 July 2002 the High Prosecutor dismissed its requests, finding that the orders had not yet become final. According to the prosecutor, it was premature to lift the seizure under these circumstances, as such a step might have been contrary to the interests pursued by the prosecuting authorities.
19. The applicant company appealed to the High Court, which dismissed its appeal on 27 August 2002.
20. On 18 November 2002 the applicant company lodged a constitutional appeal (ústavní stížnost) maintaining that the customs authorities, together with the prosecuting authorities, had misused the law to its detriment and consequently had violated Article 4 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms (Listina základních práv a svobod) (hereinafter “the Charter”).
21. In December 2002 the Constitutional Court (Ústavní soud) invited the respondent parties to the proceedings, the High Court and the High Prosecutor, to submit written observations on the applicant’s constitutional appeal pursuant to section 42(4) of the Constitutional Court Act.
22. The High Prosecutor did not submit any observations. The High Court submitted written observations, referring to the reasoning of its impugned decision. It expressed the view that the applicant’s constitutional appeal should be dismissed. This submission was not communicated to the applicant company.
23. The Constitutional Court also requested the Prague High State Prosecutor’s Office to send it the criminal file in the context of which the seizure had been carried out. The Constitutional Court made copies of the relevant documents, which were included in the case file of the Constitutional Court. Subsequently the criminal file was returned to the Prosecutor’s Office on 29 May 2003.
24. On 22 May 2003 the applicant company’s acting manager consulted the case file at the Constitutional Court. The next day he sent a letter to the court with the following text:
“On 22 May 2003, when consulting the case file, I found that it should also include nine files [covering the criminal proceedings] submitted by the Prague High Prosecutor ... [A]bout nine files annexed to the reply of the Prague High Prosecutor submitted upon the Constitutional Court’s invitation of 5 December 2002 were dispatched on 8 January 2003 ... and delivered to the Constitutional Court on 9 January 2003.
At the time of my study of the case file these nine files had been sent somewhere for consultation. ... I kindly ask you to set another date on which consultation of the case file including the aforesaid documentary evidence, will be possible.”
25. In a letter of 29 May 2003 from the Constitutional Court judge, the applicant company’s acting manager was told to make a direct approach to the High Prosecutor’s Office to which the file in question had been returned. The same letter also informed the representative of the applicant company that he was free to inspect the Constitutional Court’s file after arranging a visit to do this with the court’s registry.
26. In a letter of 5 June 2003 the applicant company’s acting manager asked the Constitutional Court judge to remedy the situation and ensure the applicant company had access to those criminal files. The latter replied, on 1 July 2003, that pursuant to section 30(1) of the Constitutional Court Act, a party to the proceedings must be legally represented. He further stated that the criminal case file was not a Constitutional Court file, but subject to the Code of Criminal Procedure, in particular Article 65, which governs access to criminal files.
On 11 March 2004 the Constitutional Court dismissed the applicant company’s constitutional appeal (II. ÚS 708/02). It held in particular:
“As it appears from the decision refusing to lift the seizure of the assets, in the High Prosecutor’s view, to lift it could jeopardise the purpose of the criminal proceedings. ... [The High Court] shared his opinion ... In its written observations, it found that there was no ground justifying the conclusion that the seizure of the [applicant company’s] assets ... was no longer necessary.
In the present case, the Constitutional Court did not consider the conduct of the State authorities a misuse of law to the applicant company’s detriment, contrary to the basic requirements of fairness and of Article 4 of the Charter. The mere fact that the applicant company was not successful in its request cannot be in itself considered as violating its right to a fair trial.”
27. On 18 March 2004 the Constitutional Court dismissed as manifestly ill-founded another applicant company’s constitutional appeal regarding a decision of the High Court to reject another applicant company’s request to partially lift the seizure.
Application no. 7937/05
28. In May and June 2002 the Prague II Customs Office ordered the applicant company to pay customs duties in the amount of CZK 16,527,646 (EUR 584,724).
29. On 20 August 2002 the High Prosecutor dismissed the applicant company’s request of 23 July 2002 for the seizure to be partially lifted in order to enable it to pay this amount.
30. At the applicant company’s request the Customs Office postponed the time-limit for payment of the company’s customs duties until 28 February 2003.
31. On 20 September 2002 the applicant company again requested the High Prosecutor to lift the seizure in order to enable the company to pay the customs duties ordered in May and June 2002. Its request was, however, refused by the prosecutor on 23 October 2002. This decision was approved by the High Court on 11 December 2002.
32. On 10 December 2002 and 10 February 2003, the High Prosecutor partly lifted the seizure covering the sum of CZK 16,527,645. The applicant company then discharged its customs debt. However, as it had not done so in time, the Customs Office ordered it to pay a penalty of CZK 232,423 (EUR 8,223).
33. On 10 October 2002 the High Court dismissed the applicant company’s appeal against the High Prosecutor’s decision of 20 August 2002.
34. On 16 December 2002 the applicant company lodged a constitutional appeal against the High Court’s dismissal.
35. At the invitation of the Constitutional Court the High Court submitted written observations, referring to the reasoning of its impugned decision. It expressed the view that the applicant’s constitutional appeal should be dismissed. This submission was not communicated to the applicant company.
36. The appeal was dismissed as manifestly ill-founded by the Constitutional Court on 24 August 2004 (I. ÚS 723/02).
Application no. 25249/05
37. On 4 November 2002 the Mladá Boleslav Customs Office ordered the applicant company to pay customs duties in the amount of CZK 14,371,989 (EUR 508,460).
38. On 12 and 29 November 2002 and 3 January 2003 respectively the Kladno Customs Office ordered the applicant company to pay customs duties amounting to CZK 1,219,922 (EUR 43,159).
39. On 12 November 2002 and 29 January 2003 the applicant company requested the High Prosecutor to lift the seizure in order to enable the company to pay its customs duties.
40. On 25 March 2003 the High Prosecutor decided not to grant the company’s requests.
41. On 2 July 2003 the High Court dismissed an appeal by the applicant company of 2 April 2003 challenging the High Prosecutor’s refusal to lift the seizure.
42. On 13 October 2003 the applicant company lodged a constitutional appeal alleging a violation of Article 4 of the Charter.
43. Upon the invitation of the Constitutional Court the High Court and the High Prosecutor submitted written observations. They expressed the view that the applicant’s constitutional appeal should be dismissed. These submissions were not communicated to the applicant company.
44. On 15 December 2004 the Constitutional Court dismissed the applicant company’s constitutional appeal as manifestly ill-founded (I. ÚS 538/03).
Application no. 29402/05
45. On 2 June 2003 the High Prosecutor decided not to grant the applicant company’s request of 19 May 2003 to lift the seizure.
46. On 20 August 2003 the High Court, upon the applicant company’s appeal of 9 June 2003, upheld the prosecutor’s refusal.
47. On 11 November 2003 the applicant company introduced a constitutional appeal challenging the aforesaid decisions and alleging, inter alia, that its property rights continued to be limited contrary to the national law.
48. At the invitation of the Constitutional Court, the High Court submitted written observations, referring to the reasoning of its impugned decision. It expressed the view that the applicant’s constitutional appeal should be dismissed. This submission was not communicated to the applicant company.
49. Its appeal was dismissed as unsubstantiated by the Constitutional Court on 9 February 2005 (IV. ÚS 585/03).
Application no. 33571/06
50. On 25 May 2004 the applicant company requested the High Prosecutor to lift the seizure of its assets, maintaining in particular that it had discharged all its customs duties.
51. On 16 December 2004 the prosecutor dismissed the request, holding that there was a reasonable suspicion that the assets represented profit from the criminal activities of the accused manager.
52. On 23 December 2004 the applicant company appealed to the High Court.
53. On 21 February 2005 the High Court accepted in principle that prolonged seizure of assets could constitute a disproportionate interference with property rights, but did not find such a disproportionality in the applicant company’s case and thus rejected its appeal.
54. On 26 July 2005 the applicant company appealed to the Constitutional Court, complaining of excessive length of the seizure of its assets.
55. Upon the invitation of the Constitutional Court, the High Court and the High Prosecutor submitted its written observations. The High Court proposed that the applicant’s constitutional appeal be dismissed. The High Prosecutor informed in detail on several aspects of the criminal proceedings. He also addressed the issue of the length of the seizure by stressing the extent and complexity of the investigation and the need for foreign cooperation. He also proposed to dismiss the appeal. These submissions were communicated to the applicant company in September 2005. The applicant company reacted by sending a letter it had received from the Ministry of Finance which contained an assurance that all money held by the customs authorities would be returned to the applicant company. The letter also contained an apology from the Ministry for problems arising in the complex case of the applicant company.
56. On 13 January 2006 the Constitutional Court again requested the High Prosecutor to inform it about the stage the investigation had reached and when it was expected to be finished. On 20 January 2006 the High Prosecutor submitted to the court a one-paragraph reply saying that almost all the sixteen States from whom assistance had been requested had responded and it was expected that they would send the required materials before April 2006. He further informed the court that he expected to conclude the investigation by mid-2006 and that it was highly likely that all the accused persons would be tried before a court. These submissions were not communicated to the applicant company.
57. On 9 February 2006 the Constitutional Court rejected the appeal as manifestly ill-founded (III. ÚS 394/05). It held that the seizure of the assets was still proportionate in view of the complexity of the investigation and in this context it considered important the assurance of the High Prosecutor that the investigation should be finished that year.
Subsequent developments
58. On 30 January 2008 the Constitutional Court found a violation of the right to property of a company, OMISSIS., which was in the same position as the applicant company. It held that the length of the seizure, over six years, was unreasonable, which thus disrupted the fair balance between the general interest of fighting serious crime and the protection of the rights of the applicant company. Consequently, the applicant company lodged another request for the seizure of its bank accounts to be lifted referring to this decision of the Constitutional Court.
59. On 6 March 2008 the High Prosecutor lifted the seizure of the applicant company’s bank accounts, holding that the conclusions of the Constitutional Court also applied to the applicant company.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
Constitutional Court Act (no. 182/1993)
60. Section 30(1) provides that the applicant must be represented in the proceedings before the Constitutional Court by an attorney.
61. Section 32 provides that parties and joined parties are entitled to comment on a constitutional appeal, to make submissions to the Constitutional Court, to consult a case file (with the exception of records of voting), to make excerpts therefrom and copies thereof, to adduce any evidence, to take part in any oral hearing in the matter, and to assist at any taking of evidence.
62. Under section 48, the Constitutional Court must take all evidence necessary to establish the facts of the case. It decides what evidence submitted by parties should be accepted and may take evidence which has not been adduced by the parties. It may assign a judge to take evidence obtained otherwise than at an oral hearing, or request another court to take such evidence. At its request, courts, public administrative authorities and other State institutions must assist it in its decision-making by procuring documentary evidence. A record must be drawn up of all evidence taken outside an oral hearing, this record being signed by a judge, a clerk and other persons participating in that evidence session. The outcome of the taking of evidence must always be communicated at an oral hearing.
63. Section 49(1) provides that any means which may be instrumental to establish facts of a case may be used in evidence, in particular the testimony of witnesses, expert opinions, reports and statements of State authorities and legal persons, documents, outcomes of inquiries and the testimony of parties.
Code of Criminal Procedure (Act no. 141/1961 as in force at the material time)
64. Pursuant to Article 9, prosecuting authorities shall assess preliminary issues arising in course of proceedings; should a final and binding decision on such an issue have already been adopted by a court or another state authority, prosecuting authorities shall be bound by it unless it concerns an issue of the guilt of the accused.
65. Article 42 provides for the rights of a concerned person. It states that anyone whose property has been seized or is liable to be seized following an application for seizure must be provided with an opportunity to comment on the given case, may attend a hearing, raise its own requests, consult the case file within the meaning of Article 65, and lodge appeals as provided for by this law.
66. Article 65 concerns access to files. The first paragraph provides, inter alia, that the accused, injured and intervening parties, their counsel and guardians shall have the right of access to files except for records and those sections of records containing personal data of anonymous witnesses, to make excerpts and notes therefrom, and to have duplicates of the files and the parts thereof made at their own expense. Other persons may do so with the authorisation of a president of a chamber and a prosecutor, or with police authority at the pre-trial stage of proceedings if it is necessary for the exercise of their rights.
67. Article 79a § 1 provides for a seizure of financial instruments deposited on a bank account. If the given facts indicate that the financial instruments on a bank account are intended for the commission of a crime, or have already been used for such a purpose, or constitute profits from criminal activities, a president of a chamber and a prosecutor, or the police authority at the pre-trial stage of criminal proceedings, are empowered to seize them.
68. Pursuant to Article 79a § 3, the State authority listed in paragraph 1 lifts or reduces the seizure if such a measure is no longer necessary, or it is not necessary to maintain it at the given amount. A decision within the meaning of the previous sentence by police is subject to prior approval by a prosecutor.
69. Under Article 79a § 4 the owner of a bank account whose assets are seized, has the right to request that the seizure be lifted or reduced. A prosecutor has to decide on such a request without delay.
70. Article 79a § 5 provides that decisions adopted pursuant to paragraphs 1, 3 and 4 may be appealed by a complaint.
71. According to Article 145 § 2 a complainant may rely on new facts and evidence.
72. Pursuant to Article 149 § 4, if a decision is erroneous due to the fact that a part of its operative section is missing, an appellate authority is empowered either to amend the impugned decision, remit the case to the authority of first instance whose decision is challenged, for it to decide on the missing part of the decision or to amend it.
Code of Administrative Proceedings on Taxes and Other Fees (No. 337/1992)
73. Article 48 § 12 provides that an appeal shall not suspend the entry into force of a decision adopted in administrative proceedings on tax and other fees unless a special law provides otherwise.
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF APPLICATIONS
74. The Court notes that the subject matter of the applications nos. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05, 29402/05 and 33571/06 is identical and they were submitted by the same applicant company. It is therefore appropriate to join the cases, in application of Rule 42 of the Rules of Court.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
75. The applicant company complained that the seizure of its bank accounts, its business documents and cash had infringed its property rights, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which states:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
76. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
(a) Seizure of the business documents and cash
77. The Court notes that the domestic proceedings which are part of the present applications and which also gave rise to the impugned decisions of the Constitutional Court concerned solely the seizure of the applicant company’s bank accounts. Regarding the seizure of the business documents and cash the applicant company did not pursue all the remedies that were available to it, in particular it did not bring this complaint before the Constitutional Court. It follows that this part of the applications is inadmissible for non-exhaustion of all domestic remedies within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention and must be declared inadmissible pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
(b) Seizure of the bank accounts
78. The Government submitted that the complaint was premature since at the time of lodging it there was a constitutional appeal of the applicant company regarding the seizure pending before the Constitutional Court.
79. The applicant company disputed this argument.
80. The Court reiterates that the only remedies which an applicant is required to exhaust are those that relate to the breaches alleged and which are at the same time available and sufficient. The existence of such remedies must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but also in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness. Moreover, an applicant who has availed himself of a remedy that is apparently effective and sufficient cannot be required also to have tried others that were available but probably no more likely to be successful (see T.W. v. Malta [GC], no. 25644/94, § 34, 29 April 1999).
81. The Court notes that as regards the seizure and its length up to 9 February 2006, the date of the last impugned decision of the Constitutional Court in the present applications, the applicant company pursued the natural remedies in respect of a seizure, namely, it asked for the seizure to be lifted, and pursued the subsequent refusals through the courts, in accordance with the rules of domestic law, up to the Constitutional Court. To that extent, the applicant company has exhausted domestic remedies (see Benet Czech, spol. s r.o. v. the Czech Republic, no. 31555/05, § 25, 21 October 2010). As regards the continuing seizure beyond that date, the Court notes that the applicant company again requested the prosecutor to lift the seizure, and again pursued refusals through the courts. The applicant company’s complaints in respect of that period have been registered under application no. 38354/06, and do not fall to be considered in the present applications.
82. The Court therefore rejects the Government’s contention that the applicant company has not exhausted domestic remedies.
2. The six-month rule
83. The Government submitted that applications nos. 33908/04 and 7937/05 were submitted out of time. The applicant company disputed this argument.
84. Regarding the application no. 33908/04 the Court observes that this application contains complaints against two Constitutional Court decisions, handed down on 11 March and 18 March 2004 respectively. The former was delivered to the applicant company’s lawyer on 19 March 2004, the latter on 24 March 2004. The application form containing complaints regarding the former decision was submitted to the Court by fax on 17 September 2004 and sent by regular mail on 20 September 2004. The application form containing complaints regarding the latter decision was submitted by fax on 23 September 2004 and subsequently sent by regular mail, which the Court received on 27 September 2004.
85. The Court reiterates that the running of the six-month time-limit imposed by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is, as a general rule, interrupted by the first letter from the applicants indicating an intention to lodge an application and giving some indication of the nature of the complaints made. The first letter can be sent by means of a fax provided that the original is then submitted by post (for example, Manitaras and Others v. Turkey (dec.), no. 54591/00, § 35, 3 June 2008). The date of the submissions by fax must thus must be considered the date of introduction. Consequently, the applicant company complied with the six-month time-limit.
86. Regarding application no. 7937/05 the Court observes that the Constitutional Court decision of 24 August 2004 was delivered to the applicant company’s lawyer on 2 September 2004. The application was submitted by fax on 1 March 2005. Subsequently, the Court received the original application form sent by regular post on 2 March 2005. The Court thus concludes that this application was also submitted within the six-month time-limit.
87. The Court notes that the complaints relating to the seizure of the bank accounts under Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 in all five applications are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3(a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
88. The applicant company claimed in the present applications that the seizure of its assets deposited in its bank accounts had lasted an unreasonably long time, that there had been unreasonable delays in the investigation by the authorities and that the authorities had not presented any evidence justifying the seizure.
89. The Government accepted that there had been an interference with the applicant company’s property rights but maintained that it was necessary for an efficient fight against organised crime and was proportionate to that aim. The Government referred particularly to the opportunity the applicant company had at any time to make requests to the authorities and courts for the seizure to be terminated, and maintained that the length of the seizure had been necessitated by the complexity and extensiveness of the investigation.
90. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which guarantees in substance the right to property, comprises three distinct rules. The first, which is expressed in the first sentence of the first paragraph and is of a general nature, lays down the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property. The second rule, in the second sentence of the same paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and makes it subject to certain conditions. The third, contained in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, among other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules, which are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property, must be construed in the light of the general principle laid down in the first rule (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 44, ECHR 1999-V).
91. The applicant company did not specify which rule should be used. The Government maintained that the seizure was justified under the third rule.
92. The Court notes that the seizure had the effect that the applicant company could not dispose of the relevant parts of its bank accounts. Consequently, the Court agrees with the Government that the seizure constituted control of the use of property and that paragraph 2 of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable (see Atanasov and Ovcharov v. Bulgaria, no. 61596/00, § 74, 17 January 2008).
93. The Court reiterates that any control of the use of property by a public authority should be lawful (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
94. The applicant company disputed the legality of the seizure, arguing that Czech law allowed the prosecuting authorities to seize only specified amounts of funds and thus the seizure orders of 25 April 2001 and 27 April 2001 were unlawful. The Government contested that argument, arguing that the original deficiency of the seizure orders had been remedied by the High Prosecutor on 28 November 2001, who was allowed to do so under Article 149 § 4 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. The applicant company replied that the High Prosecutor could have used this method to seize only the funds on the accounts on 25 and 27 April 2001 respectively, and regarding the funds which had come in later, the prosecutor had been obliged to issue a new decision.
95. Firstly, the Court notes that it is not called upon to examine the legality of the seizure before 28 November 2001, because the current applications arise from events which happened after this date.
96. The Court observes that by virtue of Article 149 § 4 of the Code of Criminal Procedure the High Prosecutor was clearly entitled to remedy any deficiency of the original seizure order. The seizure of the bank accounts as they stood on 25 and 27 April 2001 was thus clearly in accordance with the law from 28 November 2001 at the latest. The question remains if the prosecutor, making its decision on 28 November 2001, was also entitled under Czech law to seize the additional funds that came in between 25 April and 28 November 2001.
97. In this context, the Court reiterates that it has limited power to review compliance with domestic law, and it examines only whether it was applied manifestly erroneously or so as to reach arbitrary conclusions (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 108, ECHR 2000-I).
98. The Court firstly observes that under Article 79a of the Code of Criminal Procedure a prosecutor was empowered to seize assets at the pre-trial stage of criminal proceedings. Further, an appellate authority, in this case a superior prosecutor, decides on an appeal on the basis of the facts at the time of its decision, which means including new developments since the time of the challenged decision, and it has a full power of review. Under these circumstances the Court considers that the fact that the prosecutor did not issue a separate decision regarding the funds that came in between 25 April and 28 November 2001 but chose to amend the original seizure order by writing in the sums as they were on the date of its decision does not make that decision an arbitrary or manifestly erroneous application of domestic law. The Court is thus unable to conclude that the seizure of the applicant company’s assets after 28 November 2001, that is the date when the Prague High Prosecutor amended the original seizure decisions, was contrary to the law.
99. It further observes that any interference with property rights must pursue a legitimate aim in the general interest (see Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 48). The impugned measure was taken in the context of a criminal investigation, on the suspicion that the assets constituted profits from the criminal activities of the accused manager. The purpose of fighting crime undoubtedly falls within the general interest as envisaged in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Denisova and Moiseyeva v. Russia, no. 16903/03, § 58, 1 April 2010).
100. Lastly, the Court reiterates that an interference must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 as a whole, and therefore also in its second paragraph. There must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim pursued. In determining whether this requirement is met, the Court recognises that the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of enforcement and to ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question (see, for example, Immobiliare Saffi, cited above; Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 1), 25 October 1989, § 55, Series A no. 163; and AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, § 52, Series A no. 108).
101. In cases where there is a wide margin of appreciation the Court will respect the State authorities’ judgment as to what is in the general interest, unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 49, and Antonopoulou and Others v. Greece, no. 49000/06, § 57, 16 April 2009), or unless it is devoid of reasonable foundation (see “Bulves” AD v. Bulgaria, no. 3991/03, § 63, 22 January 2009, and National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society v. the United Kingdom, 23 October 1997, § 80, Reports 1997-VII).
102. The applicant company maintained that the seizure of its bank accounts was disproportionate because of its unreasonable duration.
103. The Government maintained that the interference was necessary as there was a reasonable suspicion that the assets originated in criminal activities of the former manager of the applicant company and that it was proportionate even considering its length due to the importance of the general interest at stake and the very complex and extensive nature of the crime that had to be investigated. The Government further argued that a violation should be found only where the procedure was manifestly arbitrary or the duration of the seizure manifestly unreasonable.
104. The Court notes that the interference had an origin in a measure taken by the prosecuting authorities in the context of investigating a serious crime in the area of customs duty and tax evasion involving millions of euros. The crux of the interference concerns the continuing assessment of a reasonable suspicion that the seized funds originated in criminal activities. The national authorities are clearly in a better position than the Court to evaluate these issues, because they have direct access to the available evidence, which in the present case included thousands of pages of documentary evidence, hundreds of witnesses and transactions of several companies including foreign and offshore companies. Faced with such a complex investigation it is up to the national authorities in the first place to decide whether, and if so what, further investigatory measures are necessary in order to effectively fight this type of serious and carefully premeditated crime.
105. Thus, the Court considers that the above-mentioned principles in its case-law are fully applicable to the present case. The State should in the present circumstances enjoy a wide margin of appreciation and the Court must respect its judgment as to what is necessary in the general interest unless that judgment is manifestly unreasonable. Consequently, it is not the Court’s task to conduct anew a full analysis of whether the interference was proportionate, considering that the national authorities, especially the Constitutional Court itself, performed an analysis of proportionality. The nature and scope of the Court’s supervision, mindful of its subsidiary role, is thus to assess whether the interference with the applicant company’s property rights was manifestly unreasonable (see Benet Czech, spol. s r.o. v. the Czech Republic, no. 31555/05, § 40, 21 October 2010).
106. The Court notes in this regard that the accused was at the material time an acting manager of the applicant company and that the suspected crime happened in the context of its business activities. It was not thus prima facie unreasonable for the prosecutor to assume that the bank accounts of the applicant company would have contained funds from these activities, even in 2001. The Government argued that the investigation so far had led to a conclusion that the accused used the applicant company’s bank accounts to save the funds generated by his criminal activities. In view of the submissions of the parties, the Court has no reason to hold that the prosecuting authorities’ suspicion about the origin of the seized funds was manifestly unreasonable.
107. The applicant company argued that once the customs authorities had ascertained that the applicant company had no customs or tax debt there had been no reason to continue the seizure. The Court, however, notes that the decisions on the seizure made clear that the funds had been seized on the suspicion that they came from the criminal activities of the former manager and other persons and not to secure payment of any custom or tax debt by the applicant company. Consequently, the seizure was made in the context of criminal proceedings and it was only in these proceedings that the continuing justification of the seizure should have been maintained. Any decision of administrative authorities concerning a debt of the applicant company was thus not directly relevant to the issue whether the funds originated in criminal activities of the applicant company’s former manager, and in any case those decisions were not binding on the prosecuting authorities. The Court thus considers that the decisions of the administrative authorities could not have made the seizure ipso facto unjustified.
108. However, a reasonable suspicion at the beginning of the investigation cannot justify an indefinite interference with the applicant company’s rights. The Court agrees with the applicant company that the ensuing investigation must be sufficiently diligent and speedy, so that the interference lasts only a limited time. Thus it is the Court’s task to evaluate whether in view of the conduct of the prosecuting authorities the length of the seizure, namely four years and nine and a half months (see paragraph 81 above), was manifestly unreasonable.
109. The Court notes that the Government referred to several objective factors that complicated the investigation. According to the Government it was first of all the nature and extent of the alleged crime, covering a total of 809 transactions involving the import of ferrous alloys into the Czech Republic. The Government further referred to the amount of evidence that the prosecuting authorities had to collect and evaluate, in particular over 100,000 pages of documentary evidence, including several hundred purchase agreements, and the need to examine several hundred witnesses, including persons of unknown whereabouts. Moreover, the alleged criminal activities had been conducted using over a dozen companies, some of which were foreign and offshore, and the police had requested legal assistance from the competent authorities of sixteen countries.
110. The applicant company maintained that the prosecuting authorities had not shown a maximum diligence in their investigation which was full of unnecessary delays and argued that some of the above-mentioned evidence-taking, including interviewing homeless persons, was unnecessary and irrelevant to the charges of the accused manager.
111. The Court reiterates (see paragraph 105 above) that it is not its role to evaluate whether the Czech prosecuting authorities conducted the investigation with maximum possible diligence, but only to assess whether the length of the investigation was so unreasonable as not to be compatible with Article 1 of Protocol no. 1. Similarly it is not its task to assess whether some of the evidence-gathering by the national authorities was irrelevant to the case, unless the irrelevance was manifest.
112. In this regard the Court is satisfied that the extent of the investigation was indeed considerable. As the above information suggests, the prosecuting authorities were faced with an alleged crime that was highly sophisticated and extensive. It was suspected that the alleged perpetrators used an international network of numerous companies in several countries to conduct their financial operations and cover their crimes. The Court notes that faced with this level of complexity the prosecuting authorities, far from remaining passive, actually collected extensive evidence, heard dozens of witnesses and contacted many countries with requests for assistance in the matter.
113. The Court is unable to reach the conclusion that interviewing the homeless persons was manifestly irrelevant to the case. The Government argued that the accused paid them to conclude fictitious sale agreements. The Court accepts that the prosecuting authorities could have reasonably assumed that the statements thus obtained were important to prove the guilt of the accused.
114. The Court is of the same opinion regarding the applicant company’s argument that it should have been enough for the prosecuting authorities to review the financial documents of the applicant company in order to determine whether the seized funds originated in criminal activities. The Court reiterates that it is primarily for the national authorities to choose the best way of conducting a criminal investigation. As pointed out by the Government, the amount of documentary evidence to be assessed was vast. Moreover, the Government maintained that the crux of the alleged criminal activities lay in falsifying accounting and customs documents, and thus it was necessary first to check the authenticity and validity of all the seized documents and the data included therein.
115. The Court further notes that at any given time the applicant company had available to it an effective remedy, which included access to courts, by which it could challenge the continuing seizure of its bank accounts. Thus the present case is materially different from such cases as Immobiliare Saffi or Denisova and Moiseyeva, where the Court found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on the ground, inter alia, that the applicants did not have access to an effective remedy regarding the interference with their property rights (see Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 56 and Denisova and Moiseyeva, cited above, § 64).
116. Thus, in view of the complexity and extent of the investigation and the fact that the alleged crime should have been committed in the context of the business activities of the applicant company, the Court does not consider that the length of the investigation into the former manager of the applicant company, and thus the seizure of the applicant company’s assets until 9 February 2006, was manifestly unreasonable. For the same reasons the judgment of the Constitutional Court of 9 February 2006 that the interference was still proportionate cannot be held to be manifestly unreasonable.
117. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
118. The applicant company complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention that (i) in the proceedings before the Constitutional Court, it had been denied access to certain documentary evidence in the case file, (ii) the length of the seizure was excessive, (iii) the Constitutional Court had wrongly assessed the company’s constitutional appeals and (iv) the Constitutional Court had not communicated to it the observations of the other parties. The relevant part of Article 6 states:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
119. The Government contested those arguments.
A. Admissibility
1. Denial of access to certain documentary evidence in the case file of the Constitutional Court
120. The applicant company complained that it had not been allowed access to the criminal files that the Constitutional Court had requested in the proceedings that resulted in its 11 March 2004 decision (II. ÚS 708/02) and that it had been told that only its legal representative could consult the file at the Constitutional Court.
121. The Government argued that the applicant company’s manager had consulted the case file on 22 May 2003. Moreover, the applicant company had misinterpreted the Constitutional Court’s reference in its 1 July 2003 letter of the Constitutional Court that only its lawyer would have been allowed to inspect the file, there being only the general reference to the compulsory legal representation before the Constitutional Court. The Government further argued that the criminal file did not consist of observations of the parties to the proceedings, and the criminal file had never become part of the Constitutional Court’s case file. The documents which the court had copied had been freely available for the applicant company to consult directly at the Constitutional Court; only these documents had been quoted in the factual part of the decision. The Government added that in any case the applicant company could have consulted the rest of the criminal file held by the prosecuting authorities under the rules of the Code of Criminal Procedure.
122. The Court reiterates that the right to an adversarial trial means in principle the opportunity for the parties to a criminal or civil trial to have knowledge of and comment on all evidence adduced or observations submitted, even by an independent member of the national legal service, with a view to influencing the court’s decision (see Vermeulen v. Belgium, 20 February 1996, § 33, Reports 1996-I).
123. The Court notes that only certain parts of the criminal file were included in the Constitutional Court’s file and later mentioned in its decision. The decision of the Constitutional Court did not contain any reference to and was not based on those other parts of the criminal file, which were returned to the High Prosecutor.
124. Regarding those documents that the Constitutional Court copied and relied on in its decision, the Court firstly observes that they did not have the nature of observations constituting reasoned opinion on the merits of the applicants’ constitutional appeal and neither did they manifestly aim to influence the decision of the Constitutional Court by calling for the appeal to be dismissed (see, a contrario, Milatová and Others v. the Czech Republic, no. 61811/00, § 65, ECHR 2005-V). They were objective pieces of evidence, requested by the Constitutional Court itself, constituting the facts of the case and decisions of the authorities containing reasons why the applicant company’s assets were seized and why its requests for termination of the seizure were rejected.
125. The Court notes that the applicant company must have been aware of these decisions and possessed them because they directly concerned the seizure of the applicant company’s assets. There is thus no issue that it would not be informed of these documents or would have no knowledge of them (see, a contrario, Nideröst-Huber v. Switzerland, 18 February 1997, § 31, Reports 1997-I). Further, it is obvious from the Constitutional Court’s letter of 29 May 2003 that the applicant company was free to inspect the Constitutional Court’s case file, including these documents, at any time after arranging a visit with the court registry. Moreover the Court agrees with the Government that the reference by the Constitutional Court to compulsory legal representation did not in any way imply that only the applicant company’s lawyer would be allowed to consult the case file.
126. In view of these considerations, the Court concludes that there is no appearance of a violation of the applicant company’s right to a fair trial by the Constitutional Court in this respect. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 3(a) of the Convention.
2. The length of the seizure
127. The Court considered this issue under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Having regard to the conclusion above the Court considers that no separate issue arises under Article 6 of the Convention.
3. Fairness of the proceedings before the Constitutional Court
128. The applicant company maintained that the Constitutional Court had wrongly assessed the company’s constitutional appeals. The Court reiterates that it is not its function to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by a national court unless and in so far as they may have infringed rights and freedoms protected by the Convention (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 28, ECHR 1999-I). The decisions of the Constitutional Court do not appear arbitrary or manifestly unreasonable.
129. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 3(a) of the Convention.
4. Non-communication of the observations of the other parties by the Constitutional Court to the applicant company
130. The Court reiterates that the running of the six-month time-limit under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is, as a general rule, interrupted by the first letter from the applicant indicating an intention to lodge an application and giving some indication of the nature of the complaints made. As regards complaints not included in the initial application, the running of the six-month time-limit is not interrupted until the date when the complaint is first submitted to a Convention organ. The mere fact that the applicant had relied on Article 6 is not sufficient to constitute introduction of all subsequent complaints made under that provision (see Allan v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 48539/99, 28 August 2001).
131. In the present case, the pertinent part of the first application form from 16 September 2004 (application no. 33908/04), where the applicant company set out for the first time its complaints, reads: “The applicant company further complains of a violation of its right to a fair trial under Article 6 of the Convention also in the proceedings before the Constitutional Court, because it was denied access to the file that the Constitutional Court had itself requested from the High Prosecutor”. Given that there were no submissions by the High Prosecutor in that case before the Constitutional Court, this complaint clearly referred only to the alleged denial of access to the criminal file that the Constitutional Court had requested from the High Prosecutor (see paragraph 120 above). This text was reproduced verbatim in the subsequent application forms (applications nos. 7937/05, 25249/05 and 29402/05) with an additional reference to the first proceedings before the Constitutional Court (II. ÚS 708/02) and thus clearly referring to the alleged denial of access to the criminal file. In view of these wordings of its complaints, the Court finds that these submissions cannot qualify as a succinct statement, as required by Rule 47 §1(e) of the Rules of Court (see Eule v. Germany (dec.), no. 781/06, ECHR 10 March 2009), of an alleged violation of the applicant’s right to a fair trial on the account of non-communication of the submissions of the opposing parties. The original complaints, submitted to the Court within the six-month time-limit, thus do not contain any reference, express or implied, to the alleged fact that the Constitutional Court had failed to communicate observations of the other parties to the applicant company.
132. The Court notes that the applicant company in its submissions of 22 March 2010 purported to argue that the present complaint was only an elaboration of the complaint raised in the original application forms. The Court reiterates that if the new complaint could be considered as a particular aspect of any of the initial complaints it would have been considered to have been introduced in time (see Paroisse Greco Catholique Sâmbata Bihor v. Romania (dec.), no. 48107/99, 25 May 2004). In view of the above, the Court, however, considers that this was an entirely distinct and separate complaint from those included in the original applications.
133. Consequently, the Court finds that this complaint in applications nos. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05 and 29402/05 has been introduced out of time and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
134. On the contrary the application no. 33571/06 unequivocally contained a complaint that the Constitutional Court failed to communicate to the applicant company the submissions of the High Prosecutor of 20 January 2006. This complaint has thus been introduced in time.
135. The Court will first distinguish this complaint from Holub v. Czech Republic (dec.) no. 24880/05, 14 December 2010, where a similar complaint was declared inadmissible because the applicant had not suffered a significant disadvantage within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention. In the present case, the submissions of the High Prosecutor contained new information not included in its impugned decision. Moreover, the Constitutional Court expressly relied on this submission in its reasoning. In these circumstances, the Court cannot conclude that the applicant has not suffered a “significant disadvantage” in exercising its right to adversarial proceedings before the Constitutional Court.
136. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3(a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
137. The applicant company complained in application no. 33571/06 that the Constitutional Court had violated its right to a fair trial by failing to communicate to it the submissions of the High Prosecutor of 20 January 2006, which the court itself requested and which were crucial for its decision. It opined that the information submitted by the High Prosecutor had been untrue and that it had been obvious to all authorities that the investigation could not have finished in mid-2006.
138. The Government contested that argument and maintained that the interpretation by the Court of the right to adversarial proceedings before the highest domestic courts has been in some cases too formalistic and that the Court should rather confirm the more flexible position adopted in Verdú Verdú v. Spain, no. 43432/02, 15 February 2007. They further argued that an overly strict and formalistic rule requiring the communication of all observations would have negative effect on the practical functioning of the highest courts, such as the Czech Constitutional Court. They added that the nature of the 20 January 2006 observations of the High Prosecutor was such that the information in it was not and could not have been contentious between the parties, so that the applicant company was not in a position reasonably to challenge this information.
139. The Court reiterates its established case-law that the concept of a fair hearing also implies the right to adversarial proceedings, according to which the parties must have the opportunity not only to make known any evidence needed for their claims to succeed, but also to have knowledge of, and comment on, all evidence adduced or observations submitted, with a view to influencing a court’s decision (see Krčmář and Others v. the Czech Republic, no. 35376/97, § 40, 3 March 2000). What is particularly at stake here is litigants’ confidence in the workings of justice, which is based on, inter alia, the knowledge that they have had the opportunity to express their views on every document in the file (see Nideröst-Huber, cited above, § 29).
140. The Court notes that in Verdú Verdú, cited above, it seemed to adopt a less strict approach by examining whether the applicant’s response could have had any influence on the impugned decision (§§ 27-28). The Court, however, firstly takes note of the special circumstances of that case and the explicit reference to those special circumstances in that case (see Verdú Verdú, cited above, § 28). It further observes that in its subsequent decisions it has confirmed its established case-law mentioned above (see, for example, Felicinao Bichão v. Portugal, no. 40225/04, 20 November 2007; Vokoun v. the Czech Republic, no. 20728/05, § 29, 3 July 2008; and Salduz v. Turkey [GC], no. 36391/02, § 67, 27 November 2008).
141. The Court cannot accept the Government’s contention that too strict an interpretation of the rule could contravene the principle of procedural economy and that it would place a disproportionate burden on the functioning of the Constitutional Court. In this particular context all that the right to adversarial proceedings requires is for the parties to have the opportunity to have knowledge of and comment on all observations submitted, with a view to influencing the court’s decision. In practice it is just a matter of forwarding the observations of one party to the other party and setting a deadline for possible comments. This is a straightforward administrative act which will prolong the proceedings for several weeks at most. In this context the Court reiterates that the obligation to complete a trial within a reasonable time cannot be interpreted in such a way as would violate other procedural rights under Article 6 of the Convention.
142. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court firstly notes that the observations in question contained information on the length of the investigation and therefore related directly to the grounds of the appeal, namely the proportionality of the seizure of the applicant company’s assets. The information submitted by the High Prosecutor aimed to influence the decision of the Constitutional Court by giving it assurances of speedy conclusion of the investigation and thus in effect the length of the seizure of the assets, which was a decisive element in the proportionality analysis. The Constitutional Court explicitly considered the assurance of the High Prosecutor important for its decision. Thus, having regard to the nature of the issues to be decided by the Constitutional Court, it can be seen that the applicants had a legitimate interest in receiving a copy of the observations of the High Prosecutor.
143. This piece of information was not, in view of the Court, an undisputable fact that the applicant company could not have challenged. On the contrary this was a prediction made by the High Prosecutor and predictions by their very nature are contestable. It is not for the Court to speculate whether the applicant company possessed any information or evidence that could convincingly refute that prediction and eventually persuade the Constitutional Court. The applicant company should however have had the opportunity to voice its arguments why such a prediction was in its view unreasonable.
144. The Government further contended that the applicant company had not responded to the previous observations of the High Prosecutor which were forwarded to it in September 2005 and thus it was hard to understand why it would have any valid reasons to comment on the subsequent observations including roughly the same information. The Court however observes that the September 2005 observations did not contain the information about the predicted time of conclusion of the investigation. Moreover the applicant company did not remain completely passive in respect of those observations but in response submitted a letter from the Ministry of Finance. Thus it can not be inferred that the applicant company wished to waive its right to be informed about the submissions of the other parties to the proceedings before the Constitutional Court.
145. Lastly the Government pointed to the brief, one-page length of the observations. The Court however considers that the length of the opinion itself is immaterial in this context (see Nideröst-Huber, cited above, § 26).
146. The Court finds therefore that, in the present case, respect for the right to a fair hearing, as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1, required that the applicant company be given the opportunity to comment on the documentary evidence produced at the request of the Constitutional Court by the High Prosecutor on 20 January 2006. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
147. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
148. In respect of pecuniary damage the applicant company claimed CZK 32,968,038.85, 67,004.85 United States dollars (USD), EUR 124,274.99, 6,821.69 pounds sterling (GBP), and 170,425.61 Slovakian korunas (SKK) in interest on late payments and CZK 38,740,000 as loss of profit. As to non-pecuniary damage, the applicant company claimed CZK 50,000,000 altogether for damage to goodwill, loss of market, business contacts and employees.
149. The Government maintained that there was no causal link between the damage claimed and alleged violations of the Convention and that finding a violation would constitute sufficient just satisfaction for any non-pecuniary damage the applicants might have sustained.
150. The Court notes that there is clearly no causal link between the violation of the Convention found and the applicant company’s claims in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. In particular, it is not for the Court to speculate as to what the outcome of the proceedings before the Constitutional Court would have been if they had been in conformity with the requirements of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see Milatová and Others v. the Czech Republic, no. 61811/00, § 70, ECHR 2005-V).
151. Accordingly, the Court dismisses the claim for pecuniary damage and considers that the finding of a violation constitutes sufficient just satisfaction for any non-pecuniary damage the applicants may have sustained regarding the found violation.
B. Costs and expenses
152. The applicant company also claimed CZK 39,661,843.42 for costs and expenses. The applicant company did not break down the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and those incurred before the Court. In the submitted documents the costs incurred before the Court specifically linked with the application no. 33571/06 constitute CZK 30,257.70 in legal services and postal charges incurred before end of 2007.
153. The Government maintained that a large proportion of items claimed by the applicant company could not be considered to have been necessarily and reasonably incurred in connection with the alleged violations of the Convention, and that the amount of legal services seemed excessive. The Government considered that the Court should award only a reasonable sum under this head.
154. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case regarding the costs claimed concerning the domestic proceedings, the Court holds that these costs were not incurred to prevent or rectify the Convention violation found. It accordingly dismisses this claim. Considering that the applicant company incurred further costs in the present application after end of 2007, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 1,500 to cover costs for the proceedings before the Court.
C. Default interest
155. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join the applications;
2. Declares the complaints concerning the seizure of the applicant company’s bank accounts admissible and the remainder of complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 inadmissible;
3. Declares the complaint concerning the right to adversarial proceedings before the Constitutional Court in the application no. 33571/06 admissible and the remainder of the complaints under Article 6 inadmissible;
4. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention in the application no. 33571/06;
6. Holds that the finding of a violation constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction for the non-pecuniary damage sustained by the applicant company;
7. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant company, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 1,500 (one thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of costs and expenses, to be converted into Czech korunas at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
8. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 24 February 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Dean Spielmann Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione di P1-1; Violazione del’’ Art. 6-1; danno patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta; danno Non- patrimoniale - costatazione di violazione sufficiente
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA BENET PRAHA, SPOL. S R.O. C. REPUBBLICA CECA
(Richieste N. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05 29402/05 e 33571/06)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
24 febbraio 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa BENet Praha, spol. s r.o. c. Repubblica ceca,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Dean Spielmann, Presidente, Elisabet Fura, Karel Jungwiert, Boštjan M. Zupančič, l'Ann Power, Ganna Yudkivska, Angelika Nußberger, giudici,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancellier di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 1 febbraio 2011,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da cinque richieste (N. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05 29402/05 e 33571/06) contro la Repubblica ceca depositate presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da OMISSIS (“la società richiedente”), rispettivamente il 17 settembre 2004, il 1 marzo 2005, l’11 luglio 2005, l’11 agosto 2005 e il 15 agosto 2006.
2. La società richiedentefu rappresentata dal Sig. P. K., un avvocato che pratica a Praga. Il Governo ceco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. V. A. Schorm, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. La società richiedente addusse, in particolare, violazioni del suo diritto alla proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ed ad un processo equanime sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
4. Il 10 settembre 2007 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso delle richieste al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente, OMISSIS., è una società a responsabilità limitata incorporata sotto legge ceca con sede registrato a Praga.
6. Fra il 1994 ed il 1997 la società richiedente trattava leghe ferrose.
7. Nell’ aprile 2001 le autorità doganali iniziarono un set di procedimenti amministrativi contro la società richiedente per controllare l'accuratezza del debito delle dogane (riguardo alle dogane più IVA) che la società aveva pagato durante il periodo di tempo summenzionato.
8. Simultaneamente, dei procedimenti penali furono avviati contro una persona che era un direttore (jednatel) della società richiedente durante quel periodo di tempo, sul sospetto di evasione fiscale mentre lui stava gestendo la società richiedente. Secondo il Governo il danno causato allo Stato superava i 200,000,000 koruna cechi (CZK; 7,770,000 euro (EUR)).
9. All'interno della struttura dei procedimenti penali una perquisizione dei locali della società richiedente fu eseguita il 24 aprile 2001. Contanti in molte valute nell'importo totale di circa CZK 20,000,000 (EUR 770,000) e molti documenti come archivi finanziari, libri contabili e documenti commerciali furono sequestrati. Secondo la società richiedente questi documenti e la maggior parte dei soldi non le sono ancora stati restituiti.
10. Il 25 e il 27 aprile 2001 le autorità perseguenti presero tutti gli asset della società richiedente depositati sui suoi cinque conti bancari sul sospetto che loro costituivano dei profitti da attività penali del precedente direttore. I conti bancari della società richiedente contenevano a quel tempo dei fondi equivalenti a CZK 98,458,516 (EUR 3,786,866). L’ordine di confisca che fu notificato alla società richiedente l’8 ottobre 2001 non specificava quali beni erano stati sequestrati, né in quale importo. Questo fu rimediato il 28 novembre 2001 dall’ Alto Procuratore di Praga (zástupce státní vrchní) che corresse le decisioni originali scrivendo le somme da sequestrare. Facendo così, lui congelò tutti i beni depositati sui conti della società richiedente in quel giorno, che includevano i pagamenti che erano stati fatti rispettivamente dopo il 25 aprile 2001 e il 27 aprile 2001. Gli asset della società richiedente corrispondenti a CZK 101,909,105 (EUR 3,919,580) furono così sequestrato.
11. Simultaneamente con l'indagine penale, i procedimenti amministrativi doganali e fiscali diedero luogo alla consegna di numerosi ordini di pagamento che valutano il dovuto pagabile da parte della società richiedente. Con tutti i suoi asset congelati, la società richiedente richiese alle autorità perseguenti in numerose occasioni di togliere la confisca per assolvere questi doveri, ma solamente poche di queste richieste furono accolte. I suoi ricorsi non sospesero l'effetto di quegli ordini pagabili entro trenta giorni dalla consegna. La società ha dovuto di conseguenza, fare un prestito, fra le altre misure adottate per superare questa situazione, ed evitare l'insolvenza, siccome era obbligata a pagare sotto questi ordini un importo totale della somma di CZK 55,000,000 (EUR 2,115,385).
12. Fra il 2004 e il 2005, sui ricorsi della società richiedente tutti gli ordini di pagamento e le altre decisioni adottate dalle autorità doganali e fiscali che imponevano i doveri di pagamento sulla società richiedente furono annullate come illegali dalle autorità superiori o dalle corti amministrative. I procedimenti fiscali furono cessati e di conseguenza le somme pagate dalla società richiedente in base agli ordini rimborsate.
13. Il precedente direttore è stato perseguito per atti commessi nella sua veste di direttore della società richiedente e nel contesto dei suoi esercizi d'impresa. Il 4 giugno 2009 il precedente direttore fu assolto dalla Corte Municipale di Praga (městský soud) da alcune delle accuse, e il 30 aprile 2010 l’Alta Corte di Praga (vrchní soud) sostenne quella sentenza. L'indagine concernente le altre accuse evidentemente è ancora pendente. Durante l'indagine le autorità perseguenti, inter alia, raccolsero 100,000 pagine di prova documentaria, interrogarono circa cento testimoni, incluse persone senza dimora con indirizzo ignoto i cui nomi l'accusato aveva presumibilmente usato in operazioni fittizie per evadere le dogane e gli altri doveri, e richiesto assistenza legale dalle autorità competenti di sedici paesi.
Richiesta n. 33908/04
14. Nel 2001 l’ Ufficio della Dogana di Frýdek-Místek (celní úřad) ordinò alla società richiedente di pagare i dazi di dogana nell'importo di CZK 280,672 (EUR 9,955).
15. Nel maggio e nel giugno 2002 l’ Ufficio della Dogana di Praga 4 ordinò alla società richiedente di pagare i dazi di dogana di CZK 3,361,940 (EUR 119,242).
16. Il 6 giugno 2002 l'Alto Procuratore accolse la richiesta della società richiedente affinché venisse tolta la confisca per la somma di CZK 280,672.
17. Il 5, 17 e 21 giugno 2002 rispettivamente, la società richiedente richiese all’ Alto Procuratore di togliere la confisca per permetterle di pagare i dazi doganali ordinati nel maggio e nel giugno 2002.
18. L’ 11 luglio 2002 l’ Alto Procuratore respinse le sue richieste, trovando che gli ordini non erano divenuti ancora definitivi. Secondo il procuratore, era prematuro togliere la confisca sotto queste circostanze, siccome era probabile che tale passo sarebbe stato contrario agli interessi perseguiti dalle autorità perseguenti.
19. La società richiedente fece ricorso presso l’Alta Corte che respinse il suo ricorso il 27 agosto 2002.
20. Il 18 novembre 2002 la società richiedente depositò un ricorso costituzionale (ústavní stížnost) sostenendo che le autorità doganali, insieme con le autorità perseguenti avevano utilizzato male la legge a suo danno e di conseguenza avevano violato l’Articolo 4 dello Statuto dei Diritti essenziali e delle Libertà (práv základních Listina un svobod) (in seguito “lo Statuto”).
21. Nel dicembre 2002 la Corte Costituzionale (soud Ústavní) invitò le parti rispondenti ai procedimenti, l’ Alta Corte e l’ Alto Procuratore, a presentare delle osservazioni scritte sul ricorso costituzionale della richiedente facendo seguito alla sezione 42(4) del Atto Costituzionale di Corte.
22. L'Alto Procuratore non presentò nessuna osservazione. L’ Alta Corte presentò osservazioni scritte, riferendosi al ragionamento della sua decisione contestata. Espresse la prospettiva che il ricorso costituzionale della richiedente avrebbe dovuto essere respinto. Questa osservazione non fu comunicata alla società richiedente.
23. La Corte Costituzionale richiese anche all'Ufficio dell’Alto Procuratore Statale di Praga di spedirle l'archivio penale nel contesto del quale era stata eseguita la confisca. La Corte Costituzionale fece delle copie dei documenti attinenti che furono incluse nell'archivio della causa della Corte Costituzionale. Successivamente l'archivio penale fu restituito all'Ufficio del Procuratore il 29 maggio 2003.
24. Il 22 maggio 2003 il dirigente della società richiedente consultò l'archivio della causa alla Corte Costituzionale. Il giorno successivo spedì una lettera alla corte col seguente testo:
“Il 22 maggio 2003, quando consultando l'archivio della causa, trovai che avrebbe dovuto includere anche nove archivi [che coprivano i procedimenti penali] presentati dall’Alto Procuratore di Praga Procuratore... [Circa] nove archivi annessi alla replica dell’ Alto Procuratore di Praga presentati su invito della Corte Costituzionale del 5 dicembre 2002 furono inviati il 8 gennaio 2003... e consegnati alla Corte Costituzionale il 9 gennaio 2003.
Al tempo del mio studio dell'archivio della causa questi nove archivi erano stati spediti in qualche luogo per consultazione. ... Io chiedo gentilmente a Lei di stabilire un'altra data in cui la consultazione dell'archivio della causa inclusa la suddetta prova documentaria sarà possibile.”
25. In una lettera del 29 maggio 2003 dal giudice della Corte Costituzionale, fu detto al direttore in carica della società richiedente di rivolgersi direttamente all'Ufficio dell' Alto Procuratore a cui l'archivio in oggetto era stato restituito. La stessa lettera informò anche il rappresentante della società richiedente che lui era libero di ispezionare l'archivio della Corte Costituzionale dopo aver preso appuntamento per una visita per fare questo presso la cancelleria della corte.
26. In una lettera del 5 giugno 2003 il direttore in carica della società richiedente chiese al giudice della Corte Costituzionale di rimediare alla situazione e di garantire alla società richiedente di avere accesso a quegli archivi penali. Quest’ultima rispose , il 1 luglio 2003, che facendo seguito alla sezione 30(1) dell’ Atto Costituzionale di Corte, una parte ai procedimenti deve essere rappresentata giuridicamente. Affermò inoltre che l'archivio della causa penale non era un archivio della Corte Costituzionale, ma soggetto al Codice di Procedura penale, in particolare l’Articolo 65 che disciplinava l’accesso agli archivi penali.
L’11 marzo 2004 la Corte Costituzionale respinse il ricorso costituzionale della società richiedente(II. ÚS 708/02). Sostenne in particolare:
“Come sembra dalla decisione che rifiuta di togliere la confisca dei beni, nella prospettiva dell'Alto Procuratore toglierla potrebbe mettere in pericolo il fine dei procedimenti penali. ... [L’Alta Corte] ha condiviso la sua opinione... Nelle sue osservazioni scritte, ha trovato, che non c'era base che giustificasse la conclusione per cui la confisca dei beni della [società di richiedente]... non fosse più necessaria.
Nella presente causa, la Corte Costituzionale non considerò la condotta delle autorità Statali un cattivo uso della legge a danno della società richiedente, contrariamente ai requisiti di base dell'equità e dell’ Articolo 4 dello Statuto. Il mero fatto che la società richiedente non aveva avuto successo nella sua richiesta non può essere considerato di per sé come una violazione del suo diritto ad un processo equanime.”
27. Il 18 marzo 2004 la Corte Costituzionale respinse manifestamente come mal-fondato il ricorso costituzionale di un'altra società richiedente che riguardava una decisione dell’ Alta Corte di respingere la richiesta di un'altra società richiedente per togliere parzialmente la confisca.
Richiesta n. 7937/05
28. Nel maggio e giugno 2002 l’ Ufficio Doganale di Praga II ordinò alla società richiedente di pagare i doveri doganali nell'importo di CZK 16,527,646 (EUR 584,724).
29. Il 20 agosto 2002 l' Alto Procuratore respinse la richiesta della società richiedente del 23 luglio 2002 per togliere parzialmente la confisca per permetterle di pagare questo importo.
30. Su richiesta della società richiedente l’ Ufficio Doganale posticipò il tempo-limite per il pagamento dei doveri doganali della società sino al 28 febbraio 2003.
31. Il 20 settembre 2002 la società richiedente richiese di nuovo all' Alto Procuratore di togliere la confisca per permettere alla società di pagare i doveri doganali ordinati nel maggio e nel giugno 2002. Comunque, la sua richiesta fu rifiutata dal Procuratore il 23 ottobre 2002. Questa decisione fu approvata dall’ Alta Corte l’11 dicembre 2002.
32. Il 10 dicembre 2002 e il 10 febbraio 2003, l' Alto Procuratore tolse parzialmente la confisca che copriva la somma di CZK 16,527,645. La società richiedente assolse poi il suo debito doganali. Comunque, siccome non l’aveva fatto in tempo, l’Ufficio Doganale le ordinò di pagare una sanzione penale di CZK 232,423 (EUR 8,223).
33. Il 10 ottobre 2002 l’ Alta Corte respinse il ricorso della società richiedente contro la decisione dell' Alto Procuratore del 20 agosto 2002.
34. Il 16 dicembre 2002 la società richiedente depositò un ricorso costituzionale contro il proscioglimento dell’ Alta Corte.
35. Su invito della Corte Costituzionale l’ Alta Corte presentò osservazioni scritte, riferendosi al ragionamento della sua decisione contestata. Espresse la prospettiva che il ricorso costituzionale del richiedente avrebbe dovuto essere respinto. Questa osservazione non fu comunicata alla società richiedente.
36. Il ricorso fu respinto come manifestamente mal-fondato dalla Corte Costituzionale il 24 agosto 2004 (I. ÚS 723/02).
Richiesta n. 25249/05
37. Il 4 novembre 2002 l’ Ufficio Doganale di Mladá Boleslav ordinò alla società richiedente di pagare i doveri doganali nell'importo di CZK 14,371,989 (EUR 508,460).
38. Rispettivamente il 12 ed il 29 novembre 2002 ed il 3 gennaio 2003 l’ Ufficio Doganale di Kladno ordinò alla società richiedente di pagare doveri doganali corrispondenti a CZK 1,219,922 (EUR 43,159).
39. Il 12 novembre 2002 ed il 29 gennaio 2003 la società richiedente richiese all' Alto Procuratore di togliere la confisca per permettere alla società di pagare i suoi doveri doganali.
40. Il 25 marzo 2003 l' Alto Procuratore decise di non accogliere le richieste della società.
41. Il 2 luglio 2003 l’ Alta Corte respinse un ricorso da parte della società richiedente del 2 aprile 2003 che impugnava il rifiuto dell' Alto Procuratore di togliere la confisca.
42. Il 13 ottobre 2003 la società richiedente depositò un ricorso costituzionale adducendo una violazione dell’ Articolo 4 dello Statuto.
43. Su invito della Corte Costituzionale l’ Alta Corte e l' Alto Procuratore presentarono osservazioni scritte. Loro espressero la prospettiva che il ricorso costituzionale della richiedente avrebbe dovuto essere respinto. Queste osservazioni non furono comunicate alla società richiedente.
44. Il 15 dicembre 2004 la Corte Costituzionale respinse manifestamente il ricorso costituzionale della società richiedente come mal-fondato (I. ÚS 538/03).
Richiesta n. 29402/05
45. Il 2 giugno 2003 l' Alto Procuratore decise di non accogliere la richiesta della società richiedente del 19 maggio 2003 per togliere la confisca.
46. Il 20 agosto 2003 l’ Alta Corte, su ricorso della società richiedente del 9 giugno 2003 sostenne il rifiuto del Procuratore.
47. L’11 novembre 2003 la società richiedente introdusse un ricorso costituzionale impugnando le suddette decisioni ed adducendo, inter alia che i suoi diritti di proprietà continuavano ad essere limitati contrariamente alla legge nazionale.
48. Su invito della Corte Costituzionale, l’ Alta Corte presentò osservazioni scritte, riferendosi al ragionamento della sua decisione contestata. Espresse la prospettiva che il ricorso costituzionale del richiedente avrebbe dovuto essere respinto. Questa osservazione non fu comunicata alla società richiedente.
49. Il suo ricorso fu respinto come non comprovato dalla Corte Costituzionale il 9 febbraio 2005 (IV. ÚS 585/03).
Richiesta n. 33571/06
50. Il 25 maggio 2004 la società richiedente richiese all' Alto Procuratore di togliere la confisca dei suoi beni, sostenendo in particolare che aveva assolto tutti i suoi doveri doganali.
51. Il 16 dicembre 2004 il Procuratore respinse la richiesta, sostenendo che c'era un ragionevole sospetto che i beni rappresentassero il profitto di attività criminali del direttore accusato.
52. Il 23 dicembre 2004 la società richiedente fece ricorso presso la Corte Alta.
53. Il 21 febbraio 2005 l’ Alta Corte accettò in principio che il prolungamento della confisca dei beni avrebbe potuto costituire un'interferenza sproporzionata con i diritti di proprietà, ma non trovò tale sproporzionalità nella causa della società richiedente e così respinse il suo ricorso.
54. Il 26 luglio 2005 la società richiedente fece ricorso presso la Corte Costituzionale, lamentandosi della lunghezza eccessiva della confisca dei suoi beni.
55. Su invito della Corte Costituzionale, l’ Alta Corte e l' Alto Procuratore presentarono le loro osservazioni scritte. L’ Alta Corte propose che il ricorso costituzionale della richiedente venisse respinto. L' Alto Procuratore diede informazioni in dettaglio su molti aspetti dei procedimenti penali. Lui si rivolse anche il problema della lunghezza della confisca sottolineando la misura e la complessità dell'indagine ed il bisogno di cooperazione estera. Lui propose anche di respingere il ricorso. Queste osservazioni furono comunicate alla società richiedente nel settembre 2005. La società richiedente reagì spedendo una lettera che aveva ricevuto dal Ministero delle Finanze che conteneva una garanzia per la quale tutti i contanti trattenuti dalle autorità doganali sarebbero stati restituiti alla società richiedente. La lettera conteneva anche una scusa dal Ministero per i problemi che sorgevano nella causa complessa della società richiedente.
56. Il 13 gennaio 2006 la Corte Costituzionale di nuovo richiese all' Alto Procuratore di informarla dello stadio che l'indagine aveva raggiunto e quando ci si aspettava che finisse . Il 20 gennaio 2006 l' Alto Procuratore presentò alla corte una replica di un paragrafo dicendo che quasi tutti gli Stati dei sedici la cui assistenza era stata richiesta aveva risposto e che ci si aspettava che avrebbero spedito i materiali richiesti prima dell’ aprile 2006. Informò inoltre la corte che si aspettava di concludere l'indagine a metà del 2006 e che era estremamente probabile che tutte le persone accusato sarebbero state processate di fronte ad una corte. Queste osservazioni non furono comunicate alla società richiedente.
57. Il 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte Costituzionale respinse manifestamente il ricorso come mal-fondato (III. ÚS 394/05). Sostenne che la confisca dei beni era ancora a proporzionata in prospettiva della complessità dell'indagine ed in questo contesto considerava importante l'assicurazione dell' Alto Procuratore che l'indagine avrebbe dovuto essere terminata quell’ anno.
Sviluppi susseguenti
58. Il 30 gennaio 2008 la Corte Costituzionale trovò una violazione del diritto alla proprietà di una società, OMISSIS, che era nella stessa posizione della società richiedente. Sostenne che la lunghezza della confisca, più di sei anni, era irragionevole che così rompeva l'equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della lotta contro i crimini gravi e la protezione dei diritti della società richiedente. Di conseguenza, la società richiedente depositò un'altra richiesta perché la confisca dei suoi conti bancari venisse tolta riferendosi a questa decisione della Corte Costituzionale.
59. Il 6 marzo 2008 l' Alto Procuratore tolse la confisca dei conti bancari della società richiedente, sostenendo che le conclusioni della Corte Costituzionale si applicava anche alla società richiedente.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
Atto costituzionale di Corte (n. 182/1993)
60. La Sezione 30(1) prevede che il richiedente deve essere rappresentato nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale da un avvocato.
61. La Sezione 32 prevede che le parti e le parti congiunte hanno diritto a fare commenti su un ricorso costituzionale, fare osservazioni presso la Corte Costituzionale, consultare un archivio di causa (ad eccezione dei documenti di voto), prendere estratti e copie da questo, addurre qualsiasi prova, prendere parte a qualsiasi udienza orale nella questione, ed assistere a qualsiasi prelevamento di prova.
62. Sotto la sezione 48, la Corte Costituzionale deve prendere ogni prova necessaria per stabilire i fatti della causa. Decide che la prova presentata dalle parti dovrebbe essere accettata e può accettare una prova che non è stata addotta dalle parti. Può ad assegnare un giudice di accettare una prova non ottenuta in un'udienza orale, o richiedere ad un'altra corte di accettare simile prova. Su sua richiesta, le corti, le autorità amministrative e pubbliche e le altre istituzioni Statali devono assisterla nel suo processo decisionale procurando prove documentarie. Un documento deve essere redatto sulla base di ogni prova presa in un'udienza orale, essendo questo documento firmato da un giudice, da un impiegato e da altre persone che partecipano in quella sessione di prova. Il risultato della raccolta di prove deve essere comunicato sempre in un'udienza orale.
63. La Sezione 49(1) prevede che qualsiasi mezzo che può essere utile per stabilire fatti di una causa può essere usato nelle prove, in particolare la testimonianza di testimoni, opinioni competenti, rapporti e dichiarazioni di autorità Statali e soggetti giuridici, documenti, risultati di indagini e la testimonianza delle parti.
Il Codice di Procedura penale (Atto n. 141/1961 come in vigore al tempo attinente)
64. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 9, le autorità perseguenti valuteranno le questioni pregiudiziali che sorgono nel corso dei procedimenti; se una decisione definitiva e vincolante su tale questione fosse già stata adottata da una corte o da un'altra autorità statale, l’ autorità perseguente sarà legata a questa a meno che non riguardi una questione di colpa dell'accusato.
65. L’ Articolo 42 prevede i diritti di una persona interessata. Afferma che chiunque la cui proprietà è stata sequestrata o è stata resa passibile di sequestro in seguito ad una richiesta di confisca deve avere un'opportunità di fare commenti sulla determinata causa, può frequentare un'udienza, presentare le sue proprie richieste, consultare l'archivio della causa all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 65, e depositare ricorsi come previsto da questa legge.
66. L’ Articolo 65 riguarda l’ accesso agli archivi. Il primo paragrafo prevede, inter alia che l'accusato, le terze parti danneggiate intervenute, il loro consigliere e i guardiani avranno il diritto di accesso agli archivi ad eccezioni dei documenti e di quelle sezioni di documenti che contengono dati personali di testimoni anonimi, prendere estratti e note da questi, ed avere al riguardo duplicati degli archivi e parti di questi a proprie spese. Le altre persone possono fare così con l'autorizzazione di un presidente di una camera e di un Procuratore, o dell’ autorità di polizia allo stadio di pre-processo dei procedimenti se è necessario per l'esercizio dei loro diritti.
67. L’ Articolo che 79a § 1 prevede una confisca di strumenti finanziari depositati su un conto bancario. Se determinati fatti indicano che gli strumenti finanziari su un conto bancario sono preposti per la perpetrazione di un crimine, o sono già stati usati per tale fine, o costituiscono profitti da attività penali, al presidente di una camera e ad un Procuratore o all'autorità di polizia allo stadio di pre-processo dei procedimenti penali, viene conferito il potere di prenderli.
68. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 79a § 3, l'autorità Statale elencata nel paragrafo 1 alza o riduce la confisca se tale misura non è più necessaria, o non è necessaria mantenerla in quel determinato importo. Una decisione all'interno del significato della precedente frase per politica è soggetta a precedente approvazione da parte di un Procuratore.
69. Sotto l'Articolo 79a § 4 il proprietario di un conto bancario i cui beni sono stati sequestrati, ha diritto a richiedere che la confisca venga tolta o ridotta. Un Procuratore deve decidere su tale richiesta senza ritardo.
70. L’ Articolo che 79a § 5 prevede che si possa fare ricorso contro le decisioni adottate facendo seguito ai paragrafi 1, 3 e 4 tramite un'azione di reclamo.
71. Secondo Articolo 145 § 2 un reclamante può appellarsi a nuovi fatti e prove.
72. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 149 § 4, se una decisione è erronea a causa del fatto che una parte della sua sezione operativa è mancante, ad un'autorità di appello vengono conferiti poteri o per correggere la decisione contestata, rimettere la causa all'autorità di prima istanza la cui decisione è impugnata, perché decida sulla parte mancante della decisione o per correggerla.
Codice di Procedimenti Amministrativi su Tasse e Altre Imposte (N.ro 337/1992)
73. L’ Articolo che 48 § 12 prevede che un ricorso non sospenderà l'entrata in vigore di una decisione adottata in procedimenti amministrativi su tasse e altre imposte a meno che una legge speciale preveda altrimenti.
LA LEGGE
I. CONGIUNZIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
74. La Corte nota che l'argomento delle richieste N. 33908/04, 7937/05, 25249/05 29402/05 e 33571/06 è identico e sono state presentate dalla stessa società richiedente. È perciò appropriato congiungere le cause, in applicazione dell’ Articolo 42 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
75. La società richiedente si lamentò che la confisca dei suoi conti bancari, dei suoi documenti commerciali e del denaro aveva infranto i suoi diritti di proprietà, in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che enuncia:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
76. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'esaurimento delle via di ricorso nazionali
(a) La confisca dei documenti commerciali e del denaro
77. La Corte nota che i procedimenti nazionali che sono anche parte delle presenti richieste e che generarono le decisioni contestate della Corte Costituzionale riguardavano solamente la confisca dei conti bancari della società richiedente. Riguardo alla confisca dei documenti commerciali e del denaro la società richiedente non intraprese tutte le vie di ricorso che erano disponibili a lei, in particolare non introdusse questa azione di reclamo di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. Ne segue che questa parte delle richieste è inammissibile per non-esaurimento di tutte le vie di ricorso nazionali all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione e deve essere dichiarata inammissibile facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
(b) La confisca dei conti bancari
78. Il Governo presentò che l'azione di reclamo era prematura poiché al tempo del suo deposito c'era un ricorso costituzionale della società richiedente riguardo alla confisca pendente di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale .
79. La società richiedente contestò questo argomento.
80. La Corte reitera che le sole vie di ricorso che un richiedente è costretto ad esaurire sono quelle che si riferiscono alle violazioni addotte e che sono allo stesso tempo disponibili e sufficienti. L'esistenza di simili vie di ricorso non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicura in teoria ma anche in pratica, in mancanza di ciò mancherà loro l'accessibilità e l'efficacia richieste. Inoltre un richiedente che si è giovato di una via di ricorso che è evidentemente effettiva e sufficiente non può essere costretto anche, ad averne provate altre che erano disponibili ma che probabilmente nessuna era più probabile che avesse successo (vedere T.W. c. Malta [GC], n. 25644/94, § 34 del 29 aprile 1999).
81. La Corte nota che riguardo alla confisca e alla sua lunghezza al 9 febbraio 2006, la data dell’ultima decisione contestata della Corte Costituzionale nelle presenti richieste, la società richiedente intraprese le naturali vie di ricorso a riguardo di una confisca, vale a dire ha chiesto che la confisca venisse tolta, e ha fatto ricorso contro i susseguenti rifiuti tramite le corti, in conformità con gli articoli di diritto nazionale fino alla Corte Costituzionale. In questa misura, la società richiedente ha esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali (vedere Benet ceco, spol. s r.o. c. Repubblica ceca, n. 31555/05, § 25 del 21 ottobre 2010). Riguardo alla continua confisca oltre queslla data, la Corte nota che la società richiedente richiese di nuovo al Procuratore di togliere la confisca, e di nuovo fece ricorso contro i rifiuti tramite le corti. Le azioni di reclamo della società richiedente a riguardo di quel periodo sono state registrato sotto la richiesta n. 38354/06, e non devono essere considerate nelle presenti richieste.
82. La Corte respinge perciò l’affermazione del Governo per cui la società richiedente non ha esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali.
2. La norma dei sei mesi
83. Il Governo presentò che le richieste N. 33908/04 e 7937/05 furono presentate fuori termine. La società richiedente contestò questo argomento.
84. Riguardo alla richiesta n. 33908/04 che la Corte osserva che questa richiesta contiene azioni di reclamo contro due decisioni della Corte Costituzionale, rese rispettivamente l’ 11 marzo e il 18 marzo 2004. La prima fu consegnata all'avvocato della società richiedente il 19 marzo 2004, la seconda il 24 marzo 2004. Il modulo di domanda contenente le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla prima decisione fu presentato alla Corte via fax il 17 settembre 2004 e spedito tramite posta regolare il 20 settembre 2004. Il modulo di richiesta contenente le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla seconda decisione fu presentato via fax il 23 settembre 2004 e successivamente spedito tramite posta regolare che la Corte ricevette il 27 settembre 2004.
85. La Corte reitera che la gestione del tempo-limite dei sei mesi imposta dall’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione viene, come norma generale, interrotta dalla prima lettera dai richiedenti che indica l'intenzione di depositare una richiesta e che dà indicazione della natura delle azioni di reclamo fatte. La prima lettera può essere spedita tramite un fax ammesso che l'originale venga presentato poi tramite posta (per esempio, Manitaras ed Altri c. Turchia (dec.), n. 54591/00, § 35 del 3 giugno 2008). La data delle osservazioni via fax deve essere considerata così la data di introduzione. Di conseguenza, la società richiedente si attenne col tempo-limite dei sei mesi.
86. Riguardo alla richiesta n. 7937/05 la Corte osserva che la decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 24 agosto 2004 fu consegnata all'avvocato della società richiedente il 2 settembre 2004. La richiesta fu presentata via fax il 1 marzo 2005. Successivamente, la Corte ricevette il modulo di richiesta originale spedito tramite posta regolare il 2 marzo 2005. La Corte conclude così che anche questa richiesta fu presentata all'interno del tempo-limite dei sei mesi.
87. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo relative alla confisca dei conti bancari sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 in tutte le cinque richieste non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3(a) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Loro devono essere dichiarate perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
88. La società richiedente rivendicò nelle richieste presenti che la confisca dei suoi asset depositati sui suoi conti bancari era durata un tempo irragionevolmente lungo che c'erano stati ritardi irragionevoli nell'indagine da parte delle autorità e che le autorità non avevano presentato qualsiasi prova che giustificasse la confisca.
89. Il Governo accettò che c'era stata un'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà della società richiedente ma sostenne che era necessaria per una lotta efficiente contro la malavita ed era proporzionata a quello scopo. Il Governo si riferì in particolare all'opportunità la società richiedente aveva richiesto in qualsiasi momento alle autorità ed alle corti che la confisca venisse terminata, e sostenne che la lunghezza della confisca era stata resa necessaria dalla complessità e dall’ampiezza dell'indagine.
90. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che garantisce in sostanza il diritto alla proprietà comprende tre articoli distinti. Il primo che è espresso nella prima frase del primo paragrafo ed è di natura generale, fissa il principio del godimento tranquillo della proprietà. Il secondo articolo, nella seconda frase dello stesso paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni. Il terzo, contenuto nel secondo paragrafo riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti viene concesso, fra le altre cose, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo ed il terzo articolo che riguardano le particolari casi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà devono essere costruiti alla luce del principio generale fissato nel primo articolo (vedere Immobiliare Saffi c. Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 44 il 1999-V di ECHR)
91. La società richiedente non specificò quale articolo avrebbe dovuto essere usato. Il Governo sostenne che la confisca è stata giustificata sotto il terzo articolo.
92. La Corte nota che la confisca aveva l'effetto che la società richiedente non poteva disporre delle parti attinenti dei suoi conti bancari. Di conseguenza, la Corte si confà col Governo che la confisca costituiva un controllo dell'uso di proprietà e che il paragrafo 2 dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile (vedere Atanasov ed Ovcharov c. Bulgaria, n. 61596/00, § 74 del 17 gennaio 2008).
93. La Corte reitera che qualsiasi controlla dell'uso di proprietà da parte di un'autorità pubblica dovrebbe essere legale (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
94. La società richiedente contestò la legalità della confisca, dibattendo che la legge ceca permetteva alle autorità perseguenti di prendere solamente gli importi specificati di finanziamenti e così l’ordine confisca del25 aprile 2001 e del 27 aprile 2001 era illegale. Il Governo contestò questo argomento, dibattendo che la deficienza originale degli ordini di confisca era stata rimediata il 28 novembre 2001 dall' Alto Procuratore a cui era permesso fare così sotto l’ Articolo 149 § 4 del Codice di Diritto di Procedura penale. La società richiedente rispose che l' Alto Procuratore avrebbe potuto usare questo metodo per prendere i fondi sui conti solo rispettivamente il 25 e il 27 aprile 2001, e riguardo ai finanziamenti che erano entrati più tardi, il Procuratore era obbligato ad emettere una nuova decisione.
95. In primo luogo, la Corte nota che non è chiamata ad esaminare la legalità della confisca prima del 28 novembre 2001, perché le correnti richieste scaturiscono da eventi che accaddero dopo questa data.
96. La Corte osserva che in virtù dell’ Articolo 149 § 4 del Codice di Procedura penale all' Alto Procuratore chiaramente fu concesso di rimediare a qualsiasi deficienza dell'ordine di confisca originale. La confisca dei conti bancari come erano il 25 e il 27 aprile 2001 erano così chiaramente in conformità almeno con la legge del 28 novembre 2001. La questione rimane se al Procuratore, prendendo la sua decisione del 28 novembre 2001, era anche concesso sotto legge ceca di prendere i fondi supplementari in entrata tra il 25 aprile e il 28 novembre 2001.
97. In questo contesto, la Corte reitera, che ha potere limitato per fare una revisione l’ottemperanza con il diritto nazionale, ed esamina solamente se è stato applicato in modo manifestamente erroneo o tale da giungere a conclusioni arbitrarie (vedere Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 108 ECHR 2000-I).
98. La Corte osserva in primo luogo che sotto l’Articolo 79a del Codice di Diritto di Procedura penale ad Procuratore veniva conferito il potere di prendere gli asset nei procedimenti penali prima processo . Inoltre, un'autorità di appello, in questo caso un Procuratore superiore, decide su un ricorso sulla base dei fatti al tempo della sua decisione il che vuol dire includere i nuovi sviluppi fin dal tempo della decisione impugnata e ha pieno potere di revisione. Sotto queste circostanze la Corte considera che il fatto che il Procuratore non emise una decisione separata riguardo ai fondi che in entrata tra il 25 aprile e il 28 novembre 2001 ma scelse di correggere l'ordine di confisca originale scrivendo le somme come erano in data della sua decisione non rende questa decisione un applicazione arbitraria o manifestamente erronea del diritto nazionale. La Corte è così incapace di concludere che la confisca dei beni della società richiedente dopo il 28 novembre 2001, cioè la data in cui l’Alto Procuratore di Praga corresse le decisioni di confisca originali, fosse contraria alla legge.
99. Osserva inoltre che qualsiasi interferenza con i diritti di proprietà deve perseguire uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale (vedere Immobiliare Saffi, citata sopra, § 48). La misura contestata fu presa nel contesto di un'indagine penale, sul sospetto che i beni costituivano dei profitti provenienti da attività criminali del direttore accusato. Il fine della contro crimine indubbiamente rientra all'interno dell'interesse generale come previsto nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Denisova e Moiseyeva c. Russia, n. 16903/03, § 58 del 1 aprile 2010).
100. Infine, la Corte reitera che un'interferenza deve prevedere un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. La preoccupazione di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura dell’ Articolo 1 nell'insieme, e perciò anche nel suo secondo paragrafo. Ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo perseguito. Nel determinare se questo requisito viene soddisfatto, la Corte riconosce che lo Stato gode di un ampio margine di valutazione riguardo sia alla scelta dei mezzi di esecuzione sia all’accertamento se le conseguenze di esecuzione sono giustificate nell'interesse generale al fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto (vedere, per esempio, Immobiliare Saffi, citata sopra; Allan Jacobsson c. Svezia (n. 1), 25 ottobre 1989, § 55 Serie A n. 163; ed AGOSI c. Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986, § 52 Serie A n. 108).
101. In casi in cui c'è un ampio margine di valutazione la Corte rispetterà il giudizio delle autorità Statali in merito a ciò che è nell'interesse generale, a meno che questo giudizio è manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere Immobiliare Saffi, citata sopra, § 49, ed Antonopoulou ed Altri c. Grecia, n. 49000/06, § 57 del 16 aprile 2009), o a meno che sia priva di fondamento ragionevole (vedere “Bulves” Ad c. Bulgaria, n. 3991/03, § 63, 22 gennaio 2009, e National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society c. il Regno Unito, 23 ottobre 1997, § 80 Relazioni 1997-VII).
102. La società richiedente sostenne che la confisca dei suoi conti bancari era sproporzionata a causa della sua durata irragionevole.
103. Il Governo sostenne che l'interferenza era necessaria siccome c’era un ragionevole sospetto che i beni fossero nati da attività penali del precedente direttore della società richiedente e che era proporzionata considerando anche la sua lunghezza a causa dell'importanza dell'interesse generale in gioco e la natura molto complessa ed ampia del crimine che doveva essere investigato. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che una violazione dovrebbe essere trovata solamente dove la procedura era manifestamente arbitraria o la durata della confisca manifestamente irragionevole.
104. La Corte nota che l'interferenza aveva un'origine in una misura presa dalle autorità perseguenti nel contesto di investigare un grave crimine nell'area delle imposte doganali e dell’ evasione fiscale che coinvolgono milioni di euro. Il ponte cruciale dell'interferenza concerne la valutazione continua di un ragionevole sospetto che i fondi sequestrati provenivano da attività criminali. Le autorità nazionali chiaramente sono in una posizione migliore di quella della Corte per valutare questi problemi, perché loro hanno accesso diretto alle prove disponibili che nella presente causa includevano migliaia di pagine di prove documentarie, centinaia di testimoni ed operazioni di molte società incluse società estere e società offshore. Di fronte a tale indagine complessa spetta alle autorità nazionali al primo posto decidere se, ed in tal caso in che misura, le ulteriori misure di investigazione sono necessarie per lottare efficacemente contro questo tipo di crimine grave e attentamente premeditato.
105. Così, la Corte considera che i principi summenzionati nella sua giurisprudenza sono completamente applicabili alla presente causa. Lo Stato deve nelle circostanze presenti godere di un ampio margine di valutazione e la Corte deve rispettare il suo giudizio nella misura in cui è necessario nell'interesse generale a meno che questo giudizio non sia manifestamente irragionevole. Di conseguenza, non è compito della Corte condurre di nuovo una piena analisi in merito a se l'interferenza era proporzionata, considerando che le autorità nazionali, specialmente la Corte Costituzionale stessa hanno compiuto un'analisi della proporzionalità. La natura e la sfera della soprintendenza della Corte, attenta al suo ruolo sussidiario, è così valutare se l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà della società richiedente era manifestamente irragionevole (vedere Benet ceco, spol. s r.o. c. Repubblica ceca, n. 31555/05, § 40 del 21 ottobre 2010).
106. La Corte nota a questo riguardo a che l'accusato era al tempo attinente un direttore in carica della società richiedente e che al crimine sospettato accadde nel contesto dei suoi esercizi d'impresa. Non era così prima facie irragionevole per il Procuratore presumere che i conti bancari della società richiedente avrebbero contenuto dei fondi provenienti da queste attività, anche nel 2001. Il Governo dibatté che l'indagine aveva condotto alla conclusione che l'accusato aveva usato i conti bancari della società richiedente per salvare i fondi generati dalle sue attività penali. Nella prospettiva delle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte non ha nessuna ragione di sostenere che il sospetto delle autorità perseguenti in merito all'origine dei finanziamenti sequestrati era manifestamente irragionevole.
107. La società richiedente dibatté che una volta che le autorità doganali avevano accertato che la società richiedente non aveva nessun debito di imposta o doganale non c’era nessuna ragione di continuare la confisca. Comunque, la Corte nota che le decisioni sulla confisca rendevano chiaro che i fondi erano stati sequestrati sul sospetto che loro provenivano dalle attività penali del precedente direttore e di altre persone e non garantivano il pagamento di qualsiasi debito doganale o di imposta dalla società richiedente. Di conseguenza, la confisca fu fatta nel contesto di procedimenti penali ed era solamente in questi procedimenti che la giustificazione continua della confisca avrebbe dovuto essere sostenuta. Qualsiasi decisione delle autorità amministrative riguardo ad un debito della società richiedente non era così direttamente attinente al problema se i fondi furono generati da attività criminali del precedente direttore della società richiedente, ed in qualsiasi caso quelle decisioni non erano vincolanti per le autorità perseguenti. La Corte considera così che le decisioni delle autorità amministrative non avessero potuto rendere la confisca ipso facto ingiustificata.
108. Comunque, un ragionevole sospetto all'inizio dell'indagine non può giustificare un'interferenza indefinita coi diritti della società richiedente. La Corte si confà con la società richiedente sul fatto che la conseguente indagine deve essere sufficientemente diligente e veloce, così che l'interferenza duri solamente un tempo limitato. Così è il compito della Corte valutare se nella prospettiva della condotta delle autorità perseguenti la lunghezza della confisca, vale a dire quattro anni e nove mesi e mezzo (vedere paragrafo 81 sopra), era manifestamente irragionevole.
109. La Corte nota che il Governo si riferì a molti fattori obiettivi che hanno complicato l'indagine. Secondo il Governo in primo luogo era la natura e la grandezza del crimine addotto, che ricopriva un totale di 809 operazioni che coinvolgevano l'importazione di leghe ferrose nella Repubblica ceca. Il Governo si riferì inoltre all'importo delle prove che le autorità perseguenti avevano dovuto raccogliere e valutare, in particolare più di 100,000 pagine di prove documentarie, inclusi circa cento accordi di acquisto ed la necessità di esaminare circa cento testimoni, incluse persone di residenza ignota. Inoltre, le attività penali addotte erano state condotte utilizzando una dozzina di società alcune delle quali erano estere e offshore e la polizia aveva richiesto assistenza legale alle autorità competenti di sedici paesi.
110. La società richiedente sostenne che le autorità perseguenti non avevano mostrato massima diligenza nella loro indagine che era piena di ritardi non necessari e dibatté che alcune delle raccolte di prove summenzionate, inclusi gli interrogatori di persone senza dimora erano non necessarie ed irrilevanti per le accuse del direttore accusato.
111. La Corte reitera (vedere paragrafo 105 sopra) che non è il suo ruolo valutare se le autorità perseguenti ceche hanno condotto l'indagine con la massima diligenza possibile, ma solamente valutare se la lunghezza dell'indagine era tanto irragionevole da non essere compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Similmente non è suo compito valutare se alcune della raccolte di prove da parte delle autorità nazionali erano irrilevanti per la causa, a meno che l'irrilevanza non sia stata manifesta.
112. A questo riguardo la Corte si soddisfa che la misura dell'indagine era davvero considerevole. Come suggeriscono le informazioni sopra, le autorità perseguenti furono messe di fronte ad un crimine addotto che è stato estremamente complicato ed ampio. Si sospettava che i presunti perpetratori utilizzarono una rete internazionale di numerose società in molti paesi per condurre le loro operazioni finanziarie e coprire i loro crimini. La Corte di fronte a questo livello di complessità le autorità perseguenti, lontano dal rimanere passiva, davvero raccolsero moltissime prove, ascoltarono dozzine di testimoni e contattarono molti paesi con richieste per assistenza nella questione.
113. La Corte non è in grado di giungere alla conclusione che interrogare le persone senza dimore era stato manifestamente irrilevante per la causa. Il Governo dibatté che l'accusato le pagò per concludere accordi di vendita fittizi. La Corte accetta che le autorità perseguenti avrebbero potuto ragionevolmente presumere che se le dichiarazioni così ottenute erano importante per provare la colpa dell'accusato.
114. La Corte è della stessa opinione riguardo all'argomento della società richiedente secondo cui avrebbe dovuto essere sufficiente per le autorità perseguenti per fare una revisione dei documenti finanziari della società richiedente per determinare se i fondi sequestrati furono generati da attività criminali. La Corte reitera che spetta primariamente alle autorità nazionali scegliere il modo migliore di condurre un'indagine penale. Come indicato dal Governo, l'importo delle prove documentarie da valutare era enorme. Inoltre, il Governo sostenne che la croce delle attività penali addotte risiedeva nella falsificazione della contabilità e dei documenti doganali, e così era necessario prima controllare l'autenticità e la validità di tutti i documenti sequestrati e dei dati inclusi in questi.
115. La Corte nota inoltre che in qualsiasi determinato momento la società richiedente aveva disponibile per sé una via di ricorso effettiva che includeva l’accesso alle corti con cui avrebbe potuto impugnare la confisca continua dei suoi conti bancari. Così la presente causa è materialmente diversa da cause simili come Immobiliare Saffi o Denisova e Moiseyeva, dove la Corte trovò una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sulla base, inter alia, che i richiedenti non avevano accesso ad una via di ricorso effettiva riguardo all'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà (vedere Immobiliare Saffi, citata sopra, § 56 e Denisova e Moiseyeva, citata sopra, § 64).
116. Così, nella prospettiva della complessità e dell’ampiezza dell'indagine e del fatto che il crimine addotto avrebbe dovuto essere commesso nel contesto degli esercizi d'impresa della società richiedente, la Corte non considera che la lunghezza dell'indagine sul precedente direttore della società richiedente, e così la confisca dei beni della società richiedente sino al 9 febbraio 2006, fossero manifestamente irragionevoli. Per le stesse ragioni la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 9 febbraio 2006 per cui l'interferenza era proporzionata ancora non può essere ritenuta manifestamente irragionevole.
117. Le precedenti considerazioni sono sufficienti per permettere alla Corte di concludere che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
118. La società richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che (i) nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, le era stato negato l’accesso a certe prova documentarie nell'archivio di causa, (ii) la lunghezza della confisca era eccessiva, (iii) la Corte Costituzionale aveva valutato erroneamente i ricorsi costituzionali della società e (iv) la Corte Costituzionale non le aveva comunicato le osservazioni delle altre parti. La parte attinente dell’Articolo 6 enuncia:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
119. Il Governo contestò questi argomenti.
A. Ammissibilità
1. Rifiuto di accesso a certe prove documentarie nell'archivio deòòa causa della Corte Costituzionale
120. La società richiedente si lamentò che non le era stato concesso l’accesso agli archivi penali che la Corte Costituzionale aveva richiesto nei procedimenti che hanno dato luogo alla sua decisione dell’11 marzo 2004 (II. ÚS 708/02) e che le era stato detto che solamente il suo rappresentante legale avrebbe potuto consultare l'archivio presso la Corte Costituzionale.
121. Il Governo dibatté che il direttore della società richiedente aveva consultato l'archivio della causa il 22 maggio 2003. Inoltre, la società richiedente aveva interpretato male il riferimento della Corte Costituzionale nella sua del1 luglio 2003 lettera della Corte Costituzionale per cui solamente al suo avvocato sarebbe stato permesso ispezionare l'archivio, essendoci solamente il riferimento generale alla rappresentanza legale ed obbligatoria di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che l'archivio penale non consisteva nelle osservazioni delle parti ai procedimenti, e l'archivio penale non era divenuto mai parte dell'archivio della causa della Corte Costituzionale. I documenti che aveva copiato la corte erano liberamente disponibili per la società richiedente per una consultazione diretta presso la Corte Costituzionale; solamente questi documenti erano stati citati nella parte che riguardava i fatti della decisione. Il Governo aggiunse che in qualsiasi caso la società richiedente avrebbe potuto consultare il resto dell'archivio penale in possesso delle autorità perseguenti sotto gli articoli del Codice di Procedura penale.
122. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad un processo accusatorio vuole dire in principio l'opportunità per le parti ad un processo penale o civile di avere conoscenza e fare commenti su ogni prova addotta od osservazione presentate, anche da un membro indipendente del servizio legale nazionale, nella prospettiva di influenzando la decisione della corte (vedere Vermeulen c. Belgio, 20 febbraio 1996, § 33 Relazioni 1996-io).
123. La Corte nota che solamente certe parti dell'archivio penale furono incluse nell'archivio della Corte Costituzionale e più tardi menzionate nella sua decisione. La decisione della Corte Costituzionale non conteneva qualsiasi riferimento e non era basata su quelle altre parti dell'archivio penale che furono restituite all' Alto Procuratore.
124. Riguardo a quei documenti che la Corte Costituzionale aveva copiato e su cui si era appellata nella sua decisione, la Corte osserva in primo luogo, che non avevano natura di osservazioni tali da costituire un’ opinione ragionata sui meriti del ricorso costituzionale dei richiedenti e né loro mirarono manifestamente ad influenzare la decisione della Corte Costituzionale richiedendo che il ricorso venisse respinto (vedere, a contrario, Milatová ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca, n. 61811/00, § 65 il 2005-V ECHR). Loro erano prove obiettive, richieste dalla Corte Costituzionale stessa che costituivano i fatti della causa e le decisioni delle autorità che contenevano le ragioni perché gli asset della società richiedente furono sequestrati e perché le sue richieste di conclusione della confisca furono respinte.
125. La Corte nota che la società richiedente doveva essere consapevole di queste decisioni e le possedeva perché riguardavano direttamente la confisca dei beni della società richiedente. Non c'è così nessuna questione sul fattto che non sarebbe stata informata di questi documenti o non avrebbe avuta nessuna conoscenza di questi (vedere, a contrario, Nideröst-Huber c. Svizzera, 18 febbraio 1997, § 31 Relazioni 1997-I). Inoltre, è ovvio dalla lettera della Corte Costituzionale del 29 maggio 2003 che la società richiedente era libera di ispezionare l'archivio della causa della Corte Costituzionale, inclusi questi documenti in qualsiasi tempo dopo avere accordato una visita con la cancelleria della corte. Inoltre la Corte si confà col Governo sul fatto che il riferimento della Corte Costituzionale alla rappresentanza legale obbligatoria non implicava in qualsiasi modo che solamente all'avvocato della società richiedente sarebbe stato permesso di consultare l'archivio della causa.
126. Nella prospettiva di queste considerazioni, la Corte conclude, che non c'è nessuna comparizione di violazione del diritto della società richiedente ad un processo equanime da parte della Corte Costituzionale a questo riguardo. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 3(a) della Convenzione.
2. La lunghezza della confisca
127. La Corte considerò questo problema sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Avendo riguardo alla conclusione sopra della Corte considera che nessun problema separato deriva sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
3. L'equità dei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale
128. La società richiedente sostenne che la Corte Costituzionale aveva valutato erroneamente i ricorsi costituzionali della società. La Corte reitera che non è una sua funzione trattare con gli errori di fatto o di diritto presumibilmente commessi da una corte nazionale a meno che e nella misura in cui possano aver infranto i diritti e le libertà protetti dalla Convenzione (vedere García Ruiz c. Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 28 ECHR 1999-I). Le decisioni della Corte Costituzionale non sembrano arbitrarie o manifestamente irragionevoli.
129. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 3(a) della Convenzione.
4. Non - comunicazione delle osservazioni delle altre parti della Corte Costituzionale alla società richiedente
130. La Corte reitera che la gestione del tempo-limite dei sei mesi sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione viene, come norma generale, interrotto dalla prima lettera dal richiedente che indica un'intenzione di depositare una richiesta e che da l'indicazione della natura delle azioni di reclamo fatte. Riguardo alle azioni di reclamo non incluse nella richiesta iniziale, la gestione del tempo-limite dei sei mesi non viene interrotta sino alla data in cui l'azione di reclamo viene presentata per la prima volta ad un organo di Convenzione. Il mero fatto che il richiedente si era appellato all’ Articolo 6 non è sufficiente per costituire introduzione di tutte le susseguenti azioni di reclamo fatte sotto questo articolo (vedere Allan c. Regno Unito (dec.), n. 48539/99, 28 agosto 2001).
131. Nella presente causa, la parte pertinente del primo modulo di richiesta dal 16 settembre 2004 (richiesta n. 33908/04), dove la società richiedente espose per la prima volta le sue azioni di reclamo, recita: “La società richiedente si lamenta inoltre anche di una violazione del suo diritto ad un processo equanime sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, perché le fu negato l’accesso all'archivio che la Corte Costituzionale aveva richiesto lei stessa dall' Alto Procuratore.” Dato che non c'erano osservazioni da parte dell' Alto Procuratore in quel caso di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale, questa azione di reclamo chiaramente si riferiva solamente al rifiuto addotto di accesso all'archivio penale che la Corte Costituzionale aveva richiesto dall' Alto Procuratore (vedere paragrafo 120 sopra). Questo testo fu riprodotto testualmente nei susseguenti moduli di richiesta (richieste N. 7937/05, 25249/05 e 29402/05) con un riferimento supplementare ai primi procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale (II. ÚS 708/02) e chiaramente riferendosi così al rifiuto addotto di accesso all'archivio penale. Nella prospettiva di queste enunciazioni delle sue azioni di reclamo, la Corte trova, che queste osservazioni non si possono qualificare come una dichiarazione succinta, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 47 §1(e) dell’Ordinamento di Corte (vedere Eule c. Germania (il dec.), n. 781/06, ECHR 10 marzo 2009), di una violazione addotta del diritto del richiedente ad un processo equanime sul conto della non-comunicazione delle osservazioni delle parti avversarie. Le azioni di reclamo originali, presentate alla Corte all'interno del tempo-limite dei sei mesi non contengono così qualsiasi il riferimento, espresso od implicito, al fatto addotto che la Corte Costituzionale era andata a vuoto nel comunicare le osservazioni delle altre parti alla società richiedente.
132. La Corte nota che la società richiedente nelle sue osservazioni del 22 marzo 2010 intendeva dibattere che la presente azione di reclamo era solamente un’elaborazione dell'azione di reclamo sollevata nei moduli di richiesta originali. La Corte reitera che se la nuova azione di reclamo potesse essere considerata come un particolare aspetto di un’azione qualsiasi delle azioni di reclamo iniziali introdotte si potrebbero considerare come introdotte in tempo utile (vedere Paroisse Greco Catholique Sâmbata Bihor c. Romania (dec.), n. 48107/99, 25 maggio 2004). Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte, comunque considera, che questa era un'azione di reclamo completamente distinta e separata da quelle incluse nelle richieste originali.
133. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che queste azioni di reclamo nelle richieste N. 33908/04, 7937/05 25249/05 e 29402/05 sono state introdotte fuori termini e sono state respintie facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
134. Al contrario la richiesta n. 33571/06 conteneva inequivocabilmente un'azione di reclamo che la Corte Costituzionale è andata a vuoto nel comunicare alla società richiedente le osservazioni dell' Alto Procuratore del 20 gennaio 2006. Questa azione di reclamo è stata introdotta così in tempo.
135. La Corte prima distinguerà questa azione di reclamo da Holub c. Repubblica ceca (dec.) n. 24880/05, 14 dicembre 2010 dove un'azione di reclamo simile fu dichiarata inammissibile perché il richiedente non aveva sofferto di un svantaggio significativo all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 (b) della Convenzione. Nella presente causa, le osservazioni dell' Alto Procuratore contenevano nuove informazioni non incluse nella sua decisione contestata. La Corte Costituzionale si appellò espressamente inoltre, su questa osservazione nel suo ragionamento. In queste circostanze, la Corte non può concludere, che la richiedente non ha subito uno “svantaggio significativo” nell'esercitare il suo diritto a procedimenti accusatori di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale.
136. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3(a) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
137. La società richiedente si lamentò nella richiesta n. 33571/06 che la Corte Costituzionale aveva violato il suo diritto ad un processo equanime non riuscendo a comunicarle le osservazioni dell’Alto Procuratore del 20 gennaio 2006 che la corte stessa richiese e che erano cruciali per la sua decisione. Opinò che le informazioni presentate dall' Alto Procuratore erano false e che era ovvio a tutte le autorità che l'indagine non poteva finire a metà 2006.
138. Il Governo contestò questo argomento e sostenne che l'interpretazione della Corte del diritto a procedimenti accusatori di fronte alle corti nazionali e più alte è stata in alcuni casi troppo formalistica e che la Corte dovrebbe confermare piuttosto la posizione più flessibile adottata in Verdú Verdú c. Spagna, n. 43432/02, 15 febbraio 2007. Dibatté inoltre che la norma eccessivamente severa e formalistica che richiede la comunicazione di tutte le osservazioni avrebbe un effetto negativo sul funzionamento pratico delle corti più alte, come la Corte Costituzionale ceca. Aggiunse che la natura delle osservazioni del 20 gennaio 2006 dell' Alto Procuratore era tale che le informazioni in queste non erano e non potevano essere in contenzioso fra le parti, così che la società richiedente non era ragionevolmente nella posizione per impugnare queste informazioni.
139. La Corte reitera la sua giurisprudenza consolidata per cui il concetto di un'udienza corretta implica anche il diritto a procedimenti accusatori secondo i quali le parti non solo devono avere l'opportunità di rendere noto qualsiasi prova necessaria perché le loro rivendicazioni abbiano successo, ma anche avere conoscenza di, e fare commenti su, ogni prova addotta od osservazioni presentate, nella prospettiva di influenzare la decisione di una corte (vedere Krčmář ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca, n. 35376/97, § 40 del 3 marzo 2000). Ciò che è particolarmente in pericolo qui è la fiducia dei contendenti nel lavoro della giustizia che è basato inter alia, sulla conoscenza che loro hanno avuto l'opportunità di esprimere le loro prospettive su ogni documento nell'archivio (vedere Nideröst-Huber, citata sopra, § 29).
140. La Corte nota che in Verdú Verdú, citata sopra, sembrò adottare un approccio meno severo esaminando se la risposta del richiedente avrebbe potuto avere qualsiasi influenza sulla decisione contestata (§§ 27-28). Comunque, la Corte in primo luogo prese nota delle circostanze speciali di quella causa ed il riferimento esplicito a quelle circostanze speciali in quella causa (vedere Verdú Verdú, citata sopra, § 28). Osserva inoltre che nelle sue susseguenti decisioni ha confermato la sua giurisprudenza consolidata menzionata sopra (vedere, per esempio, Felicinao Bichão c. Portogallo, n. 40225/04, 20 novembre 2007; Vokoun c. Repubblica ceca, n. 20728/05, § 29 del 3 luglio 2008; e Salduz c. Turchia [GC], n. 36391/02, § 67 del 27 novembre 2008).
141. La Corte non può accettare la rivendicazione del Governo per cui un'interpretazione troppo severa dell'articolo potrebbe contravvenire al principio di economia procedurale e che metterebbe un carico sproporzionato sul funzionamento della Corte Costituzionale. In questo particolare contesto tutto ciò che il diritto a procedimenti accusatori richiede è che le parti abbiano l'opportunità di avere conoscenza e di fare commenti su tutte le osservazioni presentate, nella prospettiva di influenzare la decisione della corte. In pratica è solo una questione di spedizione delle osservazioni di una parte all'altra parte e di predisporre un termine massimo per i possibili commenti. Questo è un atto puramente amministrativo che si estenderà ai procedimenti per alcune settimane al massimo. In questo contesto la Corte reitera che l'obbligo di completare un processo all'interno di un termine ragionevole non può essere interpretato in modo tale da violare gli altri diritti procedurali sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
142. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota in primo luogo che le osservazioni in oggetto contenevano delle informazioni sulla lunghezza dell'indagine e perciò si riferivano direttamente ai motivi del ricorso, vale a dire la proporzionalità della confisca dei beni della società richiedente. Le informazioni presentate dall’ Alto Procuratore mirarono ad influenzare la decisione della Corte Costituzionale dandole delle rassicurazioni per una conclusione veloce dell'indagine e così in effetti della lunghezza della confisca dei beni che erano un elemento decisivo nell'analisi di proporzionalità. La Corte Costituzionale considerò esplicitamente importante l'assicurazione dell' Alto Procuratore per la sua decisione. Così, avendo riguardo alla natura dei problemi che la Corte Costituzionale doveva decidere si può vedere che i richiedenti avevano un interesse legittimo nel ricevere una copia delle osservazioni dell' Alto Procuratore.
143. Questa informazione non era, nella prospettiva della Corte, un fatto indiscutibile che la società richiedente non aveva potuto impugnare. Al contrario questa era una predizione resa dall' Alto Procuratore e le predizioni per loro stessa natura sono contestabili. Non spetta alla Corte speculare se la società richiedente possedeva una qualsiasi informazione o prova che avrebbe potuto confutare convincentemente questa predizione ed infine persuadere la Corte Costituzionale. La società richiedente avrebbe dovuto avere l'opportunità di esprimere i suoi argomenti comunque perché tale predizione era nella sua prospettiva irragionevole.
144. Il Governo contese inoltre che la società richiedente non aveva risposto alle osservazioni precedenti dell' Alto Procuratore che le furono spedito nel settembre 2005 e così era difficile capire perché avrebbe avuto una qualsiasi ragione valida di fare commenti sulle susseguenti osservazioni incluse approssimativamente le stesse informazioni. La Corte osserva comunque che le osservazioni del Settembe2005 non contenevano le informazioni in merito tempo predetto della conclusione dell'indagine. Inoltre la società richiedente non rimase completamente passiva a riguardo di quelle osservazioni ma in risposta presentò una lettera dal Ministero delle Finanze. Così non si può dedurre che la società richiedente desiderasse rinunciare al suo diritto di essere informata delle osservazioni delle altre parti ai procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale.
145. Infine il Governo mise l’accento sulle sue osservazioni della lunghezza di una pagina. La Corte considera comunque che la lunghezza dell'opinione stessa è irrilevante in questo contesto (vedere Nideröst-Huber, citata sopra, § 26).
146. La Corte trova perciò che, nella presente causa, il rispetto del diritto ad un'udienza corretta, come garantito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1, richiedeva che alla società richiedente venisse data l'opportunità di fare commenti sulle prove documentarie prodotte su richiesta della Corte Costituzionale dall' Alto Procuratore il 20 gennaio 2006. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
147. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
148. A riguardo del danno patrimoniale la società richiedente chiese CZK 32,968,038.85, 67,004.85 dollari di Stati Uniti (USD), EUR 124,274.99, 6,821.69 sterline inglesi (GBP), e 170,425.61 koruna slovacche (SKK) per interesse sui ritardi nei pagamenti e CZK 38,740,000 come perdita di profitto. In merito al danno non-patrimoniale, la società richiedente chiese CZK 50,000,000 insieme per danno ad avviamento, perdita di mercato, contatti commerciali ed impiegati.
149. Il Governo sostenne che non c'era collegamento causale fra il danno chiesto e la violazione addotta della Convenzione e che una costatazione di violazione costituirebbe una soddisfazione equa sufficiente per qualsiasi danno non-patrimoniale che è probabile che i richiedenti abbiano subito.
150. La Corte nota che non c'è chiaramente collegamento causale fra la violazione della Convenzione trovata e le rivendicazioni della società richiedente a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale. In particolare, non spetta alla Corte speculare in merito a quale sarebbe stato il risultato dei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale se fossero stati in conformità ai requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Milatová ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca, n. 61811/00, § 70 il 2005-V ECHR).
151. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge la rivendicazione per danno patrimoniale e considera che la costatazione di una violazione costituisce una soddisfazione equa sufficiente per qualsiasi danno non-patrimoniale che i richiedenti hanno potuto subire riguardo alla violazione trovata.
B. Costi e spese
152. La società richiedente chiese anche CZK 39,661,843.42 per costi e spese. La società richiedente non dettaglia i costi e le spese incorse di fronte alle corti nazionali e quelli incorsi di fronte alla Corte. Nei documenti presentati i costi specificamente incorsi di fronte alla Corte collegati con la richiesta n. 33571/06 costituiscono CZK 30,257.70 per servizi legali ed oneri postali incorsi di fronte alla fine del 2007.
153. Il Governo sostenne che una grande proporzione delle voci chieste dalla società richiedente non si potevano considerare essere state, necessariamente e ragionevolmente incorsi in collegamento con le violazioni addotte della Convenzione, e che l'importo dei servizi legali sembrava eccessivo. Il Governo considerò che la Corte avrebbe dovuto assegnare solamente una somma ragionevole sotto questo capo.
154. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se viene mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli in merito al quantum. Nella presente causa riguardo ai costi richiesti riguardo ai procedimenti nazionali, la Corte sostiene che questi costi non furono sostenuti per prevenire o rettificare la violazione della Convenzione trovata. Respinge di conseguenza questa rivendicazione. Considerando che la società richiedente incorse in ulteriori costi nella presente richiesta dopo la fine del 2007, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 1,500 per coprire i costi dei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte.
C. Interesse di mora
155. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere le richieste;
2. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla confisca dei conti bancari della società richiedente ammissibili ed il resto di azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 inammissibile;
3. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto a procedimenti accusatori di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale nella richiesta n. 33571/06 ammissibile ed il resto delle azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 inammissibile;
4. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione nella richiesta n. 33571/06;
6. Sostiene che la sentenza di una violazione costituisce di per sé soddisfazione equa e sufficiente per il danno non-patrimoniale subito dalla società richiedente;
7. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare la società richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, EUR 1,500 (mille cinquecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo dei costi e delle spese da convertire in koruna ceco al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino all’ accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
8. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 24 febbraio 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Dean Spielmann Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 03/08/2020.