Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF HERRMANN v. GERMANY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, 09, P1-1

NUMERO: 9300/07/2011
STATO: Germania
DATA: 20/01/2011
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No violation of P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 14+P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 9
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF HERRMANN v. GERMANY
(Application no. 9300/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
20 January 2011
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Herrmann v. Germany,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Rait Maruste,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Ganna Yudkivska, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 7 December 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 9300/07) against the Federal Republic of Germany lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a German national, Mr G. H. (“the applicant”), on 12 February 2007.
2. The German Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs A. Wittling-Vogel, of the Federal Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that his automatic adherence to a hunter’s association and his obligation to allow the exercise of hunting rights on his property violated his rights under Articles 9, 11 and 14 of the Convention and under Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 18 November 2009 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the application and decided to communicate the complaints to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 1).
5. The parties replied in writing to each other’s observations. In addition, third-party comments were received from Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft der Jagdgenossenschaften und Eigenjagdbesitzer (BAGJE), represented by Mr R., legal counsel, and Deutscher Jagdschutz-Verband, e. V., represented by Mr T., legal counsel, who had been given leave by the President to intervene in the written procedure (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1955 and lives in Stutensee.
7. Under the German Federal Hunting Law (Bundesjagdgesetz), owners of hunting grounds with a surface of less than 75 hectares are de jure members of a hunting association (Jagdgenossenschaft), while owners of bigger plots of land manage their own hunting district. The applicant owns two landholdings in Rhineland-Palatinate which are smaller than 75 hectares in a single block. He is thus an automatic member of a hunting association, in the instant case of the municipality of Langsur.
8. On 14 February 2003 the applicant, who is opposed to hunting on ethical grounds, filed a request with the hunting authority to terminate his adherence to the hunting association. The authority rejected his request on the grounds that his adherence was prescribed by law and that there was no provision on the termination of adherence.
9. The applicant brought proceedings before the Treves Administrative Court. Relying in particular on the Court’s judgment in the case of Chassagnou and Others v. France ([GC] nos. 25088/94, 28331/95 and 28443/95, ECHR 1999-III), he requested the court to establish that he was not a member of the hunting association of the municipality of Langsur.
10. On 14 January 2004 the administrative court rejected the applicant’s request. It considered that the Federal Hunting law did not violate the applicant’s rights. With regard to the Chassagnou-judgment the administrative court considered that the situation in Germany differed from the one in France. It observed, in particular, that the German owners of hunting grounds, by way of their adherence to the hunting association, were in a position to influence the decision-making process on how the hunting rights should be exercised. Furthermore, they had a right to receive a share of the profits derived from the exploitation of the hunting rights. All owners of plots which were too small to allow a proper management of hunting rights adhered to a hunting association. The court also considered that the hunting associations did not only serve the leisure interests of those who exercised the hunting rights, but imposed certain specific obligations on them, which served the general interest, in particular the duty to manage the game stock with the aim of maintaining varied and healthy game populations and to avoid damages caused by wild game. They were furthermore obliged to comply with specific quotas set by the administration for the hunting of game. These duties applied in the same way to the owners of hunting grounds more the 75 hectares of area, notwithstanding the fact that these bigger plots were not regrouped in hunting associations.
11. On 13 July 2004 and 14 April 2005 the Rhineland-Palatinate Administrative Court of Appeal and the Federal Administrative Court rejected the applicant’s appeals on the same grounds as the administrative court.
12. On 13 December 2006 the Federal Constitutional Court (1 BvR 2084/05) refused to admit the applicant’s constitutional complaint for adjudication. It noted, at the outset, that the provisions of the Federal Hunting Law did not violate the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his property, but defined and limited the exercise of this right in a proportionate way. The relevant provisions pursued legitimate aims, were necessary and did not impose an excessive burden on the landowners.
13. When defining the content and the limits of property rights, the legislator had to weigh the proprietors’ legitimate interests against the general interest. He had, in particular, to respect the principles of proportionality and of equal treatment. The limitations imposed on the exercise of property rights must not infringe the core area of the protected right. The margin of appreciation allocated to the legislator depended on the specific context; the stronger the social context, the wider the margin of appreciation.
14. Applying these principles to the instant case, the Federal Constitutional Court considered that the applicant’s obligatory adherence to a hunting association did not violate his property rights. The core-area of that right was not infringed. The Federal Hunting Law pursued legitimate aims and limited the property rights in a proportionate way. Encompassed in the notion of “management and protection of the game stock (Hege)”, it had the aim to preserve the game in a way that was adapted to the rural and cultural conditions, and to ensure a healthy and varied wildlife. Under the Federal Hunting Law, game keeping was not only an instrument to prevent damages caused by wild-life, but also to avoid any impediment to the agricultural, forestry and fishery exploitation of the land. These aims served the general interest.
15. The obligatory adherence to a hunting association was an appropriate and necessary means to achieve these aims. Referring to paragraph 79 of the above-cited Chassagnou judgment, the Constitutional Court considered that the Court had acknowledged that it was undoubtedly in the general interest to avoid unregulated hunting and encourage the rational management of game stocks. The obligatory adherence to a hunting association was also a proportionate means. The impact on the property rights was not particularly serious and did not outweigh the general interest in a rational management of game stocks. Furthermore, the Federal Hunting Law endowed every member with the right to participate in the decision-making process and to receive a share of the profits derived from the lease of the hunting rights.
16. The Constitutional Court further considered that there was no violation of the applicant’s freedom of conscience. Referring to paragraph 114 of the Chassagnou judgment, it accepted that the applicant’s convictions attained a certain level of cogency, cohesion and importance and where therefore worthy of respect in a democratic society. Accordingly, the Federal Constitutional Court considered that the applicant’s complaint might fall within the scope of freedom of conscience, but that there was, in any event, no violation of that right. The applicant was neither enjoined to exercise the hunt himself, nor to participate in it or to support it. The fact that he had to tolerate the exercise of the hunt on his premises did not result from his own decision, but was the result of the legislator’s legitimate decision. The right to freedom of conscience did not encompass the right that the whole legal order was submitted to one’s own ethical standards. If the legal order distributed the right to exploit a certain property to several claimholders, the owner’s conscience did not necessarily outweigh the other claimholders’ constitutional rights. If the applicant’s landholding – and that of other owners who were opposed to hunting – were removed from the hunting association because of their convictions, the whole system of property ownership and of the management of the game stock would be jeopardised. The right to freedom of conscience did not outweigh the general interest in the instant case.
17. The Federal Constitutional Court further considered that the applicant’s complaint did not come within the scope of the right to freedom of association, because the German hunting associations were of a public nature. Vested with administrative, rule-making and disciplinary prerogatives, they remained integrated into State structures. There was thus no doubt that the association was not simply qualified as “public” in order to remove it from the scope of Article 11 of the Convention.
18. The Federal Constitutional Court further considered that the applicant’s right to equal treatment had not been violated. There was an objective reason which justified drawing a distinction between the owners of landholdings less than 75 hectares in area and those more than 75 hectares in area. Contrary to the situation in France, which had been examined by the Court in the Chassagnou judgment, the Federal Hunting Law applied to the whole surface of Germany and was binding on all landowners. The owners of land more than 75 hectares in area had the same duties in game keeping as those adhering to hunting associations.
19. Finally, the Federal Constitutional Court observed that the administrative courts had considered the Chassagnou judgment and had accentuated the differences between the German law and the French Law as applicable at the relevant time.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
20. Article 20a of the Basic Law provides:
“Mindful also of its responsibility toward future generations, the State shall protect the natural bases of life by legislation and, in accordance with law and justice, by executive and judicial action, all within the framework of the constitutional order.”
Section 1 § 1 of the Federal Hunting Law (Bundesjagdgesetz) provides that the hunting right encompasses the right to manage and protect the game stock on a particular area of land, to exercise the hunt and to take possession of the game. The hunting right is linked to the duty to manage and protect the game stock (Pflicht zur Hege).
Under § 2 of that section, the management of the game stock is aimed at maintaining varied and healthy game populations at level compatible with land care and cultural conditions and at avoiding game damage.
§ 3 distinguishes between the hunting right (Jagdrecht) and the right to exercise the hunt (Ausübung des Jagdrechts). The landowner has the hunting right on his premises. The right to exercise the hunt is regulated by the following provisions:
Section 4 of the Hunting Law provides:
“The hunt may be exercised either on private hunting districts (section 7) or common hunting districts (section 8).”
Section 6 (enclosed premises, stay of the hunt) reads as follows:
“The hunt is stayed on surfaces, which do not belong to a hunting district, and on enclosed surfaces (befriedete Bezirke). A limited exercise of the hunt may be permitted. This law does not apply to zoological gardens.”
Section 7 provides, inter alia, that plots of at least 75 hectares of surface which can be exploited on an agricultural, forestry or fishery level and which belong to one single owner constitute a private hunting district.
Section 8 provides that all surfaces which do not belong to a private hunting district constitute a common hunting district if they have an overall surface of at least 150 hectares.
Section 9 § 1 provides as follows:
“The owners of surfaces belonging to a common hunting district form a hunting association. Owners of surfaces on which the hunt must not be exercised do not belong to the hunting association.”
Section 10 reads as follows:
“(1) The hunting association generally exploits the hunt by lease-hold. The lease can be limited to the members of the association(...)
(2) The hunting association is allowed to practice the hunt on its own account by chartered hunters. With the agreement of the competent authority, it can decide to stay the hunt (Ruhen der Jagd ).
(3) The association decides about the use of the net profit of the hunt. If the association decides not to distribute it to the owners of hunting grounds according to the surface they own, each owner who had contested this decision is allowed to claim his share. ...”
Section 20 provides:
“(1) Hunting is prohibited in areas where the practice of the hunt would, under the specific circumstances of the case, disturb public peace, order or security or would endanger human life.
(2) The practice of the hunt in nature and wildlife protection areas and in national and wildlife parks is regulated by the Länder.”
Section 21 provides:
“(1) The shooting of the game is to be regulated in a way which fully safeguards the legitimate interests of agriculture, fishery and forestry to be protected from damages caused by wild game and which takes into account the necessities of nature protection and landscape conservation. Within these limits, the regulation of the shooting of the game shall contribute to maintain a healthy population of all domestic game in adequate numbers and, in particular, ensure the protection of endangered species.”
Section 7 of the Hunting Law of the Land of Rhineland-Palatinate provides, inter alia, as follows:
“(1) The Hunting association is a public law corporation. It is subject to State supervision. The supervision is exercised by the lower hunting authority...The hunting association has to issue its own internal statute (Satzung). The internal statute has to be approved by the supervising authority unless it is in accordance with a model statute issued by the highest hunting authority; in this case notice of the statute has to be given to the lower hunting authority. If the hunting association fails to issue a statute within one year after the issue of the model statute, the supervising authority issues an internal statute and publishes it...at the expense of the association.
...
(4) Cost orders (Umlageforderungen) are to be executed under the provisions of the law on the execution of administrative acts. The execution rights are exercised by the exchequer who executes the claims of the community in which the association is situated....”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TAKEN SEPARATELY
21. The applicant complained that the obligation to tolerate the exercise of hunting rights on his premises violated his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions as provided in Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
22. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
23. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions by the applicant
24. The applicant submitted that the limitations imposed on the use of his land by the Federal Hunting Law were disproportionate. He was even deprived of the possibility actively to protect the wildlife on his premises, for example by providing medical care to an injured animal.
25. The German legislator had failed to strike a fair balance between his interest to enjoy the use of his property and the alleged general interest in the hunt. As he was the only landowner within the hunting association who was opposed to the exercise of the hunt, he was factually unable to prevent the lease of the hunting rights.
26. The circumstances of the case resembled those which had been examined by the Court in the cases of Chassagnou (cited above) and Schneider (Schneider v. Luxembourg, no. 2113/04, 10 July 2007). The aims pursued by the German legislator were largely similar to those which had been pursued in France and Luxembourg. In their submissions in the Schneider case (cited above, § 34), the Government had also emphasised that the hunting law had the primary aim to protect persons and goods, appropriately to manage the game stock and to preserve the ecological balance.
27. The fact that he was entitled to a share of the profits deriving from the lease of the hunt did not in any way compensate his loss, as such compensation was incompatible with his ethical convictions. Furthermore, he had never received any payments, which, having regard to the size of his plots, would, in any event, amount to only a few cents per year.
28. The concept of the “Hege (management and protection of the game)” dated back to the third Reich and did not serve the protection of the game. Recent scientific research had demonstrated that wild game was able to self-regulate and that excessive hunting even increased the number of certain species. Road accidents involving wild game were in the majority of cases caused by the hunt. Furthermore, the exercise of the hunt did not respect in any way the needs to protect rare and endangered species. A number of European countries did not have hunting associations or had even almost completely prohibited hunting without encountering any damage caused by game stock or other problems relating to the exercise of the hunt.
29. In Germany, the hunt was factually exercised as a leisure activity. Many species, such as birds of prey, were hunted without any ecological or economical necessity. The exercise of the hunt could not be regarded as having a positive impact on issues of general interest. The ethical protection of animals was guaranteed by Article 20a of the German Basic Law, while the right to exercise the hunt was neither protected by the Basic Law nor by the Convention.
30. It was not true that no surfaces in Germany were exempt from the hunt. Under section 6 sentence 1 of the Federal Hunting Law, the hunt was not exercised in areas which did not adhere to a hunting district; as for example in enclaves within a private hunting district. Furthermore, under section 10 of the Federal Hunting Law the hunting authority could authorise a stay of the hunt. The Länder were entitled to create areas which were not subjected to hunting rights and had done so, in particular by creating nature reserves in which the exercise of the hunt was prohibited or only permitted under very exceptional circumstances. Furthermore, since the reform of the federal system in Germany in 2006, the Länder were free to regulate the practice of the hunt on their own motion or even to abolish hunting altogether.
2. Submissions by the Government
31. The Government conceded that the obligation to tolerate the hunt on his premises, which ran counter to the applicant’s convictions, infringed the applicant’s rights under Article 1 of Protocol no. 1. It was, however, justified under paragraph 2 of that same Article as being in the general interest and proportionate to the aims pursued.
32. The Government emphasised that, under German law, the exercise of the hunt was not conceived as a leisure activity, but was aimed at globally assuming responsibility for the game stock, its natural resources and nature, thereby taking into account agricultural and forestry interests.
33. With regard to the principle of proportionality, the Government submitted that the German system struck a fair balance between the protection of property rights and the general interest. The German hunting law substantially differed from the situation in France and Luxembourg. This was evident in the notion of “Hege”, which transcended the simple management of an orderly hunt and encompassed a general protection of the game stock both quantitatively and qualitatively. The hunting right carried with it the obligation to preserve varied and healthy game stock while at the same time regulating the number of game in order to prevent game damage on agricultural and forest areas. A regulation of the quantity of wild game was particularly important in densely populated Germany, for example in order to avoid the spreading of animal diseases and to avoid damage caused by wild game on other premises. It followed that the hunt not only served ecological interests, but also other general interests and the protection of other landowners’ properties.
34. While conceding that the applicant disposed of no effective means to avoid the transfer of the right to exercise the hunt on his premises to the hunting association, the Government considered that the duty to tolerate the exercise of the hunt did not impose an excessive burden on him. Firstly, unlike in France, the applicant received a share of the profits derived from the lease of the hunting rights. While this participation in the profits might be unsatisfactory to the applicant, who was opposed to hunting for ethical reasons, this compensation had to be taken into account when assessing the proportionality of the measure. Within the framework of Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 the Government did not share the concerns expressed by the Court in the Schneider judgment (see Schneider, cited above, § 49) that ethical convictions could not be compensated by monetary awards. The Convention right protected the enjoyment of one’s property without being subjected to external limitations. It did not, however, in any form protect ethical conceptions.
35. Secondly, the Government submitted that the system of hunting associations in Germany covered all surfaces, including State-owned property, and was self-consistent. As the wild game did not stop at district borders, and would retreat into areas which were exempt from hunting, the aims of the hunting law could only be achieved if the hunt was exercised on all appropriate surfaces. There were only rare exceptions to this rule which were all based on overriding, general interests. It was true that the hunt was stayed under section 1, § 1, first alternative of the Federal Hunting Law, on those areas which did not adhere to a hunting district. However, having regard to the wide definition of hunting districts in sections 7 and 8 of that law, only few surfaces fell within the scope of that provision. Furthermore, such surfaces were generally incorporated into other hunting districts. The hunting authority only granted a stay of the hunt under section 10 § 2 sentence 2 of the Hunting Law in exceptional cases and for reasons which related to management and protection of game stock. Even in nature reserves the exercise of the hunt was not generally excluded; the regulation of the hunt depended on the specific conservation purposes. The reform of the federal system had not changed this situation, as all Länder had opted for maintaining the system of area-wide hunting.
36. Contrary to the law applicable in Luxembourg, a duty to exercise the hunt also existed on larger plots. Even though the owners of plots more than 75 hectares of surface did not de jure adhere to a hunting association, they were obliged to regulate the game stock and thus to exercise the hunt in the same way as owners of plots belonging to a common hunting district. If they did not exercise the hunt themselves, the hunting authority could force them to do so or perform the task at the owner’s expense.
37. It was not true that those European States which did not have hunting associations did not suffer from damages caused by game. The natural system of self-regulation of the wild game had ceased to function in the densely populated and exploited regions of Central Europe.
38. The Government further submitted that the German hunting law imposed the duty on persons exercising the hunt to respect the legitimate interests of the land-owners and held them liable for any damage caused through the exercise of the hunt. The limitations imposed on the hunt took into account ethical considerations, for example by prohibiting the use of certain kinds of ammunition.
39. There was no milder means to achieve the intended aim. A system based on voluntary participation could not ensure a solution which covered the whole surface. Furthermore, the obligatory adherence assured that no concerned person was excluded from the system. It further assured that the State could effectively control the management and protection of the game stock.
40. The applicant remained free to take measures to protect wildlife on his premises. Furthermore, it was appropriate to impose on the person exercising the hunt the duty to catch, take care and, if necessary, kill seriously injured game because only a hunter had the necessary training allowing him to assess the situation and to take the necessary measures.
3. Submissions by the third parties
41. The Deutscher Jagdschutzverband e. V. emphasised the high significance of the outcome of the instant proceedings both for the entire hunting system and for the hunters’ interests. In order to be allowed to practice the hunt, hunters had to prove extensive knowledge in the relevant areas and had to adhere to the highest ethical standards regarding animal protection and nature preservation. The specific framework conditions in Germany, in particular its dense population and the intensive cultivation of its land, made it extremely difficult to regulate game population.
42. The principle of area-wide hunting was a central element of the obligation to preserve wildlife. It was essential to hunt area-wide on all landed areas in order to be able to follow migrating game. Area-wide hunting was consistently implemented in Germany. Areas excluded from hunting districts under section 6 § 1 of the Federal Hunting Law comprised less than 0.01 % of all landed properties, were only of a temporary nature and compelled hunting authorities to incorporate them rapidly into neighbouring hunting districts. Stays of the hunt under section 10 § 2 of the Federal Hunting Law were subject to a consent by the hunting authority. In practice, the hunting authority only consented to hunting being stayed in very rare and exceptional cases, for example in cases in which the game population of a certain area had been virtually wiped out as the result of a catastrophe, and only for a limited period of time. There was currently no known case in which any such application had been approved by the upper hunting authority of the Federal State of Rhineland-Palatinate, where the applicant’s premises were situated.
43. If certain areas were excluded from the hunt, there would inevitably be considerable concentrations of wild animals on those properties where hunting was not permitted. This would entail a considerably enhanced risk of transmission of game diseases and animal epidemics, and considerable stress situation for the game. A further consequence would be increased damage caused by wild game on neighbouring land properties. Fleeing and injured game could not be followed into these areas with the result of an effective practice of the hunt and giving relief to suffering animals would become virtually impossible. Summing up, the third party considered that it would no longer be possible to carry out the proper regulation of game populations, resulting in a severe disruption of the biological equilibrium. Furthermore, hunters would no longer be prepared to assume liability for damage caused by wild game.
44. The Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft der Jagdgenossenschaften und Eigenjagdbesitzer confirmed these submissions and added that there was a great danger that landowners who were interested in eluding a membership in a hunting association for completely different reasons used the ethical objection against the hunt as a mere pretext.
4. Assessment by the Court
45. The Court notes, at the outset, that the Government did not contest that the obligation to allow the practice of the hunt on his premises interfered with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his property. The Court endorses this assessment.
46. It follows that it has to be determined whether this interference was in accordance with the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol no. 1, which allows the State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary in the general interest.
47. It is well-established case-law that the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must be construed in the light of the principle laid down in the first sentence of the Article. Consequently, an interference must achieve a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. There must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim pursued. In determining whether this requirement is met, the Court recognises that the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of enforcement and to ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question (see Chassagnou, cited above, § 75).
48. The Court notes, at the outset, that the aim of the impugned provisions are laid down in Section 1 § 2 of the Federal Hunting Law, providing that the management of the game stock is aimed at maintaining varied and healthy game populations at a level compatible with land care and cultural conditions and at avoiding game damage. The Court accepts that these aims are in the general interest (compare Chassagnou, cited above, § 49 and Schneider, cited above, § 46).
49. With regard to the proportionality of the interference, the Court takes note of the emphasis the relevant law puts on the maintenance of a healthy fauna in accordance with the ecological and economic circumstances. Even though it appears to be true that the hunt is primarily practiced by individuals during their spare time, the purpose of the hunting law cannot be reduced to merely enabling certain individuals to exercise a leisure activity.
50. As regards the necessity of the measure at issue, the Court takes note of the Government’s submissions that the specific situation in Germany as one of the most densely populated areas in Central Europe made it necessary to allow area-wide hunting on all suitable premises. The Court further observes that the German law applies nationwide. In this respect, the situation in Germany differs from the situation found in France, where only 29 of the 93 départements concerned had been made subject to the regime of compulsory adherence to hunting associations (see Chassagnou, cited above, § 84).
51. Furthermore, the Court observes that the German regime does not exempt any public or private owners of property which is a priori suitable for the hunt from the obligation to tolerate hunting on their premises. In this respect, the situation has to be distinguished from that examined in the Luxembourg case, where the property of the Crown was excluded from adherence to hunting associations (see Schneider, cited above, §§ 18 and 50). Even though plots of at least 75 hectares of surface are not regrouped, this does not dispense the owners of these plots from either exercising the hunt themselves or tolerating it on their premises.
52. The Court notes that the German system of area-wide hunting is subject to the following exceptions: Under section 6 sentence 1 of the Federal Hunting Law, the hunt is stayed on areas which do not belong to a hunting district and in enclosed areas. Furthermore, the hunting association, with the consent of the hunting authority, can decide to stay the hunt (section 10 § 2 sentence 2). Section 20 of the Federal Hunting Law prohibits the exercise of the hunt in places where public peace, order or security would be otherwise disturbed or human life jeopardised. Furthermore, special regulations apply to the exercise of the hunt in nature and wildlife reserves (section 20 § 2).
53. The Court observes that the stay of the hunt in enclosed areas can be justified by the fact that wild game cannot move into these areas. As regards the stay of the hunt in areas which do not belong to a hunting district, the Court observes that these exception are due to the specific setting of the premises, for example as enclaves surrounded by a private hunting district. The Court further takes note of the third party’s submissions (see paragraph 41, above), which had not been contested by the applicant, that these stays of the hunt are of a merely temporary nature and concern less than 0.01 % of the landed property. The Court further observes that the hunting association cannot freely decide on a stay of the hunt, but has to obtain the hunting authority’s consent (compare Schneider, cited above, § 50, for the differing situation in Luxembourg). According to the uncontested submissions by the Government, such consent was only given in rare and exceptional cases, and only for a limited period of time. The Court finally observes that the exceptions under section 20 of the Federal Hunting Law lie in the interest of maintaining public order and security (paragraph 1) and in the interest to afford special protection to nature reserves (paragraph 2).
54. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court considers that the exceptions to the rule of area-wide hunting are sufficiently motivated by general and hunting-related interests and thus do not call into question the principle of area-wide hunting as such. In this respect, the instant case can be clearly distinguished from the situation examined by the Court in the French and Luxembourg cases, in which the Court found exceptions from the application of the principle of area-wide hunting which were not sufficiently motivated and which, according to the Court’s assessment, proved that it was not absolutely necessary to subject the whole rural area to the exercise of these rights (see Chassagnou, cited above, § 84, and Schneider, cited above, § 50).
55. The Court further notes that the applicant, under section 10 § 3 of the Federal Hunting Law, has a claim to a share of the profit of the lease which corresponds to the size of his property. Even though the sum the applicant could claim under this provision does not appear to be substantial, the Court notes that the relevant provisions prevent other individuals from drawing a financial profit from the use of the applicant’s land. The Court further observes that the applicant has a claim to be compensated for any damages which might be caused by the exercise of the hunt on his premises.
56. Having regard to the wide margin of appreciation afforded to the Contracting States in this area, allowing them to take into account the specific circumstances prevailing in their country, the foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the Government struck a fair balance between the competing interests at stake. There has accordingly been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1, TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
57. The applicant submitted that the provisions of the Federal Hunting Law discriminated against him in two ways, one grounded on property and the other on his ethical convictions. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 taken in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, which provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
58. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
59. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions by the applicant
60. According to the applicant, the Federal Hunting Law privileged hunters, since in consideration for their private right to hunt they had been given the right to hunt on a wider area, whereas non-hunters had lost, without any compensation or consideration, not only their right of use but also their freedom of thought and the freedom to manifest their beliefs by putting their ethics into practice on their own property. Furthermore, the relevant provisions discriminated against owners of smaller landholdings, as plots more than 75 hectares of area were not included in the districts of the hunting associations.
61. The different treatment was disproportionate and was not suited to serve the general interest. While it was true that the owners of land more than 75 hectare in area could be obliged to regulate the quantities of certain game stock, they could otherwise freely decide which species they wished to hunt and which not. This concerned a large number of animal species. In Germany, many species of wild life were hunted without any economic or ecological necessity. They could also decide to fulfil their shooting quota in a way which was compatible with their ethical convictions, for example, by avoiding hunting during breeding times and by choosing their hunting method. They could even decide to stay the hunt and to contest any order to exercise the hunt before the courts.
62. Furthermore, owners of private hunting districts did neither have to tolerate the erection of hunting appliances nor to tolerate the presence of strangers on their premises. Furthermore, the landowner was deprived of the possibility to observe and to take care of the wildlife in its natural habitat. It followed that the transfer of the right to exercise the hunt went beyond that which was necessary to prevent damages caused by wild game.
63. The applicant further considered that the existence of nature reserves proved that area-wide hunting was not necessary in order to protect and manage the game stock and prevent damages. Finally, he pointed out that owners of enclaves, which fell within the ambit of section 6 sentence 1, first alternative, did not have to tolerate the hunt on their premises. This also constituted a clear violation of Article 14 of the Convention.
2. Submissions by the Government
64. The Government submitted that the applicant had not been treated differently from any other landowner with respect to his rights under Article 1 of Protocol no. 1, as the owners of plots more of 75 hectares in area were also obliged to tolerate hunting on their premises. Even though they retained the right to exercise the hunt, they were not allowed to turn their plots into hunting-free areas. The owner of a private hunting ground either had to hunt himself or to tolerate the hunt. The question whether the owner of a private hunting district had certain discretion as to how to practice the hunt was irrelevant with respect to the applicant’s complaint.
65. Insofar as the applicant complained about a discrimination of hunting-objectors as opposed to hunters, the Government submitted that in Germany, unlike in France, the membership in a hunting association did not convey the right to hunt on the whole hunting district.
66. Furthermore, the owner of a larger plot was not free to choose which species of wild game to hunt, as the German law contained strict provisions as to when and which wild game was to be hunted. Under section 21 of the Federal Hunting Law, the shooting of the game had to be regulated in order to ensure that a healthy population of all animal species remained in appropriate number and the legitimate interests of agriculture, forestry and fishery were safeguarded. Thus, shooting was not permitted in an arbitrary way, but had to be planned and exercised in a sustainable way.
67. The erection of hunting appliances such as raised hides served a safe practice of the hunt in conformity with animal protection. An owner of a private hunting district who had leased his right to exercise the hunt had to tolerate the erection of such appliances in the same way as the owner of a smaller plot. The Government finally submitted that any unequal treatment was justified for the reasons set out in connection with the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol no. 1.
3. Assessment by the Court
68. The Court reiterates that a difference in treatment is discriminatory if it “has no objective and reasonable justification”, that is if it does not pursue a “legitimate aim” or if there is not a “reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised”. Moreover, the Contracting States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences between otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (see, among many other authorities, Chassagnou, cited above, § 91).
69. Turning to the circumstances of the instant case, the Court observes that, under German hunting law, the hunting rights of owners of plots less than 75 hectares in area are automatically transferred to a hunting association, which decides on the lease of the hunting rights, whereas owners of larger plots are allowed to chose whether they wish to exercise the hunt themselves or to lease the hunting rights. However, contrary to the situation examined by the Court in the cases of Chassagnou and Schneider (cited above, § 92 and 50 respectively), owners of larger plots were not allowed to stay the hunt completely, but had to fulfil the same obligations regarding the management of game stock as the hunting associations.
70. The Court considers that there exists a difference in treatment between the owners of smaller plots and those of larger plots in that the latter remain free to choose in which way to fulfil their obligation under the hunting laws, whereas the former merely retain the right to take part in the decisions taken by the hunting association. The Court considers, however, that this difference in treatment is sufficiently justified by the reasons put forward by the Government in respect of the alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol no. 1, in particular the necessity to pool smaller plots in order to allow for area-wide hunting and thus to assure an effective management of the game stock. As regards the treatment of owners of areas which do not belong to a hunting district and which were not subject to the hunt (section 6 § 1 sentence 1 of the Federal Hunting Law), the Court, having regard to it findings under Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 (see paragraph 52, above), considers that this exception from the general adherence to hunting associations is owed to the specific circumstances of the respective plot, which justifies a difference in treatment.
It follows that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol no. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 11 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN SEPARATELY
71. The applicant further complained that his obligatory adherence to a hunting association violated his rights under Article 11 of the Convention, which provides:
“1. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and to freedom of association with others, including the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.
2. No restrictions shall be placed on the exercise of these rights other than such as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others. This Article shall not prevent the imposition of lawful restrictions on the exercise of these rights by members of the armed forces, of the police or of the administration of the State.”
1. Submissions by the Government
72. The Government submitted that the applicant’s complaint did not come within the scope of the right to freedom of association, because the German hunting associations were of a public nature. Under section 7 § 1 of the Hunting Law of the Land of Rhineland Palatinate, the hunting associations, by the means of supervision by the State, were more closely integrated into State structures than the French or Luxembourg associations. The hunting authority was vested with extensive rights of control, such as the right to object against decisions, to order the association to comply with their legal prerogatives and, should the situation arise, install an administrator. The supervising authority further had the right to consult all case-files and to carry out further examinations. Under specific circumstances, community organs could even serve as directors of a hunting association.
73. Unlike in France and Luxembourg, hunting associations were vested with public law prerogatives. They could issue their own internal statutes and use administrative forms of action such as issuing cost orders by administrative act. The execution of these orders was governed by public law.
2. Submissions by the applicant
74. The applicant submitted that the hunting associations fell within the ambit of Article 11 of the Convention. They were formed by private individuals who convened at regular intervals in order to decide on the lease. If Contracting States were able, at their discretion, by classifying an association as “public” or “para-administrative” to remove it from the scope of Article 11, that would give them such latitude that it might lead to results incompatible with the object and purpose of the Convention, which was to protect rights which were not theoretical or illusory, but practical and effective.
75. The applicant contested that the hunting associations were vested with any public law prerogatives. They did not employ any public officials or civil servants allowing them to take measures belonging to the field of the public law. The supervision exercised by the State was not sufficient to assume a public law character. Private associations were also entitled to issue their own internal statues, and all private associations were subject to State supervision under the Law of Associations. Furthermore, under the present law, the Länder were entitled to organise hunting associations in the form of private associations.
3. Assessment by the Court
76. The Court reiterates that the notion of “association” is to be interpreted by the Court in an autonomous way; the qualification given by the Contracting State merely serves as a starting point (see Schneider, cited above, § 69). Under the case-law of the Court, elements in determining whether an association is to be considered as private or public are: whether it was founded by individuals or by the legislature; whether it remained integrated within the structures of the State, whether it was invested with administrative, rule-making and disciplinary power, and whether it pursued an aim which was in the general interest (see, mutatis mutandis, Le Compte, Van Leuven and De Meyere v. Belgium, 23 June 1981, § 64, Series A no. 43).
77. Turning to the circumstances of the instant case, the Court notes, at the outset, that the hunting associations in the Land of Rhineland-Palatinate are established by law in the form of public law associations. They are subject to the control of the hunting authority and their internal statutes are subject to the approval of that authority. Furthermore, hunting associations are allowed to issue cost orders by administrative acts, which are executed by the public exchequer.
78. Having regard to these elements, the Court observes that the hunting associations are subject to State supervision which goes clearly beyond the supervision normally exercised over private associations. Furthermore, they are not only obliged to issue their internal statutes, but have the right to issue cost orders by administrative acts which are executed by State authorities. The Court thus considers that the hunting associations are sufficiently integrated into State structures in order to qualify them as public law institutions. Furthermore, they pursue the aim to manage the exercise of the hunting rights and thus to ensure the management and protection of the game stock, which lies in the general interest. There is no indication that the legislator classified the hunting association as “public” or “para-administrative” with the sole aim of removing them from the scope of Article 11 of the Convention (compare, a contrario, Schneider, cited above, § 100).
79. Having regard to these circumstances, the Court concludes that the hunting associations as established under the hunting law of the Land of Rhineland-Palatinate have to be regarded as public law institutions. It follows that Article 11 of the Convention is not applicable in the instant case. Consequently, this complaint is incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 11 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14
80. The applicant further complained about having been discriminated against with regard to his obligation to adhere to a hunting association.
81. The Court reiterates that it has consistently held that Article 14 of the Convention complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. Although the application of Article 14 does not presuppose a breach of those provisions – and to this extent it is autonomous – there can be no room for its application unless the facts at issue fall within the ambit of one or more of the latter (see, among many other authorities, Haas v. the Netherlands, no. 36983/97, § 41, ECHR 2004-I).
82. The Court has found above that Article 11 was not applicable in the instant case. It follows that Article 14 cannot be relied on and that this complaint is to be rejected as being incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 9 OF THE CONVENTION
83. Lastly, the applicant complained that the obligation to tolerate the exercise of the hunt violated his right to freedom of thought and conscience under Article 9 of the Convention, which provides:
“1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.
2. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
A. Admissibility
84. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
B. Merits
85. The applicant submitted that his convictions as a hunting opponent attained a level of cogency, cohesion and importance which brought it within the scope of Article 9 of the Convention. The obligatory adherence to the hunting association deprived him of the possibility to act in accordance with his convictions, for example by helping an injured animal on his premises, and was not justified under any of the reasons set out in paragraph 2 of Article 9.
86. According to the Government, the applicant could not rely on Article 9 of the Convention as an individual could not rely on his rights under that Article if he was obliged to tolerate actions by third parties which lay in the public interest. In any event, any interference with the applicant’s rights under Article 9 had to be regarded as being justified for the reasons already set out before.
87. The Court does not find it necessary to determine whether the applicant’s complaint falls to be examined under Article 9 of the Convention, as it considers that any interference with the applicant’s rights is justified under paragraph 2 of Article 9 as being necessary in a democratic society in the interest of public safety, for the protection of public health and for the protection of the rights of others for the reasons set above (see paragraphs 48 to 55 above). It follows that there has been no violation of the applicant’s rights under Article 9 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken separately and in conjunction with Article 14 and under Article 9 of the Convention admissible;
2. Declares by a majority the remainder of the application inadmissible;
3. Holds by four votes to three that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds by four votes to three that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention;
5. Holds by six votes to one that there has been no violation of Article 9 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 20 January 2011, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment:
(a) Joint dissenting opinion of Judges Lorenzen, Berro-Lefèvre and Kalaydjieva;
(b) Separate dissenting opinion of Judge Kalaydjieva.
P.L.
C.W.


JOINT DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES
LORENZEN, BERRO-LEFÈVRE AND KALAYDJIEVA
(Translation)
To our great regret, we do not share the majority’s opinion that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in this case.
In support of that conclusion, the Chamber judgment’s reasoning sets out numerous arguments demonstrating the existence of several points of divergence with the situations which, in the past, gave rise to the Chassagnou and Others v. France ([GC] nos. 25088/94, 28331/95 and 28443/95, ECHR 1999-III) and Schneider v. Luxembourg (no. 2113/04, 10 July 2007) judgments, in which violations of this Article were found.
For our part, we find it difficult to differentiate between these three cases.
Under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the only question which arises is whether the measure adopted was “necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest”, it being understood that there must, of course, be a reasonable degree of proportionality between the measure in question and the aim pursued by it.
In the French, Luxembourg and German cases, the disputed legislation pursued several aims, including that of promoting the rational management of the cynegetic heritage and respect for the ecological balance.
The question must therefore be asked whether the interference with property resulting from the impugned legislation is necessary in order to regulate hunting, in accordance with the general interest, and whether that interference is reasonably proportionate to the objectives pursued.
In this respect, we are obliged to note that the answer has already been given in the French and Luxembourg cases, notwithstanding the qualifications highlighted by the German Government and repeated by the majority of the Chamber.
Thus, as in the above-cited cases, the effective possibilities for the applicant successfully to ensure that hunting rights were not exercised on his land were almost non-existent.
We would also point out that in the Schneider judgment, where the facts and context were the most similar to those in this case and which was adopted unanimously, the Chamber considered that the existence of compensation for the landowners concerned did not amount to sufficient legitimation for the compulsory membership of an association, given that the argument of an ethical objection to hunting could not meaningfully be weighted against an annual remuneration as consideration for the loss of the right to use the property, if only on account of the essentially irreconcilable nature of compensation in equivalence with the subjective argument invoked (see Schneider, cited above, § 49). Identical reasoning is therefore applicable in this case.
Equally, we are not convinced by the Chamber’s analysis in paragraphs 52 to 54, to the effect that there exists a difference in the reasoning given for the exceptions from the mandatory principle of area-wide hunting in the German legislation and that in force in France and in Luxembourg. Here too, independently of the arguments put forward, the only conclusion that can be reached is that those exceptions show that it is not essential to subject the entirety of the non-urban territory to the exercise of hunting rights.
The system put in place in Germany, intended to regulate hunting by ensuring increased protection for the cynegetic heritage, has resulted, as in the two previous cases, in a situation where it is impossible for the applicant to object to the exercise by third parties of their right to hunt on his land.
The conclusion accepted in the Chassagnou and Others and Schneider judgments was as follows: “notwithstanding the legitimate aims ... the result of the compulsory-transfer system ... has been to place the applicants in a situation which upsets the fair balance to be struck between protection of the right of property and the requirements of the general interest. Compelling small landowners to transfer hunting rights over their land so that others can make use of them in a way which is totally incompatible with their beliefs imposes a disproportionate burden which is not justified under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1” (see Chassagnou, § 85, and Schneider, § 51).
We are unable to see how a different result can be found in the Herrmann case. A violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must therefore be found in this case also.
In consequence, having regard to this finding, we also consider that it is not necessary to examine separately whether there has been a violation of Article 14 (taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1).


SEPARATE DISSENTING OPIONION OF JUDGE KALAYDJIEVA
I joined the opinion of Judges Lorenzen and Berro-Lefèvre, which expresses our common failure to see how the different result of finding no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention was reached in the present case – having regard to the conclusions of the Court in the similar circumstances of the cases of Chassagnou v. France (Chassagnou and Others v. France [GC], nos. 25088/94, 28331/95 and 28443/95, ECHR 1999-III) and Schneider v. Luxembourg (Schneider v. Luxembourg, no. 2113/04, 10 July 2007). In my view the same reasons for disagreement are equally valid for the conclusions of the majority on the applicability of Article 11 of the Convention to the circumstances of the present case.
Having agreed that in the present case “the hunting associations [to which the applicant was obliged to adhere] are sufficiently integrated into State structures in order to qualify them as public law institutions”, the majority arrived at the conclusion that Article 11 does not apply to the circumstances. Similar objections of the respondent Government in Chassagnou did not prevent the Grand Chamber from finding that the fact that the prefect supervised the way the associations operated was not sufficient to support the contention that they remained integrated within the structures of the State. The Court also found that it could not be maintained that the associations enjoyed prerogatives outside the orbit of the ordinary law, whether administrative, rule-making or disciplinary, or that they employed processes of a public authority, like professional associations (see Chassagnou, para. 101). The Court concluded that to “compel a person by law to join an association such that it is fundamentally contrary his own convictions to be a member of it, and to oblige him, on account of his membership of that association, to transfer his rights over the land he owns so that the association in question can attain objectives of which he disapproves, goes beyond what is necessary to ensure that a fair balance is struck between conflicting interests and cannot be considered proportionate to the aim pursued” (para. 117). Those findings were confirmed, as recently as in 2007, in Schneider.
I see no reason to arrive at different conclusions in the case of Herrmann v. Germany.
I also ask myself whether - if correct - the conclusion on the public nature of the associations is also capable of serving as a basis of the majority’s view that “it is not necessary to determine whether the complaint [that the applicant’s obligatory adherence to the hunting associations deprived him of the possibility to act in accordance with his convictions] falls to be examined under Article 9 of the Convention, as it considers that any interference with the applicant’s rights is justified under paragraph 2 of Article 9 as being necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety and for the protection of the rights of others.”
In particular, I wonder whether mandatory membership of public law institutions aggravates the compulsion an individual suffers when being required to engage in activities contrary to his views. Although mentioned in the views of the Commission, the Court and the Committee of Ministers in the earlier cases of Chassagnou and Schneider came to no findings as to the right to convictions. Regrettably, the brief reasons offered for the majority’s conclusion in the present case provide insufficiently detailed answers to the questions of applicability and respect to the rights under Article 9 of the Convention in the present case.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione di P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 9
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA HERRMANN C. GERMANIA
(Richiesta n. 9300/07)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
20 gennaio 2011
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Herrmann c. Germania,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger, Rait Maruste, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Ganna Yudkivska, giudici,
e da Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 7 dicembre 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 9300/07) contro la Repubblica Federale della Germania depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino tedesco, il Sig. G. H. (“il richiedente”), il 12 febbraio 2007.
2. Il Governo tedesco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra A. Wittling-Vogel, del Ministero Federale della Giustizia.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che la sua appartenenza automatica all'associazione dei cacciatori ed il suo obbligo di permettere l'esercizio dei diritti di caccia sulla sua proprietà hanno violato i suoi diritti sotto gli Articoli 9, 11 e 14 della Convenzione e sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione.
4. Il 18 novembre 2009 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta e decise di comunicare le azioni di reclamo al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 1).
5. Le parti risposero per iscritto alle loro reciproche osservazioni . Inoltre, commenti di terze-parti furono ricevuti dal Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft der Jagdgenossenschaften und Eigenjagdbesitzer (BAGJE), rappresentato dal Sig. R., consigliere legale, e dal Deutscher Jagdschutz-Verband, e. C., rappresentato dal Sig. T., consigliere legale a cui era stato dato il permesso di intervenire nella procedura scritta dal Presidente (Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1955 e vive a Stutensee.
7. Sotto la Legge Federale tedesca sulla Caccia (Bundesjagdgesetz), i proprietari di terreni di caccia con una superficie di meno di 75 ettari sono membri de jure di un'associazione di cacciatori (Jagdgenossenschaft), mentre i proprietari di aree più grandi di terreno gestiscono il loro proprio distretto di caccia. Il richiedente possiede due proprietà a Rhineland-Platinate che è più piccolo di 75 ettari in un solo blocco. Lui è così un membro automatico di un'associazione di caccia, nella presente causa del municipio di Langsur.
8. Il 14 febbraio 2003 il richiedente che si oppone alla caccia per motivi etici, introdusse una richiesta presso l'autorità di caccia per terminare la sua appartenenza all'associazione di caccia. L'autorità respinse la sua richiesta per i motivi che la sua appartenenza era prescritta dalla legge e che non c'era disposizione sulla conclusione dell’appartenenza.
9. Il richiedente introdusse procedimenti di fronte alla Corte amministrativa di Treves. Appellandosi in particolare alla sentenza della Corte nella causa Chassagnou ed Altri c. Francia ([GC] N. 25088/94, 28331/95 e 28443/95 ECHR 1999-III), lui richiese alla corte di stabilire che lui non era un membro dell'associazione della caccia del municipio di Langsur.
10. Il 14 gennaio 2004 la corte amministrativa respinse la richiesta del richiedente. Considerò che la legge Federale sulla Caccia non violava i diritti del richiedente. Riguardo alla sentenza Chassagnou la corte amministrativa considerò che la situazione in Germania differiva da quella in Francia. Osservò, in particolare, che i proprietari tedeschi di terreni di caccia, tramite appartenenza alla loro associazione di caccia erano nella posizione di influenzare il processo decisionale in merito a come i diritti di caccia avrebbero dovuto essere esercitati. Inoltre, loro avevano diritto a ricevere una quota dei profitti derivati dallo sfruttamento dei diritti di caccia. Tutti i proprietari delle aree che erano troppo piccole da permettere una gestione corretta dei diritti di cacciagione appartenevano ad un'associazione di caccia. La corte considerò anche che le associazioni di caccia non solo servivano gli interessi di piacere di coloro che esercitarono i diritti di caccia, ma imponeva certi specifici obblighi a coloro che servivano l'interesse generale in particolare il dovere di gestire la scorta pronta allo scopo di mantenere varie e sane le popolazioni di selvaggina ed evitare danni causati dalla caccia selvaggia . Erano obbligati inoltre ad attenersi alle specifiche quote stabilite dall'amministrazione della caccia della selvaggina. Questi doveri si applicavano allo stesso modo ai proprietari di terreni di caccia di area superiore ai 75 ettari, nonostante il fatto che queste aree più grandi non fossero raggruppate in associazioni di caccia.
11. Il 13 luglio 2004 e il 14 aprile 2005 la Corte amministrativa del Ricorso di Rhineland-Palatinate e la Corte amministrativa Federale respinse i ricorsi del richiedente sugli stessi motivi della corte amministrativa.
12. Il 13 dicembre 2006 la Corte Costituzionale Federale (1 BvR 2084/05) rifiutò di ammettere l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente per aggiudicazione. Notò, all'inizio, che le disposizioni della Legge Federale sulla Caccia non violava il diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà, ma definiva e limitava l'esercizio di questo diritto in modo proporzionato. Le disposizioni attinenti perseguivano degli scopi legittimi, erano necessarie e non imponevano un carico eccessivo sui possidenti.
13. Nel definire il contenuto ed i limiti dei diritti di proprietà, il legislatore doveva valutare gli interessi legittimi dei proprietari contro l'interesse generale. Lui doveva, in particolare, rispettare i principi della proporzionalità e dell'uguaglianza di trattamento. Le limitazioni imposte sull'esercizio dei diritti di proprietà non devono infrangere l'area cruciale del diritto protetto. Il margine di valutazione accordato al legislatore dipende dallo specifico contesto; più forte è il contesto sociale, più ampio è il margine di valutazione.
14. Applicando questi principi alla presente causa, la Corte Costituzionale Federale considerò che l’appartenenza obbligatoria del richiedente ad un'associazione di caccia non violava i suoi diritti di proprietà. La area cruciale di quel diritto non veniva infranta. La Legge Federale sulla Caccia perseguiva degli scopi legittimi e limitava i diritti di proprietà in modo proporzionato. Incluso nella nozione di “gestione e protezione delle scorte di selvaggina (Hege)”, aveva lo scopo di preservare la selvaggina in modo da essere adattata alle condizioni culturali e rurali, ed assicurare una fauna e una flora selvatica sana e varia. Sotto la Legge Federale sulla Caccia, la custodia della selvaggina non solo era un strumento per ostacolare i danni causati dalla fauna selvatica, ma anche evitare qualsiasi impedimento all'agricoltura, alla selvicoltura e allo sfruttamento dell’attività di pesca del territorio. Questi scopi servivano l'interesse generale.
15. L'appartenenza obbligatoria ad un'associazione di caccia era un mezzo appropriato e necessario per realizzare questi scopi. Facendo riferimento al paragrafo 79 della sentenza di Chassagnou sopra-citata, la Corte Costituzionale considerò che la Corte aveva ammesso che era indubbiamente nell'interesse generale evitare una caccia sregolata ed incoraggiare la gestione razionale delle riserve di selvaggina. L'appartenenza obbligatoria ad un'associazione di caccia era anche un mezzo proporzionato. L'impatto sui diritti di proprietà non era particolarmente serio e non era preminente rispetto all'interesse generale di una gestione razionale delle scorte della selvaggina. Inoltre, la Legge Federale sulla Caccia dotava ogni membro del diritto di partecipare al processo decisionale e di ricevere una quota dei profitti derivati dal contratto d'affitto dei diritti di caccia.
16. La Corte Costituzionale considerò inoltre che non c'era nessuna violazione della libertà del richiedente di coscienza. Facendo riferimento al paragrafo 114 della sentenza Chassagnou, accettò che le condanne del richiedente raggiungevano un certo livello di forza, coesione ed importanza ed erano perciò degne di riguardo in una società democratica. Di conseguenza, la Corte Costituzionale Federale considerò che era probabile che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente rientrasse all'interno della sfera della libertà di coscienza, ma che non c'era in qualsiasi caso, nessuna violazione di quel diritto. Al richiedente non fu né comandato di praticare la caccia lui stesso , né di parteciparvi o di sostenerla. Il fatto che lui doveva tollerare l'esercizio della caccia sulla sua proprietà non era il risultato di una sua propria decisione, ma era il risultato della decisione legittima del legislatore. Il diritto alla libertà di coscienza non includeva il diritto che l'intero ordine legale venisse sottomesso agli standard etici di qualcuno. Se l'ordine legale avesse distribuito il diritto di sfruttare una certa proprietà a molti rivendicatori di diritti, la coscienza del proprietario non sarebbe stata necessariamente preminente sui diritti costituzionali degli altri. Se la proprietà del terreno del richiedente-e degli altri proprietari che si opponevano alla caccia-fosse stata rimossa dall'associazione di caccia a causa delle loro condanne, il sistema intero di proprietà e della gestione della selvaggina sarebbe stato messo in pericolo. Il diritto alla libertà di coscienza non prevaleva sull'interesse generale nella presente causa.
17. La Corte Costituzionale Federale considerò inoltre che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente non rientrava all'interno della sfera del diritto alla libertà di associazione, perché le associazioni di caccia tedesche erano di natura pubblica. Assegnato legalmente dall’ amministrativo, le prerogative disciplinari e legislative, rimanevano integrate nelle strutture di Stato. Non c'era così dubbio che l'associazione non era qualificata semplicemente come “pubblica” per rimuoverla dalla sfera dell’Articolo 11 della Convenzione.
18. La Corte Costituzionale Federale considerò inoltre che il diritto del richiedente all'uguaglianza di trattamento non era stato violato. C'era una ragione obiettiva che giustificava una distinzione fra i proprietari di terreni inferiori per area ai 75 ettari e quelli di area superiore ai 75 ettari. Contrariamente alla situazione in Francia che era stata esaminata dalla Corte nella sentenza Chassagnou la Legge Federale sulla Caccis si applicava alla superficie intera della Germania e vincolava tutti i possidenti. I proprietari di terreni di area superiore ai i 75 ettari avevano gli stessi doveri di custodia di riserva di quelli che aderivano alle associazioni di caccia.
19. Infine, la Corte Costituzionale Federale osservò che le corti amministrative avevano considerato la sentenza Chassagnou ed avevano accentuato le differenze fra la legge tedesca e la Legge francese come applicabile al tempo attinente.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
20. L’Articolo 20a della Legge Di base prevede:
“Attento anche alla sua responsabilità verso le generazioni future, lo Stato proteggerà le basi naturali della vita con ls legislazione e, in conformità con la legge e la giustizia, tramite azione giudiziale e direttiva tutto all'interno della struttura dell'ordine costituzionale.”
La Sezione 1 § 1 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia (Bundesjagdgesetz) prevede che il diritto di caccia include il diritto di gestire e proteggere le scorte delle selvaggina in una particolare area di terreno, esercitare la caccia e prendere proprietà della riserva. Il diritto di caccia è collegato al dovere di gestire e proteggere la scorta della riserva (zur di Pflicht Hege).
Sotto il § 2 di questa sezione, la gestione della scorta della riserva ha lo scopo di mantenere varie e sane le popolazioni della riserva a livello compatibile con le condizioni culturali e la cura della terra e di evitare danni alla riserva.
Il § 3 distingue fra il diritto di caccia (Jagdrecht) ed il diritto di esercitare la caccia (des di Ausübung Jagdrechts). Il possidente ha il diritto di caccia sui suoi terreni. Il diritto di esercitare la caccia è regolato dalle seguenti disposizioni:
La Sezione 4 della Legge sulla Caccia prevede:
“La caccia può essere esercitata o su distretti di caccia privati (sezione 7) o su distretti di caccia comuni (sezione 8).”
La Sezione 6 (terreni inclusi, sospensione della caccia)si legge come segue:
“La caccia viene sospesa su superfici che non appartengono ad un distretto di caccia e su superfici recitante (befriedete Bezirke). Un esercizio limitato della caccia può essere permesso. Questa legge non si applica a giardini zoologici.”
La Sezione 7 prevede, inter alia che gli appezzamenti di almeno 75 ettari di superficie che possono essere sfruttati a livello agricolo, di selvicoltura o di pesca e che appartengono ad un solo proprietario costituiscono un distretto di caccia privato.
La Sezione 8 prevede che tutte le superfici che non appartengono ad un distretto di caccia privato costituiscono un distretto di caccia comune se loro hanno una superficie complessiva di almeno 150 ettari.
La Sezione che 9 § 1 prevede come segue:
“I proprietari di superfici che appartengono ad una forma di distretto di caccia comune da un'associazione di caccia. I proprietari di superfici sui cui la caccia non deve essere esercitata non appartengono all'associazione di caccia.”
La Sezione 10 recita come segue:
“(1) l'associazione di caccia sfrutta la caccia generalmente tramite contratto d'affitto*. Il contratto d'affitto può essere limitato ai membri dell'associazione (...)
(2) all'associazione di caccia è permesso praticare la caccia per proprio conto tramite cacciatori affittati. Con l'accordo dell'autorità competente, può decidere di sospendere la caccia (Ruhen der Jagd ).

(3) l'associazione decide dell'uso del profitto netto della caccia. Se l'associazione decide di non distribuirlo ai proprietari dei terreni di caccia secondo la superficie che possiedono, ad ogni proprietario che aveva contestato questa decisione è permesso chiedere la sua quota. ...”
La Sezione 20 prevede:
“(1) la caccia è proibita nelle aree in cui la pratica della caccia può, sotto specifiche circostanze del caso, disturbare la pace pubblica, l’ordine o la sicurezza o mettere in pericolo la vita umana.
(2) la pratica della caccia in aree naturali o di protezione flora e fauna selvatiche ed in parchi nazionali di animali e piante selvatiche è regolata dalla Länder.”
La Sezione 21 prevede:
“(1) la riserva di caccia deve essere regolata in modo da salvaguardare pienamente gli interessi legittimi dell'agricoltura, della pesca e della selvicoltura perché siano protetti da danni causati da battute di caccia selvagge e da prendere in considerazione le necessità di protezione della natura e la conservazione del panorama. All'interno di questi limiti, la regolamentazione della selvaggina contribuirà a mantenere una popolazione sana di ogni riserva nazionale in numeri adeguati e, in particolare, ad assicurare la protezione di specie in via d'estinzione.”
La Sezione 7 della Legge sulla del Terreno di Rhineland-Palatinate prevede, inter alia, come segue:
“(1) l'associazione di Caccia è una società per azioni di legge pubblica. È soggetta a soprintendenza Statale. La soprintendenza è esercitata dall'autorità di caccia inferiore... L'associazione di caccia deve emettere il suo proprio statuto interno (Satzung). Lo statuto interno deve essere approvato dall'autorità che supervisiona a meno che sia in conformità con un statuto di modello emesso dall'autorità di caccia più alta; in questo caso una nota dello statuto deve essere dato all'autorità di caccia inferiore. Se l'associazione di caccia va a vuoto nell’emettere un statuto entro un anno dopo la questione dello statuto di modello, l'autorità che supervisiona emette un statuto interno e lo pubblica... a spese dell'associazione.
...
(4) gli ordini dei costi (Umlageforderungen) saranno eseguiti sotto le disposizioni di legge sull'esecuzione degli atti amministrativi. I diritti di esecuzione sono esercitati dallo scacchiere che esegue le rivendicazioni della comunità nelle quali l'associazione è situata....”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 PRESO SEPARATAMENTE
21. Il richiedente si lamentò del fatto che l'obbligo per tollerare l'esercizio dei diritti di caccia sui suoi locali aveva violato il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà come previsto nell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al rispetto dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato della sua proprietà se non a causa di utilità pubblica e nelle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni precedenti non recano offesa al diritto che possiedono gli Stati di mettere in vigore le leggi che giudicano necessarie per regolamentare l'uso dei beni conformemente all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento delle imposte o di altri contributi o delle multe. "
22. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
23. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni del richiedente
24. Il richiedente presentò che le limitazioni imposte sull'uso della sua terra tramite la Legge Federale sulla Caccia erano sproporzionate. Lui fu privato anche della possibilità di proteggere attivamente gli animali e le piante selvatiche sulle sue proprietà , per esempio offrendo cure mediche ad un animale ferito.
25. Il legislatore tedesco non era riuscito a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra il suo interesse al godimento dell'uso della sua proprietà e l'addotto interesse generale per la caccia. Siccome lui era il solo possidente all'interno dell'associazione di caccia che si opponeva all'esercizio della caccia, lui non era effettivamente in grado di ostacolare il contratto d'affitto dei diritti di caccia.
26. Le circostanze della causa assomigliarono a quelle che erano state esaminate dalla Corte nelle cause Chassagnou (citata sopra) e Schneider (Schneider c. Lussemburgo, n. 2113/04, 10 luglio 2007). Gli scopi perseguiti dal legislatore tedesco erano ampiamente simili a quelli che erano stati perseguiti in Francia e nel Lussemburgo. Nelle sue osservazioni sulla causa Schneider (citata sopra, § 34), il Governo aveva enfatizzato anche che la legge sulla caccia aveva lo scopo primario di proteggere persone e beni, propriamente gestire la scorta della riserva e preservare l'equilibrio ecologico.
27. Il fatto che gli fosse concesso una quota dei profitti derivanti dal contratto d'affitto della caccia non compensava in nessun modo la sua perdita, siccome simile risarcimento era incompatibile con le sue condanne etiche. Lui non aveva mai ricevuto inoltre, nessun pagamento che, avendo riguardo ad alle dimensioni delle sue aree, in qualsiasi caso, avrebbe corrisposto solamente ad alcuni centesimi l’anno.
28. Il concetto di “Hege (gestione e protezione della riserva)” risaliva al terzo Reich e non serviva la protezione della riserva. La recente ricerca scientifica aveva dimostrato che la selvaggina era in grado di regolarsi lei stessa e che una caccia eccessiva aveva anche aumentato il numero di certe specie. Incidenti stradali che coinvolgono la fauna selvatica erano nella maggior parte dei casi causati dalla caccia. Inoltre, l'esercizio della caccia non rispettava in qualsiasi modo le necessità di protezione delle specie rare ed in via d'estinzione. Un numero di paesi europei non aveva le associazioni di caccia o aveva addirittura quasi completamente proibito la caccia senza incontrare qualsiasi danno causato dalla selvaggina o altri problemi relativi all'esercizio della caccia.
29. In Germania, la caccia veniva esercitata effettivamente come passatempo. Molte specie, come i rapaci furono cacciate senza qualsiasi necessità ecologica o economica. L'esercizio della caccia non si poteva considerare come avente un impatto positivo su dei problemi di interesse generale. La protezione etica degli animali era garantita con l’Articolo 20a della Legge Di base tedesca, mentre il diritto ad esercitare la caccia non era né fu protetto dalla Legge Di base né dalla Convenzione.
30. Non era vero che nessuna superficie in Germania era esente dalla caccia. Sotto la sezione 6 frase 1 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia, la caccia non veniva esercitata nelle aree che non appartenevano ad un distretto di caccia; come per esempio in enclavi all'interno di un distretto di caccia privato. Sotto la sezione 10 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia l'autorità della caccia potrebbe autorizzare inoltre, una sospensione della caccia. Ai Länder fu concesso di creare delle aree che non erano sottoposte ai diritti di caccia e fu fatto così, in particolare creando riserve naturali nelle quali l'esercizio della caccia era proibito o permesso solamente sotto circostanze molto eccezionali. Fin dalla riforma del sistema federale in Germania nel 2006, i Länder erano inoltre, liberi di regolare la pratica della caccia di loro propria iniziativa o anche di abolire insieme caccia.
2. Osservazioni del Governo
31. Il Governo ammise che l'obbligo di tollerare la caccia sulla sua proprietà che andava contro le convinzioni del richiedente infranse i diritti del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Comunque, era giustificato sotto il paragrafo 2 di questo stesso Articolo come essendo nell'interesse generale e proporzionato agli scopi perseguiti.
32. Il Governo enfatizzò che, sotto la legge tedesca, l'esercizio della caccia non veniva concepito come un passatempo, ma era volto ad assumersi la piena responsabilità per le riserve, le loro risorse naturali, prendendo con ciò in considerazione gli interessi agricoli e della selvicoltura.
33. Riguardo al principio della proporzionalità, il Governo presentò, che il sistema tedesco prevede un equilibrio equo fra la protezione dei diritti di proprietà e l'interesse generale. La legge di caccia tedesca differiva sostanzialmente dalla situazione in Francia e nel Lussemburgo. Questo era evidente nella nozione di “Hege” che andava oltre la semplice gestione di una caccia ordinata ed includeva una protezione generale della selvaggina sia quantitativamente che qualitativamente. Il diritto di caccia portava con sé l'obbligo di preservare la selvaggina varia e sana regolando allo stesso tempo il numero di selvaggina per ostacolare i danni sull’agricoltura e sulle foresta. Una regolamentazione della quantità di selvaggina era particolarmente importante in Germania densamente popolata, per esempio per evitare la propagazione di malattie degli animali ed evitare i danni causati dalla fauna selvatica su altri terreni. Ne segue che la caccia non solo ha servito degli interessi ecologici, ma anche degli altri interessi generali e la protezione della proprietà di altri possidenti .
34. Ammettendo che il richiedente non disponeva di nessun mezzo efficace per evitare il trasferimento del diritto di esercitare la caccia sulle sue proprietà all'associazione della caccia, il Governo considerò che il dovere di tollerare l'esercizio della caccia non gli aveva imposto un carico eccessivo. In primo luogo, diversamente dalla Francia, il richiedente riceveva una quota dei profitti derivante dal contratto d'affitto dei diritti di caccia. Mentre è probabile che questa partecipazione nei profitti sia insoddisfacente per il richiedente che si opponeva alla caccia per ragioni etiche questo risarcimento doveva essere preso in considerazione nel valutare la proporzionalità della misura. All'interno della struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 il Governo non condivideva le preoccupazioni espresse dalla Corte nella sentenza Schneider (vedere Schneider, citata sopra, § 49) per cui le condanne etiche non potevano essere compensate tramite assegnazioni valutarie. Il diritto di Convenzione proteggeva il godimento della proprietà di qualcuno senza essere sottoposto a limitazioni esterne. Comunque, non proteggeva in qualsiasi forma le concezioni etiche.
35. In secondo luogo, il Governo presentò che il sistema delle associazioni di caccia in Germania copriva tutte le superfici, incluse le proprietà Statali ed era coerente. Siccome la selvaggina non si fermava ai confini delle aree, e si sarebbe potuta ritirare in aree che erano esenti dalla caccia, gli scopi della legge della caccia si sarebbero potuti realizzare solamente se la caccia fosse stata esercitata su tutte le superfici appropriate. C'erano solamente rare eccezioni a questa norma che erano tutte basate sulla interessi generali di priorità. Era vero che la caccia veniva sospesa sotto la sezione 1, § 1, prima alternativa della Legge Federale sulla Caccia su quelle aree che non appartenevano ad un distretto di caccia. Comunque, avendo riguardo alla definizione ampia di distretti per la caccia nelle sezioni 7 e 8 di questa legge, solo poche superfici rientravano all'interno della sfera di quella disposizione. Simili superfici generalmente erano incorporate inoltre, in altri distretti di caccia. L'autorità di caccia ammetteva solamente una sospensione della caccia sotto la sezione 10 § 2 frase 2 della Legge sulla Caccia in casi eccezionali e per ragioni che si riferivano alla gestione ed alla protezione delle scorta di selvaggina. Anche nelle riserve naturali l'esercizio della caccia non veniva generalmente escluso; la regolamentazione della caccia dipendeva da specifici fini di conservazione. La riforma del sistema federale non aveva cambiato questa situazione, siccome ogni Länder aveva optato per mantenere il sistema di ampie aree di caccia.
36. Contrariamente alla legge applicabile nel Lussemburgo, esisteva anche un dovere di esercitare la caccia su aree più grandi. Anche se i proprietari di aree di superficie superiore ai 75 ettari non appartenevano de jure ad un'associazione di caccia, loro erano obbligati a regolare la scorta di selvaggina e così ad esercitare la caccia allo stesso modo dei proprietari di aree appartenenti ad un distretto di caccia comune. Se loro non avessero esercitato la caccia loro stessi, l'autorità di caccia avrebbe potuto costringerli a fare così o a compiere il compito a spesa del proprietario.
37. Non era vero che gli Stati europei che non avevano delle associazioni di caccia non soffrivano di danni causati dalla selvaggina. Il sistema naturale di autoregolazione della selvaggina aveva cessato di funzionare nelle regioni densamente popolate e sfruttate dell'Europa Centrale.
38. Il Governo presentò inoltre che la legge di caccia tedesca imponeva il dovere su persone che esercitavano la caccia di rispettare gli interessi legittimi dei proprietari dei terreni e li riteneva responsabili per qualsiasi danno causato per l'esercizio della caccia. Le limitazioni imposte sulla caccia prendevano in considerazione le considerazioni etiche, per esempio proibendo l'uso di certi generi di munizioni.
39. Non c’era nessun mezzo più mite per realizzare lo scopo intenzionale. Un sistema basato sulla partecipazione volontaria non poteva assicurare una soluzione che coprisse l’ intera superficie. Inoltre, l'appartenenza obbligatoria assicurava che nessuna persona interessata venisse esclusa dal sistema. Assicurava inoltre che lo Stato potesse controllare efficacemente la gestione e la protezione della scorta di selvaggina.
40. Il richiedente rimaneva libero di prendere delle misure per proteggere gli animali e le piante selvatiche sui suoi terreni. Inoltre, era appropriato imporre sulla persona che esercitava la caccia il dovere di prendere, prendersi cura e, se necessario, uccidere la selvaggina seriamente ferita perché solamente un cacciatore aveva l'addestramento necessario che gli permetteva di valutare la situazione e prendere le misure necessarie.
3. Osservazioni delle terze parti
41. Il Deutscher Jagdschutzverband e. C. enfatizzò l’alto significato alto della conseguenza dei presenti procedimenti sia per l’intero sistema di caccia che per gli interessi dei cacciatori . Perché venisse concesso loro di praticare la caccia i cacciatori dovevano provare un’ampia conoscenza delle aree attinenti e dovevano rispettare gli agli standard etici più alti riguardo alla protezione animale e alla conservazione della natura. La specifiche condizioni strutturali in Germania, in particolare la sua densa popolazione e la coltura intensiva della sua terra, rendeva estremamente difficile regolare la popolazione della selvaggina.
42. Il principio di ampie aree di caccia era un elemento centrale dell'obbligo di preservare animali e piante selvatiche. Era essenziale su ampie aree su tutte le aree terriere per essere in grado di seguire le emigrazioni della selvaggina. Ampie aree di caccia furono implementate costantemente in Germania. Le aree escluse dai distretti di caccia sotto la sezione 6 § 1 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia comprendevano meno dello 0.01% di tutte le proprietà fondiarie, erano solamente di natura provvisoria e le autorità di caccia erano obbligate ad incorporarle rapidamente nei vicini distretti di caccia. La sospensione della caccia sotto la sezione 10 § 2 della Legge Federale sulla caccia era soggetta ad un beneplacito da parte dell'autorità di caccia. In pratica, l'autorità di caccia acconsentiva solamente alla sospensione della caccia in causi molto rari ed eccezionali, per esempio in causi in cui la popolazione della selvaggina di una certa area era stata effettivamente ridotta come risultato di una catastrofe e solamente per un periodo limitato di tempo. Non c'era attualmente nessun caso noto in cui qualsiasi simile richiesta era stata approvata da parte dell'autorità di caccia superiore dello Stato Federale di Rhineland-Palatinate, dove i locali del richiedente erano situati.
43. Se certe aree fossero state escluse dalla caccia, ci sarebbero state inevitabilmente concentrazioni considerevoli di animali selvatici su quelle proprietà dove la caccia non era permessa. Questo avrebbe comportato un rischio notevolmente incrementato di trasmissione di malattie della selvaggina ed epidemie di animali, e situazioni di stress considerevoli per la selvaggina. Un'ulteriore conseguenza sarebbe stata l’incremento dei danni causati dalla selvaggina sulle terre delle proprietà confinanti . La selvaggina ferita e in fuga non poteva essere seguita in queste aree col risultato di una pratica efficace della caccia e dare sollievo ad animali sofferenti sarebbe diventato virtualmente impossibile. Per riassumere, la terza parte considerava che non sarebbe stato più possibile mettere in opera la regolamentazione corretta di popolazioni di selvaggina, dando luogo ad una disgregazione grave dell'equilibrio biologico. I cacciatori non sarebbero inoltre, più preparati ad assumersi responsabilità per i danni causati dalla selvaggina.
44. Il Bundesarbeitsgemeinschaft der Jagdgenossenschaften und Eigenjagdbesitzer confermò queste osservazioni ed aggiunse che c'era un grande pericolo che dei possidenti che erano interessati ad eludere un'appartenenza ad un'associazione di caccia per ragioni completamente diverse usassero l'obiezione e etica contro la caccia come mero pretesto.
4. Valutazione della Corte
45. La Corte nota, all'inizio che il Governo non ha contestato che l'obbligo di permettere la pratica della caccia sulla sua proprietà interferì col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà. La Corte sottoscrive questa valutazione.
46. Ne segue che si doveva determinare se questa interferenza era in conformità col secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 che permette allo Stato di mettere in atto simili leggi come ritiene necessario nell'interesse generale.
47. È giurisprudenza ben consolidata che il secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere costruito alla luce del principio esposto nella prima frase dell'Articolo. Di conseguenza, un'interferenza deve realizzare un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. Ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo perseguito. Nel determinare se questo requisito è soddisfatto, la Corte riconosce che lo Stato gode di un margine ampio di valutazione riguardo sia alla scelta dei mezzi di esecuzione che ala verifica se le conseguenze di esecuzione sono giustificate nell'interesse generale al fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto (vedere Chassagnou, citata sopra, § 75).
48. La Corte nota, all'inizio che lo scopo delle disposizioni contestate viene espresso nella Sezione 1 § 2 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia, prevedendo che la gestione della scorta della selvaggina ha lo scopo di mantenere varie e sane le popolazioni di selvaggina ad un livello compatibile con la cura del terreno e le condizioni culturali ed ad evitare danni alla selvaggina. La Corte accetta che questi scopi sono nell'interesse generale (confronta Chassagnou, citata sopra, § 49 e Schneider, citata sopra, § 46).
49. Riguardo alla proporzionalità dell'interferenza, la Corte prende nota dell'enfasi che la legge attinente pone sul mantenimento di una fauna sana in conformità con le circostanze ecologiche ed economiche. Anche se sembra essere vero che la caccia è praticata primariamente da individui durante il loro tempo libero, il fine della legge sulla caccia non può essere ridotto ad abilitare soltanto certi individui ad esercitare un'attività di piacere.
50. Riguardo alla necessità della misura in questione, la Corte prende nota delle osservazioni del Governo per cui la specifica situazione in Germania come una delle aree densamente popolate nell’ Europa Centrale rese necessario permettere ampie area di caccia su tutti le proprietà appropriate. La Corte osserva inoltre che la legge tedesca si applica su scala nazionale. A questo riguardo, la situazione in Germania differisce dalla situazione trovata in Francia, dove solamente 29 dei 93 dipartimenti riguardati erano soggetti al regime dell'appartenenza obbligatoria ad associazioni di caccia (vedere Chassagnou, citata sopra, § 84).
51. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che il regime tedesco non esenta qualsiasi proprietario pubblico o privato di proprietà che è a priori appropriato per la caccia dall'obbligo di tollerare la caccia sulle loro proprietà. A questo riguardo, la situazione doveva essere distinta da quella esaminata nella causa del Lussemburgo, dove la proprietà della Corona era esclusa dall'appartenenza ad associazioni di caccia (vedere Schneider, citata sopra, §§ 18 e 50). Anche se le aree di almeno 75 ettari di superficie non sono raggruppate, questo non dispensa i proprietari di queste aree dall’esercitare la caccia loro stessi o dal tollerarla sui loro terreni.
52. La Corte nota che il sistema tedesco di ampie aree di caccia è soggetto alle seguenti eccezioni: Sotto la sezione 6 frase 1 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia, la caccia è sospesa sulle aree che non appartengono ad un distretto di caccia e sulle aree recintate. Inoltre, l'associazione di caccia, col beneplacito dell'autorità di caccia può decidere di sospendere la caccia (sezione 10 § 2 frase 2). La Sezione 20 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia proibisce l'esercizio della caccia in luoghi dove la pace pubblica, l’ordine o la sicurezza sarebbero altrimenti disturbati o la vita umana messa in pericolo. Inoltre, delle regolamentazioni speciali si applicano all'esercizio della caccia riserve naturali (sezione 20 § 2).
53. La Corte osserva che la sospensione della caccia nelle aree recitante può essere giustificata dal fatto che la selvaggina non possa passare in queste aree. Riguardo alla sospensione della caccia in aree non appartenenti ad un distretto di caccia, la Corte osserva che questa eccezione è dovuta alla specifica configurazione dei terreni, per esempio come enclavi recintate da un distretto di caccia privato. La Corte ulteriormente prende nota delle osservazioni della terza parte (vedere paragrafo 41, sopra) che non era stata contestata dal richiedente per cui queste sospensioni della caccia sono di natura soltanto provvisoria e riguardano meno del 0.01% della proprietà fondiaria. La Corte osserva inoltre che l'associazione di caccia non può decidere liberamente su una sospensione della caccia, ma deve ottenere il beneplacito dell'autorità di caccia (confornta Schneider, citata sopra, § 50, per la situazione differente nel Lussemburgo). Secondo le osservazioni incontestate del Governo, simile beneplacito veniva dato solamente in casi rari ed eccezionali, e solamente per un periodo limitato di tempo. La Corte infine osserva che le eccezioni sotto la sezione 20 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia risiedono nell'interesse di mantenere l’ordine pubblico e la sicurezza (paragrafo 1) e nell'interesse di riconoscere protezione speciale alle riserve naturali (paragrafo 2).
54. Avendo riguardo alle considerazioni sopra, la Corte considera, che le eccezioni alla norma delle ampie aree di caccia sono sufficientemente motivate dall’interesse generale e relativo alla caccia e così non richiamano in questione il principio delle ampie aree di caccia area come tale. A questo riguardo, la presente causa chiaramente può essere distinta dalla situazione esaminata dalla Corte nelle cause francesi e nelle cause del Lussemburgo in cui la Corte trovò delle eccezioni dell’applicazioni del principio ampie aree di caccia che non erano sufficientemente motivate e che, secondo la valutazione della Corte provavano che non era assolutamente necessario sottoporre l'intera area rurale all'esercizio di questi diritti (vedere Chassagnou, citata sopra, § 84, e Schneider, citata sopra, § 50).
55. La Corte nota inoltre che il richiedente, sotto la sezione 10 § 3 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia, ha una rivendicazione ad una quota del profitto del contratto d'affitto che corrisponde alla misura della sua proprietà. Anche se la somma che il richiedente potrebbe chiedere sotto questa disposizione non sembra essere sostanziale, la Corte nota che le disposizioni attinenti impediscono agli altri individui di trarre un profitto finanziario dall'uso della terra del richiedente. La Corte osserva inoltre che il richiedente ha diritto ad essere compensato per qualsiasi danno che causato dall'esercizio della caccia sui suoi terreni.
56. Avendo riguardo all’ampio margine di valutazione riconosciuto agli Stati Contraenti in questa area, concedendo loro di prendere in considerazione le specifiche circostanze che prevalgono nel loro paese, le precedenti considerazioni sono sufficienti ad abilitare la Corte a concludere che il Governo ha previsto un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi che competono in gioco. Non c'è stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1, PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
57. Il richiedente presentò che le disposizioni della Legge Federale sulla Caccia lo discriminavano in due modi, uno basato sulla proprietà e l'altro sulle sue convinzioni etiche. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
58. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
59. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata a quella esaminata sopra e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni del richiedente
60. Secondo il richiedente, la Legge Federale sulla Caccia privilegiava i cacciatori, poiché in considerazione del loro diritto privato a cacciare era stato dato loro il diritto a cacciare su un'area più ampia, mentre i non-cacciatori avevano perso senza qualsiasi risarcimento o considerazione, non solo il loro diritto di uso ma anche la loro libertà di pensiero e la libertà di manifestare le loro convinzioni mettendo le loro morali in pratica sulla loro propria proprietà. Inoltre, le disposizioni attinenti discriminavano i proprietari di terreni più piccoli, siccome i terreni di area superiore ai 75 ettari non erano inclusi nei distretti delle associazioni di caccia.
61. Il trattamento diverso era sproporzionato e non riusciva a servire l'interesse generale. Mentre era vero che i proprietari di terreni di aree superiori ai 75 ettari potrebbero essere stati obbligati a regolare le quantità di certe scorte di selvaggina, loro potrebbero decidere altrimenti liberamente quale specie desiderarono cacciare e quale no. Questo riguardava un gran numero di specie animale. In Germania, molte specie di vita selvatica venivano cacciate, senza qualsiasi necessità economica o ecologica. Loro potrebbero decidere anche di adempiere la loro quota di caccia in modo non compatibile con le loro convinzioni etiche, per esempio evitando la caccia durante il periodo della riproduzione e scegliendo il loro metodo di caccia. Loro potrebbero decidere anche di sospendere la caccia e di contestare qualsiasi ordine per esercitare la caccia di fronte alle corti.
62. I proprietari di distretti di caccia privati non dovevano inoltre neanche tollerare la costruzione di apparecchiature di caccia né tollerare la presenza di estranei sui loro locali. Inoltre, il possidente veniva privato della possibilità di osservare e di prendersi cura degli animali e delle piante selvatiche nel suo habitat naturale. Ne seguiva che il trasferimento del diritto di esercitare la caccia andava oltre ciò ce era necessario per ostacolare i danni causati dalla fauna selvatica.
63. Il richiedente considerò inoltre che l'esistenza di riserve naturali provava che la caccia su ampie aree non era necessaria a proteggere e a gestire le scorte di selvaggina ed ostacolarne i danni. Infine, lui indicò che i proprietari di enclavi che rientravano all'interno dell'ambito della sezione 6 frase 1 prima l'alternativa, non dovevano tollerare la caccia sulle loro proprietà. Questo costituiva anche una chiara violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
2. Osservazioni del Governo
64. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non era stato trattato differentemente da qualsiasi altro possidente riguardo ai suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, siccome anche i proprietari di aree inferiori ai di 75 ettari erano obbligati a tollerare caccia sulle loro proprietà. Anche se loro mantenevano il diritto di esercitare la caccia, non era concesso loro di trasformare le loro aree in aree di caccia libera. Il proprietario di un terreno di caccia privata doveva cacciare lui stesso o tollerare la caccia. La questione se il proprietario di un distretto di caccia privato aveva una certa discrezione n merito a come praticare la caccia era irrilevante riguardo all'azione di reclamo del richiedente.
65. Pertanto siccome il richiedente si lamentava di una discriminazione degli obiettori della caccia in opposizione ai cacciatori, il Governo presentò che in Germania, diversamente dalla Francia, l'appartenenza ad un'associazione di caccia non portava il diritto a cacciare sull’intero distretto di caccia.
66. Inoltre, il proprietario di una are’ più grande non era libero di scegliere quale specie di fauna selvatica cacciare, siccome la legge tedesca conteneva delle disposizioni severe in merito a quando e a quale fauna selvatica sarebbe stata cacciata. Sotto la sezione 21 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia, la caccia della selvaggina doveva essere regolata per assicurare che una popolazione sana di ogni specie animale rimanesse in numero appropriato e gli interessi legittimi dell'agricoltura, selvicoltura e pesca fossero salvaguardati. Così, la caccia non era permessa in modo arbitrario, ma doveva essere progettata ed esercitata in modo sostenibile.
67. La costruzione di dispositivi di caccia come nascondigli sospesi se4rviva una pratica sicura della caccia in conformità alla protezione animale. Un proprietario di un distretto di caccia privato che aveva affittato il suo diritto ad esercitare la caccia doveva tollerare l'erezione di simili dispositivi allo stesso modo del proprietario di un’area più piccola. Il Governo infine presentò che qualsiasi trattamento disuguale era giustificato per le ragioni esposte in collegamento con l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
3. Valutazione della Corte
68. La Corte reitera che una differenza nel trattamento è discriminatoria se “non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole”, cioè se non persegue uno “scopo legittimo” o se non c'è una “relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo che si cerca di perseguire.” Inoltre, gli Stati Contraenti godono di un certo margine di valutazione nel valutare se ed in che misura la differenza fra situazioni altrimenti simili giustifichi un trattamento diverso (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Chassagnou, citata sopra, § 91).
69. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte osserva che, sotto la legge di caccia tedesca, i diritti di caccia dei proprietari di aree di area inferiore ai 75 ettari sono trasferiti automaticamente ad un'associazione di caccia che decide sul contratto d'affitto dei diritti di caccia mentre ai proprietari di aree più grandi è permesso di scegliere se auspicano esercitare la caccia loro stessi o affittare i diritti di caccia. Comunque, contrariamente alla situazione esaminata dalla Corte nelle cause Chassagnou e Schneider (citate sopra, rispettivamente § 92 e 50), ai proprietari di aree più grandi non era permesso sospendere completamente la caccia, ma dovevano adempiere gli stessi obblighi riguardo alla gestione delle scorte di selvaggina come le associazioni di caccia.
70. La Corte considera che esiste una differenza nel trattamento fra i proprietari delle aree più piccole e quelli delle aree più grandi in quanto questi ultimi rimangono liberi di scegliere in che modo adempiere il loro obbligo sotto le leggi della caccia, mentre i primi mantengono soltanto il diritto di prendere parte alle decisioni prese dall'associazione di caccia. Comunque, la Corte considera che questa differenza nel trattamento è sufficientemente giustificata dalle ragioni esposte dal Governo a riguardo della violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, in particolare la necessità di mettere in fondo comune le aree più piccole per lasciare spazio alle ampie aree di caccia area e così assicurare una gestione effettiva delle scorte di selvaggina. Riguardo al trattamento dei proprietari di aree che non appartengono ad un distretto di caccia e che non erano soggettoe alla caccia (la sezione 6 § 1 frase 1 della Legge Federale sulla Caccia), la Corte, avendo riguardo ai giudizi sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (vedere paragrafo 52, sopra), considera che questa eccezione dall'appartenenza generale alle associazioni di caccia è dovuta alle specifiche circostanze delle rispettive aree che giustifica una differenza nel trattamento.
Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 11 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO SEPARATAMENTE
71. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che la sua appartenenza obbligatoria ad un'associazione di caccia violava i suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 11 della Convenzione che prevede:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà di riunione pacifica ed alla libertà di associazione con altri, incluso il diritto a formare e congiungere sindacati per la protezione dei suoi interessi.
2. Nessuna restrizione sarà messa sull'esercizio di questi diritti se non come prescritto dalla legge e se necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale o della sicurezza pubblica, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui. Questo Articolo non ostacolerà l'imposizione di restrizioni legali sull'esercizio di questi diritti da parte dei membri delle forze armate, della polizia o dell'amministrazione dello Stato.”
1. Osservazioni del Governo
72. Il Governo presentò che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente non rientrava all'interno della sfera del diritto alla libertà di associazione, perché le associazioni di caccia tedesche erano di natura pubblica. Sotto la sezione 7 § 1 della Legge sulla Caccia della Terra di Palatinato di Rhineland, le associazioni di caccia, tramite i mezzi di soprintendenza da parte dello Stato erano integrate in strutture di Stato più da vicino rispetto ai francesi o alle associazioni del Lussemburgo. All’autorità di caccia venivano assegnati legalmente degli ampi diritti di controllo, come il diritto d obiettare contro decisioni, ordinare che l'associazione si attenga alle loro prerogative legali e, se la situazione dovesse presentarsi, nominare un amministratore. L'autorità supervisionante aveva diritto inoltre a consultare tutta la giurisprudenza ed eseguire ulteriori esami. Sotto le specifiche circostanze, degli organi di comunità potrebbero servire anche da direttori di un'associazione di caccia.
73. Diversamente dalla Francia e dal Lussemburgo, alle associazioni di caccia venivano assegnate legalmente prerogative di legge pubblica. Loro potrebbero emettere i loro propri statuti interni ed utilizzare forme amministrative di azione come emettere ordini di spese tramite atto amministrativo. L'esecuzione di questi ordini veniva governata dalla legge pubblica.
2. Osservazioni del richiedente
74. Il richiedente presentò che le associazioni di caccia rientravano all'interno dell'ambito dell’Articolo 11 della Convenzione. Erano formate da individui privati che si riunivano ad intervalli regolari per decidere sul contratto d'affitto. Se gli Stati Contraenti fossero in grado, a loro discrezione, classificando un'associazione come “pubblica” o “para-amministrativa” di rimuoverla dalla sfera dell’Articolo 11, ciò darebbe una latitudine così ampia che sarebbe probabile che conduca a risultati incompatibili con l'oggetto ed il fine della Convenzione che era di proteggere diritti non teoretici o illusori, ma pratici ed effettivi.
75. Il richiedente contestò che alle associazioni di caccia venivano assegnate legalmente qualsiasi prerogativa di legge pubblica. Loro non assumevano nessun ufficiale pubblico o funzionario civile che avrebbe permesso loro di prendere misure appartenenti al campo della legge pubblica. La soprintendenza esercitata dallo Stato non era sufficiente a presumere un carattere di legge pubblica. Alle associazioni private veniva anche concesso di emettere i loro proprie statuti interni, e tutte le associazioni private erano soggette a soprintendenza Statale sotto la Legge delle Associazioni. Inoltre, ai Länder veniva concesso di organizzare le associazioni di caccia nella forma di associazioni private sotto la presente legge.
3. Valutazione della Corte
76. La Corte reitera che la nozione di “associazione” sarà interpretata dalla Corte in modo autonomo; la qualifica data dallo Stato Contraente serve soltanto come un punto iniziale (vedere Schneider, citata sopra, § 69). Sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte, gli elementi nel determinare se un'associazione sarà considerata come privata o pubblica sono: se era fondata da individui o dalla legislatura; se è rimasta integrata all'interno delle strutture dello Stato, se è stata investita di potere amministrativo, legislativo e disciplinare, e se intraprendeva uno scopo che era nell'interesse generale (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Le Compte, Van Leuven e De Meyere c. Belgio, 23 giugno 1981, § 64 Serie A n. 43).
77. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota, all'inizio che le associazioni di caccia nella Terra di Rhineland-Palatinate sono stabilite dalla legge nella forma di associazioni di legge pubblica. Loro sono soggette al controllo dell'autorità di caccia ed i loro statuti interni sono soggetti all'approvazione di quell'autorità. Alle associazioni di caccia è permesso inoltre, emettere ordini di spese tramite atti amministrativi che sono eseguiti dal pubblico scacchiere.
78. Avendo riguardo a questi elementi, la Corte osserva, che le associazioni di caccia sono soggetto a soprintendenza Statale che chiaramente va normalmente oltre la soprintendenza esercitata sulle associazioni private. Loro non solo sono obbligate inoltre, ad emettere i loro statuti interni, ma hanno diritto ad emettere ordini di spese tramite atti amministrativi che sono eseguiti dalle autorità Statali. La Corte considera così che le associazioni di caccia sono sufficientemente integrate nelle strutture dello Stato da qualificarle come istituzioni di legge pubblica. Inoltre, loro intraprendono lo scopo di gestire l'esercizio dei diritti di caccia e garantire così la gestione e la protezione delle scorte di selvaggina che giace nell'interesse generale. Non c'è indicazione che il legislatore abbia classificato l'associazione di caccia come “pubblica” o “para-amministrativa” col solo scopo di rimuoverla dalla sfera dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione (confronta, a contrario, Schneider citata sopra, § 100).
79. Avendo riguardo a queste circostanze, la Corte conclude, che le associazioni di caccia come stabilite sotto la legge di caccia della Terra di Rhineland-palatinate debbano essere considerate istituzioni di legge pubblica. Ne segue che l’Articolo 11 della Convenzione non è applicabile nella presente causa. Di conseguenza, questa azione di reclamo è incompatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 11 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 14
80. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre di stato discriminato a riguardo del suo obbligo di appartenenza ad un'associazione di caccia.
81. La Corte reitera che ha sostenuto costantemente che l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione completa le altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione e dei Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione al “godimento dei diritti e delle libertà” salvaguardate da quelle disposizioni. Benché l’applicazione dell’ Articolo 14 non presupponga una violazione di quelle disposizioni- ed in questa misura è autonoma -non ci può essere stanza per la sua applicazione a meno che i fatti in questione rientrino all'interno dell'ambito di uno o più di quest’ultimo (vedrtr, fra molte altre autorità, Haas c. Paesi Bassi, n. 36983/97, § 41 ECHR 2004-I).
82. La Corte ha trovato sopra che l’Articolo 11 non era applicabile nella presente causa. Ne segue che l’Articolo 14 non ci si può appellare a questo e questa azione di reclamo sarà respinta come incompatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
V. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 9 DELLA CONVENZIONE
83. Infine, il richiedente si lamentò che l'obbligo di tollerare l'esercizio della caccia ha violato il suo diritto alla libertà di pensiero e di coscienza sotto l’Articolo 9 della Convenzione che prevede:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà di pensiero, coscienza e religione; questo diritto include la libertà di cambiare la sua religione o credenza e la libertà, o da solo o in comunità con altri ed in pubblico o in privato, di manifestare la sua religione o credenza, nel culto, nell’insegnamento, nella pratica e nell'osservanza.
2. La libertà di manifestare una religione o una credenza sarà soggetta solamente limitazioni che sono previste dalla legge e sono necessarie in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza pubblica, per la protezione dell’ ordine pubblico, della salute o della morale o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
A. Ammissibilità
84. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata a quella sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
B. Meriti
85. Il richiedente presentò che le sue condanne come oppositore alla caccia raggiunsero un livello di forza, i coesione e d’importanza tale da portarlo all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 9 della Convenzione. L'appartenenza obbligatoria all'associazione di caccia lo spogliò della possibilità di agire in conformità con le sue convinzioni, per esempio aiutando un animale ferito sulla sua proprietà e non era giustificata sotto nessuna ragiona esposta nel paragrafo 2 dell’ Articolo 9.
86. Secondo il Governo, il richiedente non poteva appellarsi all’ Articolo 9 della Convenzione siccome un individuo non poteva appellarsi ai suoi diritti sotto quell’ Articolo nel caso fosse obbligato a tollerare azioni da parte di terze parti che risiedevano nell'interesse pubblico. In qualsiasi caso qualsiasi interferenza coi diritti del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 9 doveva essere considerata come già giustificata per le ragioni esposte prima.
87. La Corte non trova necessario determinare se l'azione di reclamo del richiedente debba essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 9 della Convenzione, siccome considera che qualsiasi interferenza coi diritti del richiedente è giustificata sotto il paragrafo 2 dell’ Articolo 9 come necessaria in una società democratica nell'interesse della sicurezza pubblica, per la protezione della salute pubblica e per la protezione dei diritti altrui per le ragioni esposte sopra (vedere paragrafi 48 a 55 sopra). Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dei diritti del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 9 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso separatamente ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 e sotto l’Articolo 9 della Convenzione ammissibili;
2. Dichiara alla maggioranza il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
3. Sostiene per quattro voti a tre che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene per quattro voti a tre che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 9 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesei, e notificato per iscritto il 20 gennaio 2011, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, le seguenti opinioni separate sono annesse a questa sentenza:
(a) opinione congiunta dissidente dei Giudici Lorenzen, Berro-Lefèvre e Kalaydjieva;
(b) opinione dissidente separata del Giudice Kalaydjieva.
P.L.
C.W.


OPINIONE DISSIDENTE CONGIUNTA DEI GIUDICI
LORENZEN, BERRO-LEFÈVRE E KALAYDJIEVA
(Traduzione)
Con nostro grande rammarico, noi non condividiamo l'opinione della maggioranza per cui non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in questa causa.
In appoggio a questa conclusione, il ragionamento della Camera espone numerosi argomenti che dimostrano l'esistenza di molti punti di divergenza con le situazioni che, in passato, hanno generato Chassagnou ed Altri c. Francia ([GC] N. 25088/94, 28331/95 e 28443/95 ECHR 1999-III) e Schneider c. Lussemburgo (n. 2113/04, 10 luglio 2007) sentenze nelle quali furono trovate violazioni di questo Articolo.
Da parte nostra, noi troviamo difficile rendere differenti queste tre cause.
Sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la sola questione che sorge è se la misura adottata era “necessaria a controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale”, essendo compreso che deve, chiaramente, esserci un grado ragionevole di proporzionalità fra la misura in questione e lo scopo perseguito da questa.
Nelle cause francesi, del Lussemburgo e tedesche, la legislazione contestata intraprese molti scopi, incluso quello di promuovere la gestione razionale dell'eredità di cinegetica ed il rispetto dell'equilibrio ecologico.
La domanda che deve ci si deve perciò porre è se l'interferenza con la proprietà che è il risultato della legislazione contestata è necessaria per regolare la caccia, in conformità con l'interesse generale e se questa interferenza è ragionevolmente proporzionata agli obiettivi perseguiti.
A questo riguardo, noi siamo obbligati a notare, che la risposta è già stata data nelle cause francesi e del Lussemburgo, nonostante le qualifiche accentuate dal Governo tedesco e ripetute dalla maggioranza della Camera.
Così, come nelle cause sopra-citate, le possibilità effettiva per il richiedente si garantire con successo che i diritti di caccia non venissero esercitati sulla sua terra era quasi inesistente.
Noi indicheremmo anche che nella sentenza Schneider, dove i fatti ed il contesto erano più simili a quelli in questa causa e che fu adottata all’unanimità, la Camera considerò che l'esistenza del risarcimento per i possidenti riguardati non corrispose ad una legittimazione sufficiente per l'appartenenza obbligatoria ad un'associazione, dato che l'argomento di una convinzione etica contro la caccia non poteva essere controbilanciata significativamente da una rimunerazione annuale come considerazione per la perdita del diritto all’uso della proprietà, se non fosse che solamente a causa della natura essenzialmente irreconciliabile del risarcimento in equivalenza con l'argomento soggettivo invocato (vedere Schneider, citata sopra, § 49). Ragionamento identico è perciò applicabile in questa causa.
Ugualmente, noi non siamo convinti dell'analisi della Camera nei paragrafi 52 a 54, per cui esiste una differenza nel ragionamento dato per le eccezioni dal principio obbligatorio di ampie aree di caccia nella legislazione tedesca e quella in vigore in Francia e nel Lussemburgo. Anche qui, sola conclusione alla quale si può giungere è che, indipendentemente dagli argomenti esposti, quelle eccezioni mostrano che non è essenziale sottoporre l'interezza del territorio non-urbano all'esercizio dei diritti di caccia.
Il sistema stabilito in Germania, inteso a regolare la caccia garantendo la protezione incrementata dell'eredità cinegetica è risultato, come nelle due cause precedenti, in una situazione dove è impossibile per il richiedente obiettare all'esercizio da parte di terze parti del loro diritto a cacciare sulla sua terra.
La conclusione accettata nelle sentenze Chassagnou ed Altri e Schneider era come segue: “nonostante gli scopi legittimi... il risultato del sistema di trasferimento obbligatorio... è stato mettere i richiedenti in una situazione che sconvolge l'equilibrio equo da prevedere fra la protezione del diritto di proprietà ed i requisiti dell'interesse generale. Obbligando i piccoli possidenti a trasferire i diritti di caccia sulla loro terra così che altri possano avvalersi di questi in un modo che è totalmente incompatibile con le loro credenze impone un carico sproporzionato che non è giustificato sotto il secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1” (vedere Chassagnou, § 85, e Schneider, § 51).
Noi siamo incapaci di vedere come un risultato diverso può essere trovato nella causa Herrmann. Una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere trovata perciò anche in questa causa.
Di conseguenza, avendo riguardo a questo giudizio, noi consideriamo anche, che non è necessario esaminare separatamente se c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 (preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1).


OPIONION DISSIDENTE SEPARATA DEL GIUDICE KALAYDJIEVA
Io mi unisco all'opinione dei Giudici Lorenzen e Berro-Lefèvre che esprimono il nostro comune insuccesso nel vedere come si sia giunti al risultato diverso di non trovare nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo No.1 alla Convenzione nella causa presente-avendo riguardo alle conclusioni della Corte in circostanze simili delle cause Chassagnou c. Francia (Chassagnou ed Altri c. la Francia [GC], N. 25088/94, 28331/95 e 28443/95 ECHR 1999-III) e Schneider c. Lussemburgo (Schneider c. il Lussemburgo, n. 2113/04, 10 luglio 2007). Nella mia prospettiva le stesse ragioni per il disaccordo sono ugualmente valide per le conclusioni della maggioranza sull'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione alle circostanze della causa presente.
Avendo concordato che nella presente causa “le associazioni di caccia [a cui il richiedente era obbligato ad appartenere] sono sufficientemente integrate in strutture di Stato da qualificarle come istituzioni di legge pubblica”, la maggioranza è arrivata alla conclusione che l’Articolo 11 non si applica alle circostanze. Eccezioni simili del Governo rispondente in Chassagnou non impedirono alla Grande Camera di trovare che il fatto che il prefetto soprintese il modo in cui le associazioni operavano non era sufficiente per sostenere la rivendicazione che loro erano rimaste integrate all'interno delle strutture dello Stato. La Corte trovò anche che non si poteva sostenere che le associazioni godevano di prerogative fuori dall'orbita della legge ordinaria, se amministrative, legislative o disciplinare, o che loro impiegavano processi di un'autorità pubblica, come ordini professionali (vedere Chassagnou, par. 101). La Corte concluse che “obbligare una persona per legge ad unirsi ad un'associazione simile che è fondamentalmente contraria alle sue proprie convinzioni ed essere un membro di questa, ed obbligarlo, a causa della sua appartenenza di questa associazione, a trasferire i suoi diritti sul terreno da lui posseduto così che l'associazione in oggetto possa raggiungere degli obiettivi che lui disapprova, va oltre ciò che è necessario per garantire che un equilibrio equo venga previsto fra gli interessi contraddittori e non può essere considerato proporzionato allo scopo perseguito” (par. 117). Quelle sentenze furono confermate, recentemente nel 2007, in Schneider.
Io non vedo nessuna ragione di arrivare a conclusioni diverse nella causa Herrmann c. Germania.
Io mi chiedo anche se - se corretto - la conclusione sulla natura pubblica delle associazioni è anche capace di servire come base della prospettiva della maggioranza per cui “non è necessario determinare se l'azione di reclamo [che l’appartenenza obbligatoria del richiedente alle associazioni di caccia lo spogliò della possibilità di agire in conformità con le sue convinzioni] deve essere esaminato sotto l’Articolo 9 della Convenzione, siccome considera che qualsiasi interferenza coi diritti del richiedente è giustificata sotto il paragrafo 2 dell’ Articolo 9 come essendo necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza pubblica e per la protezione dei diritti altrui.”
In particolare, io mi chiedo se l’ appartenenza obbligatoria ad istituzioni di legge pubblica aggrava la coercizione di cui un individuo soffre quando costretto a prendere parte ad un’ attività contraria alle sue prospettive. Benché menzionato nelle prospettive della Commissione, della Corte e del Comitato dei Ministri nelle precedenti cause Chassagnou e Schneider non si è giunti a nessun giudizio in merito al diritto alle convinzioni. Spiacevolmente, le brevi ragioni offerte per la conclusione della maggioranza nella presente causa offrono risposte insufficientemente dettagliate alle questioni dell'applicabilità e del rispetto dei diritti sotto l’Articolo 9 della Convenzione nella presente causa.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.