Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF YURIY LOBANOV v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, P1-1

NUMERO: 15578/03/2010
STATO: Russia
DATA: 02/12/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary damage - reserved ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF YURIY LOBANOV v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 15578/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
2 December 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Yuriy Lobanov v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 9 November 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 15578/03) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr Y. I. L. (“the applicant”), on 23 April 2003.
2. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mrs V. Milinchuk, former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicant alleged a violation of his property rights.
4. On 9 March 2007 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1938 and lives in Shuya in the Ivanovo Region.
6. The applicant is a holder of 1982 State premium loan bonds (облигации Государственного внутреннего выигрышного займа 1982 года) having a total nominal value of 19,845 “promissory roubles” (see paragraph 17 below).
7. In 1982, the USSR issued a State internal premium loan to finance certain State programmes (see paragraph 13 below). According to the conditions of the loan, individuals could invest their money in State premium bonds and redeem them at any time during the term of the loan with interest at three per cent per annum. The term of the loan was fixed at twenty years. In that period, 160 State-organised draws were to be held in which some bonds would win cash prizes.
8. In 1992, the Government of the Russian Federation acknowledged its succession in respect of the obligations of the USSR under the 1982 loan and suspended payments under the 1982 State premium bonds (see paragraph 14 below).
9. Between 1995 and 2000, a series of Russian laws was adopted which provided for conversion of Soviet securities, including the 1982 loan bonds, into special Russian promissory notes (see paragraphs 16 to 20 below). The Government was mandated to devise a procedure for the conversion and fix the value of the promissory notes. Although a regulation on the conversion was adopted in 2000 (see paragraph 21 below), the actual conversion did not start and application of the regulation has remained suspended to the present day (see paragraph 22 below).
10. In early 2002, the applicant wrote to the Ministry of Finance to inquire about possibilities and time-limits for converting his 1982 bonds into Russian promissory notes. By a letter of 27 April 2002, a deputy director of the Internal Debt Department confirmed to the applicant that his bonds should be converted into the Russian promissory notes in accordance with the Savings Protection Act. The deputy director went on to explain why the conversion had not yet been possible:
“Section 10 of the [Conversion Procedure] Act provides that the procedure for calculating the interest accrued on the Russian promissory notes and the procedure for servicing the [internal] debt would be set out in a special federal law, which has not yet been enacted. In this connection, actual payments in [Russian] roubles under the promissory notes – as provided in the [Conversion Procedure] Act – cannot be made and the determination of the value of the [‘promissory rouble’] would be of no practical significance since its application has not yet been defined by the legislator.
...
Once the legislation on the procedure for calculating the interest and the debt-servicing procedure has been adopted, the Ministry of Finance will make the necessary arrangements for the conversion of USSR securities... into promissory notes and the servicing of them; it will also launch an open tender for selection of the conversion agent ...”
11. In November 2002 the applicant brought proceedings before the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation challenging the Government for inactivity and failure to put the redemption programme into effect.
12. On 4 December 2002 the Supreme Court refused to examine the applicant’s claim. It found as follows:
“By virtue of the constitutional principle of separation of powers, the court may not, in civil proceedings, require the Government of the Russian Federation to enact a specific legal act if the law does not explicitly set out the duty of the Government to adopt appropriate regulation; the claim may not be accepted for examination by the court.”
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
13. On 30 December 1980 the USSR Cabinet of Ministers approved, by Resolution no. 1220, the issue of bonds of the 1982 State premium internal loan having nominal values of 25, 50 and 100 Soviet roubles. Their period of circulation was set at twenty years, from 1 January 1982 to 1 January 2002. Soviet citizens could either buy the 1982 bonds with their own money or obtain them in exchange for bonds from the earlier 1966 State premium internal loan. The 1982 bonds could be sold and redeemed throughout the entire period of circulation.
14. On 19 February 1992 the Government of the Russian Federation issued Resolution no. 97 concerning the 1982 State internal premium loan and a new Russian internal premium loan to be issued in 1992. It provided as follows:
“1. To confirm succession of the Government of the Russian Federation in respect of obligations of the former USSR to Russian Federation citizens arising out of the bonds of the 1982 State internal premium loan.
2. Starting from 20 February 1992, to discontinue sale and purchase of bonds of that loan and holding of prize draws.
3. To issue the 1992 Russian internal premium loan.
...
6. To give Russian Federation citizens who are holders of bonds of the 1982 State internal premium loan the right to voluntary exchange of the bonds against State securities, including 1992 Russian internal premium loan bonds, shares in the Savings Bank of the Russian Federation, and also to credit the proceeds from sale of bonds to deposits open in the Savings Bank of the Russian Federation, from 1 October 1992...”
15. By Resolution no. 549 of 5 August 1992, the Russian Government decided that from 1 October 1992 to 1 October 1993 the Savings Bank would be authorised to purchase 1982 bonds and exchange them for 1992 bonds at the rate of 160 Russian roubles for one bond with a nominal value of 100 roubles.
16. On 10 May 1995 the Savings Protection Act (no. 73-FZ, ФЗ «О восстановлении и защите сбережений граждан Российской Федерации») was enacted. The State guaranteed the protection of Russian citizens’ savings, including their investments in State securities issued by the USSR and RSFSR before 1 January 1992 (section 1). Guaranteed savings were recognised as part of the internal State debt of the Russian Federation secured with the entirety of the assets available at the disposal of the Government of Russia (sections 2 and 3). Soviet securities were to be converted into special promissory notes of the Russian Federation with a special promissory value (sections 5 and 7). Separate laws were to be enacted to determine the procedure for converting Soviet securities into Russian promissory notes and to determine their current value (section 12).
17. On 6 July 1996 the Promissory Value Act (no. 87-FZ, ФЗ «О порядке установления долговой стоимости единицы номинала целевого долгового обязательства Российской Федерации») introduced the “promissory rouble” as the currency of special promissory notes of the Russian Federation (section 1). The actual value of the “promissory rouble” was to be determined as a proportion of the “control value” of the consumer goods basket and its “base value” at the prices that prevailed in the RSFSR in 1990 (section 2). The “control value” was to be calculated on a weekly basis by the State Statistical Service and the “base value” was to be fixed in a federal law (sections 3 to 7). The Government was to publish the current value of the “promissory rouble” within one month of the Act’s coming into force.
18. On 4 February 1999 the Base Value Act (no. 21-FZ, ФЗ «О базовой стоимости необходимого социального набора») was enacted in pursuance of the Promissory Value Act. It set the “base value” at 464 Soviet roubles. Its application was suspended from 1 January 2003 to 1 January 2012 by successive federal laws (no. 176-FZ of 24 December 2002, no. 186-FZ of 23 December 2003, no. 173-FZ of 23 December 2004, no. 189-FZ of 26 December 2005, no. 238-FZ of 19 December 2006, no. 198-FZ of 24 July 2007, and no. 206-FZ of 24 November 2008).
19. On 15 March 1999 the State Statistical Service approved guidelines on calculation of the “control value” (resolution no. 19).
20. On 12 July 1999 the Conversion Procedure Act (no. 162-FZ, ФЗ «О порядке перевода государственных ценных бумаг СССР и сертификатов Сберегательного банка СССР в целевые долговые обязательства Российской Федерации») confirmed that bonds of the 1982 State internal premium loan which are still in circulation in Russia are part of the guaranteed savings of Russian citizens (section 1). Sections 3 to 8 set out the general principles for conversion of the bonds into special promissory notes of the Russian Federation. The debt servicing procedure was to be governed by a separate federal law (section 10). Section 11 specified that the guarantees of the Savings Protection Act were fully applicable to securities which had not been converted into Russian promissory notes and that no statute of limitation applied to claims arising out of those securities.
21. In pursuance of section 15 of the Conversion Procedure Act, on 29 January 2000 the Russian Government approved a regulation on the procedure for conversion of USSR securities into Russian promissory notes (Resolution no. 82). It set out that conversion into promissory notes would be performed by putting a stamp on the face of the bonds, which would certify the fact of conversion and also the nature, face value and interest rate of the new promissory note (paragraph 3). Converted bonds were to be entered into a register maintained by the Ministry of Finance (paragraph 4). The conversion was to be carried out by a designated lending agency, which the Ministry of Finance was to choose by tender (section 5).
22. Starting from 2003, the application and implementation of Resolution no. 82 was repeatedly suspended by successive Government Resolutions (no. 625 of 14 October 2003, no. 349 of 13 July 2004, no. 489 of 4 August 2005, no. 467 of 28 July 2006, no. 479 of 25 July 2007, no. 558 of 22 July 2008, no. 594 of 21 July 2009, and no. 387 of 1 June 2010).
23. On 17 March 2004 the Presidium of the Moscow Regional Court quashed, by way of supervisory review, all the judgments in a civil case in which the claimants sued the Russian Government for their failure to determine the value of the “promissory rouble” (decision no. 229). It held as follows:
“The claims raised by Mr and Ms K. fall outside the courts’ competence; a court may not encroach on the competence of the executive body by requiring it to perform actions or to issue regulations which are within the competence of that body. The court may only ... assess the compliance of the Government regulations with Russian federal legislation. Besides, district courts have no competence over such claims. Pursuant to Article 220 § 1 of the Code of Civil Procedure, a court shall discontinue the proceedings if the claim may not be examined and determined in civil proceedings.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
24. The applicant complained, without invoking a specific Convention provision, about a violation of his property rights owing to the failure of the Russian authorities to fulfil their obligations under the 1982 State premium bonds. The Court considers that this complaint falls to be examined from the standpoint of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Compatibility ratione temporis
25. The Court observes at the outset that the bonds which are at issue in the present case were introduced in 1982, that is before the ratification of the Convention by Russia, which occurred on 5 May 1998. Accordingly, the Court must verify, even though this objection was not raised by the Government in the present case, whether it has competence ratione temporis to examine the present application (see Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 67, ECHR 2006-...).
26. The Court reiterates that its jurisdiction ratione temporis covers only the period after the ratification of the Convention or its Protocols by the respondent State. From the ratification date onwards, all the State’s alleged acts and omissions must conform to the Convention or its Protocols and subsequent facts fall within the Court’s jurisdiction even where they are merely extensions of an already existing situation (see Broniowski v. Poland (dec.) [GC], no. 31443/96, § 74, ECHR 2002-X).
27. Accordingly, the Court is competent to examine the facts of the present case for their compatibility with the Convention only in so far as they occurred after 5 May 1998, the date of ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Russia. It may, however, have regard to the facts prior to ratification inasmuch as they could be considered to have created a situation extending beyond that date or may be relevant for the understanding of facts occurring after that date.
28. The factual basis for the applicant’s Convention claim is the alleged failure of the Russian State to satisfy his entitlement to redemption of the Soviet bonds which he had acquired in 1982. Following the formal dissolution of the USSR in December 1991, the Russian Government confirmed its succession in respect of obligations arising out of the 1982 bonds and launched a programme for their redemption and exchange for the bonds of a new Russian internal loan (see paragraph 14 above). This programme was discontinued in 1995 upon enactment of the Savings Protection Act, which declared the bonds to be part of the Russian State’s internal debt and guaranteed the Russian citizens’ investments in State securities issued by the USSR and RSFSR before 1 January 1992, including the 1982 bonds.
29. Since the enactment of the Savings Protection Act the applicant has continuously held a claim against the Russian State arising out of the 1982 bonds. This claim existed both on the date of ratification of the Convention by Russia and on the date of submission of the application to the Court. Despite the changes in the implementing legislation which was in part suspended in application, the relevant provisions of the Savings Protection Act have never been revoked or annulled. In addition, the Conversion Procedure Act, adopted in 1999, explicitly acknowledged the existence of the entitlement and specified that no statute of limitation applied to claims arising out of USSR securities which had not yet been converted into Russian promissory notes (see paragraph 20 above). It follows that the legal basis for the entitlement which is the subject matter of the applicant’s complaint before the Court has been established in domestic legislation on a continuing basis.
30. It follows that, in so far as the applicant’s complaint is directed against the failure of the Russian State to implement the entitlement vested in him under Russian law – an entitlement which existed on 5 May 1998 and still exists today – the Court has temporal jurisdiction to entertain the application.
2. Compatibility ratione materiae
31. The Government did not express a view as to whether they considered the 1982 bonds to have been the applicant’s “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Nevertheless, the Court has to satisfy itself that it has jurisdiction ratione materiae in any case brought before it. To hold the contrary would mean that where a respondent State waived its right to plead or omitted to plead incompatibility, the Court would have to rule on the merits of a complaint against that State concerning a right not guaranteed by the Convention (see Blečić, loc. cit.).
32. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning, which is not limited to ownership of physical goods and is independent of the formal classification in domestic law: certain other rights and interests, such as debts, constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights”, and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision. The issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Broniowski (dec.), cited above, § 98).
33. The Court observes that the instant case is similar to the recent case of Suljagić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, in which it was determined that a claim arising out of the foreign currency savings deposited with Yugoslav banks before the dissolution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia amounted to a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (no. 27912/02, §§ 34-36, 3 November 2009). Similarly to Mr S., the applicant in the present case decided to invest his savings in 1982 State premium loan bonds. In accordance with the conditions of the loan, he acquired an entitlement to have the bonds redeemed by the State with accumulated interest at any time during the entire period of the bonds’ circulation, which had been fixed at twenty years, that is until 2002 (see paragraph 13 above). As noted above, the Russian State acknowledged its succession in respect of the USSR’s obligations arising out of the 1982 bonds and took upon itself the obligation to have them converted into special Russian promissory notes which could be exchanged for cash upon determination of their value. The Court therefore finds that the applicant had, and still has, a claim amounting to a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
34. It follows that the application is compatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention.
3. Compatibility ratione personae
35. The Government pointed out that the 1982 bonds had been an obligation of the USSR.
36. The Court observes that, by Resolution no. 97 of 19 February 1992, the Russian Government explicitly confirmed its succession in respect of obligations of the former USSR to Russian citizens arising out of the 1982 State internal premium loan (see paragraph 13 above). The same guarantee was contained in sections 1 to 3 of the 1995 Savings Protection Act, which recognised USSR securities, including 1982 bonds held by Russian citizens, as part of the Russian State’s internal debt secured with the entirety of the assets at the Russian Government’s disposal (see paragraph 16 above). It appears therefore that the Russian State took upon itself an obligation to settle the debt arising out of the bonds. The applicant being a Russian national and holder of the 1982 bonds, he was undoubtedly eligible to benefit from the settlement.
37. It follows that the Russian Federation has voluntarily accepted its responsibility in respect of the applicant’s entitlement and that no issue arises regarding the compatibility ratione personae of the present application.
4. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
38. Finally, the Government claimed that the applicant had not exhausted domestic remedies because he had not applied to a district court or to a prosecutor.
39. The applicant responded that a district court would not be competent to decide on such an issue.
40. The Court observes that the Government did not refer to any legislative provisions or case-law in support of their allegation that a district court or a prosecutor’s office would have been able to provide effective redress in a situation where an individual complains about the Government’s failure to adopt implementing legislation. It is further noted that the Presidium of the Moscow Regional Court, ruling on a similar claim concerning the Government’s failure to act, held that district courts have no competence over such claims and that such claims may not be examined or determined in civil proceedings (see paragraph 23 above). Accordingly, the Court dismisses the Government’s objection as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
5. Conclusion as to the admissibility of the application
41. As far as compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is concerned, the Court considers that the application raises serious issues of fact and law under the Convention, the determination of which should depend on an examination of the merits.
42. No ground for declaring the application inadmissible has been established. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Arguments by the parties
43. The Government submitted that in 1992 the Russian Federation had taken on the USSR’s obligations arising out of the 1982 bonds and had offered their holders a choice between having them redeemed by the Savings Bank and having them converted into 1992 Russian bonds. The applicant had not made use of either option.
44. The applicant contended that both options had only existed from 1992 to 1995, during a period of high inflation and sharp devaluation of Russian currency, and had therefore been financially disadvantageous for bond holders. He pointed out that the Russian State had acknowledged its debt arising out of the 1982 bonds but that the Russian Government had done nothing to extinguish it, despite the federal laws that had already been adopted.
2. The Court’s assessment
45. The Court notes at the outset that for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 the applicant’s “possessions” consisted in his entitlement to obtain some form of compensation for, or redemption of, the 1982 bonds. As noted above, although the debt arising out of the bonds had been recognised by the Russian State in a series of legislative acts, the absence of implementing regulations has made redemption of the bonds impossible. The thrust of the applicant’s complaint was thus directed against the lack of legal regulation of his entitlement and absence of a specific procedure for redemption of bonds of that type. This element distinguishes the present case from those cases in which the legislative framework had already been put in place but applicants were dissatisfied with the level of compensation available to them (see, for example, Grishchenko v. Russia (dec.), no. 75907/01, 8 July 2004). On the other hand, the Court has recently had an opportunity to examine a series of cases substantially similar to the present one, in which the absence of implementing regulations for redemption of a different type of Russian bonds, Urozhay-90, was at issue (see Malysh and Others v. Russia, no. 30280/03, 11 February 2010; SPK Dimskiy v. Russia, no. 27191/02, 18 March 2010; and Tronin v. Russia, no. 24461/02, 18 March 2010). It will draw inspiration from its findings in those cases in its analysis of the present one.
46. The Court reiterates that the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition. The applicable principles are nonetheless similar. Whether the case is analysed in terms of a positive duty of the State or in terms of an interference by a public authority which needs to be justified, the criteria to be applied do not differ in substance. In both contexts regard must be had to the fair balance which needs to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole. It also holds true that the aims mentioned in that provision may be of some relevance in assessing whether a balance has been struck between the demands of the public interest involved and the applicant’s fundamental right of property. In both contexts the State enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in determining the steps to be taken to ensure compliance with the Convention (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 144, ECHR 2004-V, and Hatton and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 36022/97, §§ 98 et seq., ECHR 2003-VIII).
47. In the present case the applicant’s submission under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was that the Russian State, having conferred on him an entitlement to seek redemption of the 1982 bonds, made it impossible to benefit from that entitlement, by failing for years to adopt the implementing regulations. That situation may well be examined in terms of a hindrance to the effective exercise of the right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 or in terms of a failure to secure the implementation of that right (compare Broniowski, § 146, and Malysh and Others, § 75, both cited above).
48. The Court will determine whether the conduct of the Russian State was justifiable in the light of the principles of lawfulness, pursuance of a legitimate aim in the public interest and striking of a fair balance between the general interest of the community and the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions (see, for a detailed description of those principles, Broniowski, cited above, §§ 147-151).
49. As regards the lawfulness requirement, the Court notes that the application of the Base Value Act and the Government-approved conversion regulation, which were together the necessary elements for performing the conversion of 1982 bonds into Russian promissory notes, was repeatedly suspended through the Government regulations and federal laws for each successive year (see paragraphs 18 and 22 above). It is therefore satisfied that an interference with, or a restriction on, the exercise of the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions was “provided for by law” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
50. As the Court has already observed in the Malysh and Others judgment with regards to the existence of a legitimate aim in the public interest, in the 1990s the Russian State went through a tumultuous transition from a State-controlled to a market economy. Its economic well-being was further jeopardised by the financial crisis of 1998 and the sharp devaluation of the national currency. Even though it has achieved relative prosperity and wealth in recent years, the Court agrees that defining budgetary priorities in terms of favouring expenditure on pressing social issues to the detriment of claims with a purely pecuniary nature was a legitimate aim in the public interest (see Malysh and Others, § 80, cited above).
51. On the question of the striking of a fair balance between the general interest and the applicant’s rights, the Court reiterates that the rule of law underlying the Convention and the principle of lawfulness in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 require States not only to respect and apply, in a foreseeable and consistent manner, the laws they have enacted, but also, as a corollary of this duty, to ensure the legal and practical conditions for their implementation (see Broniowski, cited above, §§ 147 and 184). In the context of the present case, those principles required the Russian State to fulfil in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner, the legislative promises it had made in respect of claims arising out of the 1982 bonds (compare Malysh and Others, § 82, cited above). In particular, it was incumbent on the authorities to legislate on the conditions for implementation of the bond-bearers’ entitlement, with a view to satisfying the undertaking that had been created through the enactment of the Savings Protection Act and follow-up legislation.
52. In the period that immediately followed the enactment of the Savings Protection Act in 1995, the Russian Parliament promptly enacted a number of legislative acts that were required for its successful implementation, such as the 1996 Promissory Value Act, the 1999 Base Value Act, and the 1999 Conversion Procedure Act. Those acts laid down a legislative framework for settlement of bond-bearers’ entitlements, which had been continuously recognised as part of the State’s internal debt. In early 2000, the Russian Government adopted a regulation on the application of the conversion procedure. However, for reasons that remain unclear to the Court, as no explanation was put forward by the Government, starting from 2003 the application and implementation of the existing legal framework governing redemption of the 1982 bonds was repeatedly suspended, year by year. The information available to the Court does not allow it to find that the Russian Government took any measures in that period with a view to satisfying the claims arising out of the bonds. An appropriate balancing exercise determining the exact amount that would be required to settle the debt under the bonds in relation to other priority expenses could not have been possible in the absence of crucial figures, such as the quantity and total valuation of the remaining bonds. While the Court agrees that the radical reform of Russia’s political and economic system, as well as the state of the country’s finances, may have justified stringent financial limitations on rights of a purely pecuniary nature, it finds that the Russian Government were not able to adduce satisfactory grounds justifying, in terms of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the continuous failure over many years to implement an entitlement conferred on the applicant by Russian legislation (compare Malysh and Others, § 83, cited above).
53. As regards the conduct of the applicant, the Court has no competence ratione temporis to examine the options that were available to the bond-bearers prior to the ratification of the Convention and the Protocol. It notes, however, that since the enactment of the Savings Protection Act he has had a legitimate expectation of obtaining some form of compensation for, or redemption of, his bonds. He did not remain passive, but rather displayed an active attitude by making requests to the competent authorities and lodging claims with the domestic courts. In these circumstances, it cannot be said that the applicant was responsible for, or culpably contributed to, the state of affairs which he complained about (compare Broniowski, § 181, and Malysh and Others, § 84, both cited above). Rather, as the Court has found on the strength of the evidence before it, the hindrance to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions was solely attributable to the respondent State.
54. On balance, the Court considers that the Russian authorities, by imposing successive limitations on the application of the legislative and regulatory provisions establishing the basis for the applicant’s right to redemption of the 1982 bonds and by failing for years to put into practice the procedure for implementation of that entitlement, kept the applicant in a state of uncertainty, which was incompatible in itself with the obligation arising under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to secure the peaceful enjoyment of possessions, notably with the duty to act in good time and in an appropriate and consistent manner where an issue of general interest is at stake (see Broniowski, §§ 151 and 185, and Malysh and Others, § 85, both cited above).
55. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
56. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
57. The applicant submitted that he was the holder of 1982 bonds with a total nominal value of 19,845 “promissory roubles”. Pursuant to the Conversion Procedure Act, interest on the converted securities was to accrue at a rate no lower than ten per cent per annum and the current value of his bonds amounted to 39,690 “promissory roubles”. In January 2003, the “promissory rouble” was equivalent to 32 Russian roubles (RUB); its current value is unknown. Multiplying the last known value of the “promissory rouble” by the current nominal value of his bonds and making an adjustment for the time that lapsed since 2003, the applicant assessed his claim in respect of pecuniary damage at RUB 1,500,000.
58. The Government submitted that no compensation should be awarded to the applicant because there had been no violation of his rights.
59. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of pecuniary damage is not ready for decision. Accordingly, it shall be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having regard to any agreement which might be reached between the Government and the applicant (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
B. Non-pecuniary damage
60. The applicant asked the Court to determine the appropriate award in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
61. The Government submitted that the applicant had failed to produce any evidence of non-pecuniary damage.
62. The Court reiterates its constant position that an applicant cannot be required to furnish any proof of non-pecuniary damage he or she has sustained (see, among many others, Antipenkov v. Russia, no. 33470/03, § 82, 15 October 2009; Pshenichnyy v. Russia, no. 30422/03, § 35, 14 February 2008; Garabayev v. Russia, no. 38411/02, § 113, ECHR 2007-VII (extracts); and Gridin v. Russia, no. 4171/04, § 20, 1 June 2006). It further considers that the applicant must have suffered anxiety and frustration on account of the authorities’ prolonged failure to devise a procedure for settlement of his entitlement. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 1,800 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on it.
C. Costs and expenses
63. The applicant did not claim any costs and expenses. Accordingly, there is no call to make an award under this head.
D. Default interest
64. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds that as far as any pecuniary damage is concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly:
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within six months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be;
4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 1,800 (one thousand eight hundred euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable on the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 2 December 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the concurring opinion of Judge Malinverni is annexed to this judgment.
C.L.R.
A.M.W.

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE MALINVERNI
(Translation)
In the present case I joined the rest of my colleagues in finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, I have considerable difficulty in subscribing to the reasoning which led the Court to that conclusion.
In paragraph 46 of the judgment, the Court points out that the present case could be considered either in terms of interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions or in terms of the State’s positive obligations, given that “the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition”.
One can only agree with this statement. However, I am of the view that, when faced with a choice between these two approaches, the Court must opt for whichever it considers more appropriate, and then adhere to its choice.
The judgment does not do this, however. In paragraph 47 already, it states that “[the] situation may well be examined in terms of a hindrance to the effective exercise of the right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 or in terms of a failure to secure the implementation of that right”.
Paragraphs 48 to 50 favour the interference approach, as they examine whether the conditions of lawfulness, pursuance of a legitimate aim and proportionality were met.
Paragraph 51, meanwhile, sees the Court revert to the positive obligations approach, stating that “[i]n the context of the present case, those principles required the Russian State to fulfil in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner, the legislative promises it had made in respect of claims arising out of the 1982 bonds”. The same applies to paragraphs 52 to 54.
I find this shifting between one approach and another unsatisfactory. In my view, the present case should have been examined solely in terms of the State’s positive obligation to enact legislation. As the judgment itself states, “although the debt arising out of the bonds had been recognised by the Russian State in a series of legislative acts”, it was “the absence of implementing regulations” which made “redemption of the bonds impossible” (paragraph 45).
The Russian Supreme Court, moreover, did not err in refusing to examine the applicant’s claim on the ground that “[b]y virtue of the constitutional principle of separation of powers, the court may not, in civil proceedings, require the Government of the Russian Federation to enact a specific legal act...” (paragraph 12).


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; danno Patrimoniale - riservato; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA YURIY LOBANOV C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 15578/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
2 dicembre 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Yuriy Lobanov c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, compose da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e da André Wampach, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 9 novembre 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 15578/03) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, il Sig. Y. io. L. (“il richiedente”), il 23 aprile 2003.
2. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani.
3. Il richiedente addusse una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà.
4. Il 9 marzo 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1938 e vive a Shuya nella Regione di Ivanovo.
6. Il richiedente è un possessore delle obbligazioni premium di Stato del 1982 (облигации Государственного внутреннего выигрышного займа 1982 года) aventi un valore nominale e totale di 19,845 “rubli promissori” (vedere paragrafo 17 sotto).
7. Nel 1982, l'URSS emise un prestito Statale premium interno per finanziare certi programmi Statali (vedere paragrafo 13 sotto). Secondo le condizioni del prestito, gli individui avrebbero potuto investire i loro soldi in obbligazioni Statali premium e avrebbero potuto riscattarle in un qualsiasi periodo durante il termine del prestito con interesse al tre per cento all'anno. Il termine del prestito era fissato a venti anni. In quel periodo, 160 estrazioni organizzate dallo stato avrebbero dovuto tenersi in cui delle obbligazioni avrebbero guadagnato dei premi in contanti.
8. Nel 1992 il Governo della Federazione russa riconobbe la sua successione a riguardo degli obblighi dell'URSS sotto il prestito del 1982 e i pagamenti sospesi sotto le obbligazioni premium dello Stato del 1982 (vedere paragrafo 14 sotto).
9. Fra il 1995 ed il 2000, una serie di leggi russe furono adottate che prevedevano una conversione delle security sovietiche, incluse le obbligazioni di prestito del 1982 in speciali vaglia cambiari russi (vedere paragrafi 16 a 20 sotto). Al Governo fu affidato di concepire una procedura per la conversione e fissare il valore del vaglia cambiario. Benché una regolamentazione sulla conversione fosse stata adottata nel 2000 (vedere paragrafo 21 sotto), la conversione effettiva non cominciò e la richiesta della regolamentazione è rimasta sospesa ad oggi (vedere paragrafo 22 sotto).
10. Nel primo 2002, il richiedente scrisse al Ministero delle Finanze per chiedere in merito alle possibilità e i tempo-limiti per convertire le sue obbligazioni del 1982 in vaglia cambiari russi. Con una lettera del 27 aprile 2002, un direttore aggiunto del Dipartimento del Debito Interno confermò al richiedente che le sue obbligazioni avrebbero dovuto essere convertite in vaglia cambiari russi in conformità con l'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi. Il direttore aggiunto proseguì spiegando perché la conversione non era stata ancora possibile:
“La Sezione 10 dell’Atto [di Procedura di Conversione] prevedeva che la procedura per calcolare l'interesse accumulato sul vaglia cambiario russo e la procedura per riparare il debito [interno] avrebbero dovuto essere stabilite tramite una legge federale speciale che non era ancora stata decretata. In questo collegamento, i pagamenti effettivi in rubli [russi] sotto i vaglia cambiari -come previsto nell’Atto [di Procedura di Conversione] l-non possono essere fatti e la determinazione del valore del [‘rublo promissorio '] non era di nessun significato pratico poiché la sua richiesta non era stata ancora definita dal legislatore.
...
Una volta che la legislazione sulla procedura per calcolare l'interesse e la procedura del servizio al debito è stata adottata, il Ministero di Finanza costituirà le disposizioni necessarie per la conversione delle security dell’ URSS... in vaglia cambiari e la loro erogazione; avvierà anche un bando di gara aperto per la selezione dell'agente di conversione...”
11. Nel novembre 2002 il richiedente introdusse procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema della Federazione russa citando il Governo per l'inattività e l’ insuccesso nell’ attivare il programma del rimborso.
12. Il 4 dicembre 2002 la Corte Suprema rifiutò di esaminare la rivendicazione del richiedente. Trovò ciò che segue:
“In virtù del principio costituzionale della separazione dei poteri, la corte non può, in procedimenti civili, costringere il Governo della Federazione russa a decretare uno specifico atto legale se la legge non prevede esplicitamente il dovere del Governo di adottare la regolamentazione appropriata; la rivendicazione non può essere accettata per esame dalla corte.”
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
13. Il 30 dicembre 1980 il Gabinetto dei Ministri dell’ URSS risolse, con Decisione n. 1220, il problema delle obbligazioni premium del prestito interno dello Stato del 1982 che avevano valore nominali di 25, 50 e 100 rubli sovietici. Il loro periodo di circolazione fu fissato a venti anni, dal 1 gennaio 1982 al 1 gennaio 2002 . I cittadini sovietici avrebbero potuto o comprare le obbligazioni del 1982 coi loro propri soldi o avrebbero potuto ottenerle in cambio di obbligazioni dal precedente prestito premium interno dello Stato del 1966. Le obbligazioni del 1982 avrebbero potuto essere vendute e avrebbero potuto essere riscattate nell’intero periodo di circolazione.
14. Il 19 febbraio 1992 il Governo della Federazione russa emise la Decisione n. 97 riguardo al prestito premium interno dello Stato del 1982 e di un nuovo prestito premium interno russo da emettere nel 1992. Prevedeva come segue:
“1. Confermare la successione del Governo della Federazione russa a riguardo dei precedenti obblighi dell'URSS nei confronti dei cittadini della Federazione russa originati dalle obbligazioni premium del prestito statale interno del 1982.
2. Cominciando dal 20 febbraio 1992, cessare la vendita e l’ acquisto delle obbligazioni di quel prestito e sostenere estrazioni di premi.
3. Emettere il prestito premium interno russo del 1992.
...
6. Dare ai cittadini di Federazione russi che sono possessori di obbligazioni dello Stato del prestito interno premium del 1982 al cambio volontario delle obbligazioni contro le security Statali, incluso le obbligazioni premium del prestito interno del1992 obbligazioni , le quote russe nella Banca di Risparmio della Federazione russa, ed anche accreditare gli incassi da vendita di obbligazioni a depositi aperti presso la Banca di Risparmio della Federazione russa, dal 1 ottobre 1992...”
15. Tramite la Decisione n. 549 del 5 agosto 1992, il Governo russo decise che dal 1 ottobre 1992 al 1 ottobre 1993 la Banca di Risparmio sarebbe stata autorizzata ad acquistare le obbligazioni1982 ed a scambiarle per le obbligazioni 1992 al tasso di 160 rubli russi per un'obbligazione con un valore nominale di 100 rubli.
16. Il 10 maggio 1995 fu decretato l'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi (no. 73-FZ, ФЗ «О восстановлении и защите сбережений граждан Российской Федерации»). Lo Stato garantiva la protezione dei risparmi dei cittadini russi incluso i loro investimenti in security Statali emesse dall'URSS e dalla RSFSR prima del 1 gennaio 1992 (sezione 1). I risparmi garantiti furono riconosciuti come parte del debito Statale interno garantito della Federazione russa con l'interezza dei beni disponibili a disposizione del Governo della Russia (sezioni 2 e 3). Le security sovietiche avrebbero dovuto essere convertite in vaglia cambiari speciali della Federazione russa con un valore promissorio speciale (sezioni 5 e 7). Leggi separate sarebbero state decretate per determinare la procedura per convertire le security sovietiche in vaglia cambiari russi e determinare il loro valore corrente (sezione 12).
17. Il 6 luglio 1996 l'Atto del Valore Promissorio ((no. 87-FZ, ФЗ «О порядке установления долговой стоимости единицы номинала целевого долгового обязательства Российской Федерации») introdusse il “rublo promissorio” come valuta dei vaglia cambiari speciali della Federazione russa (sezione 1). Il valore effettivo del “rublo promissorio” sarebbe stato determinato come una proporzione del “valore di controllo” del paniere dei beni al consumo ed il suo “valore di base” ai prezzi che hanno prevalso nella RSFSR nel 1990 (sezione 2). Il “valore di controllo” sarebbe stato calcolato su una base settimanale dal Servizio Statistico Statale ed il “valore di base” sarebbe stato fissato in una legge federale (sezioni 3 a 7). Il Governo doveva pubblicare il valore corrente del “rublo promissorio” entro un mese dall'entrata in vigore dell’Atto.
18. Il 4 febbraio 1999 l'Atto del Valore di Base (no. 21-FZ, ФЗ «О базовой стоимости необходимого социального набора») fu decretato in adempimento dell'Atto del Valore Promissorio. Fissava il “valore di base” a 464 rubli sovietici. La sua applicazione fu sospesa dal1 gennaio 2003 al 1 gennaio 2012 con leggi federali successive (n. 176-FZ del 24 dicembre 2002, n. 186-FZ del 23 dicembre 2003, n. 173-FZ del 23 dicembre 2004, n. 189-FZ del 26 dicembre 2005, n. 238-FZ del 19 dicembre 2006, n. 198-FZ del 24 luglio 2007, e n. 206-FZ del 24 novembre 2008).
19. Il 15 marzo 1999 il Servizio Statistico Statale approvò le linee guida sul calcolo del “valore di controllo” (decisione n. 19).
20. Il 12 luglio 1999 l'Atto della Procedura della Conversione (no. 162-FZ, ФЗ «О порядке перевода государственных ценных бумаг СССР и сертификатов Сберегательного банка СССР в целевые долговые обязательства Российской Федерации») confermò che le obbligazioni premium del prestito interno dello Stato del 1982 ancora in circolazione in Russia sono parte dei risparmi garantiti dei cittadini russi (sezione 1). Le Sezioni 3 a 8 stabiliscono i principi generali per la conversione delle obbligazioni in vaglia cambiari speciali della Federazione russa. La procedura del sevizio del debito sarebbe stata disciplinata da una legge federale separata (sezione 10). La Sezione 11 specificò che le garanzie dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi erano completamente applicabili a security che non erano state convertite in vaglia cambiari russi e che nessun statuto di limitazione si applicava a rivendicazioni generate da quelle security.
21. In adempimento della sezione 15 dell'Atto della Procedura della Conversione il 29 gennaio 2000 il Governo russo approvò una regolamentazione sulla procedura per la conversione delle security dell’ URSS in vaglia cambiari russi (Decisione n. 82). Stabilì che la conversione in vaglia cambiari sarebbe stata compiuta apponendo un timbro sul fronte delle obbligazioni che avrebbe certificato il fatto della conversione ed anche la natura, il valore nominale ed il tasso di interesse del nuovo vaglia cambiario (paragrafo 3). Le obbligazioni convertite sarebbero state registrate in un registro tenuto dal Ministero delle Finanze (paragrafo 4). La conversione sarebbe stata eseguita da un'agenzia di prestito designata che il Ministero delle Finanze doveva scegliere tramite bando (sezione 5).
22. Cominciando dal 2003, l’applicazione e l’ attuazione della Decisione n. 82 furono sospese ripetutamente da Decisioni Statali successive (n. 625 del 14 ottobre 2003, n. 349 del 13 luglio 2004, n. 489 del 4 agosto 2005, n. 467 del 28 luglio 2006, n. 479 del 25 luglio 2007, n. 558 del 22 luglio 2008, n. 594 del 21 luglio 2009, e n. 387 del 1 giugno 2010).
23. Il 17 marzo 2004 il Presidium della Corte Regionale di Mosca ha annullato, tramite riesame direttivo tutte le sentenze in un giudizio civile in cui i rivendicatori citarono in giudizio il Governo russo per il suo insuccesso nel determinare il valore del “rublo promissorio” (decisione n. 229). Sostenne come segue:
“Le rivendicazioni sollevate dal Sig. e dalla Sig.ra K. escono dalle competenza delle corti ; una corte non può abusare della competenza del corpo esecutivo costringendolo a compiere azioni o emettere regolamentazioni che sono all'interno della competenza di quel corpo. La corte può solamente... valutare l'ottemperanza delle regolamentazioni Statali con la legislazione federale russa. Inoltre, le corti distrettuali non hanno competenza su simili rivendicazioni. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 220 § 1 del Codice di Procedura Civile, una corte cesserà i procedimenti se la rivendicazione non può essere esaminata e determinata in procedimenti civili.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
24. Il richiedente si lamentò, senza invocare una specifica disposizione della Convenzione, di una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà a causa dell'insuccesso delle autorità russe nell0 adempiere i loro obblighi sotto le obbligazioni premium dello Stato del 1982. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata dal punto d'osservazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Compatibilità ratione Temporis
25. La Corte osserva all'inizio che le obbligazioni che sono in questione nella presente causa sono state introdotte nel 1982, cioè prima della ratifica della Convenzione da parte della Russia che avvenne il 5 maggio 1998. Di conseguenza, la Corte deve verificare, anche se questa eccezione non è stata sollevata dal Governo nella presente causa, se ha competenza ratione temporis per esaminare la presente richiesta (vedere Blečić c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 67 ECHR 2006 -...).
26. La Corte reitera che la sua giurisdizione ratione temporis copre solamente il periodo dopo la ratifica della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli da parte dello Stato rispondente. Dalla data della ratifica in poi, tutti gli atti ed omissioni addotti dello Stato devono esseri conformi alla Convenzione o ai suoi Protocolli ed i fatti susseguenti rientrano all'interno della giurisdizione della Corte nel caso in cui sono soltanto proroghe di una situazione già esistente (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia (dec.) [GC], n. 31443/96, § 74 ECHR 2002-X).
27. Di conseguenza, la Corte è competente per esaminare i fatti della presente causa per la loro compatibilità con la Convenzione solamente nella misura in cui si sono verificati dopo il 5 maggio 1998, data della ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Russia. Comunque, può avere riguardo ai fatti prima della ratifica poiché si potrebbe considerare che loro abbiano creato una situazione che si prolunga oltre quella data o possono essere attinenti per la comprensione di fatti accaduti dopo quella data.
28. La base che riguarda i fatti per la rivendicazione della Convenzione del richiedente è l'insuccesso addotto dello Stato russo nel soddisfare il suo diritto al rimborso delle obbligazioni sovietiche che lui aveva acquisito nel 1982. In seguito alla risoluzione formale dell'URSS nel dicembre 1991, il Governo russo confermò la sua successione a riguardo degli obblighi generati dalle obbligazioni del 1982 ed avviò un programma per il loro rimborso e lo scambio con obbligazioni di un nuovo prestito interno russo (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). Questo programma fu cessato nel 1995 su promulgazione dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi che dichiarò le obbligazioni parte del debito interno dello Stato russo e garantì gli investimenti dei cittadini russi in security Statali emesse dall'URSS e dalla RSFSR prima del 1 gennaio 1992, incluso le obbligazioni del 1982.
29. Fin dalla promulgazione dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi il richiedente ha sostenuto continuamente una rivendicazione contro lo Stato russo generata dalle obbligazioni del 1982. Questa rivendicazione esisteva sia in data della ratifica della Convenzione della Russia che in data della sottomissione della richiesta alla Corte. Nonostante i cambi nell’implementazione della legislazione che fu in parte sospesa nell’applicazione, le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi non sono state mai revocate, o sono state annullate. Inoltre, l'Atto della Procedura della Conversione, adottato nel 1999 ammise esplicitamente l'esistenza del diritto e specificò che nessun statuto di limitazione si applicava alle rivendicazioni originate dalle security dell’ URSS che non erano ancora state convertite in vaglia cambiari russi (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Ne segue che la base legale per il riconoscimento che è l'argomento dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente di fronte alla Corte è stata stabilita nella legislazione nazionale su base continua.
30. Ne segue che, nella misura in cui l'azione di reclamo del richiedente è diretta contro l'insuccesso dello Stato russo nell’ implementare il diritto assegnatogli legalmente sotto il diritto russo -un diritto che esisteva nel 5 maggio 1998 ed ancora esiste oggi-la Corte ha giurisdizione temporale per accogliere la richiesta.
2. Compatibilità ratione materiae
31. Il Governo non espresse una prospettiva in merito a se considerava le obbligazioni del 1982 come “proprietà” del richiedente all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte deve ciononostante, soddisfarsi che ha giurisdizione ratione materiae in qualsiasi causa portata di fronte a sé. Sostenere il contrario vorrebbe dire che dove un Stato rispondente ha rinunciato al suo diritto per replica o ha omesso di sollevare l’eccezione di incompatibilità, la Corte dovrebbe decidere sui meriti di un'azione di reclamo contro questo Stato riguardo ad un diritto non garantito dalla Convenzione (vedere Blečić, loc. cit.).
32. La Corte reitera che il concetto di “proprietà” nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato a proprietà di beni fisici ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale: certi altri diritti ed interessi, come debiti che costituiscono beni possono essere anche considerati come “diritti di proprietà”, e così come “proprietà” ai fini di questa disposizione. Il problema che occorre esaminare è se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, hanno conferito al richiedente il diritto ad un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Broniowski (dec.), citata sopra, § 98).
33. La Corte osserva che la presente causa è simile alla recente causa Suljagić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina in cui fu determinato che una rivendicazione originata dai risparmi in valuta estera depositati presso banche iugoslave prima della costituzione della Repubblica Federale e Socialista dell'Iugoslavia corrispondeva ad una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (n. 27912/02, §§ 34-36 del 3 novembre 2009). Similmente al Sig. S., il richiedente nella presente causa decise di investire i suoi risparmi in obbligazioni premium di prestito statale del 1982 . In conformità con le condizioni del prestito, lui acquisì un diritto al riscatto delle obbligazioni da parte dello Stato con interesse accumulato in qualsiasi tempo durante l’intero periodo di circolazione delle obbligazioni che era stato fissato a venti anni cioè fino al 2002 (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Come notato sopra, lo Stato russo accettò la sua successione a riguardo degli obblighi dell'URSS originati dalle obbligazioni del 1982 e si prese carico dell'obbligo di convertirle in vaglia bancari russi speciali che avrebbero potuto essere scambiati in contanti sulla determinazione del loro valore. La Corte perciò costata che il richiedente aveva, ed ancora ha, una rivendicazione che corrisponde ad una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
34. Ne segue che la richiesta è compatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
3. Compatibilità ratione personae
35. Il Governo indicò che le obbligazioni del 1982 erano un obbligo dell'URSS.
36. La Corte osserva che, con la Decisione n. 97 del 19 febbraio 1992, il Governo russo confermò esplicitamente la sua successione a riguardo degli obblighi della precedente URSS a cittadini russi nati dal prestito premium interno dello Stato del 1982 (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). La stessa garanzia era contenuta nelle sezioni 1 a 3 dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi del 1995 che riconobbe le security dell’ URSS incluse le obbligazioni del 1982 in possesso dei cittadini russi, come parte del debito interno dello Stato russo garantito dall'interezza dei beni a disposizione del Governo russo (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Sembra perciò che lo Stato russo si prese carico dell’ obbligo di stabilire il debito originato dalle obbligazioni. Il richiedente che è un cittadino russo e possessore delle obbligazioni del 1982, lui era indubbiamente eleggibile per trarre profitto dall'accordo.
37. Ne segue che la Federazione russa ha accettato volontariamente la sua responsabilità a riguardo del diritto del richiedente e che nessun problema sorge a riguardo della compatibilità ratione personae della presente richiesta.
4. L'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
38. Infine, il Governo affermò che il richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali perché lui non aveva fatto domanda presso una corte distrettuale o presso un accusatore.
39. Il richiedente rispose che una corte distrettuale non sarebbe stata competente per decidere su tale problema.
40. La Corte osserva che il Governo non ha fatto riferimento ad una qualsiasi disposizione legislativa o giurisprudenza in appoggio alla sua dichiarazione per cui una corte distrettuale o l'ufficio di un accusatore avrebbe potuto essere in grado offrire compensazione effettiva in una situazione in cui un individuo si lamenta dell'insuccesso del Governo nell’ adottare l’implementazione legislativa. Si nota inoltre che il Presidium della Corte Regionale di Mosca, decidendo su una rivendicazione simile riguardo all'omissione di atti del Governo, sostenne che le corti distrettuali non hanno competenza su simili rivendicazioni e che simili rivendicazioni non possono essere esaminate o determinate in procedimenti civili (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo come alla non-esaurimento di via di ricorso nazionali.
5. Conclusione in merito all'ammissibilità della richiesta
41. Nella misura in cui viene presa in considerazione l'ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che l’applicazione solleva problemi seri di fatto e di diritto sotto la Convenzione, la determinazione dei quali dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti.
42. Non è stato stabilita nessuna base per dichiarare la richiesta inammissibile. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Argomenti delle parti
43. Il Governo presentò che nel 1992 la Federazione russa aveva assunto gli obblighi dell'URSS originati dalle obbligazioni del 1982 ed aveva offerto una scelta ai loro possessori fra cui il riscatto da parte della Banca di Risparmio e la conversione in obbligazioni russe del 1992. Il richiedente non si era avvalso di nessuna delle due opzioni.
44. Il richiedente contese che ambo le scelte sono esistite solamente dal 1992 al 1995, per un periodo di elevata inflazione e di svalutazione acuta della valuta russa ed erano state perciò finanziariamente svantaggiose per gli obbligazionisti. Lui indicò che lo Stato russo aveva riconosciuto il suo debito originato dalle obbligazioni del 1982 ma che il Governo russo non aveva fatto niente per estinguerlo, nonostante le leggi federali che erano già state adottate.
2. La valutazione della Corte
45. La Corte nota all'inizio che ai fini di Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 “la proprietà” del richiedente consisteva nel suo diritto ad ottenere un certa forma di risarcimento, o il rimborso delle obbligazioni del 1982. Come notato sopra, benché il debito originato dalle obbligazioni fosse stato riconosciuto dallo Stato russo in una serie di atti legislativi, l'assenza di implementazione di regolamentazioni ha reso impossibile il rimborso delle obbligazioni. La spinta dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente fu diretta così contro la mancanza di regolamentazione legale del suo diritto e l'assenza di una specifica procedura per il rimborso delle obbligazioni di quel tipo. Questo elemento distingue la presente causa da quelle cause in cui la struttura legislativa era già stata fissata ma in cui richiedenti erano scontentati del livello del risarcimento disponibile per loro (vedere, per esempio, Grishchenko c. Russia (dec.), n. 75907/01, 8 luglio 2004). D'altra parte la Corte ha avuto recentemente l'opportunità di esaminare una serie di cause sostanzialmente simili al presente in cui l'assenza di implementazione di regolamentazioni per il rimborso di un tipo diverso di obbligazioni russe ,Urozhay-90, era in questione (vedere Malysh ed Altri c. Russia, n. 30280/03, 11 febbraio 2010; SPK Dimskiy c. Russia, n. 27191/02, 18 marzo 2010; e Tronin c. Russia, n. 24461/02, 18 marzo 2010). Trarrà inspirazione dai suoi giudizi in quelle cause nella sua analisi della presente.
46. La Corte reitera che i confine fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non si prestano a definizione precisa. I principi applicabili sono nondimeno simili. Se la causa è analizzata in termini di un dovere positivo dello Stato o in termini di un'interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica che necessita di essere giustificata, i criteri da applicare non differiscono nella sostanza. In ambo i contesti occorre avere riguardo all'equilibrio equo che bisogna prevedere fra gli interessi in competizione dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme. Risulta anche vero che gli scopi menzionati in questa disposizione potrebbero essere di una certa attinenza nel valutare se un equilibrio è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse pubblico coinvolte ed il diritto essenziale del richiedente alla proprietà. In ambo i contesti lo Stato gode di un certo margine di valutazione nel determinare i passi da intraprendere per assicurare l’ottemperanza con la Convenzione (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 144, il 2004-V di ECHR, e Hatton ed Altri c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 36022/97, §§ 98 et seq., ECHR 2003-VIII).
47. Nella presente causa l'osservazione del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 era che lo Stato russo, avendo conferitogli un diritto a chiedere il rimborso delle obbligazioni del1982, rese impossibile trarre profitto da questo diritto, fallendo per anni nell’ adottare l’implementazioni delle regolamentazioni. Questa situazione può essere esaminata proprio in termini di un ostacolo all'esercizio effettivo del diritto protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 o in termini di un insuccesso nel garantire l'attuazione di questo diritto (confronta Broniowski, § 146, e Malysh ed Altri, § 75 entrambe citate sopra).
48. La Corte determinerà se la condotta dello Stato russo era giustificabile alla luce dei principi di legalità, dell'adempimento di un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico e della predisposizione di un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della comunità ed il diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà (vedere, per una descrizione particolareggiata di questi principi, Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 147-151).
49. Riguardo al requisito di legalità, la Corte nota che l’applicazione dell'Atto del Valore di Base e la regolamentazione della conversione approvata dal Governo che erano insieme gli elementi necessari per compiere la conversione delle obbligazioni del 1982 in vaglia bancari russi furono sospesi ripetutamente tramite regolamentazioni Statali e leggi federali per ogni anno successivo (vedere paragrafi 18 e 22 sopra). È soddisfatta perciò che un'interferenza, o una restrizione, con l'esercizio del diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà era “prevista dalla legge” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
50. Come la Corte già ha osservato nella sentenza Malysh ed Altri riguardo all'esistenza di uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico, negli anni novanta lo Stato russo superò una transizione tumultuosa da un’economia controllata dallo Stato ad un'economia di mercato. Il suo benessere economico fu messo in pericolo inoltre dalla crisi finanziaria del 1998 e dalla svalutazione acuta della valuta nazionale. Anche se ha realizzato relativa prosperità e ricchezza nei recenti anni, la Corte concorda che definire le priorità budgetarie in termini di destinare la spesa a favore dei problemi sociali a danno delle rivendicazioni di natura puramente patrimoniale era uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico (vedere Malysh ed Altri, § 80 citata sopra).
51. Sulla questione di stabilire un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale ed i diritti del richiedente, la Corte reitera, che la preminenza del diritto che è posta sotto alla Convenzione ed il principio della legalità nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non solo costringe gli Stati a rispettare ed applicare, in modo prevedibile e coerente le leggi che loro hanno decretato, ma anche, come corollario di questo dovere, assicurare le condizioni legali e pratiche per la loro attuazione (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 147 e 184). Nel contesto della presente causa, quei principi costringevano lo Stato russo ad adempiere nel tempo dovuto, in modo appropriato e coerente le promesse legislative che aveva fatto a riguardo di rivendicazioni originate dalle obbligazioni del 1982 (confronta Malysh ed Altri, § 82 citata sopra). In particolare, era spettava alle autorità legiferare sulle condizioni per l’attuazione dei diritti dei portatori delle obbligazioni, nella prospettiva di soddisfare l’impegno che era stato creato per la promulgazione dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi e della legislazione di seguito.
52. Nel periodo che immediatamente seguì la promulgazione dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi nel 1995, il Parlamento russo decretò prontamente un numero di atti legislativi richiesti per la riuscita della sua implementazione, come l’Atto del Valore Promissorio del 1996, l'Atto del Valore di Base del 1999, e l'Atto della Procedura di Conversione del 1999. Questi atti stabilirono una struttura legislativa per rispettare i diritti dei portatori di obbligazioni che erano stati continuamente riconosciuti come parte del debito interno dello Stato. Nel primo 2000, il Governo russo adottò una regolamentazione sull’applicazione della procedura di conversione. Comunque, per ragioni che rimangono poco chiare alla Corte, siccome nessun chiarimento è stato esposto dal Governo, cominciando dal 2003 l’applicazione e l’ attuazione della struttura legale esistente che disciplinava il rimborso delle obbligazioni del 1982 furono ripetutamente sospese, di anno in anno. Le informazioni disponibili alla Corte non le permettono di trovare che il Governo russo prese qualsiasi misura in quel periodo nella prospettiva di soddisfare le rivendicazioni originate dalle obbligazioni. Un esercizio di bilanciamento appropriato che determinasse l'importo esatto che sarebbe stato costretto a stabilire il debito sotto le obbligazioni in relazione alle altre spese prioritarie non poteva essere possibile in assenza di cifre cruciali, come la quantità e la valutazione totale delle obbligazioni rimanenti. Mentre la Corte concorda che la riforma integrale del sistema politico ed economico della Russia, così come lo stato delle finanze del paese, abbia potuto giustificare le severe limitazioni finanziarie sui diritti di natura puramente patrimoniale, trova che il Governo russo non sia in grado addurre motivi tali da giustificare in modo soddisfacente, in termini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, l'insuccesso continuo nel corso di molti anni nell’ implementare un diritto conferito al richiedente dalla legislazione russa (confronta Malysh ed Altri, § 83 citata sopra).
53. Riguardo alla condotta del richiedente, la Corte non ha nessuna competenza ratione temporis per esaminare le scelte che erano disponibili ai portatori di obbligazioni - prima della ratifica della Convenzione e del Protocollo. Comunque, nota che fin dalla promulgazione dell'Atto della Protezione dei Risparmi ha avuto un'aspettativa legittima di ottenere una forma di risarcimento, o di rimborso , delle sue obbligazioni. Lui non rimase passivo, ma piuttosto mostrò un atteggiamento attivo facendo richieste alle autorità competenti e rivendicazioni depositate presso le corti nazionali. In queste circostanze, non può essere detto, che il richiedente era responsabile, o ritenuto colpevole di aver contribuito, dello stato di affari del quale lui si lamentava (confronta Broniowski, § 181, e Malysh ed Altri, § 84 sia citate sopra). Piuttosto, come la Corte ha trovato per forza delle prove di fronte a sé, l'ostacolo al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà era solamente attribuibile allo Stato rispondente.
54. D’altra parte, la Corte considera, che le autorità russe, imponendo limitazioni successive all’applicazione delle disposizioni legislative e che dettavano le norme che stabilivano la base per il diritto del richiedente al rimborso delle obbligazioni del 1982 e fallendo per anni nel fissare in pratica la procedura per l’implementazione di quel diritto, hanno tenuto il richiedente in un stato di incertezza che era di per sé incompatibile con l'obbligo che deriva dall’Articolo 1 del Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 per garantire il godimento tranquillo della proprietà, in particolare col dovere di agire nel dovuto tempo ed in modo appropriato e coerente dove è in gioco un problema di interesse generale (vedere Broniowski, §§ 151 e 185, e Malysh ed Altri, § 85 entrambe citate sopra).
55. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
56. L’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno patrimoniale
57. Il richiedente presentò che lui era il possessore delle obbligazioni del 1982 con un valore nominale totale di 19,845 “rubli promissori.” Facendo seguito all'Atto della Procedura di Conversione, l’ interesse sulle security convertite doveva accumularsi ad un tasso non inferiore al dieci per cento all'anno ed il valore corrente delle sue obbligazioni corrispondeva a 39,690 “rubli promissori.” Nel gennaio 2003, il “rublo promissorio” era equivalente a 32 rubli russi (RUB); il suo valore corrente è ignoto. Moltiplicando lo scorso valore noto del “rublo promissorio” col valore nominale corrente delle sue obbligazioni e facendo un adeguamento per il tempo che trascorso dal 2003, il richiedente ha valutato la sua rivendicazione a riguardo del danno patrimoniale a RUB 1,500,000.
58. Il Governo presentò che nessun risarcimento dovrebbe essere assegnato al richiedente perché non c'era stata nessuna violazione dei suoi diritti.
59. La Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 a riguardo del danno patrimoniale non è pronta per una decisione. Di conseguenza, sarà riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata, avendo riguardo a qualsiasi accordo a cui avrebbero potuto giungere il Governo ed il richiedente (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
B. Danno non-patrimoniale
60. Il richiedente chiese alla Corte di determinare l'assegnazione appropriata a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
61. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non era riuscito a produrre qualsiasi prova del danno non-patrimoniale.
62. La Corte reitera la sua posizione continua per cui un richiedente non può essere costretto a fornire una qualsiasi prova del danno non-patrimoniale che ha subito (vedere, fra molte altre, Antipenkov c. Russia, n. 33470/03, § 82 del 15 ottobre 2009; Pshenichnyy c. Russia, n. 30422/03, § 35 del 14 febbraio 2008; Garabayev c. Russia, n. 38411/02, § 113 ECHR 2007-VII (estratti); e Gridin c. Russia, n. 4171/04, § 20 del 1 giugno 2006). Considera inoltre che il richiedente ha dovuto soffrire di ansia e di frustrazione a causa del prolungato insuccesso delle autorità nel concepire una procedura per saldare il suo diritto. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 1,800 al richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo.
C. Costi e spese
63. Il richiedente non ha chiesto nessun rimborso di costi e spese. Non c'è di conseguenza, nessuna necessità di fare un'assegnazione sotto questo capo.
D. Interesse di mora
64. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene che nella misura in cui si considera un qualsiasi danno patrimoniale, la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione e di conseguenza:
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro sei mesi della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo a cui potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissarla all’occorrenza ;
4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 1,800 (mille ottocento euro) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 2 dicembre 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione concordante del Giudice Malinverni è annessa a questa sentenza.
C.L.R.
A.M.W.

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE MALINVERNI
(Traduzione)
Nella presente causa io mi sono unito al resto dei miei colleghi nel trovare una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Comunque, trovo una difficoltà considerevole nel sottoscrivere il ragionamento che ha condotto la Corte a quella conclusione.
Nel paragrafo 46 della sentenza, la Corte indica, che la presente causa potrebbe essere considerata sia in termini di interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà che nei termini degli obblighi positivi dello Stato, dato che “i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non si prestano a definizione precisa.”
Non ci si può che confarsi con questa dichiarazione. Comunque, sono della prospettiva che, quando si è di fronte ad una scelta fra questi due approcci, la Corte deve optare per quello che considera più appropriato, e poi aderire alla sua scelta.
La sentenza non fa questo, comunque. Nel paragrafo 47 già afferma, che “[la] situazione può essere esaminata sia in termini di un ostacolo all'esercizio effettivo del diritto protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che in termini di un insuccesso per garantire l'attuazione di quel diritto.”
I paragrafi dal 48 al 50 favoriscono l'approccio dell’ interferenza, siccome esaminano se le condizioni della legalità, dell'adempimento di uno scopo legittimo e della proporzionalità erano stati soddisfatti.
Il paragrafo 51, invece, vede la Corte ritornare all'approccio degli obblighi positivi, affermando che “[nel] contesto della presente causa, quei principi costringevano lo Stato russo ad adempiere nel dovuto tempo, in modo appropriato e coerente le promesse legislative che aveva fatto a riguardo delle rivendicazioni originate dalle obbligazioni del 1982.” Lo stesso si applica ai paragrafi 52 a 54.
Io trovo questo cambiamento da un approccio ad un altro insoddisfacente. Nella mia prospettiva, la presente causa avrebbe dovuto essere esaminata solamente nei termini dell'obbligo positivo dello Stato di decretare la legislazione. Come la sentenza stessa enuncia, “benché il debito originato dalle obbligazioni fosse stato riconosciuto dallo Stato russo in una serie di atti legislativi”, era “l'assenza di implementazione delle regolamentazioni” che rese “impossibile il rimborso delle obbligazioni” (paragrafo 45).
La Corte Suprema russa, inoltre non errò nel rifiutare di esaminare la rivendicazione del richiedente sulla base che “[in virtù del ] del principio costituzionale della separazione dei poteri, la corte non può, nei procedimenti civili, costringere il Governo della Federazione russa a decretare uno specifico atto legale...” (paragrafo 12).




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.