Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF DOKIC v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, P1-1

NUMERO: 6518/04/2010
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 27/05/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Remainder inadmissible ; Pecuniary damage - award ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF ĐOKIĆ v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
(Application no. 6518/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
27 May 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Đokić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Ledi Bianku,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 May 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 6518/04) against Bosnia and Herzegovina lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, Mr B. Đ. (“the applicant”), on 9 December 2003.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr N. S., a lawyer practising in Niš, Serbia. The Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the respondent Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Mijić.
3. The case is about the applicant’s failed attempts, despite a legally valid purchase contract, to repossess his pre-war flat and to register his title.
4. On 27 September 2007 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the respondent Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3 of the Convention). The applicant and the respondent Government each submitted written observations. In addition, third-party comments were received from the Serbian Government, which had exercised their right to intervene (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b) of the Rules of Court). The applicant and the respondent Government replied in writing to those comments (Rule 44 § 5).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Relevant background
1. Socially owned flats
5. Flats represented nearly 20% of the pre-war housing stock of Bosnia and Herzegovina1 (around 250,000 housing units out of 1,315,000). By local standards, they were a particularly attractive type of home, equipped with modern conveniences and located in urban centres. Practically all flats were under the regime of “social ownership” – a concept which, while it does exist in other countries, was particularly highly developed in the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (“the SFRY”). They were generally built by socially owned enterprises or other public bodies for allocation to their employees, who became “occupancy right holders”2. All citizens of the SFRY were required to pay a means-tested contribution to subsidise housing construction. However, the amount an individual had contributed was not amongst the legal criteria taken into account in the waiting lists for allocation of such flats.
6. The rights of both the allocation right holders (public bodies which nominally controlled the flats) and the occupancy right holders were regulated by law (the Housing Act 1984, which is still in force in Bosnia and Herzegovina3). In accordance with this Act, an occupancy right, once allocated, entitled the occupancy right holder to permanent, lifelong use of the flat against the payment of a nominal fee. When occupancy right holders died, their rights transferred, as a matter of right, to their surviving spouses (indeed, spouses held occupancy rights in common) or registered members of their family households who were also using the flat (sections 19 and 21 of this Act). In practice, these provisions on transfer meant that occupancy rights originally allocated by public bodies to their employees could pass, as of right, to multiple generations for whom the initial employment-based link to the allocation right holder no longer existed. Occupancy rights could be cancelled only in court proceedings (section 50 of this Act) on limited grounds (sections 44, 47 and 49 of this Act), the most important of which was failure by the occupancy right holders to physically use their flats for their own housing needs for a continuous period of at least six months, without justified grounds (such as, military service, medical treatment, prison sentence, or temporary work elsewhere in the SFRY or abroad). Although inspections were foreseen to ensure compliance with this requirement (section 42 of this Act), occupancy rights were rarely, if ever, cancelled on these grounds prior to the 1992-95 war. Moreover, on 24 December 1992 the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina annulled the inspection provisions4.
7. Following its declaration of independence on 6 March 1992, a brutal war started in Bosnia and Herzegovina. More than 2.2 million people left their homes as a consequence of “ethnic cleansing” or generalised violence. As a rule, they fled to areas controlled by their own ethnic groups. All parties to the conflict quickly adopted procedures allowing the flats of those who had fled the territory under their control to be declared “abandoned” and allocated to new occupancy right holders. While the alleged rationale for the allocation of “abandoned” properties was to provide humanitarian shelter to displaced persons, particularly attractive properties – typically urban flats – were commonly awarded to the military and political elites. In some cases, occupancy rights were cancelled pursuant to the aforementioned section 47 of the Housing Act 1984, because of failure by the occupancy right holders to use their flats for a continuous period of at least six months. In most cases, however, the authorities applied legislation specially enacted for those purposes: the Abandoned Flats Act 19925, the Abandoned Flats Decree 19936, the Refugee Accommodation Decree 19937, the Refugee Accommodation Act 19958 and the Abandoned Property Act 19969.
8. The concept of “social ownership” was abandoned during the 1992-95 war 10. As a result, socially owned flats were effectively nationalised.
9. On 14 December 1995 the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Dayton Peace Agreement”) entered into force. Pursuant to that Agreement, Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of two Entities: the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska. In the immediate aftermath of the war, legislation on abandoned property remained in force in both Entities and reallocation of flats continued nearly unabated, which further reinforced ethnic separation.
10. All such legislation was repealed in 1998 under international pressure. Initially, however, in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina only those who could prove that they were genuine refugees or displaced persons were entitled to return to their pre-war homes (former section 3(2) of the Restitution of Flats Act 199811). The vague terms of this provision left broad discretion to the housing authorities and reportedly led to abuses. The High Representative12 therefore repealed it in July 1999. Nevertheless, as a result of strong resistance of the military of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (see decision CH/97/60 et al. of the Human Rights Chamber of 7 December 2001, § 56), a similar restriction remained in force as regards military flats (section 3a of this Act). While this was done on the pretext of creating a pool of flats which could be used to house destitute war veterans and their families, the domestic Human Rights Chamber held that there was no evidence that the property was necessarily being used for this stated purpose (see, for example, its decision CH/97/60 et al. of 7 December 2001, § 154). The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe maintained, in its third-party submissions to that Chamber, that many high-ranking military officials in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina whose housing needs were otherwise met had nevertheless been allocated military flats, in direct contravention of domestic legislation, and that the Ministry of Defence of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina had almost 2,000 unclaimed military flats at its disposal to pursue the legitimate aim of housing war veterans without the need to reach out for claimed ones (see decision CH/02/8202 et al. of the Human Rights Chamber of 4 April 2003, § 121; see also the High Representative’s submissions in decision CH/97/60 et al. of the Human Rights Chamber of 7 December 2001, § 61).
2. Military flats
11. The JNA, the armed forces of the SFRY, nominally controlled around 16,000 flats in Bosnia and Herzegovina until the 1992-95 war.
12. On 6 January 1991 the JNA members were offered the opportunity to purchase their flats at a discount on their market value (see the Military Flats Act 199013). On 18 February 1992 Bosnia and Herzegovina put on hold the sale of military flats on its territory (see the Suspension on the Sale of Flats Decree 199214). The Decree was respected in what is today the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and those who had purchased military flats located in that Entity could not register their ownership and remained, strictly speaking, occupancy right holders (a purchase contract does not of itself transfer title to the buyer under domestic law). Since the Decree was ignored in what is today the Republika Srpska, those who had purchased military flats in that Entity became their registered owners.
13. During the war, the local armed forces (namely, the ARBH, HVO and VRS forces) assumed the nominal control of all non-privatised military flats on the territory under their respective control15. Although on 1 January 2006 those forces merged into the armed forces of Bosnia and Herzegovina, non-privatised military flats are still under the nominal control of the Entities (see “Relevant domestic law and practice” below).
3. Foreign armed forces in the 1992-95 war in Bosnia in Herzegovina
14. The dissolution of the SFRY was a gradual process which took place in 1991/92 (see Opinion No. 11 of the Arbitration Commission of the International Conference on the Former Yugoslavia of 16 July 199316). Bosnia and Herzegovina declared its independence on 6 March 1992. It was recognised by the European Community and the United States on 7 April 1992 and admitted to membership of the United Nations on 22 May 1992.
15. On 15 May 1992 the United Nations Security Council, acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, demanded that all units of the JNA and all elements of the Croatian Army either be withdrawn from Bosnia and Herzegovina, or be subject to the authority of the Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina, or be disbanded and disarmed with their weapons placed under effective international monitoring (see Resolution 757). While the JNA formally withdrew from Bosnia and Herzegovina on 19 May 1992, the United Nations Secretary General and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (“the ICTY”), a United Nations court of law dealing with war crimes that took place during the conflicts in the Balkans in the 1990s, later established that JNA members born in Bosnia and Herzegovina actually remained there with their equipment and joined the VRS forces17 and only those born in Serbia and Montenegro left and joined the VJ forces18 (see the United Nations Secretary General’s report of 3 December 1992, A/47/747, § 11, and the ICTY judgment in the Tadić case, IT-94-1-A, § 151, 15 July 1999).
16. The ICTY has also held that the VRS forces were to be regarded as acting under the overall control of and on behalf of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia19 and that hence, even after 19 May 1992, the armed conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina between the local Serbs and the central authorities of Bosnia and Herzegovina must be classified as an international armed conflict (see the ICTY judgment in the Tadić case, IT-94-1-A, §§ 146-62, 15 July 1999, and the ICTY judgment in the Čelebići case, IT-96-21-A, §§ 34-51, 20 February 2001). It has arrived at a similar conclusion as regards the relationship between neighbouring Croatia and the HVO forces (see the ICTY judgments in the Blaškić case, IT-95-14-T, §§ 95-123, 3 March 2000, and IT-95-14-A, §§ 167-78, 29 July 2004).
17. The International Court of Justice (“the ICJ”), the principal judicial organ of the United Nations, has arrived at a different conclusion in the Application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Bosnia and Herzegovina v. Serbia and Montenegro) case. It held that despite much evidence of direct and indirect participation by the VJ forces, along with the VRS forces, in military operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the acts of those who committed genocide at Srebrenica cannot be attributed to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia under the rules of international law of State responsibility (see the judgment of 26 February 2007, §§ 377-415).
B. The present case
18. The applicant was born in Serbia in 1960. He lives in Niš, Serbia.
19. Being a lecturer at a military school in Sarajevo, the applicant was allocated a military flat there in 1986.
20. On 9 March 1992 he bought the flat pursuant to the Military Flats Act 1990. Although he had paid the full purchase price on 18 February 1992 (in the amount of 379,964 Yugoslav dinars20), the local authorities refused to register his title (see paragraph 12 above).
21. On 18 April 1992 the military school was transferred from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Serbia (initially to Sombor and then to Niš). On 19 May 1992 the applicant decided to leave Bosnia and Herzegovina and to continue lecturing at the same military school.
22. On 17 August 1998 the applicant made an application for the restitution of his flat in Sarajevo. On 30 March 2000 his application was rejected pursuant to section 3a of the Restitution of Flats Act 1998.
23. On 17 July 2000 the competent Ministry of the Sarajevo Canton upheld the first-instance decision of 30 March 2000.
24. On 21 May 2001 the applicant lodged an application with the Human Rights Chamber, a domestic human-rights body. He relied on Articles 6, 8 and 14 of, and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to, the Convention.
25. On 25 April 2002 the Sarajevo Cantonal Court, on an application for judicial review, quashed the administrative decisions of 30 March and 17 July 2000 for procedural reasons and remitted the case for reconsideration.
26. On 9 July 2002 the restitution commission set up by Annex 7 to the Dayton Peace Agreement, before which the applicant pursued parallel proceedings, held that the applicant was neither a refugee nor a displaced person within the meaning of Annex 7 and declined jurisdiction.
27. On 12 November 2002 the competent housing authorities refused once again the applicant’s application for restitution pursuant to section 3a of the Restitution of Flats Act 1998.
28. On 12 September 2003 the competent Ministry of the Sarajevo Canton upheld the first-instance decision of 12 November 2002.
29. On 26 November 2003 the applicant lodged an application for judicial review. On 22 June 2004 the Sarajevo Cantonal Court stayed the proceedings under an instruction from the legislature of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
30. On 28 December 2005 the Ministry of Defence of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina formally allocated the disputed flat to Dž.K., a former member of the ARBH forces. It would appear, however, that Dž.K. had lived in that flat even before, since 25 April 2000.
31. On 8 March 2006 the Human Rights Commission (which had succeeded the Human Rights Chamber in 2004) found a violation of Article 6 of the Convention because of the length of the restitution proceedings and awarded the applicant 2,100 convertible marks21 for non-pecuniary damage in this connection. Having established the excessive length of the restitution proceedings, the Human Rights Commission held that they did not constitute an effective remedy which would have to be used as a condition for the examination of the applicant’s substantive complaints. In accordance with domestic jurisprudence, it considered that although the purchase contract of 9 March 1992 had not of itself transferred title to the impugned flat to the applicant, it had conferred on him valuable personal rights (that is, the rights to occupy the flat and to be registered as owner) amounting to “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The Human Rights Commission further held that the situation complained of (that is, the applicant’s inability to repossess the flat and to register his title to it) undoubtedly amounted to a continuing interference with the peaceful enjoyment of his “possessions”. While assessing the proportionality of the interference, the Human Rights Commission held that the applicant’s service in the VJ forces after the 1992-95 war demonstrated his disloyalty to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Taking into consideration also the serious shortage of housing units and compensation to which the applicant was entitled, the Human Rights Commission concluded that the interference was justified. It therefore found no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and considered it to be unnecessary to examine the discrimination and Article 8 complaints.
32. On 30 August 2006 the Supreme Court of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina quashed the decision of 22 June 2004 and remitted the case to the Sarajevo Cantonal Court for reconsideration.
33. On 19 December 2006 the Sarajevo Cantonal Court upheld the administrative decision of 12 September 2003.
34. The applicant has not been allocated a flat in Serbia, but receives from the Serbian authorities a rent allowance in the monthly amount of approximately 100 euros (EUR). It would appear that he has not applied for compensation pursuant to section 39e of the Privatisation of Flats Act 1997 (see paragraph 37 below).
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Bosnia and Herzegovina
35. On 22 December 1995 all purchase contracts concluded under the Military Flats Act 1990 were declared void22. As explained in paragraph 12 above, this affected flats in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina only.
36. On 3 November 1997 the domestic Human Rights Chamber held that a contract to purchase a military flat, although it had not of itself transferred title to the buyer, conferred on the buyer valuable property rights (that is, the rights to occupy the flat and to be registered as owner) which constituted “possessions” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. It then found a breach of that Article and ordered the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina to restore the legal validity of all such contracts (decision CH/96/3 et al.).
37. On 5 July 1999 the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina amended the Privatisation of Flats Act 199723 and the Restitution of Flats Act 1998. While all such contracts have since been regarded as legally valid, two categories of buyers are not entitled to repossess their flats and to register their title (see section 39e of the Privatisation of Flats Act 1997 and section 3a of the Restitution of Flats Act 1998). First, those who served in foreign armed forces after the 1992-95 war. Since those who were granted a refugee or equivalent status in a country outside the former SFRY are exempted, the restriction affects only those who served in the forces of the successor States of the SFRY and, in reality, almost exclusively those who served in the VJ forces referred to in paragraph 15 above. The second category is those who acquired an occupancy or equivalent right to a military flat in a successor State of the SFRY. At present, people falling into those categories are only entitled to the refund of the amount paid for their flats in 1991/92 plus interest at the rate applicable to overnight deposits (see section 39e of the Privatisation of Flats Act 1997, as amended on 11 July 2006). Previously the compensation was calculated differently: the value of a flat was to first be calculated at a rate of approximately EUR 300 per square metre, the age of the flat was to then be taken into consideration with the depreciation of 1% of its value for each year24.
38. On 7 December 2001 the Human Rights Chamber considered the amended legislation to still be discriminatory and in conflict with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. It ordered the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina to register the applicants as owners, regardless of their service in foreign armed forces (decision CH/97/60 et al.). The relevant part of that decision (§ 164) reads as follows:
“It could potentially be reasonable and necessary to bar persons serving in a foreign army from the exercise of certain rights; however service in a foreign army is not a basis for stripping a person of an otherwise valid property contract.”
The Human Rights Commission, which had succeeded the Human Rights Chamber in 2004, followed that approach in decisions CH/98/514 of 7 July 2004 and CH/99/1704 of 1 November 2004, but on 9 February 2005 it decided to depart from that jurisprudence (decision CH/98/874 et al.). It regarded those who had served in foreign armed forces after the 1992-95 war as disloyal to Bosnia and Herzegovina and held that it was hence justified to strip them of their purchase contracts. The same approach has subsequently been applied in numerous follow-up cases.
39. On 27 June 2007 the Human Rights Commission held in a similar case (also concerning the purchase of a socially owned flat before the 1992-95 war which had not been followed by the registration of ownership) that a legally valid purchase contract, although it had not of itself transferred title to the buyer, conferred on the buyer valuable property rights (notably the right to be registered as owner) which constituted “possessions” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see decision CH/03/13106 and CH/103/13402 of 27 June 2007).
40. On 9 July 2009 the Supreme Court of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina held that a tenancy right of limited duration on a military flat in Serbia should not be regarded as equivalent to occupancy right for the purposes of the restitution legislation.
B. Serbia
41. Since 2 August 1992 it has no longer been possible to acquire occupancy rights in Serbia (see section 30(1) of the Housing Act 199225). From that date until 14 December 2004 members of the armed forces had the opportunity to acquire a tenancy right of unlimited duration on a military flat. Since 14 December 2004 they have only had the right to acquire a tenancy right of limited duration26.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTS
A. General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Dayton Peace Agreement”)
42. The Dayton Peace Agreement was initialled at a military base near Dayton, the United States, on 21 November 1995. It entered into force on 14 December 1995 when it was signed in Paris, France. It put an end to the 1992-95 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The relevant part of Annex 4 (the Constitution of Bosnia and Herzegovina) reads as follows:
Article II § 5
“All refugees and displaced persons have the right freely to return to their homes of origin. They have the right, in accordance with Annex 7 to the General Framework Agreement, to have restored to them property of which they were deprived in the course of hostilities since 1991 and to be compensated for any such property that cannot be restored to them. Any commitments or statements relating to such property made under duress are null and void.”
The relevant part of Annex 7 (the Agreement on Refugees and Displaced Persons) provides:
Article I § 1
“All refugees and displaced persons have the right freely to return to their homes of origin. They shall have the right to have restored to them property of which they were deprived in the course of hostilities since 1991 and to be compensated for any property that cannot be restored to them. The early return of refugees and displaced persons is an important objective of the settlement of the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Parties confirm that they will accept the return of such persons who have left their territory, including those who have been accorded temporary protection by third countries.”
Article VI
“Any returning refugee or displaced person charged with a crime, other than a serious violation of international humanitarian law as defined in the Statute of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia since January 1, 1991 or a common crime unrelated to the conflict, shall upon return enjoy an amnesty. In no case shall charges for crimes be imposed for political or other inappropriate reasons or to circumvent the application of the amnesty.”
B. Agreement on Succession Issues
43. The Agreement on Succession Issues was the culmination of nearly ten years of intermittent negotiations under the auspices of the International Conference on the former Yugoslavia and the High Representative (appointed pursuant to Annex 10 to the Dayton Peace Agreement). It entered into force between Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (succeeded in 2006 by Serbia), “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” and Slovenia on 2 June 2004. The provision concerning occupancy rights reads as follows:
Article 6 of Annex G
“Domestic legislation of each successor State concerning dwelling rights (‘stanarsko pravo/ stanovanjska pravica/ станарско право’) shall be applied equally to persons who were citizens of the SFRY and who had such rights, without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
C. United Nations Principles on Housing and Property Restitution for Refugees and Displaced Persons (“the Pinheiro Principles”)
44. The relevant principles, endorsed by the United Nations Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights in 2005 (E/CN.4/Sub.2/2005/17), are the following:
Principle 1 (Scope and application)
“1.1 The Principles on housing and property restitution for refugees and displaced persons articulated herein are designed to assist all relevant actors, national and international, in addressing the legal and technical issues surrounding housing, land and property restitution in situations where displacement has led to persons being arbitrarily or unlawfully deprived of their former homes, lands, properties or places of habitual residence.
1.2 The Principles on housing and property restitution for refugees and displaced persons apply equally to all refugees, internally displaced persons and to other similarly situated displaced persons who fled across national borders but who may not meet the legal definition of refugee (hereinafter ‘refugees and displaced persons’) who were arbitrarily or unlawfully deprived of their former homes, lands, properties or places of habitual residence, regardless of the nature or circumstances by which displacement originally occurred.”
Principle 2 (The right to housing and property restitution)
“2.1 All refugees and displaced persons have the right to have restored to them any housing, land and/or property of which they were arbitrarily or unlawfully deprived, or to be compensated for any housing, land and/or property that is factually impossible to restore as determined by an independent, impartial tribunal.
2.2 States shall demonstrably prioritize the right to restitution as the preferred remedy for displacement and as a key element of restorative justice. The right to restitution exists as a distinct right, and is prejudiced neither by the actual return nor non-return of refugees and displaced persons entitled to housing, land and property restitution.
Principle 7 (The right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions)
“7.1 Everyone has the right to the peaceful enjoyment of his or her possessions.
7.2 States shall only subordinate the use and enjoyment of possessions in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law. Whenever possible, the ‘interest of society’ should be read restrictively, so as to mean only a temporary or limited interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions.”
Principle 16 (The rights of tenants and other non-owners)
“16.1 States should ensure that the rights of tenants, social-occupancy rights holders and other legitimate occupants or users of housing, land and property are recognized within restitution programmes. To the maximum extent possible, States should ensure that such persons are able to return to and repossess and use their housing, land and property in a similar manner to those possessing formal ownership rights.”
Principle 21 (Compensation)
“21.1 All refugees and displaced persons have the right to full and effective compensation as an integral component of the restitution process. Compensation may be monetary or in kind. States shall, in order to comply with the principle of restorative justice, ensure that the remedy of compensation is only used when the remedy of restitution is not factually possible, or when the injured party knowingly and voluntarily accepts compensation in lieu of restitution, or when the terms of a negotiated peace settlement provide for a combination of restitution and compensation.
21.2 States should ensure, as a rule, that restitution is only deemed factually impossible in exceptional circumstances, namely when housing, land and/or property is destroyed or when it no longer exists, as determined by an independent, impartial tribunal. Even under such circumstances the holder of the housing, land and/or property right should have the option to repair or rebuild whenever possible. In some situations, a combination of compensation and restitution may be the most appropriate remedy and form of restorative justice.”
D. Resolution 1708 (2010) of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe of 28 January 2010 on solving property issues of refugees and displaced persons
45. The relevant part of the Resolution reads as follows:
“...
9. In the light of the above, the Assembly calls on member states to resolve post-conflict housing, land and property rights issues of refugees and IDPs, taking into account the Pinheiro Principles, the relevant Council of Europe instruments, and Recommendation Rec(2006)6 of the Committee of Ministers.
10. Bearing in mind these relevant international standards and the experience of property restitution and compensation programmes carried out in Europe to date, member states are invited to:
...
10.4. ensure that previous occupancy and tenancy rights with regard to public or social accommodation or other analogous forms of home ownership which existed in former communist systems are recognised and protected as homes in the sense of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights and as possessions in the sense of Article 1 of the First Protocol to the Convention;
10.5. ensure that the absence from their accommodation of holders of occupancy and tenancy rights who have been forced to abandon their homes shall be deemed justified until the conditions that allow for voluntary return in safety and dignity have been restored;
...”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
46. The applicant complained about his inability to have restored to him his pre-war flat in Sarajevo and to be registered as its owner, regardless of a legally valid purchase contract. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
47. The respondent Government maintained that the legislation which declared the impugned purchase contract void had been enacted before the ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Bosnia and Herzegovina and invited the Court to declare the application incompatible ratione temporis in that regard (they made a reference to Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, ECHR 2006-III). While the legislation in question had subsequently been repealed, the respondent Government emphasised that the applicant had not fulfilled the statutory requirements relevant to the restitution of military flats and the registration of title. Since Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 did not guarantee the right to acquire property, they concluded that the applicant did not have “possessions” for the purposes of that Article (they referred to Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, ECHR 2004-IX and the authorities cited therein).
48. The applicant and the third-party Government contested that argument. They invited the Court to follow the domestic jurisprudence in this field and declare the application admissible.
49. The Court emphasises that the concept of “possessions” has an autonomous meaning which is independent from the formal classification in domestic law and that the issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of a case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 60, ECHR 2000-XII).
50. While it agrees with the respondent Government that it is only competent ratione temporis to examine the period after the ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Court notes that the pre-ratification legislation which declared the impugned purchase contract void has meanwhile been repealed. The contract at issue is now regarded as legally valid under domestic law (see paragraph 37 above).
Furthermore, the national authorities have consistently held that a contract to purchase a military or any other socially owned flat, although it does not of itself transfer title to the buyer, confers on the buyer the right to occupy the flat and to be registered as owner and that it therefore constitutes “possessions” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 36, 38 and 39 above). The domestic Human Rights Commission adopted the same position in the present case (see paragraph 31 above). The statutory requirements regarding the restitution of military flats and the registration of title, to which the respondent Government referred, have always been regarded by the national authorities as restrictions upon existing property rights rather than conditions under which property rights could be acquired (contrast Kopecký, cited above). Since the position of the national authorities appears to be in accordance with international standards (see notably Pinheiro Principle 16, cited in paragraph 44 above, and Resolution 1708 (2010) of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, § 10.4, cited in paragraph 45 above), the Court does not see any reason to depart from it (see, by analogy, Veselinski v. “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, no. 45658/99, 24 February 2005, concerning a contract to purchase a military flat concluded before the dissolution of the SFRY, and Bozcaada Kimisis Teodoku Rum Ortodoks Kilisesi Vakfı v. Turkey, nos. 37639/03, 37655/03, 26736/04 and 42670/04, § 50, 3 March 2009, concerning refusal to register the Greek Orthodox Church foundation as the owner of property).
51. The respondent Government’s admissibility objection is accordingly dismissed. Since the application is neither manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention nor inadmissible on any other grounds, the Court declares the application admissible and, in accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 4 above), it will immediately consider its merits.
B. Merits
52. The applicant submitted that he and his family had fled Sarajevo because they feared for their safety. At that time, he decided to keep his post as lecturer at a military school, which had meanwhile been transferred to Serbia, as he allegedly had no other options. As regards the merits of the case, the applicant argued that the contested measures were manifestly without reasonable foundation (he referred to James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 46, Series A no. 98). He considered his categorisation as a “disloyal citizen” and the categorisation of the current occupant of his flat as a “respectable citizen” to be totally arbitrary. Furthermore, he maintained that the contested measures were not applied consistently and named a number of individuals who, although in a similar situation, had repossessed their military flats (such as M.N., M.Z., O.K., M.B., M.S. and Z.K.). However, he substantiated this allegation only with respect to M.N. and O.K. by submitting an official document showing that they remained employed by the armed forces of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 31 May 2001 and 31 March 2005 respectively.
53. The respondent Government objected to the applicant’s version of the facts under which he had fled Bosnia and Herzegovina because he feared for his safety and argued that he had actually left Bosnia and Herzegovina within the context of the formal withdrawal of the JNA (see paragraph 15 above). He should therefore not be regarded as a refugee or a displaced person in their opinion. On the assumption that the applicant had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the respondent Government maintained that the contested measures were justified given notably the scarce housing space and a pressing need to accommodate former members of the ARBH forces and their families in the aftermath of the 1992-95 war. They further emphasised that the applicant fulfilled the statutory requirements for the allocation of a tenancy right on a military flat in Serbia and that he was entitled to compensation for his military flat in Bosnia and Herzegovina (they assessed the amount at approximately EUR 10,750). He was therefore, so it was argued, not made to bear an excessive burden (the respondent Government made a reference to Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 117, ECHR 2005-VI, in which the Court held that the lack of any compensation did not upset the “fair balance” that had to be struck between the protection of property and the requirements of the general interest). In support of their position, the respondent Government also referred to domestic jurisprudence which considered the applicant and all others who had served in foreign armed forces after the 1992-95 war to be disloyal to Bosnia and Herzegovina (the decision CH/98/874 et al. of the Human Rights Commission of 9 February 2005 mentioned in paragraph 38 above and a number of follow-up cases, as well as decision U 83/03 of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 22 September 2004).
54. The third-party Government explained that the applicant indeed fulfilled the statutory requirements for the allocation of a tenancy right on a military flat in Serbia (and that he therefore appeared on a list of those who should be allocated a flat to which the respondent Government referred), but that no flat had yet been allocated. The applicant had been receiving instead a rent allowance in the monthly amount of approximately EUR 100. Furthermore, they maintained that members of the Serbian armed forces could no longer acquire either an occupancy right or a tenancy right of unlimited duration (see paragraph 41 above), but solely a tenancy right of limited duration which should not be confused with the erstwhile occupancy right. As to the merits of the case, the third-party Government argued that the applicant should be regarded as the owner of the flat in Sarajevo (despite the absence of registration of his title) and that the contested measures amounted to a de facto expropriation incompatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (they referred to, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 63, Series A no. 52; Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece, 24 June 1993, § 45, Series A no. 260-B; and Matos e Silva, Lda., and Others v. Portugal, 16 September 1996, § 92, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV).
1. The nature of the interference
55. As the Court has stated on numerous occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among other authorities, Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II).
56. The complexity of the legal situation in the present case prevents its being classified in a precise category: on the one hand, the impugned purchase contract is regarded as legally valid and, on the other hand, the applicant is unable to have his flat restored to him and to be registered as its owner pursuant to that contract (see paragraph 37 above). While this situation resembles a de facto expropriation (Papamichalopoulos and Others, cited above), the Court does not consider it necessary to rule on whether the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 applies in this case. As noted above, the situation envisaged in the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 is only a particular instance of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property as guaranteed by the general rule set forth in the first sentence. The Court therefore considers that it should examine the situation complained of in the light of that general rule (Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 106, ECHR 2000-I). It should also be emphasised that the situation under consideration began on 5 July 1999 (see paragraph 37 above). As it still obtains at the present time, it is of a continuing nature.
2. The aim of the interference
57. Any interference with the enjoyment of a Convention right must, as can be inferred from Article 18 of the Convention, pursue a legitimate aim. The principle of a “fair balance” inherent in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 itself presupposes the existence of a general interest of the community. Moreover, it should be reiterated that the various rules incorporated in this Article are not distinct in the sense of being unconnected (see paragraph 55 above). One of the effects of this is that the existence of a “public interest” required under the second sentence, or the “general interest” referred to in the second paragraph, are in fact corollaries of the principle set forth in the first sentence, so that an interference with the exercise of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must also pursue an aim in the public interest.
58. The Court agrees with the applicant that a deprivation of property carried out for no reason other than to confer a private benefit on a private party cannot be “in the public interest”. That being said, the compulsory transfer of property from one individual to another may, depending on the circumstances, constitute a legitimate means for promoting the public interest (see James and Others, cited above, § 40). In this regard, a taking of property executed in pursuance of legitimate social, economic or other policies may be in “in the public interest”, even if the community at large has no direct use or enjoyment of the property taken (ibid., § 45). In the present case, the Court is prepared to accept that the contested measures were aimed at enhancing social justice, as maintained by the respondent Government, and that they thus pursue a legitimate aim.
3. Whether there was a fair balance
59. An interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must strike a fair balance between the protection of property and the requirements of the public interest (see, among many authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, § 69). While it is true that States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation in this sphere (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 49, ECHR 1999-V; Radanović v. Croatia, no. 9056/02, § 49, 21 December 2006; and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 75, ECHR 2007-X), the Court nonetheless considers that a fair balance has not been struck in the present case for the following reasons.
60. To begin with, the Court is aware of the fact that Sarajevo, where most military flats are situated, was subjected to blockades, day-to-day shelling and sniping throughout the war (see the ICTY judgments in the Galić case, IT-98-29-T, 5 December 2003, and IT-98-29-A, 30 November 2006, as well as the ICTY judgments in the Dragomir Milošević case, IT-98-29/1-T, 12 December 2007, and IT-98-29/1-A, 12 November 2009). There is also much evidence of direct and indirect participation by the VJ forces in military operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina (see paragraphs 15-17 above). This explains strong local opposition to the return to their pre-war homes of those who served in the VJ forces (see paragraph 10 above), but it does not justify it. In this regard, the Court notes that there is no indication that the applicant participated, as part of the VJ forces, in any military operations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, let alone in any war crimes. He is treated differently merely because of his service in those forces. It is well known that the nature of the recent war in Bosnia and Herzegovina was such that service in certain armed forces was to a large extent indicative of one’s ethnic origin. The ARBH forces, loyal to the central authorities of Bosnia and Herzegovina were, despite some notable exceptions, mostly made up of Bosniacs27. The same is true for the HVO (mostly made up of Croats) and VRS forces (mostly made up of Serbs). Similar patterns are noted in the neighbouring countries. Accordingly, the contested measures, although apparently neutral, have the effect of treating people differently on the ground of their ethnic origin. The Court has held in comparable situations that, as a matter of principle, no difference in treatment which is based exclusively or to a decisive extent on a person’s ethnic origin is capable of being objectively justified in a contemporary democratic society (see Sejdić and Finci v. Bosnia and Herzegovina [GC], nos. 27996/06 and 34836/06, § 44, 22 December 2009; D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 176, ECHR 2007-XII; and Timishev v. Russia, nos. 55762/00 and 55974/00, § 58, ECHR 2005-XII).
61. Secondly, the respondent Government argued that the contested measures were justified in view of the scarce housing space and a pressing need to accommodate destitute members of the ARBH forces and their families in the aftermath of the 1992-95 war. However, they have failed to demonstrate that thus freed housing space was indeed used to accommodate those who were deserving of protection. Neither the statistics provided by the respondent Government within the context of this case nor those to which the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina referred in its decision U 83/03 of 22 September 2004, § 21, are of any assistance. They simply confirmed that most military flats were allocated to war veterans, war invalids and families of killed members of the ARBH forces, without indicating their housing situation or their income. Moreover, according to reliable reports (mentioned in paragraph 10 above) many high-ranking officials whose housing needs had otherwise been met were nevertheless allocated military flats.
62. Thirdly, as regards the possibility for the applicant to acquire a tenancy right in Serbia, it is noted that he has not been allocated a flat. In addition, he can only acquire a tenancy right of limited duration (see paragraph 41 above), which the Supreme Court of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina does not consider to be equivalent to occupancy right for the purposes of the restitution legislation (see paragraph 40 above).
63. Fourthly, the Court has not overlooked the fact that the Privatisation of Flats Act 1997 envisages compensation (see paragraph 37 above). The respondent Government assessed that the applicant should receive around EUR 10,750, but they based their assessment on criteria which were no longer in force. Since 11 July 2006 the applicant has only been entitled to a refund of the amount actually paid for the flat plus interest at the rate applicable to overnight deposits (that is, less than EUR 3,500). The Court agrees with the respondent Government that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances, but neither of the amounts mentioned above is reasonably related to the market value of the impugned flat (see James and Others, cited above, § 54; Pincová and Pinc v. the Czech Republic, no. 36548/97, § 53, ECHR 2002-VIII; and Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 95-97, ECHR 2006-V). While it is true that even a total lack of compensation can be regarded as justifiable under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in exceptional circumstances, the Court does not consider the circumstances of the present case to be such (contrast Jahn and Others, cited above, § 117, concerning land acquired under the land reform implemented from 1945 in the Soviet Occupied Zone of Germany and continued after 1949 in the GDR).
64. Lastly, the Court has noted that, strictly speaking, the applicant is neither a refugee (because of his Serbian nationality) nor an internally displaced person (because he left the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina). While it is true that international principles on housing and property restitution for refugees and displaced persons apply equally to “other similarly situated displaced persons who fled across national borders but who may not meet the legal definition of refugee” (see Pinheiro Principle 1.2, cited in paragraph 44 above), it is uncertain whether the applicant could be considered to have “fled” Sarajevo within the meaning of that provision (see paragraphs 52-53 above). In any event, the Court does not consider it necessary to answer that question, because the reasons set out in paragraphs 60-63 above are sufficient to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
65. The applicant complained under Article 6 of the Convention about the outcome of the restitution proceedings. Article 6, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
The Court considers this complaint to be essentially of a fourth-instance nature: there is no indication in the case file that the domestic authorities lacked impartiality or that the proceedings were otherwise unfair or arbitrary. This complaint is therefore manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
66. The applicant complained under Article 8 of the Convention that the impugned situation amounted also to an unnecessary interference with the right to respect for his home. Article 8 provides:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
However, there is no indication in the case file that the applicant intends to resettle in Sarajevo. Indeed, in the proceedings before this Court, the applicant expressly agreed to compensation in lieu of restitution (see paragraph 70 below). The Court accordingly does not find that the facts of the present case are such as to disclose any present interference with the applicant’s right to respect for his home (compare Demopoulos and Others v. Turkey (dec.) [GC], nos. 46113/99 et al., 1 March 2010, and contrast Gillow v. the United Kingdom, 24 November 1986, § 46, Series A no. 109). It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
67. The applicant also complained that he did not have an effective domestic remedy for his substantive complaints, in breach of Article 13 of the Convention. Article 13 provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
The Court notes that it was open to the applicant to pursue domestic proceedings, which he did. The mere fact that he ultimately lost does not render the domestic system ineffective. This part of the application is therefore manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
68. Lastly, the applicant alleged a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, relying essentially on the considerations underlying his complaint under the latter provision taken alone. Article 14 provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Having already taken those arguments into account in its examination of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court declares the complaint under Article 14 admissible but considers that it is not necessary to examine the matter under these provisions taken together (Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 47, ECHR 2004-IX).
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
69. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
70. As his main claim, the applicant sought the restitution of the flat and the registration of title, together with compensation for loss of earnings (EUR 170 per month from 17 August 1998 until the settlement of this case) and compensation for non-pecuniary damage (EUR 10,000). In the event of the flat not being restored to him and his title not being registered, he also sought a sum corresponding to the present value of the flat, which he estimated at EUR 108,810 (that is, EUR 1,800 per square metre).
71. The respondent Government considered the amounts claimed to be excessive. They added that the applicant had already received compensation in the proceedings before the Human Rights Commission (see paragraph 31 above) and that he was entitled to compensation pursuant to the restitution legislation (see paragraph 37 above).
72. In accordance with the Court’s settled jurisprudence, a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 32, ECHR 2000-XI). Since the present applicant expressly agreed to compensation in lieu of restitution (see paragraph 70 above), the Court considers that the respondent Government should pay him the current value of the disputed flat (compare Demopoulos and Others, cited above). It is noted that the parties disagreed about the amount of that compensation. Having regard to the information available to it on prices on the Sarajevo property market (see, by analogy, Brumărescu, cited above, § 24), the Court assesses the current market value of the flat at EUR 60,000. Accordingly, it awards the applicant EUR 60,000 under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable. The Court agrees with the respondent Government that, as a rule, any compensation paid pursuant to the restitution legislation should be deducted, but no such compensation has been paid in this case.
73. As regards compensation in respect of loss of earnings, the Court emphasises that it is only competent ratione temporis to examine the period after the ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Bosnia and Herzegovina (that is, after 12 July 2002). Since the applicant receives a rent allowance from the Serbian authorities in the monthly amount of around EUR 100 (which he would not have received, had he repossessed his flat in Sarajevo) and in the absence of any evidence that he would have indeed been able to obtain EUR 170 per month by letting his flat in Sarajevo, the Court rejects this claim.
74. Lastly, it is clear that the applicant sustained some non-pecuniary loss arising from the breach of the Convention found in this case, for which he should be compensated. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, it awards the applicant EUR 5,000 in this respect, plus any tax that may be chargeable. The compensation paid to the applicant pursuant to the decision of the Human Rights Commission (see paragraph 31 above) should not be deducted because it was awarded on different grounds (the excessive length of the restitution proceedings).
B. Costs and expenses
75. The applicant was paid legal aid in the amount of EUR 850 for costs and expenses incurred before this Court. In addition, he sought compensation of EUR 500 for costs and expenses incurred in the domestic proceedings, but he submitted evidence showing that only part of that amount had actually been incurred (approximately EUR 200).
76. The respondent Government said that the claim was unsubstantiated.
77. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 200 under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant.
C. Default interest
78. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 60,000 (sixty thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage, EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, and EUR 200 (two hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses, to be converted into convertible marks at the rate applicable on the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 27 May 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President
1. While the respondent State was called “the Socialist Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina” until 8 April 1992 and “the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina” from 8 April 1992 until 14 December 1995, the name “Bosnia and Herzegovina” is nevertheless used in this judgment when referring also to the period before 14 December 1995.

2. The domestic Human Rights Chamber and Constitutional Court have consistently used the term “occupancy right” for this type of tenancy. It will therefore be used in this judgment instead of the term “specially protected tenancy” used by the Court in Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, ECHR 2006-III, and other cases against Croatia.

3. Zakon o stambenim odnosima, published in the Official Gazette of the Socialist Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 14/84, amendments published in the Official Gazette of the Socialist Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina nos. 12/87 and 36/89, the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 2/93, the Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina nos. 11/98 of 3 April 1998, 38/98 of 4 October 1998, 12/99 of 6 April 1999 and 19/99 of 28 May 1999, and the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska nos. 19/93 of 9 October 1993, 22/93 of 26 November 1993, 12/99 of 17 May 1999 and 31/99 of 12 November 1999.

4. Decision U 174/90, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 2/93.

5. Zakon o napuštenim stanovima, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 6/92, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 8/92, 16/92, 13/94, 36/94, 9/95 and 33/95.

6. Uredba o korišćenju napuštenih stanova, published in the Official Gazette of the Croatian Community of Herceg-Bosna no. 13/93.

7. Uredba o smeštaju izbeglica i drugih lica na teritoriji Republike Srpske, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 27/93.

8. Uredba sa zakonskom snagom o smeštaju izbeglica, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 19/95.

9. Zakon o korišćenju napuštene imovine, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 3/96 of 27 February 1996, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 8/96 of 10 April 1996 and 21/96 of 23 September 1996.

10. Zakon o prenosu sredstava društvene u državnu svojinu, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 4/93 of 28 April 1993, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 29/94 of 28 November 1994, 31/94 of 27 December 1994, 9/95 of 19 June 1995, 19/95 of 2 October 1995, 8/96 of 10 April 1996 and 20/98 of 15 June 1998; Zakon o pretvorbi društvene svojine, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 33/94 of 25 November 1994.

11. Zakon o prestanku primjene Zakona o napuštenim stanovima, published in the Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 11/98 of 3 April 1998, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 38/98 of 4 October 1998, 12/99 of 6 April 1999, 18/99 of 20 May 1999, 27/99 of 5 July 1999, 43/99 of 28 October 1999, 31/01 of 16 July 2001, 56/01 of 21 December 2001, 15/02 of 27 April 2002, 24/03 of 10 June 2003, 29/03 of 30 June 2003 and 81/09 of 28 December 2009.

12. Following the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the United Nations Security Council authorised the establishment of an international administrator for Bosnia and Herzegovina (High Representative) by an informal group of States actively involved in the peace process (Peace Implementation Council) as an enforcement measure under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter (for more information, see Berić and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), nos. 36357/04 et al., ECHR 2007-XII).

13. Zakon o stambenom obezbjeđivanju u Jugoslovenskoj narodnoj armiji, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 84/90.

14. Uredba o privremenoj zabrani prodaje stanova u društvenoj svojini, published in the Official Gazette of the Socialist Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 4/92.

15. Zakon o preuzimanju sredstava bivše Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije u svojinu Republike Bosne i Hercegovine, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 6/92, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 13/94, 50/95 and 2/96; Odluka o preuzimanju vojnostambenog fonda JNA, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 16/92; Zakon o sredstvima i finansiranju Armije Republike Bosne i Hercegovine, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 6/93, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 17/93 and 13/94; Odluka o utvrđivanju namjene i prenošenju prava upravljanja i korištenja sredstvima bivše Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije, koje je koristila bivša JNA, a koja se nalaze na području Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine; published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 24/96.

16. The Arbitration Commission of the International Conference on the Former Yugoslavia (also known as the Badinter Commission) was set up by the European Community and its Member States on 27 August 1991. Between late 1991 and the middle of 1993 it handed down fifteen opinions pertaining to legal issues arising from the dissolution of the SFRY (see International Law Reports 92 (1993), pp. 162-208, and 96 (1994), pp. 719-37).

17. The VRS forces, the armed forces of the Republika Srpska, were established on 12 May 1992. On 1 January 2006 they merged into the armed forces of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

18. The VJ forces, the armed forces of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, were established on 20 May 1992.

19. The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was succeeded by the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro in 2003, which was succeeded by Serbia in 2006.

20. Around 5,775 German marks at the time.

21. Approximately EUR 1,075.

22. Zakon o preuzimanju sredstava bivše Socijalističke Federative Republike Jugoslavije u svojinu Republike Bosne i Hercegovine, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 6/92, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 13/94, 50/95 and 2/96.

23. Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, published in the Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 27/97 of 28 November 1997, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 11/98 of 3 April 1998, 22/99 of 11 June 1999, 27/99 of 5 July 1999, 7/00 of 5 March 2000, 32/01 of 24 July 2001, 61/01 of 31 December 2001, 15/02 of 27 April 2002, 54/04 of 16 October 2004, 36/06 of 10 July 2006, 51/07 of 1 August 2007, 72/08 of 17 November 2008 and 23/09 of 8 April 2009.

24. While the applicant was thus entitled to approximately EUR 10,750 before 11 July 2006, he is now entitled to less than EUR 3,500.

25. Zakon o stanovanju, published in the Official Gazette of Serbia no. 50/92, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 76/92, 84/92, 33/93, 53/93, 67/93, 46/94, 47/94, 48/94, 44/95, 49/95, 16/97, 46/98, 26/01 and 101/05).

26. Pravilnik o davanju službenih stanova u zakup zaposlenima u Ministarstvu odbrane i Vojsci Srbije i Crne Gore, published in the Military Gazette no. 31 of 6 December 2004.

27. Bosniacs were known as Muslims until the 1992-95 war. The term “Bosniacs” (Bošnjaci) should not be confused with the term “Bosnians” (Bosanci) which is commonly used to denote citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina irrespective of their ethnic origin.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; Resto inammissibile; danno Patrimoniale - assegnazione; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA ĐOKIĆ C. BOSNIA ED ERZEGOVINA
(Richiesta n. 6518/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
27 maggio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
 
Nella causa Đokić c. Bosnia ed Erzegovina,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compota da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Ledi Bianku, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato in 4 maggio 2010,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 6518/04) contro Bosnia e Erzegovina depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino della Bosnia e Erzegovina e Serbia, il Sig. B. Đ. (“il richiedente”), il 9 dicembre 2003.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. N. S., un avvocato che pratica a Niš, Serbia. Il Governo della Bosnia e Erzegovina (“il Governo rispondente”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra M. Mijić.
3. La causa riguarda i tentativi falliti del richiedente, nonostante un contratto di acquisto giuridicamente valido di riacquistare il suo appartamento guerra e registrare il suo titolo.
4. Il 27 settembre 2007 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo rispondente. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione). Il richiedente ed il Governo rispondente entrambi hanno presentato osservazioni scritte. Inoltre, commenti da terze-parti furono ricevuti dal Governo serbo che aveva esercitato il suo diritto ad intervenire (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 1 (b) del’Ordinamento di Corte). Il richiedente ed il Governo rispondente risposero per iscritto a quei commenti (Articolo 44 § 5).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. BAckground attinente
1. Appartamenti socialmente posseduti
5. Gli appartamenti rappresentavano quasi il 20% del totale degli immobili prima della guerra della Bosnia e Erzegovina1 (circa 250,000 unità di alloggi su 1,315,000). Per i locali standard, erano un tipo particolarmente attraente di abitazione, dotati di attrezzature moderne ed ubicati in centri urbani. Praticamente tutti gli appartamenti erano sotto il regime di “proprietà sociale”-un concetto che, sebbene esistesse in altri paesi, era estremamente sviluppato in particolare nella Precedente Repubblica Federale Socialista dell'Iugoslavia (“SFRY”). Loro furono costruiti da imprese possedute socialmente o da altri organi pubblici per l’alloggio dei loro impiegati che divennero generalmente “detentori di diritti di occupazione”2. Tutti i cittadini della SFRY erano costretti a pagare un contributo con mezzi testati per sovvenzionare la costruzione di alloggio. Comunque, l'importo con cui un individuo aveva contribuito non era fra i criteri legali preso in considerazione nelle liste d'attesa per l’assegnazione di simili appartamenti.
6. I diritti sia detentori dei diritti di assegnazione (gli organi pubblici che nominalmente controllavano gli appartamenti) che dei detentori dei diritti di occupazione erano regolati dalla legge (Atto sull’Alloggio del 1984 che è ancora in vigore in Bosnia e Erzegovina3). In conformità con questo Atto, un diritto di occupazione, una volta assegnato, dava titolo al detentore del diritto di occupazione all’ uso permanente, per tutta la vita dell'appartamento contro il pagamento di una parcella nominale. Alla morte dei detentori del diritto di occupazione , i loro diritti venivano trasferiti, come questione di diritto, ai loro coniugi superstiti (infatti, i consorti detenevano i diritti di occupazione in comune) o ai membri registrati delle loro nuclei famigliari che usavano allo stesso modo l'appartamento (sezioni 19 e 21 di questo Atto). In pratica, queste disposizioni sul trasferimento significavano che originalmente i diritti di occupazione assegnati da organi pubblici ai loro impiegati sarebbero potuti passare, di pieno diritto, a generazioni successive per cui l’iniziale collegamento basato sul lavoro del detentore dei diritti di assegnazione non esistevano più. I diritti di occupazione avrebbero potuto essere annullati solamente in procedimenti giudiziali (sezione 50 di questo Atto) per motivi limitati (sezioni 44, 47 e 49 di questo Atto) il più importante di cui era l’insuccesso da parte del detentori dei diritti di occupazione di usare fisicamente i loro appartamenti come necessitò della loro propria dimora per un periodo continuo di almeno sei mesi, senza dei motivi giustificati (come, servizio militare, trattamento medico, pena detentiva, o lavoro provvisorio altrove nella SFRY o all'estero). Benché delle ispezioni furono previste per assicurare l’ottemperanza con questo requisito (sezione 42 di questo Atto), i diritti di occupazione raramente venivano, se non addirittura mai, annullati per questi motivi prima della guerra del 1992-95. Il 24 dicembre 1992 la Corte Costituzionale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina annullò inoltre, i provvedimenti dell'ispezione 4.
7. In seguito alla sua dichiarazione di indipendenza il 6 marzo 1992, una brutale guerra cominciò in Bosnia e Erzegovina. Più di 2.2 milioni di persone lasciarono le loro case come conseguenza della “pulizia etnica” o violenza generalizzata. Come norma, fuggirono verso aree controllate dai loro propri gruppi etnici. Tutte le parti coinvolte nel conflitto adottarono rapidamente procedure che permettevano di dichiarare gli appartamenti di coloro che avevano abbandonato il territorio sotto il loro controllo “abbandonati” e li assegnarono a nuovi detentori dei diritti di occupazione. Mentre la base razionale addotta per l'assegnazione di proprietà “abbandonato” era offrire un ricovero umanitario ai deportati, le proprietà di appartamenti particolarmente attraenti tipicamente urbani-furono assegnate comunemente a militari e ad élite politiche. In dei casi, i diritti di occupazione furono annullati, facendo seguito alla sezione 47 del summenzionato Atto sull’Alloggio del 1984, a causa dell0 insuccesso da parte dei detentori dei diritti di occupazione di usare i loro appartamenti per un periodo continuo di almeno sei mesi. In più cause, comunque le autorità applicarono la legislazione specialmente decretata a quel fine: l’Atto sugli Appartamenti Abbandonati del 19925, il Decreto sugli Appartamenti Abbandonati del 19936, il Decreto sull’ Alloggio del Rifugiato del 19937, l’Atto sull’ Alloggio del Rifugiato del 19958 e l’Atto sulla Proprietà Abbandonata del 19969.
8. Il concetto di “proprietà sociale” fu abbandonato durante la guerra del 1992-95 10. Di conseguenza, gli appartamenti socialmente posseduti furono a tutti gli effetti nazionalizzati.
9. Il 14 dicembre 1995 lo Schema dell’ Accordo per la Pace in Bosnia e Erzegovina (“l’Accordo della Pace di Dayton”) entrò in vigore. Facendo seguito a quell’ Accordo, la Bosnia e Erzegovina consisteva in due Entità: la Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina e la Republika Srpska. Nell’immediato dopo guerra , la legislazione sulla proprietà abbandonata rimase in vigore in entrambele Entità e la riassegnazione degli appartamenti continuò quasi in modo identico, il che inoltre rafforzò la separazione etnica.
10. Tutta simile legislazione è stata abrogata nel 1998 sotto la pressione internazionale. Comunque, inizialmente nella Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina solamente a coloro che potevano provare che di essere rifugiati genuini o deportati furono veniva permesso di ritornare alle loro case prima della guerra (precedente sezione 3(2) dell’Atto sulla Restituzione di Appartamenti Atto 199811). I termini vaghi di questa disposizione lasciavano ampia discrezione alle autorità per gli alloggi ed a quanto riferito condussero ad abusi. L’alto rappresentante12 l'abrogò perciò nel luglio 1999. Ciononostante, come risultato della forte resistenza dei militari della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina (vedere decisione et al CH/97/60 della Camera dei Diritti umani del 7 dicembre 2001, § 56), simile restrizione rimase in vigore riguardo agli appartamenti militari (sezione 3a di questo Atto). Mentre questo veniva fatto sul pretesto di creare un pool di appartamenti che avrebbero potuto essere usati come alloggio dei veterani di guerra bisognosi e delle loro famiglie, la Camera nazionale dei Diritti umani sosteneva che non c'era nessuna prova che le proprietà necessariamente venivano usate per questo determinato fine (vedere, per esempio, la sua decisione et al CH/97/60 del 7 dicembre 2001, § 154). L'Organizzazione per la Sicurezza e la Cooperazione in Europa sostenne, nelle sue osservazioni come terza-parte a quella Camera che la stessa alta-classificazione degli ufficiali militari nella Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina le cui necessità di alloggio venivano soddisfatte a prescindere che fossero già stati assegnati loro appartamenti militari, in violazione diretta della legislazione nazionale e che il Ministero della Difesa della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina aveva circa 2,000 appartamenti militari non reclamati a sua disposizione per perseguire lo scopo legittimo di dare alloggio ai veterani di guerra senza il bisogno di stendere la mano per quelli richiesti (vedere decisione CH/02/8202 et al. della Camera dei Diritti umani del 4 aprile 2003, § 121; vedere anche le osservazioni dell’Alto Rappresentante nella decisione CH/97/60 et al. della Camera dei Diritti umani del 7 dicembre 2001, § 61).
2. Appartamenti militari
11. Le JNA, le forze armate della SFRY nominalmente controllavano circa 16,000 appartamenti in Bosnia e Erzegovina sino alla guerra del 1992-95.
12. Il 6 gennaio 1991 ai membri delle JNA fu offerta l'opportunità di acquistare i loro appartamenti a prezzo scontato rispetto al loro valore di mercato (vedere L’Atto sugli Appartamenti Militari del 199013). Il 18 febbraio 1992 la Bosnia e Erzegovina sospese la vendita di appartamenti militari sul suo territorio (vedere Il Decreto sulla Sospensione della Vendita di Appartamenti del 199214). Il Decreto fu rispettato in ciò che è oggi la Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina, e coloro che avevano acquistato appartamenti militari ubicati in quell'Entità non poterono registrare la loro proprietà e rimasero, parlando in senso stretto,detentori di diritti di occupazione (un contratto di acquisto non trasferisce di per sé titolo di proprietà all'acquirente sotto il diritto nazionale). Poiché il Decreto fu ignorato in ciò che è oggi la Republika Srpska, coloro che avevano acquistato appartamenti militari in quell'Entità divennero i loro proprietari registrati.
13. Durante la guerra, le forze armate locali (vale a dire, le forze ARBH, HVO e VRS) assunsero il controllo nominale di tutti gli appartamenti militari non privatizzati sul territorio sotto il loro rispettivo controllo15. Benché il 1 gennaio 2006 quelle forze si sono unite alle forze armate della Bosnia e Erzegovina, gli appartamenti militari non privatizzati sono ancora sotto il controllo nominale delle Entità (vedere “diritto nazionale Attinente e pratica” sotto).
3. Forze armate estere nella guerra del 1992-95 in Bosnia in Erzegovina
14. La risoluzione della SFRY è stato un processo graduale che ebbe luogo nel 1991/92 (vedere Opinione N.ro 11 della Commissione dell’ Arbitrato della Conferenza Internazionale sulla Precedente Iugoslavia del 16 luglio 199316). La Bosnia e Erzegovina dichiararono la sua indipendenza il 6 marzo 1992. Fu riconosciuta dalla Comunità europea e dagli Stati Uniti il 7 aprile 1992 ed ammessa all’appartenenza delle Nazioni Unite nel 22 maggio 1992.
15. Il 15 maggio 1992 il Consiglio della Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unite, agendo sotto il Capitolo VII della Carta delle Nazioni Unito, richiese che tutte le unità delle JNA e tutti gli elementi dell'Esercito croato venissero ritirate dalla Bosnia e Erzegovina, o fossero soggette all'autorità del Governo della Bosnia e Erzegovina, o venissero sciolte e disarmate e che le loro armi venissero messe sotto l’ effettivo monitoraggio internazionale (vedere Decisione 757). Mentre le JNA si ritirarono formalmente dalla Bosnia e Erzegovina il 19 maggio 1992, il Segretario Generale delle Nazioni Unite ed il Tribunale Penale Internazionale per la precedente Iugoslavia (“ICTY”), un tribunale delle Nazioni Unite che tratta i crimini di guerra che hanno avuto luogo durante i conflitti nei Balcani negli anni novanta, più tardi stabilirono che i membri delle JNA davvero nati nella Bosnia e Erzegovina dovessero rimanere là con il loro equipaggiamento e congiungersi con le forze VRS17 e solamente quelli nati in Serbia e nel Montenegro dovessero partire e congiungersi con le forze VJ18 (vedere il rapporto del Segretario Generale delle Nazioni Unito del 3 dicembre 1992, A/47/747, § 11, e la sentenza dell’ ICTY nella causa Tadić, It-94-1-A, § 151, 15 luglio 1999).
16. L'ICTY ha sostenuto anche che sarebbe occorso considerare le forze VRS sotto il controllo complessivo ed a favore della Repubblica Federale della Yugoslavia19 e che dopo il 19 maggio 1992, il conflitto armato in Bosnia e Erzegovina fra i serbi locali e le autorità centrali della Bosnia e Erzegovina doveva essere classificato come un conflitto armato internazionale (vedere la sentenza dell’ ICTY nella causa Tadić, Sé-94-1-A, §§ 146-62, 15 luglio 1999, e la sentenza ICTY nella causa Čelebići, IT-96-21-A, §§ 34-51, 20 febbraio 2001). È arrivato ad una conclusione simile riguardo alla relazione fra la vicina Croazia e le forze HVO (vedere le sentenze dell’ ICTY nella causa Blaškić, IT-95-14-T §§ 95-123, 3 marzo 2000 e IT-95-14-A, §§ 167-78, 29 luglio 2004).
17. La Corte di giustizia Internazionale (“ICJ”), il principale organo giudiziale delle Nazioni Unitr, è arrivato ad una conclusione diversa nella Richiesta della Convenzione sulla Prevenzione e Punizione del Crimine per Genocidio (causa Bosnia e Erzegovina c. Serbia e Montenegro). Sostenne che nonostante molte prove di partecipazione diretta ed indiretta delle forze VJ, insieme alle forze VRS, in operazioni militari nella Bosnia e Erzegovina gli atti come quelli che portarono al genocidio a Srebrenica non possono essere attribuiti alla Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia sotto gli articoli di diritto internazionale della responsabilità Statale (vedere sentenza del 26 febbraio 2007, §§ 377-415).
B. La presente causa
18. Il richiedente nacque in Serbia nel 1960. Vive a Niš, Serbia.
19. Essendo un conferenziere in una scuola militare a Sarajevo, al richiedente fu assegnato qui un appartamento militare nel 1986.
20. Il 9 marzo 1992 lui comprò l'appartamento facendo seguito all’Atto sugli Appartamenti Militari del 1990. Benché avesse pagato il pieno prezzo di acquisto il 18 febbraio 1992 (nell'importo di 379,964 dinars20 iugoslavi), le autorità locali si rifiutarono di registrare il suo titolo (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra).
21. Il 18 aprile 1992 la scuola militare fu trasferita dalla Bosnia e Erzegovina alla Serbia (inizialmente a Sombor e poi a Niš). Il 19 maggio 1992 il richiedente decise di lasciare la Bosnia e Erzegovina e continuare a fare conferenze nella stessa scuola militare.
22. Il 17 agosto 1998 il richiedente fece una richiesta per la restituzione del suo appartamento a Sarajevo. Il 30 marzo 2000 la sua richiesta fu respinta facendo seguito alla sezione 3a dell’Atto sulla Restituzione degli Appartamenti del 1998.
23. Il 17 luglio 2000 il Ministero competente del Cantone di Sarajevo sostenne la decisione di prima - istanza del 30 marzo 2000.
24. Il 21 maggio 2001 il richiedente depositò una richiesta presso la Camera dei Diritti umani, un corpo nazionale per i diritti umano. Lui si appellò agli Articoli 6, 8 e 14, e sull’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
25. Il 25 aprile 2002 la Corte Cantonale di Sarajevo, su richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale annullò le decisioni amministrative del 30 marzo e del 17 luglio 2000 per ragioni procedurali e rinviò la causa per un riesame.
26. Il 9 luglio 2002 la commissione per la restituzione stabilita dall’ Annesso 7 all’Accordo della Pace di Dayton di fronte a cui il richiedente intraprese procedimenti paralleli, sostenne che il richiedente non era né un rifugiato né un deportato, all'interno del significato dell’ Annesso 7 e declinò la giurisdizione.
27. 12 novembre 2002 le autorità di alloggio competenti ancora una volta rifiutarono la richiesta del richiedente per restituzione facendo seguito a sezione 3a della Restituzione di Appartamenti Atto 1998.
28. Il 12 settembre 2003 il Ministero competente del Cantone di Sarajevo sostenne la decisione di prima - istanza del 12 novembre 2002.
29. Il 26 novembre 2003 il richiedente depositò una richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale. Il 22 giugno 2004 la Corte Cantonale di Sarajevo sospese i procedimenti sotto istruzione dalla legislatura della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina.
30. Il 28 dicembre 2005 il Ministero della Difesa della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina assegnò formalmente l'appartamento contestato a Dž.K., un precedente membro delle forze ARBH. Comunque, sembrerebbe che Dž.K. avesse vissuto in quell’ appartamento anche prima, fin dal 25 aprile 2000.
31. L’ 8 marzo 2006 la Commissione dei Diritti umani (che era successa alla Camera dei Diritti umani nel 2004) trovò una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione a causa della lunghezza dei procedimenti di restituzione ed assegnò al richiedente 2,100 marks21 convertibili per danno non-patrimoniale in questo collegamento. Avendo stabilito la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti di restituzione, la Commissione dei Diritti umani sostenne che non costituirono una via di ricorso effettiva da utilizzare come condizione per l'esame delle azioni di reclamo effettive del richiedente. In conformità con la giurisprudenza nazionale, considerò, che benché il contratto di acquisto del 9 marzo 1992 non avesse di per sé trasferito al richiedente il titolo di proprietà sull'appartamento contestato, gli aveva conferito dei diritti personali preziosi (cioè i diritti ad occupare l'appartamento e ad essere registrato come proprietario) corrispondenti a “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. La Commissione dei Diritti umani sostenne inoltre che la situazione di cui ci si lamentava (cioè, l'incapacità del richiedente di riacquistare l'appartamento e registrare il suo titolo di proprietà su questo) indubbiamente corrispose ad un'interferenza continua col godimento tranquillo delle sue “proprietà.” Valutando la proporzionalità dell'interferenza, la Commissione dei Diritti umani sostenne che il servizio del richiedente nelle forze VJ dopo che la guerra del 1992-95 dimostrava la sua slealtà verso la Bosnia e Erzegovina. Prendendo anche in esame la grave scarsità di unità abitative ed il risarcimento che fu concesso al richiedente, la Commissione dei Diritti umani concluse che l'interferenza era giustificata. Non trovò perciò nessuna violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e considerò non necessario esaminare le azioni di reclamo per discriminazione e sotto l’ Articolo 8.
32. Il 30 agosto 2006 la Corte Suprema della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina annullò la decisione del 22 giugno 2004 e rinviò la causa alla Corte Cantonale di Sarajevo per riesame.
33. Il 19 dicembre 2006 la Corte Cantonale di Sarajevo sostenne la decisione amministrativa del 12 settembre 2003.
34. Al richiedente non è stato assegnato un appartamento in Serbia, ma ricevette dalle autorità serbe un assegno di affitto nell'importo mensile di approssimativamente 100 euro (EUR). Sembrerebbe che lui non abbia fatto domanda per il risarcimento facendo seguito alla sezione 39e dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione degli Appartamenti del 1997 (vedere paragrafo 37 sotto).
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Bosnia e Erzegovina
35. Il 22 dicembre 1995 tutti i contratti di acquisto conclusi sotto l’Atto sugli Appartamenti Militari del 1990 furono dichiarati nulli22. Come spiegato nel paragrafo 12 sopra, questo riguardava solamente gli appartamenti nella Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina.
36. Il 3 novembre 1997 la Camera nazionale dei Diritti umani sostenne che un contratto di acquisto per un appartamento militare, benché non avesse di per sé trasferito il titolo all'acquirente, conferiva all'acquirente dei preziosi diritti di proprietà (cioè, i diritti per occupare l'appartamento ed essere registrato come proprietario) che costituivano “proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Trovò poi una violazione di quell’ Articolo ed ordinò alla Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina di ripristinare la validità legale di tutti tali contratti (decisione CH/96/3 et al.).
37. Il 5 luglio 1999 la Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina emendò l’Atto sulla Privatizzazione degli Appartamenti del 199723 e l’Atto sulla Restituzione degli Appartamenti del 1998. Mentre tutti simili contratti sono stati considerati da allora giuridicamente valide, a due categorie di acquirenti non è stato dato il titolo per riacquistare i loro appartamenti e registrare il loro titolo di proprietà (vedere sezione 39e dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione degli Appartamenti del 1997 e la sezione 3a dell’Atto sulla Restituzione degli Appartamenti del 1998). In primo luogo, coloro che servivano le forze armate estere dopo la guerra del 1992-95. Poiché coloro a cui fu accordato la qualità di rifugiato o uno status equivalente in un paese fuori dalla precedente SFRY sono esentati, la restrizione colpisce solamente coloro che servirono le forze degli stati successori della SFRY e, in realtà, coloro che servirono quasi esclusivamente le forze VJ a cui si fa riferimento nel paragrafo 15 sopra. La seconda categoria è quella di coloro che acquisirono un diritto d'occupazione o un diritto equivalente su un appartamento militare in uno Stato successore della SFRY. Alle persone che rientrano in quelle categorie attualmente viene concesso solamente il risarcimento dell'importo pagato per i loro appartamenti nel 1991/92 più interesse al tasso applicabile a depositi interbancari con scadenza a ventiquattro ore (vedere sezione 39e dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione degli Appartamenti del 1997, emendato l’ 11 luglio 2006). Prima il risarcimento veniva calcolato differentemente: prima il valore di un appartamento doveva essere calcolato ad un tasso di circa EUR 300 il metro quadrato, poi l'età dell'appartamento doveva essere presa in esame col deprezzamento del 1% del suo valore per ogni anno24.
38. Il 7 dicembre 2001 la Camera Diritti umani considerò che la legislazione emendata fosse ancora discriminatoria ed in conflitto con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Ordinò alla Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina di registrare i richiedenti come proprietari, nonostante il loro servizio nelle forze armate estere (decisione CH/97/60 et al.). La parte attinente di questa decisione (§ 164) recita come segue:
“Potrebbe essere potenzialmente ragionevole e necessario bloccare per le persone che hanno servito un esercito estero l’esercizio di certi diritti; comunque il servizio in un esercito estero non è una base per togliere ad una persona un contratto di proprietà altrimenti valido.”
La Commissione dei Diritti umani che era successa alla Camera dei Diritti umani nel 2004 seguì questo approccio nelle decisioni CH/98/514 del 7 luglio 2004 e CH/99/1704 del 1 novembre 2004, ma il 9 febbraio 2005 decise di abbandonare quella giurisprudenza (decisione CH/98/874 et al.). Considerava coloro che avevano servito le forze armate estere dopo la guerra del 1992-95 come sleali verso la Bosnia e Erzegovina ed aveva sostenuto che era quindi giustificato togliere loro i contratti di acquisto. Lo stesso approccio è stato applicato successivamente in numerose seguenti cause.
39. Il 27 giugno 2007 la Commissione dei Diritti umani sostenne in una causa simile (anche riguardo all'acquisto di un appartamento socialmente posseduto prima della guerra del 1992-95 che non era stato seguito dalla registrazione di proprietà) che un contratto di acquisto giuridicamente valido, benché non avesse di per sé trasferito il titolo di proprietà all'acquirente, conferiva all'acquirente dei preziosi diritti di proprietà (in particolare il diritto di essere registrato come proprietario) che costituivano una “proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere decisione CH/03/13106 e CH/103/13402 del 27 giugno 2007).
40. Il 9 luglio 2009 la Corte Suprema della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina sostenne che un diritto di affitto della durata limitata su un appartamento militare in Serbia non avrebbe dovuto essere considerato come equivalente ad un diritto di occupazione ai fini della legislazione della restituzione.
B. Serbia
41. Dal 2 agosto 1992 non è stato più possibile acquisire diritti di occupazione in Serbia (vedere la sezione 30(1) dell'Atto sull’Alloggio del 199225). Da questa data sino al14 dicembre 2004 i membri delle forze armate avevano l'opportunità di acquisire un diritto di affitto della durata illimitata su un appartamento militare. Dal 14 dicembre 2004 loro hanno diritto ad acquisire un diritto di affitto della durata limitata26.
III. DOCUMENTI INTERNAZIONALI ATTINENTI
A. Schema Generale dell’Accordo per la Pace in Bosnia e Erzegovina (“l’ Accordo della Pace di Dayton”)
42. L’Accordo della Pace di Dayton fu definito inizialmente in una base militare vicino a Dayton, dagli Stati Uniti 21 novembre 1995. Entrò in vigore il 14 dicembre 1995 quando fu firmato a Parigi, Francia. Pose fine alla guerra del 1992-95 in Bosnia e Erzegovina.
La parte attinente dell’Annesso 4 (la Costituzione della Bosniae Erzegovina) recita come segue:
Articolo II § 5
“Tutti i rifugiati e i deportati hanno diritto a ritornare liberamente alle loro case di origine. Loro hanno il diritto, in conformità con l’Annesso 7 allo Schema Generale dell’Accordo, a far ripristinare la loro proprietà di cui loro furono privati nel corso delle ostilità dal 1991 e ad essere compensati per qualsiasi simile proprietà che non può essere ripristinata a loro. Qualsiasi impegno o dichiarazione relativa a simile proprietà fatti sotto prigionia sono privi di valore legale.”
La parte attinente dell’Annesso 7 (l'Accordo sui Rifugiati e Deportati) prevede:
Articolo I § 1
“Tutti i rifugiati e i deportati hanno diritto a ritornare liberamente alle loro case di origine. Loro avranno diritto a far ripristinare loro le proprietà di cui loro furono privati nel corso delle ostilità dal 1991 e ad essere compensati per qualsiasi proprietà che non può essere ripristinata loro. Il pronto ritorno di rifugiati e deportati è un importante obiettivo dell'accordo del conflitto in Bosnia e Erzegovina. Le Parti confermano che loro accetteranno il ritorno di simili persone che hanno lasciato il loro territorio, incluso coloro a cui è stata concessa la protezione provvisoria da parte di terzi paesi.”
Articolo VI
“Qualsiasi rifugiato o deportato che ritorna accusato di un crimine, diverso da una grave violazione della legge umanitaria ed internazionale come definito nello Statuto del Tribunale Internazionale per la Precedente Iugoslavia dal 1 gennaio 1991 o di un crimine comune non correlato al conflitto, al ritorno godrà di un'amnistia. In nessun caso le accuse per crimini verranno imposte o per ragioni improprie e politiche o altre o circonverranno alla richiesta dell'amnistia.”
B. Accordo sulle Questioni di Successione
43. L'Accordo sulle Questioni di Successione era il culmine di quasi dieci anni di negoziazioni intermittenti sotto gli auspici della Conferenza Internazionale sulla precedente Iugoslavia e dell’Alto Rappresentante (nominato facendo seguito all’Annesso 10 all’Accordo della Pace di Dayton Accordo). Entrò in vigore fra la Bosnia e Erzegovina, Croazia e la Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia (succeduta nel 2006 dalla Serbia), “la precedente Repubblica iugoslava e della Macedonia” e la Slovenia 2il giugno 2004. La disposizione riguardo ai diritti di occupazione recita come segue:
Articolo 6 dell’Annesso G
“Legislazione nazionale di ogni Stato successore riguardo a diritti abitativi (‘stanarsko pravo/ stanovanjska pravica/ станарско право’) sarà applicata ugualmente a persone che erano cittadini della SFRY e che avevano simili diritti, senza discriminazione su qualsiasi base come il sesso, la razza, il colore, la lingua,la religione, opinione politica o altra, cittadinanza od origine sociale, associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o altro status.”
C. Principi delle Nazioni Unite sugli Alloggi e la Restituzione delle Proprietà per i Rifugiati e Deportati (“i Principi di Pinheiro”)
44. I principi attinenti, sottoscritti dalla sub - commissione delle Nazioni Unite sulla Promozione e la Protezione dei Diritti umani nel 2005 (E/CN.4/Sub.2/2005/17), sono i seguenti:
Principio 1 (Scopo ed applicazione)
“1.1 I Principi sull’ alloggio e la restituzione della proprietà per i rifugiati e i deportati articolati qui sono progettati per assistere tutti gli attinenti attori, cittadini ed internazionali, nel rivolgere i problemi legali e tecnici che circondano l’alloggio, la terra e la restituzione delle proprietà in situazioni dove il dislocamento ha condotto a persone che vengono private arbitrariamente o illegalmente delle loro precedenti case, terreni, proprietà o posti di residenza abituale.
1.2 I Principi sull’ alloggio e la restituzione della proprietà per rifugiati e deportati si applicano ugualmente a tutti i rifugiati, internamente deportati ed ad altri deportati in situazioni simili che fuggirono attraverso i confini nazionali ma che non possono soddisfare la definizione legale di rifugiato (qui di seguito “le persone rifugiate o deportate” ') chi veniva privato arbitrariamente o illegalmente delle sue precedenti case, terreni, proprietà o posti di residenza abituale, nonostante la natura o le circostanze per cui accadde originalmente il dislocamento.”
Principio 2 (Il diritto alla casa e alla restituzione di proprietà)
“2.1 tutti i rifugiati e i deportati hanno diritto a far ripristinare loro qualsiasi alloggio, proprietà e/o terreno di cui erano stati arbitrariamente o illegalmente deprivati o ad essere compensati per qualsiasi alloggio, proprietà e/o terreni che sono effettivamente impossibili da ripristinare come determinato da un tribunale indipendente, imparziale.
2.2 Gli Stati daranno priorità in modo dimostrabile al diritto alla restituzione come via di ricorso preferita per il dislocamento e come elemento chiave della giustizia ristorativa. Il diritto alla restituzione esiste come diritto distinto, e non è pregiudicato né dal ritorno effettivo né dal non-ritorno di rifugiati e deportati a cui viene concesso l’ alloggio, il terreno e la restituzione di proprietà.
Principio 7 (Il diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà)
“7.1 ognuno ha il diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
7.2 Gli Stati subordineranno l'uso e il godimento della proprietà solamente nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale. Ogni qualvolta possibile, l’ ‘interesse della società' dovrebbe essere letto restrittivamente, così da intendere un'interferenza solamente provvisoria o limitata col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà.”
Principio 16 (I diritti di inquilini e gli altri non-proprietari)
“16.1 Gli Stati dovrebbero assicurare che i diritti degli inquilini, dei detentori di diritti di occupazione sociale e gli altri occupanti legittimi o utenti dell’ alloggio, del terreno e della proprietà vengano riconosciuti all'interno di programmi di restituzione. Nella misura massima possibile, gli Stati dovrebbero assicurare che simili persone siano in grado ritornare e rientrare in possesso e di utilizzare il loro alloggio, terreno e proprietà in modo simile a coloro che possiedono dei diritti di proprietà formali.”
Principio 21 (Risarcimento)
“21.1 tutti i rifugiati e deportati hanno il diritto al pieno ed effettivo risarcimento come componente integrante del processo di restituzione. Il risarcimento può essere valutario o in natura. Gli Stati possono per attenersi col principio di giustizia ristorativa, garantire che la via di ricorso del risarcimento venga usata solamente quando la via di ricorso della restituzione non sia effettivamente possibile, o quando la vittima accetta di proposito e volontariamente il risarcimento al posto della restituzione, o quando i termini di un accordo di pace negoziata prevedono una combinazione di restituzione e di risarcimento.
21.2 Gli Stati dovrebbero garantire, come norma che la restituzione venga ritenuta effettivamente impossibile solamente in circostanze eccezionali, vale a dire quando l’alloggio, la proprietà e/o il terreno sono stati distrutti o quando non esistono più, come determinato da un tribunale indipendente, imparziale. Anche sotto simile circostanze il possessore dell'alloggio, terreno e/o il diritto di proprietà dovrebbe avere la scelta di riparare o ricostruire ogni qualvolta possibile. In alcune situazioni, una combinazione del risarcimento e della restituzione può essere la via di ricorso e la forma di giustizia ristorativa più appropriata.”
D. Decisione 1708 (2010) della Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell’ Europa del 28 gennaio 2010 in merito alla risoluzione dei problemi delle proprietà di rifugiati e deportati
45. La parte attinente della Decisione recita scome segue:
“...
9. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Riunione richiama gli stati membro a chiarire le questioni dei diritti di alloggio , di terreni e di diritti di proprietà posto-conflitto dei rifugiati e delle IDP, prendendo in considerazione i Principi di Pinheiro, gli attinenti strumenti del Consiglio d’ Europa e Raccomandazione Rec(2006)6 del Comitato dei Ministri.
10. Tenendo presente questi attinenti standard internazionali e l'esperienza della restituzione della proprietà e i programmi di risarcimento eseguiti in Europa ad oggi, gli stati membri sono invitati:
...
10.4. a garantire che la precedente occupazione e i diritti di affitto riguardo all’ alloggio pubblico o sociale o alle altre forme analoghe di proprietà di casa esistenti nei precedenti sistemi comunisti vengano riconosciuti e protetti come dimore ai sensi dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione europea dei Diritti umani e come proprietà ai sensi dell’Articolo 1 del primo Protocollo alla Convenzione;
10.5. garantire che l'assenza dal loro alloggio dei detentori di diritti d’ occupazione e d’ affitto che sono state costrette ad abbandonare le loro case sarà ritenuta giustificata finché non verranno ripristinate le condizioni che permettono il ritorno volontario nella sicurezza e nella dignità;
...”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
46. Il richiedente si lamentò della sua incapacità di farsi ripristinare il suo appartamento a Sarajevo prima della guerra e di farsi registrare come suo proprietario, nonostante un contratto di acquisto giuridicamente valido. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
47. Il Governo rispondente sostenne che la legislazione che dichiarò nullo il contestato contratto di acquisto era stata decretata prima della ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 da parte della Bosnia e Erzegovina ed invitò la Corte a dichiarare la richiesta incompatibile ratione temporis a questo riguardo (fece riferimento a Blečić c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, ECHR 2006-III). Nonostante la legislazione in oggetto fosse stata successivamente abrogata, il Governo rispondente enfatizzò che il richiedente non aveva adempiuto i requisiti legali attinenti alla restituzione degli appartamenti militari ed alla registrazione del titolo. Siccome l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantiva il diritto ad acquisire proprietà, concluse che il richiedente non aveva “proprietà” ai fini di quell’ Articolo (fece riferimento a Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, ECHR 2004-IX e le autorità citate in essa).
48. Il richiedente e il Governo come terza-parte contestarono quell'argomento. Loro invitarono la Corte a seguire la giurisprudenza nazionale in questo campo e a dichiarare la richiesta ammissibile.
49. La Corte enfatizza che il concetto di “proprietà” ha un significato autonomo che è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale e che il problema che bisogna esaminare è se le circostanze di una causa, considerate nell'insieme, conferirono sul titolo di richiedente un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Re Precedente della Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 60 ECHR 2000-XII).
50. Sebbene convenga col Governo rispondente che è competente ratione temporis per esaminare il periodo solamente dopo la ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 da parte della Bosnia e Erzegovina, la Corte nota che la legislazione precedente alla ratifica che dichiarò nullo il contratto d’acquisto contestato è stata nel frattempo abrogata. Il contratto in questione ora è considerato come giuridicamente valido sotto il diritto nazionale (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra).
Le autorità nazionali hanno sostenuto costantemente inoltre, che un contratto di acquisto di un appartamento militare o di qualsiasi altro appartamento socialmente posseduto, benché non trasferisca il titolo di proprietà all'acquirente, conferisce all'acquirente il diritto ad occupare l'appartamento e ad essere registrato come proprietario e il che costituisce perciò una “proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafi 36, 38 e 39 sopra). La Commissione nazionale dei Diritti umani adottò la stessa posizione nella presente causa (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). I requisiti legali riguardo alla restituzione degli appartamenti militari e la registrazione del titolo ai quali il Governo rispondente ha fatto riferimento, sono stati sempre considerati dalle autorità nazionali restrizioni su diritti di proprietà esistenti piuttosto che condizioni sotto cui avrebbero potuto essere acquisiti dei diritti di proprietà (per contrasto Kopecký, citata sopra). Poiché la posizione delle autorità nazionali sembra essere in conformità con gli standard internazionali (vedere in particolare Pinheiro Principio 16, citata nel paragrafo 44 sopra e la Decisione 1708 (2010) della Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio dell'Europa, § 10.4, citata nel paragrafo 45 sopra), la Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione per discostarsi da questa (vedere, per analogia, Veselinski c. “precedente Repubblica iugoslava e della Macedonia”, n. 45658/99, 24 febbraio 2005 riguardo ad un contratto per acquistare un appartamento militare priam dellarisoluzione del laSFRY, e Bozcaada Kimisis Teodoku Rum Ortodoks Kilisesi Vakfı c. Turchia, N. 37639/03, 37655/03, 26736/04 e 42670/04 § 50, 3 marzo 2009 riguardo al rifiuto di registrare la fondazione della Chiesa greca Ortodossa come proprietaria della proprietà).
51. L'eccezione di ammissibilità del Governo rispondente viene di conseguenza respinta. Poiché la richiesta non è né manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione né inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo, la Corte dichiara la richiesta ammissibile e, in conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra), immediatamente considererà i suoi meriti.
B. Meriti
52. Il richiedente presentò che lui e la sua famiglia avevano abbandonato Sarajevo perché temettero per la loro sicurezza. A quel tempo, lui decise di tenere il suo posto come conferenziere presso una scuola militare che era stata trasferita nel frattempo in Serbia siccome lui non aveva presumibilmente altre scelte. Riguardo ai meriti della causa, il richiedente dibatté che le misure contestate erano manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (lui si riferì a James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 46 Serie A n. 98). Lui considerò la sua categorizzazione come “cittadino sleale” e la categorizzazione dell'attuale occupante del suo appartamento come “cittadino rispettabile” come totalmente arbitrarie. Inoltre, lui sostenne che le misure contestate non furono applicate costantemente e ha citato un numero di individui che, benché in una situazione simile, avevano riacquistato i loro appartamenti militari (come M.N., M.Z., O.K, M.B., M.S. e Z.K.). Lui provò solamente comunque, questa dichiarazione riguardo a M.N. ed O.K. presentando un'esposizione di un documento ufficiale secondo cui sono rimasti impiegati presso le forze armate della Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia rispettivamente sino al 31 maggio 2001 e al 31 marzo 2005.
53. Il Governo rispondente fece obiezione alla versione del richiedente dei fatti secondo cui aveva abbandonato la Bosnia e Erzegovina perché temeva per la sua sicurezza e dibatté che lui aveva lasciato la Bosnia e Erzegovina davvero all'interno del contesto del ritiro formale della JNA (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra). Lui non dovrebbe essere considerato perciò un rifugiato o un deportato secondo lui. Presumendo che il richiedente avesse avuto “una proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 dell’Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, il Governo rispondente sostenne che le misure contestate erano state giustificate in particolare dato lo scarso spazio degli alloggi ed un bisogno incalzante di accomodare i precedenti membri delle forze ARBH e le loro famiglie in conseguenza della guerra del 1992-95. Loro enfatizzò inoltre che il richiedente adempiva ai requisiti legali per l'allocazione di un diritto di affitto su un appartamento militare in Serbia e che gli fu concesso il risarcimento per il suo appartamento militare in Bosnia e Erzegovina (valutò l'importo a circa EUR 10,750). Perciò lui, così fu dibattuto, non dovette sopportare un carico eccessivo (il Governo rispondente fece un riferimento a Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 117 ECHR 2005-VI nel quale la Corte sostenne che la mancanza di qualsiasi risarcimento non sconvolse il “giusto equilibrio” che doveva essere previsto fra la protezione della proprietà ed i requisiti dell'interesse generale). In appoggio alla sua posizione, il Governo rispondente si riferì anche alla giurisprudenza nazionale che considerava il richiedente e tutti coloro che avevano servito le forze armate estere dopo la guerra del 1992-95 come sleali verso la Bosnia e Erzegovina (la decisione CH/98/874 et al. della Commissione dei Diritti umani del 9 febbraio 2005 menzionata nel paragrafo 38 sopra ed un numero di cause di seguito, così come la decisione U 83/03 della Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia e Erzegovina del 22 settembre 2004).
54. Il Governo come terza -parte spiegò che il richiedente adempiva davvero ai requisiti legali per l'allocazione di un diritto di affitto su un appartamento militare in Serbia (e che lui compariva perciò su una lista di coloro a cui avrebbe dovuto essere assegnato un appartamento al quale si riferiva il Governo rispondente), ma che nessun appartamento era stato ancora assegnato. Il richiedente stava ricevendo invece un assegno di affitto nell'importo mensile di circa EUR 100. Inoltre, sostenne che i membri delle forze armate serbe non potevano più acquisire né un diritto di occupazione né un diritto di affitto di durata illimitata (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra), ma solamente un diritto di affitto di durata limitata che non avrebbe dovuto essere confuso col diritto di occupazione di principio. In merito ai meriti della causa, il Governo terza - parte dibatté, che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto essere considerato come il proprietario dell'appartamento a Sarajevo (nonostante l'assenza della registrazione del suo titolo) e che le misure contestate corrisposero ad un'espropriazione de facto incompatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (fece riferimento, fra le altre autorità, a Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 63 Serie A n. 52; Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. Grecia, 24 giugno 1993, § 45 Serie A n. 260-B; e Matos e Silva, Lda., ed Altri c. Portogallo, 16 settembre 1996, § 92 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV).
1. La natura dell'interferenza
55. Come la Corte ha affermato in numerose occasioni, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo della proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo riguarda la privazione della proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti è concesso, fra le altre cose, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano dei particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 55 ECHR 1999-II).
56. La complessità della situazione legale nella presente causa impedisce di classificarla in una categoria precisa: da una parte, il contratto di acquisto contestato è considerato come giuridicamente valido e, d'altra parte il richiedente non è in grado di farsi ripristinare il suo appartamento e di essere registrato come il suo proprietario facendo seguito a quel contratto (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra). Mentre questa situazione assomiglia ad un'espropriazione de facto (Papamichalopoulos ed Altri, citata sopra), la Corte non considera necessario decidere sul fatto se la seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’Articolo 1 si applica a questa causa. Come notato sopra, la situazione prevista nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 è solamente un particolare esempio di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà come garantito dall'articolo generale stabilito nella prima frase. La Corte considera perciò che dovrebbe esaminare la situazione di cui ci si lamenta alla luce di quell’articolo generale (Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 106 ECHR 2000-I). Si dovrebbe enfatizzare anche che la situazione sotto considerazione è iniziata il 5 luglio 1999 (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra). Siccome è ancora in essere al tempo presente, è di natura continua.
2. Lo scopo dell'interferenza
57. Qualsiasi interferenza col godimento di un diritto della Convenzione deve, come si può dedurre dall’ Articolo 18 della Convenzione, perseguire uno scopo legittimo. Il principio di un “equilibrio equo” inerente all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 presuppone l'esistenza di un interesse generale della comunità. Inoltre, s dovrebbe reiterare che i vari articoli inclusi in questo Articolo non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccati (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra). Uno degli effetti di questo è che l'esistenza di un “interesse pubblico” richiesto sotto la seconda frase, o l’ “interesse generale” a cui si far riferimento nel secondo paragrafo, sono difatti corollari del principio esposto nella prima frase, così che un'interferenza con l'esercizio del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà all'interno del significato della prima frase dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 deve perseguire allo stesso modo uno scopo nell'interesse pubblico.
58. La Corte si confà col richiedente in quanto al fatto che una privazione di proprietà eseguita per nessuna ragione se non quella di conferire un beneficio privato ad una parte privata non può essere “nell'interesse pubblico.” Che detto ciò, il trasferimento obbligatorio di proprietà da un individuo ad un altro, a seconda delle circostanze, costituisce un legittimo mezzo per promuovere l'interesse pubblico (vedere James ed Altri, citata sopra, § 40). A questo riguardo , una presa di proprietà eseguita nell'adempimento di politiche sociali, economiche o altre legittime può essere “nell'interesse pubblico”, anche se la grande maggioranza della comunità non ha nessun uso diretto o nessun godimento della proprietà presa (ibid., § 45). Nella presente causa, la Corte è pronta ad accettare che le misure contestate avevano lo scopo di migliorare la giustizia sociale furono, come sostenuto dal Governo rispondente, e che loro perseguivano così un scopo legittimo.
3. Se c'era un equilibrio equo
59. Un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della proprietà deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra la protezione della proprietà ed i requisiti dell'interesse pubblico (vedere, fra molte autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, § 69). Mentre è vero che gli Stati godono i un margine ampio di valutazione in questa sfera (vedere Immobiliare Saffi c. Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 49 il 1999-V di ECHR; Radanović c. Croatia, n. 9056/02, § 49 21 dicembre 2006; e J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 75 ECHR 2007-X), la Corte considera nondimeno che un equilibrio equo non è stato previsto nella presente causa per le seguenti ragioni.
60. La Corte è consapevole per cominciare del fatto che Sarajevo, dove è situata la maggior parte degli appartamenti militari, fu sottoposto a blocchi, che si aprivano giorno dopo giorno durante la guerra (vedere le sentenze di ICTY nella causa Galić, Sé-98-29-T, 5 dicembre 2003 e IT-98-29-A, 30 novembre 2006, così come le sentenze ICTY nella causa Dragomir Milošević, IT-98-29/1-T, 12 dicembre 2007 e Sé-98-29/1-A, 12 novembre 2009). Ci sono anche molte prove della partecipazione diretta ed indiretta da parte delle forze VJ in operazioni militari in Bosnia e Erzegovina (vedere paragrafi 15-17 sopra). Questo spiega la forte opposizione locale al ritorno alle loro case prima della guerra da parte di coloro che servirono le forze VJ (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra), ma non lo giustifica. A questo riguardo, la Corte nota, che non c'è nessuna indicazione che il richiedente abbia partecipato, come parte delle forze VJ in qualsiasi operazioni militare in Bosnia e Erzegovina, e nemmeno a nessun crimine di guerra. Lui è trattato differentemente soltanto a causa del suo servizio in quelle forze. Si sa bene che la natura della recente guerra in Bosnia e Erzegovina era che simile servizio in certe forze armate era in grande misura indicativo dell'origine etnica di una persona. Le forze ARBH, fedeli alle autorità centrali della Bosnia e Erzegovina erano, nonostante delle eccezioni notabili, soprattutto costituite da Bosniaci27. Lo stesso è vero per le forze HVO (soprattutto costituite da Croati) e le forze VRS (soprattutto costituite da serbi). Modelli simili sono notati nei paesi vicini. Di conseguenza, le misure contestate, benché evidentemente neutrali, anno avuto l'effetto di trattare differentemente persone sulla base della loro origine etnica. La Corte ha sostenuto in situazioni comparabili che, come una questione di principio, nessuna differenza nel trattamento basata esclusivamente o in misura decisiva sull'origine etnica di una persona è obiettivamente capace di essere giustificato in una società democratica contemporanea (vedere Sejdić e Finci c. Bosnia e Erzegovina [GC], N. 27996/06 e 34836/06, § 44 del 22 dicembre 2009; D.H. ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 176 ECHR 2007-XII; e Timishev c. Russia, N. 55762/00 e 55974/00, § 58 ECHR 2005-XII).
61. In secondo luogo, il Governo rispondente dibatté che le misure contestate erano giustificate nella prospettiva dello scarso spazio dell’ alloggio e dal bisogno incalzante di accomodare i membri bisognosi delle forze ARBH e le loro famiglie nell’immediato dopo guerra del 1992-95. Comunque, non è riuscito a dimostrare che tale spazio di alloggio così liberato fu usato davvero per accomodare coloro che meritavano protezione. Neanche le statistiche fornite dal Governo rispondente all'interno del contesto di questa causa né quelle a cui la Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia e Erzegovina fece riferimento nella sua decisione U 83/03 del 22 settembre 2004, § 21 sono di qualsiasi aiuti. Loro confermavano semplicemente che la maggior parte degli appartamenti militari fu assegnata ai veterani della guerra , ad invalidi di guerra ed alle famiglie di membri uccisi delle forze ARBH, senza indicare la loro situazione di alloggio o il loro reddito. Inoltre, secondo dei rapporti affidabili (menzionati nel paragrafo 10 sopra) agli stessi ufficiali di alto-rango le cui necessità di alloggio erano state soddisfatte altrimenti furono assegnati ciononostante appartamenti militari.
62. In terzo luogo, riguardo alla possibilità per il richiedente di acquisire un diritto di affitto in Serbia, si nota che non gli è stato assegnato un appartamento. Inoltre, può acquisire solamente un diritto di affitto della durata limitata (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra) che la Corte Suprema della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina non considera essere equivalente al diritto di occupazione ai fini della legislazione della restituzione (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra).
63. In quarto luogo, la Corte non ha trascurato il fatto che l’Atto di Privatizzazione degli Appartamenti del 1997 prevede il risarcimento (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra). Il Governo rispondente valutò che il richiedente avrebbe potuto ricevere circa EUR 10,750, ma basarono la loro valutazione su criteri che non erano più in vigore. Dal 11 luglio 2006 al richiedente è concesso solamente davvero un risarcimento dell'importo pagato per l’appartamento più interesse positivo al tasso applicabile a depositi interbancari con scadenza a ventiquattro ore (cioè, meno che EUR 3,500). La Corte si confà col Governo rispondente che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce un diritto al pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze, ma nessuno degli importi menzionati sopra si riferisce ragionevolmente al valore di mercato dell'appartamento contestato (vedere James ed Altri, citata sopra, § 54; Pincová e Pinc c. Repubblica ceca, n. 36548/97, § 53 ECHR 2002-VIII; e Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, §§ 95-97 il 2006-V di ECHR). Mentre è vero che anche una mancanza totale di risarcimento può essere considerata giustificabile sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in circostanze eccezionali, la Corte non considera le circostanze della presente causa come tali (per contrasto Jahn ed Altri, citata sopra, § 117, riguardo all’acquisto di terreno sotto la riforma agraria implementata dal 1945 nella Zona Occupata dai sovietici della Germania e continuata dopo il 1949 nella GDR).
64. Infine, la Corte ha notato che, parlando in senso stretto, il richiedente non è né un rifugiato (a causa della sua nazionalità serba) né un deportato internamente (perché lui lasciò il territorio della Bosnia e Erzegovina). Mentre è vero che i principi internazionali sull’ alloggio e sulla restituzione della proprietà per i rifugiati e i deportati si applicano ugualmente ad “altri deportati in situazioni simili che fuggirono attraverso i confini nazionali ma che non possono soddisfare la definizione legale di rifugiato” (vedere Principio Pinheiro 1.2, citato nel paragrafo 44 sopra), è incerto se si possa considerare che il richiedente sia, “fuggito” da Sarajevo all'interno del significato di quella norma (vedere paragrafi 52-53 sopra). In qualsiasi caso, la Corte non considera necessario rispondere a quella domanda , perché le ragioni esposte nei paragrafi 60-63 sopra sono sufficienti per trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
65. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto l’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione del risultato dei procedimenti di restituzione. L’ Articolo 6, nella parte attinente, recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”
La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo è essenzialmente di natura di quarta-istanza: non c'è indicazione nell'archivio della causa che alle autorità nazionali mancò l'imparzialità o che i procedimenti erano stati altrimenti ingiusti o arbitrari. Questa azione di reclamo è perciò mal-fondata manifestamente all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e viene respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
66. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione che la situazione contestata ha corrisposto anche ad un'interferenza non necessaria col diritto al rispetto per la sua dimora. L’Articolo 8 prevede:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Non c'è comunque, indicazione nell'archivio della causa che il richiedente intende ristabilirsi a Sarajevo. Nei procedimenti di fronte a questa Corte, il richiedente effettivamente accettò espressamente il risarcimento al posto della restituzione (vedere paragrafo 70 sotto). La Corte non trova di conseguenza che i fatti della presente causa siano tali da rivelare qualsiasi interferenza col diritto del richiedente al rispetto della sua dimora (confronta Demopoulos ed Altri c. Turchia (dec.) [GC], N. 46113/99 et al., 1 marzo 2010, e per contrasto Gillow c. Regno Unito, 24 novembre 1986, § 46 Serie A n. 109). Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta è manifestamente mal-fondata e viene respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
67. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che di non aver avuto una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per le sue azioni di reclamo effettive, in violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione. L’Articolo 13 prevede:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
La Corte nota che era aperto al richiedente intraprendere procedimenti nazionali ciò che fece. Il mero fatto che lui ha perso alla fine non rende il sistema nazionale inefficace. Questa parte della richiesta è perciò manifestamente mal-fondata e viene respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
V. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESA IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
68. Infine, il richiedente addusse una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, essenzialmente appellandosi alle considerazioni che sono poste sotto la sua azione di reclamo sotto quest’ultima disposizione, presa da solo. L’Articolo 14 prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
Avendo già preso quegli argomenti in considerazione nel suo esame dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte dichiara l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 ammissibile ma considera che non è necessario esaminare la questione sotto queste disposizioni prese insieme (Kjartan Ásmundsson c. Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 47 ECHR 2004-IX).
VI. APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
69. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
70. In merito alla sua rivendicazione principale, il richiedente chiese la restituzione dell'appartamento e la registrazione del titolo, insieme con il risarcimento per la perdita di guadagni (EUR 170 al mese dal 17 agosto 1998 sino all'accordo di questa causa) ed il risarcimento per danno non-patrimoniale (EUR 10,000). Nel caso in cui l'appartamento non gli venisse ripristinato ed il suo titolo non venisse registrato, chiese anche una somma corrispondente al valore attuale dell'appartamento che lui valutò a EUR 108,810 (cioè , EUR 1,800 il metro quadrato).
71. Il Governo rispondente considerò eccessivi gli importi chiesti. Aggiunse che il richiedente aveva già ricevuto il risarcimento nei procedimenti di fronte alla Commissione dei Diritti umani (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra) e che gli fu concesso il risarcimento facendo seguito alla legislazione della restituzione (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra).
72. In conformità con la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte, una sentenza in cui trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione delle sue conseguenze in modo tale da ripristinare il più possibile la situazione esistente prima della violazione (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 32 ECHR 2000-XI). Poiché il presente richiedente accettò espressamente il risarcimento al posto della restituzione (vedere paragrafo 70 sopra), la Corte considera che il Governo rispondente dovrebbe pagargli il valore corrente dell'appartamento contestato (confronta Demopoulos ed Altri, citata sopra). Si nota che le parti non erano d'accordo sull'importo di quel risarcimento. Avendo riguardo alle informazioni disponibili sui prezzi di mercato delle proprietà a Sarajevo (vedere, per analogia, Brumărescu, citata sopra, § 24), la Corte valuta il valore di mercato corrente dell'appartamento ad EUR 60,000. Di conseguenza, assegna EUR 60,000 al richiedente sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile. La Corte si confà col Governo rispondente in merito al fatto che, come norma, qualsiasi il risarcimento pagato facendo seguito alla legislazione della restituzione dovrebbe essere dedotto, ma nessun simile risarcimento è stato pagato in questo caso.
73. Come risarcimento a riguardo della perdita di guadagni, la Corte enfatizza, che è competente ratione temporis solamente per esaminare il periodo dopo la ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Bosnia e Erzegovina (cioè dopo 12 luglio 2002). Poiché il richiedente riceve un assegno di affitto dalle autorità serbe nell'importo mensile di circa EUR 100 (che non avrebbe ricevuto, se avesse riacquistato il suo appartamento a Sarajevo) e in mancanza di qualsiasi prova che lui sarebbe stato davvero in grado di ottenere EUR 170 al mese affittando il suo appartamento a Sarajevo, la Corte respinge questa rivendicazione.
74. Infine, è chiaro che il richiedente subì una perdita non-patrimoniale derivante dalla violazione della Convenzione trovata in questa causa per cui dovrebbe essere compensato. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, assegna EUR 5,000 al richiedente a questo riguardo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile. Il risarcimento pagato al richiedente facendo seguito alla decisione della Commissione dei Diritti umani (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra) non dovrebbe essere dedotto perché fu assegnato per motivi diversi (la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti di restituzione).
B. Costi e spese
75. Al richiedente fu pagato il patrocinio gratuito nell'importo di EUR 850 per costi e spese incorsi di fronte a questa Corte. Inoltre, chiese il risarcimento di EUR 500 per i costi e le spese incorsi nei procedimenti nazionali, ma presentò prove che mostravano che solamente parte di quell’ importo davvero era stato sostenuto (circa EUR 200).
76. Governo rispondente rivendicò che la rivendicazione non era comprovata.
77. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se viene dimostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli in merito al quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo ai documenti in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 200 sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente.
C. Interesse di mora
78. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione preso da solo ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 60,000 (sessanta mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno patrimoniale EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale ed EUR 200 (duecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, a riguardo dei costi e delle spese da convertire in marchi convertibili al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 27 maggio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
1. Mentre lo Stato rispondente fu chiamato “Repubblica Socialista della Bosnia ed Erzegovina” sino all’ 8 aprile 1992 e “la Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina” dall’ 8 aprile 1992 sino al 14 dicembre 1995, il nome “Bosnia e Erzegovina” è usato ciononostante in questa sentenza riferendosi anche al periodo prima del 14 dicembre 1995.

2. La Camera nazionale dei Diritti umani e la Corte Costituzionale hanno usato costantemente il termine “diritto di occupazione” per questo tipo di affitto. Lo si userà perciò in questa sentenza invece del termine “affitto specialmente protetto” usato dalla Corte in Blečić c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, ECHR 2006-III, e nelle altre cause contro Croazia.

3. Zakon o stambenim odnosima, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Socialista della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 14/84, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Socialista della Bosnia e Erzegovina N. 12/87 e 36/89, sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 2/93, sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina N. 11/98 3 il 3 Aprile 1998 , 38/98 del 4 ottobre 1998 12/99 del 6 aprile 1999 e 19/99 del 28 maggio 1999, e sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Republika Srpska N. 19/93 del 9 ottobre 1993 22/93 del 26 novembre 1993 12/99 del 17 maggio 1999 e 31/99 del 12 novembre 1999.

4. Decisione U 174/90, pubblicata sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 2/93.

5. Zakon o napuštenim stanovima, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia ed Erzegovina n. 6/92, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 8/92, 16/92, 13/94, 36/94, 9/95 e 33/95.

6. Uredba o korišćenju napuštenih stanova, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Comunità croata di Herceg-Bosna n. 13/93.

7. . Uredba o smeštaju izbeglica i drugih lica na teritoriji Republike Srpske, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Republika Srpska n. 27/93.

8. Uredba sa zakonskom snagom o smeštaju izbeglica, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Republika Srpska n. 19/95.

9. Zakon o korišćenju napuštene imovine, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale del Republika Srpska n. 3/96 27 febbraio 1996, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 8/96 del 10 aprile 1996 e 21/96 del 23 settembre 1996.

10. Zakon o prenosu sredstava društvene u državnu svojinu, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Republika Srpska n. 4/93 del 28 aprile 1993, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 29/94 del novembre 28 1994 31/94 del 27 dicembre 1994 9/95 del 19 giugno 1995 19/95 del 2 ottobre 1995 8/96 del 10 aprile 1996 e 20/98 del 15 giugno 1998; Zakon o pretvorbi društvene svojine, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 33/94 del 25 novembre 1994.

11. Zakon o prestanku primjene Zakona o napuštenim stanovima, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Federazione della Bosni ae Erzegovina n. 11/98 3 aprile 1998, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 38/98del 4 ottobre 1998 12/99 del 6 aprile 1999 18/99 del 20 maggio 1999, 27/99 del 5 luglio 1999 43/99 del 28 ottobre 1999 31/01 del 16 luglio 2001 56/01 del 21 dicembre 2001 15/02 del 27 aprile 2002 24/03 del 10 giugno 2003 29/03 del 30 giugno 2003 e 81/09 del 28 dicembre 2009.

12. In seguito alla guerra in Bosnia e Erzegovina, il Consiglio della Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unito autorizzò la costituzione di un amministratore internazionale per la Bosnia e Erzegovina (Alto Rappresentante) da parte di un gruppo informale di Stati attivamente coinvolti nel processo di pace (Consiglio dell'Attuazione della Pace) come misura di esecuzione sotto il Capitolo VII delle Carta delle Nazioni Unite (per ulteriori informazioni, vedere Berić ed Altri c. Bosnia e Erzegovina (dec.), N. 36357/04 et al., ECHR 2007-XII).

13. Zakon o stambenom obezbjeđivanju u Jugoslovenskoj narodnoj armiji, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 84/90.

14. Uredba o privremenoj zabrani prodaje stanova u društvenoj svojini, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Socialista della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 4/92.

15. . Zakon o preuzimanju sredstava bivše Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije u svojinu Republike Bosne i Hercegovine,pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 6/92, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 13/94, 50/95 e 2/96; Odluka o preuzimanju vojnostambenog fonda JNA,pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Republika Srpska n. 16/92; Zakon o sredstvima i finansiranju Armije Republike Bosne i Hercegovine, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 6/93, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 17/93 e 13/94; Odluka o utvrđivanju namjene i prenošenju prava upravljanja i korištenja sredstvima bivše Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije, koje je koristila bivša JNA, a koja se nalaze na području Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine; pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 24/96.

16. La Commissione di Arbitrato della Conferenza Internazionale sulla Precedente Iugoslavia (anche noto come la Commissione di Badinter) fu stabilita dalla Comunità europea e dai suoi Stati Membro il 27 agosto 1991. Fra il tardo 1991 e la metà del 1993 redasse quindici opinioni concernenti i problemi legali che nascevano dalla risoluzione della SFRY (vedere Diritto internazionale Relazioni 92 (1993), pp. 162-208, e 96 (1994), pp. 719-37).

17. Le forze VRS, le forze armate della Republika Srpska, furono stabilite il 12 maggio 1992. Il 1 gennaio 2006 si unirono alle forze armate della Bosniae Erzegovina.

18. Le forze VJ, le forze armate della Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia, fu stabilito il 20 maggio 1992.

19. La Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia fu succeduta dall'Unione Statale della Serbia e del Montenegro nel 2003 che fu succeduta dalla Serbia nel 2006.

20. Circa 5,775 marchi tedeschi al tempo.

21. Approssimativamente EUR 1,075.

22. Zakon o preuzimanju sredstava bivše Socijalističke Federative Republike Jugoslavije u svojinu Republike Bosne i Hercegovine, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 6/92, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 13/94, 50/95 e 2/96.

23. Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 27/97 del 28 novembre 1997, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 11/98 3 il 1998 aprile 22/99 dell’ 11 giugno 1999 27/99 del 5 luglio 1999 7/00 del 5 marzo 2000 32/01 del 24 luglio 2001 61/01 del 31 dicembre 2001 15/02 del 27 aprile 2002 54/04 del 16 ottobre 2004 36/06 del 10 luglio 2006 51/07 del 1 agosto 2007 72/08 del 17 novembre 2008 e 23/09 dell’8 aprile 2009.

24. Sebbene al richiedente furono concessi così circa EUR 10,750 prima dell’ 11 luglio 2006, a lui ora vengono concessi meno di EUR 3,500.

25. Zakon o stanovanju, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale della Serbia n. 50/92, emendamenti pubblicati sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 76/92, 84/92 33/93, 53/93 67/93, 46/94 47/94, 48/94 44/95, 49/95 16/97, 46/98 26/01 e 101/05).

26. Pravilnik o davanju službenih stanova u zakup zaposlenima u Ministarstvu odbrane i Vojsci Srbije i Crne Gore, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Militare n. 31 del 6 dicembre 2004.

27. I Bosniaci erano noti come musulmani sino alla guerra del 1992-95. Il termine “Bosniaci” (Bošnjaci) non dovrebbe essere confuso col termine “Bosniaci” (Bosanci) che è usato comunemente per indicare cittadini della Bosnia e Erzegovina a prescindere dalla loro origine etnica.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 03/08/2020.