Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF TARKOEV AND OTHERS v. ESTONIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, P1-1

NUMERO: 14480/08/2010
STATO: Estonia
DATA: 04/11/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion No violation of Art. 14+P1-1 ; Remainder inadmissible
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF TARKOEV AND OTHERS v. ESTONIA
(Applications nos. 14480/08 and 47916/08)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
4 November 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Tarkoev and Others v. Estonia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Rait Maruste,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva,
Ganna Yudkivska, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 12 October 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in two applications (nos. 14480/08 and 47916/08) against the Republic of Estonia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by forty-five former servicemen of the Russian (Soviet) army (“the applicants”), on 24 March and 2 October 2008, respectively. The applicants reside in Estonia and are Russian or Estonian nationals whose names, along with other relevant information, are listed below (Annex).
2. The applicants were represented by Mr M. R., a lawyer at the Legal Information Centre for Human Rights in Tallinn. The Estonian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Kuurberg, of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The Government of the Russian Federation did not make use of their right to intervene under Article 36 § 1 of the Convention.
3. Two of the original applicants, Mr P. S. and Mr V. R. died (on 19 September and 6 November 2009, respectively) after the submission of the applications. Mr E. S., Mr P. S.’s son, and Ms S. R., Mr V. R.’s widow, wished to pursue the case before the Court.
4. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the refusal of the Estonian authorities to pay them a pension for their period of civil employment in Estonia unless they gave up their military pension paid by the Russian Federation was discriminatory, in breach of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
5. On 4 June 2009 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the applications to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the applications at the same time as their admissibility (Article 29 § 1).
6. The parties submitted written observations. The applicants requested the Chamber to hold a hearing. The Chamber decided, pursuant to Rule 54 § 3, that no hearing was required.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
7. The applicants, forty-five Russian military pensioners whose names along with other relevant information are listed below (Annex), live in Estonia.
A. Background of the case
8. On 26 July 1994, at the same time as the conclusion of a treaty on the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonian territory, Estonia and the Russian Federation signed an agreement concerning the provision of social security guarantees to the retired military personnel of the armed forces of the Russian Federation on the territory of Estonia (“the Agreement”). The Agreement provided that retired military personnel, that is − persons discharged from army service and receiving pensions, could apply for residence permits in Estonia. The Russian Federation undertook the securing of the payment of pensions to the persons concerned according to Russian legislation. Furthermore, it was stipulated that the retired military personnel could also apply for an Estonian pension, in which case the payment of their Russian pension would be suspended while they were receiving an Estonian pension, and vice versa.
9. Until 1998 the Russian military pension was, in most cases, considerably higher than the Estonian old-age pension. Then, after the change in the economic situation and amendment of the pension law, the Russian military retirees faced the situation where they could choose to receive either a Russian military pension (smaller than the average old-age pension in Estonia) or an Estonian old-age pension for fewer years of service. In the latter case, only the years of pensionable employment in the civil sphere – and not the years of service in the Russian (Soviet) armed forces – were taken into account. According to the applicants, in both cases the sums were rather small and not enough for survival in Estonia.
10. From January 2006 many military retirees, including the applicants, who had worked in Estonia in the civil sphere and fulfilled the requirements (in particular, at least fifteen years of pensionable employment in Estonia) for receiving an Estonian old-age pension, applied for and were granted, such a pension for life. However, a few months later, after a regular exchange of information between the Estonian social insurance authorities and the Russian Embassy, the Estonian authorities realised that the Russian Embassy was continuing to pay the persons concerned Russian military pensions. The Estonian authorities then suspended the payment of the Estonian pension to the persons concerned and requested that they provide confirmation of the suspension of payment of the Russian military pension if they wished that the payment of the Estonian pension be resumed.
11. According to the Government, who referred to information published in the Russian-speaking press, the average military pension paid by the Russian Federation in 2008 was, depending on the person’s military rank, 7,400, 5,800 or 5,000 kroons (EEK) a month (corresponding to approximately 473, 371 or 320 euros (EUR), respectively). At the same time, the average old-age pension in Estonia was EEK 4,356 (EUR 278). Although the pensions paid by Estonia had increased since 1994, the Russian military pension was higher than the average Estonian old-age pension and definitely higher than the minimum pension established in Estonia (EEK 2,008.80 (EUR 128) in 2009) which they had been guaranteed under Article 3 of the Agreement.
According to the applicants, who relied on the information from the Russian Embassy in Tallinn, the average pension of a Russian military pensioner in Estonia in 2008 was EEK 3,817 (EUR 244) − which was much less than the average Estonian pension at the same time.
B. Court proceedings initiated by the applicants
12. The applicants challenged the decisions of the Estonian social security authorities to suspend the payment of the Estonian old-age pension (in the case of Mr V. G. – invalidity pension). Arguing that they had been discriminated against and that their property rights had been violated, they lodged complaints with the competent administrative courts against the individual decisions of the Estonian social security authorities. They requested that the courts order the social security authorities to resume payment of the pension. Their complaints were dismissed in separate administrative court proceedings by the administrative courts and courts of appeal. In the case of all of the applicants, with the exception of Mr V. G., the Supreme Court dismissed the appeals as manifestly ill-founded. Mr V. G.’s appeal was refused by the Supreme Court because of his failure to pay the court fee of EEK 400 (EUR 26). The Supreme Court examined his request for exemption and rejected it by a reasoned decision.
13. The reasoning underlying the individual decisions of the social security authorities as well as the complaints and judgments in respect of each of the applicants were similar and can be summarised as follows.
14. The courts found that the clear and unequivocal wording of Article 5 of the Agreement provided that only one of the States (not both States simultaneously), should pay a pension to the military retirees. Simultaneous payment of the Russian military pension and the Estonian old-age pension was excluded because the State Pension Insurance Act (Riikliku pensionikindlustuse seadus) provided that if an international agreement entered into by the Republic of Estonia contained provisions which differed from the provisions of this Act for the grant or payment of pensions, the international agreement applied (section 4(3)). By way of comparison, the courts noted that the State Pension Insurance Act generally provided that persons who had the right to receive several state pensions were granted one state pension of their choice. The same applied to members of the Estonian Defence Forces even if they qualified for an old-age pension and defence forces pension simultaneously (section 196(5) of the Defence Forces Service Act (Kaitseväeteenistuse seadus)).
15. The courts did not exclude the possibility that there were people living in Estonia who were receiving military pensions from a foreign country and, at the same time, a state pension from Estonia. Nevertheless, they found that the Russian military retirees had not been discriminated against, as their situation was not comparable to that of persons who had served in the armies of States which were members of the same international organisations as Estonia, such as NATO or the European Union. The courts pointed out that the relationship of Estonia with those countries had been established on a different basis.
16. The courts dismissed the argument concerning an alleged violation of the applicants’ legitimate expectation, noting that they could have no legitimate expectation of receiving two pensions simultaneously, as the Agreement provided that a person could not receive two pensions at the same time.
17. The courts also rejected the applicants’ allegation that their property rights had been violated, finding that, as they were continuing to receive their Russian military pension, the applicants did not meet the conditions required for receiving the Estonian pension and that therefore they had no property rights within the meaning of Article 32 of the Estonian Constitution or Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The courts emphasised in this context that the applicants had the right to opt for an Estonian pension instead of the Russian one at any moment they wished.
18. The courts found that the essence of the applicants’ pension rights had not been undermined, as they had been guaranteed an income sufficient for subsistence. They noted that, according to Article 3 of the Agreement, the applicants received a pension at least equal in value to the amount of the minimum pension in Estonia.
19. Finally, the courts noted that the States which were parties to the Agreement could amend the Agreement so that each of them undertook to pay pensions according to the pensionable years of work in the respective country. However, this was a matter of political will; the actual Agreement did not foresee such a possibility and there were no grounds for not applying the Agreement.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW AND PRACTICE
20. The State Pension Insurance Act (Riikliku pensionikindlustuse seadus), as in force at the material time, provided:
Section 4 – Right to receive a state pension
“(1) Under the conditions provided for in this Act, state pensions shall be granted and paid to:
1) permanent residents of Estonia;
2) aliens residing in Estonia on the basis of temporary residence permits or a temporary right of residence.
...
(2) A state pension shall be granted pursuant to this Act unless a person receives a state pension pursuant to other Estonian Acts.
(3) If an international agreement entered into by the Republic of Estonia contains provisions which differ from the provisions of this Act for the grant or payment of pensions, the international agreement applies.”
Section 6 – Right to choose type of pension
“Persons who have the right to receive several state pensions shall be granted one state pension of their choice ...”
Section 7 – Right to receive an old-age pension
“(1) The following persons have the right to receive an old-age pension:
1) persons who have reached sixty-three years of age and
2) whose pension-qualifying period as provided for in section 27 of this Act and spent in Estonia is fifteen years.
...”
Section 11 – Amount of old-age pension
“(1) An old-age pension consists of three components:
1) the basic amount (baasosa);
2) a component calculated on the basis of years of pensionable service (staažiosak), the amount of which equals the number of years of pensionable service (pensioniõiguslik staaž) (section 28) multiplied by the financial value of a year of pensionable service;
3) an insurance component (kindlustusosak), the amount of which equals the sum of the annual factors of an insured person (section 12) multiplied by the financial value of a year of pensionable service.
...”
Section 27 – Pension qualifying period
“(1) A pension-qualifying period (pensionistaaž) is a period during which an insured person is engaged in an activity which merits the right to receive a state pension.
(2) A pension qualifying period shall be divided as follows:
1) the years of pensionable service (pensioniõiguslik staaž), which is calculated up to 31 December 1998;
2) the accumulation period (pensionikindlustusstaaž), which is calculated from 1 January 1999.
...”
Section 28 – Time included in years of pensionable service
“(1) Time during which the employer of a person is required to pay social tax for the person shall be included in the years of pensionable service (pensioniõiguslik staaž) of the person.
...”
21. The relevant provisions of the Agreement concerning social guarantees to retired military personnel of the armed forces of the Russian Federation on the territory of Estonia, agreed between Estonia and the Russian Federation on 26 July 1994, provide as follows:
Article 3
“The Russian Federation shall secure pensions for military retirees on the territory of the Republic of Estonia regardless of their nationality, on the conditions and according to the norms established by the legislation of the Russian Federation. The pension shall be paid at least in the amount of the minimum pension in the Republic of Estonia, including compensation.
...”
Article 5
“The authorities of the Republic of Estonia may establish and pay at the cost of the Republic of Estonia pensions to military retirees who have a right to a pension under the laws of the Republic of Estonia, subject to the wishes of those military retirees.
In this case the payment of the pension that had earlier been established by the Russian Federation shall be suspended for the period of payment of pensions by the authorities of the Republic of Estonia, and vice versa.”
22. A cooperation agreement on exchange of information on the enforcement of Article 5 of the Agreement was signed by the Estonian Social Insurance Board (Sotsiaalkindlustusamet) and the Social Department of the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Estonia on 7 July 2004. A new agreement concerning the same matter was signed on 20 February 2007.
23. In the meantime, on 25 June 1993, Estonia and the Russian Federation signed a general pension agreement which was amended by a protocol signed on 5 November 2002. That agreement and its protocol entered into force on 16 October 2007. These instruments provide that, as a rule, a person receives pension from his or her country of residence on the basis of that country’s legislation. Military pensioners, subject to the Agreement, do not fall under the general pension agreement.
24. The Government informed the Court that Estonia and the Russian Federation were holding negotiations to sign a new general pension agreement instead of the current one which was due to expire in 2011. According to its draft, each country would pay pension for the years of pensionable employment accumulated on its territory. That principle would also apply to the military pensioners instead of Article 5 of the Agreement.
25. In a judgment of 28 April 2008 (case no. 3-3-1-1-08) the Administrative Law Chamber of the Supreme Court dealt with a case similar to that of the applicants. The Supreme Court quashed the lower court’s judgment on procedural grounds and therefore did not rule on the merits of the case. Nevertheless, it pronounced its opinion on some aspects of the matter.
The Supreme Court considered that the so-called military pension paid under the Agreement was not a state pension and that therefore section 6 of the State Pension Insurance Act was not applicable. It pointed out that pursuant to section 4(3) of the Act, if an international agreement signed by Estonia contained provisions which differed from the provisions of that Act, the international agreement took precedence.
The Supreme Court found that pursuant to Article 5 of the Agreement it was not possible to simultaneously pay a pension for service in the Soviet armed forces and for a subsequent period of employment in Estonia. According to the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs which was invited to participate in the proceedings, this had been the understanding of the parties to the Agreement since its signing. However, the parties were aware of the problem and since 2002 the Russian party had taken the initiative to resolve it. The Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs admitted that both the general approach and the factual circumstances had changed since the signing of the Agreement. In drawing up recent pension agreements the principle of adding up different (not overlapping) periods was also applied; this approach was used in the European Union as well. It was also noted that the Estonian and Russian parties were preparing a new pension agreement presumably also to address the issue of the military pensioners.
The Supreme Court referred the case to the Tallinn Court of Appeal which, in a judgment of 4 September 2008 (case no. 3-06-2305), dismissed the appeal. It held:
“18. ... In the Court of Appeal’s opinion, Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement is justified, on the one hand, by the State’s obligation and need to economically use of the state budget. On the other hand, in assessing Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement, the context of the conclusion of the Agreement has to be taken into account, in particular [its] relation to the [treaty on the withdrawal of Russian troops from the Estonian territory] that was concluded at the same time. The purpose of these “July agreements” was the withdrawal from Estonia of the armed forces of the country that had occupied Estonia. As a compromise between the countries, military pensioners who did not pose a threat to Estonian national security were granted the right to stay in Estonia. In return, the Russian Federation assumed an obligation to secure for the military pensioners staying in Estonia under the Agreement, a pension from the Russian Federation that would ensure their subsistence. When entering into the Agreement, Estonia had the right to avoid taking excessive risks with its state budget in connection with the remaining of the military pensioners in Estonia.
As the complainant is and was an Estonian national, his right to stay in Estonia was guaranteed regardless of the Agreement; however, [his] nationality alone does not provide him with any wider social guarantees as compared to other military pensioners of the [Soviet Union]. The Russian Federation undertook to provide a pension to the complainant as well, regardless of his nationality (Article 3 of the Agreement).
19. The complainant as a subject falling under the Agreement signed with the Russian Federation is not in the same position as the military pensioners who have served in the armies of those countries which belong to the same international organisations as Estonia such as NATO or the European Union.
...
22. On the basis of the above, the Court of Appeal considers that Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement was in conformity with the Constitution at the time of its signing and ratification.
23. Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement, in order to be applicable in the present case, also had to conform with the Constitution at the time when the disputed administrative decision was taken. A provision of an international agreement can become unconstitutional after its ratification when the provision depriving a person of a right has in the meantime become unreasonable because of changed circumstances, and a reasonable time for amending the agreement or resolution of the matter at the domestic level has elapsed.
24. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has acknowledged that the conceptual bases of the international pension agreements had changed in the meantime. In the opinion of the Court of Appeal this gives no ground to argue that Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement has already by now become unconstitutional. The conceptual bases of international pension agreements do not amount to constitutional principles. The development of international social insurance law is a long-term process wherein Estonia also needs to be given considerable time to find the best legal and political solutions. The material referred to in the Supreme Court’s judgment in the present case confirms that the parties to the Agreement are engaged with the question concerning the pensions of the military pensioners of the former [Soviet Union].
25. Nor can the Court of Appeal see that Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement has violated or currently violates any international obligations.”
On 5 November 2008 the Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal against the Court of Appeal’s judgment.
26. In a judgment of 13 June 2008 (case no. 3-3-1-31-08) the Administrative Law Chamber of the Supreme Court dealt with a case where the main issue was whether the complainant in that case was covered by the provisions of the Agreement. It was also required to interpret Article 5 of the Agreement. Referring to its judgment of 28 April 2008 (see paragraph 25 above), the Supreme Court reaffirmed that, based on the grammatical interpretation of Article 5 and, above all, the common will and understanding of the parties to the Agreement in respect of the interpretation and application of this provision, its current wording and the will of the parties only provided for the possibility of receiving a pension granted by one of the countries at a time.
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY OBSERVATION
27. The Government objected to the succession in the proceedings of Mr P. S. by his son Mr E. S. and of Mr V. R. by his widow Ms S. R., the original two applicants having passed away on 19 September and 6 November 2009, respectively, noting that they had not submitted succession certificates issued by a notary and, in any event, pension rights were not inheritable.
28. In this respect, the Court has had regard to its findings in a series of earlier cases concerning the death of an applicant (see Vääri v. Estonia (dec.), no. 8702/04, 8 July 2008, with further references). It notes that Mr E. S. and Ms S. R. were close relatives of the deceased. It further takes note of the Government’s argument that pension rights were not transferrable; however, it considers that, while having no entitlement to any further pension payments, the original applicants’ family members can be considered to have a pecuniary interest in so far as the case concerns payments which had been withheld, allegedly in violation of the applicants’ rights, until the death of the original applicants. The Court is satisfied at this stage that it has been presented with copies of documents indicating that the persons seeking to pursue the case are close relatives of the original applicants, and attaches no decisive importance to the fact that no succession certificates issued by a notary have been submitted so far.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
29. The applicants complained that they had been deprived of their possessions and discriminated against by the failure of the Estonian authorities to pay them pensions. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention.
Article 14 provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
30. The Court who is the master of the characterisation to be given in law to the facts of the case (see, for example, Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 54, ECHR 2009-...) deems it appropriate to examine the case under Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The Government
31. The Government considered that the applicants were dissatisfied with Article 5 § 2 of the Agreement signed between Estonia and the Russian Federation. However, the implementation or amendment of bilateral treaties was not a matter that could be dealt with under the Court’s jurisdiction. Moreover, the Government emphasised that Estonia could not be held liable for the fact that the pension which the applicants received from the Russian Federation had not increased at the same pace as the pensions paid by Estonia. Therefore, they considered that the applications were incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention.
32. The Government further argued that the applications were incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention, since the applicants did not have any “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Nor had they any legitimate expectation of payment of a pension simultaneously by the Russian Federation and Estonia as, from the very beginning, the Agreement enshrined the principle that the pension was guaranteed by the Russian Federation, and Estonia only paid it in the event that its payment by the Russian Federation was suspended.
33. Alternatively, the Government called upon the Court to declare the applications manifestly ill-founded.
(b) The applicants
34. The applicants reiterated that they did not complain about a violation of the Estonian-Russian Agreement but about a violation by the Estonian authorities of their rights guaranteed under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 14 of the Convention. Furthermore, their complaints did not relate to the size of the Russian pension but rather to the payment of the Estonian pension.
35. The applicants argued that their pension claim was based on the fact that they had made insurance payments to the state budget. They also pointed out that for a limited period in 2006 the Estonian authorities had paid them the pension, which had been then suspended.
36. Lastly, the applicants disagreed with the Government’s opinion that the applications were manifestly ill-founded.
2. The Court’s assessment
37. The Court observes that the applicants complained about the refusal by the Estonian authorities to pay them a pension for their years of employment in Estonia. They considered such a refusal to be discriminatory and in violation of the Convention. Thus, this complaint relates to an alleged violation by the respondent State of the applicants’ rights guaranteed under the Convention and therefore it is not incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention.
38. In respect of the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court reiterates that Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols. It has no independent existence, since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. The application of Article 14 does not necessarily presuppose the violation of one of the substantive rights guaranteed by the Convention. The prohibition of discrimination in Article 14 thus extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and Protocols require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Article of the Convention, for which the State has voluntarily decided to provide. It is necessary but it is also sufficient for the facts of the case to fall “within the ambit” of one or more of the Convention Articles (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 39, ECHR 2005-X; Andrejeva v. Latvia [GC], no. 55707/00, § 74, ECHR 2009-...; and Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 42184/05, § 63, 16 March 2010).
39. Although there is no obligation on a State under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to create a welfare or pension scheme, if a State did decide to enact legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit or pension – whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 54, and Carson and Others, cited above, § 64).
40. In cases such as the present one, concerning a complaint under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that the applicant has been denied all or part of a particular benefit on a discriminatory ground covered by Article 14, the relevant test is whether, but for the condition of entitlement about which the applicant complains, he or she would have had a right enforceable under domestic law, to receive the benefit in question. Although Protocol No. 1 does not include the right to receive a social security payment of any kind, if a State does decide to create a benefits scheme it must do so in a manner which is compatible with Article 14 (see Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 55). The Court considers therefore that in the present case the facts fell within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
41. As concerns the question whether Mr G.’s complaint should be declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies since he did not lodge an appeal with the Supreme Court in accordance with the applicable procedural requirements, the Court considers that, in the light of the Supreme Court’s decisions in respect of the remaining applicants, Mr G. had no prospect of success before the Supreme Court and, accordingly, it would be wrong to declare his complaint inadmissible on this ground (see, mutatis mutandis, Carson and Others, cited above, § 58).
42. The Court concludes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. The merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
43. The applicants submitted that their claim concerned a period of civil employment in Estonia subsequent to their service in the Russian (Soviet) army; thus, their aim was not to receive two pensions for the same period but for different periods of employment. They specified that they did not claim any particular amount of pension; rather, they demanded that they be paid pension on the same conditions as all civil pensioners in Estonia in accordance with Estonian law without any discriminatory restrictions. According to the applicants, the essence of their right to a pension had been undermined since they received no pension whatsoever from Estonia.
44. The applicants pointed out that Estonian law did not allow two Estonian pensions to be paid at the same time but no regulation prohibited receiving an Estonian pension concurrently with one or more foreign pensions, given that the conditions for the receipt of the Estonian pension had been fulfilled. Nevertheless, the applicants were prevented from receiving an Estonian pension simultaneously with a foreign pension on the basis of Article 5 of the Agreement – as interpreted by the Estonian authorities –, which took precedence over domestic law, as stipulated by section 4(3) of the State Pension Insurance Act. However, this provision of the Agreement, which had been signed fifteen years earlier, was completely obsolete. The applicants noted that the Russian Federation had, on several occasions, proposed the amendment of Article 5 of the Agreement but the Estonian authorities had not agreed to these proposals. Moreover, the Agreement was discriminatory as none of Estonia’s other bilateral agreements on social insurance prohibited the award of an Estonian pension to persons who were permanent residents of Estonia, had completed fifteen years of pension-qualifying employment in Estonia and had reached pensionable age.
45. The applicants admitted that, although an Estonian pensioner who was entitled to a special pension could not simultaneously receive an Estonian special pension (for example, a military pension) and a regular old-age pension, he or she was entitled to the old-age pension for the whole period of his or her employment, including the period giving entitlement to the special pension. However, service in the Russian (Soviet) army – unlike service in the Estonian army – was not included in the pension-qualifying period under Estonian law.
46. The applicants rejected the Government’s argument that the Russian Federation could pay them pension for their years of employment in Estonia, alleging that during their employment in Estonia they had made obligatory payments to the pension insurance budget of that country. They noted, in turn, that nothing prevented Estonia from taking into account the applicants’ years of service in the Russian (Soviet) army upon calculation of Estonian civil pensions.
47. The applicants considered that they had been discriminated against based on their language and ethnic (national) origin, and their association with a national minority, arguing that most of the Russian military pensioners were ethnic Russians or native speakers of Russian. They considered it inappropriate to compare Russian military pensioners with Estonian military pensioners and considered that the group they should properly be compared with was that of foreign military retirees of other countries. They argued that Russian military pensioners were the only group of persons forced to refuse a foreign pension in order to receive an Estonian pension for civil employment in Estonia.
48. The applicants rejected the idea that the Russian military pensioners constituted a special group not comparable to any other group because they were former members of an army of a country that had occupied Estonia. In their view, such arguments merely demonstrated the biased attitude against them.
49. The applicants further rejected budgetary considerations as a legitimate justification for their different treatment. They conceded that an excessive burden on the state budget could have been an argument to be considered in the context of the scope of social assistance but it could not be used to justify unequal treatment of individuals. Nor could the fact of the existence of the Agreement as such justify their disadvantageous treatment which in the absence of any reasonable justification amounted to discrimination.
(b) The Government
50. The Government referred to the historic context of the conclusion of the Agreement and emphasised that it was closely connected to the treaty on the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia. According to the Agreement, retired personnel of the armed forces were allowed, as a rule, to remain living in Estonia if they so wished, with one of the reasons given having been the consideration that their resettlement could have caused practical problems and been burdensome for the Russian Federation. From the Estonian viewpoint the retired servicemen did not pose the same threat to the Estonian national security as persons in active service.
51. The Government emphasised that the military pensioners had served for a significant period of their life in the armed forces of the Soviet Union, the Russian Federation’s legal predecessor. Thus, it was natural that the Russian Federation assumed an obligation to pay their pensions. The Government pointed out that the Agreement provided a double guarantee for them. Firstly, according to Article 3 of the Agreement, the Russian Federation had to pay them pension pursuant to the legislation of the Russian Federation in at least the amount of the minimum pension established in Estonia, whereby, according to the Government, nothing prevented the Russian Federation from taking into account the years of pensionable employment accumulated in Estonia. In any event, even without this period having been taken into account, the size of the military pension was comparable to an average pension in Estonia. Secondly, Article 5 of the Agreement provided for an additional guarantee according to which the applicants could opt for an Estonian old-age pension in case they were not in receipt of a Russian pension. Thus, the applicants received a pension either from the Russian Federation or Estonia according to their own preferences. The Government also emphasised that, unlike in the above-cited case of Andrejeva, where no agreement between the countries existed, Estonia had a bilateral Agreement with the Russian Federation regulating the payment of pensions in such a way that none of the subjects to the Agreement was deprived of his or her social guarantees.
52. The Government noted that other international agreements on pension insurance signed by the Russian Federation at that time had also been based on the principle “one State pays”. An agreement of 13 March 1992 on pension insurance in the member States of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and a special agreement concerning military pensioners, signed between the members of the CIS on 15 May 1992, served as examples. The only exception in the present case, according to the Government, was that under the Agreement the responsibility to pay the pensions lay with the Russian Federation and not with the country of residence. However, the Government had no influence over the changes in the amount of pension paid to the applicants by the Russian authorities or any pension reforms carried out by them.
53. The Government made reference to Estonia’s social insurance agreements with Latvia, Lithuania, Finland, Canada and the Ukraine and two agreements with the Russian Federation (the Agreement and a general pension insurance agreement), all of which were necessarily different, reflecting the results of negotiations between different countries and regulating situations which had developed under different historical, economic and political circumstances. Furthermore, in respect of EU Member States, EU regulations applied. The Government submitted that the social insurance agreements signed in the 1990s were characterised by the fact that the obligation of paying the pension rested with one party; besides the Agreement, the same principle was also enshrined in the Estonian-Russian general pension insurance agreement.
54. Furthermore, the Government informed the Court about ongoing negotiations on a new pension agreement between Estonia and the Russian Federation (see paragraph 24 above). However, the signing of the new agreement and its entry into force depended on both parties.
55. The Government contended that the applicants had not been discriminated against on the basis of their ethnic origin or nationality. Article 3 of the Agreement unequivocally stipulated that the Agreement applied to military pensioners of the Russian Federation regardless of their nationality. It could also be seen from the list of the applicants in the present case that they were of diverse ethnic origin and nationality.
56. The Government pointed out that the Russian military pensioners were not treated differently to other pensioners living in Estonia. Those entitled to an Estonian special pension (for example, members of the defence forces, police officers, judges and prosecutors) also had to choose whether they wished to receive the special pension or an ordinary old-age pension; in the latter case they were not simultaneously entitled to the special pension.
57. The Government considered that the Russian military pensioners could not be compared to any other group since no other relevantly similar group of persons existed. There was no identifiable group of “military pensioners of other countries who were not denied Estonian civil pensions” in Estonia. The Russian military pensioners were a unique group of persons who were granted the exceptional right to stay in Estonia on the basis of the Agreement after the withdrawal of Russian troops. According to the Agreement, the Russian Federation undertook to provide them with social guarantees regardless of the fact that they did not live on the territory of the Russian Federation; Estonia only assumed the responsibility of paying their pensions if they met the criteria for receiving an Estonian pension and on the condition that the person in question gave up the special status obtained as a result of having served in the armed forces that had previously occupied Estonia. Everyone subject to the Agreement, including the applicants, had been aware of these conditions when they had decided to stay in Estonia.
2. The Court’s assessment
58. The Court has established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14. Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations. Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify different treatment. The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject-matter and the background. A wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are, in principle, better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social or economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature’s policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (see Carson and Others, cited above, § 61, with further references).
59. The Court recalls that the applicants in the present case are former Russian (Soviet) servicemen who after the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia in 1994 remained in Estonia on the basis of the Estonian-Russian Agreement and who receive a Russian military pension on the basis of that Agreement. The Court notes that the applicants’ different treatment as compared to other persons who have completed at least fifteen years of pensionable employment in Estonia is based on the fact that they are in receipt of another pension, that is a pension paid by the Russian Federation under the Russian legislation and in accordance with the Agreement. The Court observes that the distinction in question is not based on the applicants’ nationality or ethnic origin and finds it questionable whether this difference in the applicants’ treatment can be considered to be based on any other personal characteristic or “status”. However, it considers it not necessary to determine this matter because of the reasons set out below.
60. The applicants argued that they had been treated differently from military pensioners of other countries, for example, those of NATO countries. Thus, the Court is called to determine whether the applicants are in a similar situation to military pensioners of other countries in respect of whom Estonia has not signed international agreements limiting their pension rights or, more generally, as compared with any other persons who have completed at least fifteen years of pensionable employment in Estonia and who, again in the absence of any restrictive international agreements, are not prevented from receiving several pensions from several countries at the same time.
61. In doing so, the Court has had regard to the specific historical context of the present case. It notes that the Estonian-Russian Agreement is only applicable to persons who had already retired by the time the Agreement was signed in 1994 and who were already in receipt of the Russian military pension at that time. Furthermore, as the Agreement was signed at the same time as the conclusion of a treaty on the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia, the conditions on which the Estonian authorities agreed to accept the continued presence of Russian military retirees in their territory have to be seen in the context of the Russian Federation’s primary obligation to secure the withdrawal of its forces from the occupied territory.
62. The Court observes that the Agreement did not concern any further military pensioners who might have moved to Estonia after it was signed. Moreover, the Russian military pensioners who remained in Estonia on the basis of the Agreement were fully aware at the time and after the signing of the Agreement that if, being in receipt of a Russian military pension, they started or continued to be employed in the civil sphere in Estonia, such employment would not give them any entitlement to a further Estonian civil pension.
63. The Court has also had regard to the facts that according to Article 3 of the Agreement the applicants are guaranteed a pension at least in the amount of the minimum pension in Estonia and that, according to the submissions of the parties, the amount of the pension the Russian military pensioners receive is comparable to the size of ordinary Estonian old-age pensions (according to the information provided by the Government, the Russian military pension is higher than an average Estonian old-age pension whereas according to the applicants the Russian military pension was about 12% lower in 2008). Moreover, the value of the Russian military pension received by the applicants in Estonia, and its relation to the Estonian old-age pension, depends on a variety of circumstances, such as the size of Russian pensions as set down by Russian legislation, the two countries’ comparative costs of living, interest and exchange rates, their comparative rates of economic growth, inflation, taxation and even the availability of other welfare benefits and the eligibility of the persons concerned for such benefits (see, for comparison, Carson and Others, cited above, § 86).
64. The Court also notes that the applicants do have the right to apply for the Estonian old-age pension, given that they have attained the age of sixty-three years, have completed at least fifteen years of pensionable employment in Estonia and, at the same time, are not in receipt of the Russian military pension. While it is true that in such a case their years of service in the Russian (Soviet) armed forces would not be taken into account for calculation of their pensions, Estonia cannot be considered responsible for any pension payments for such service. Service in the Russian (Soviet) armed forces forms no part of pensionable employment for anyone under the Estonian legislation, so there is no room to find any different treatment of the applicants in this respect.
65. Lastly, the Court considers that the fact that Estonia and the Russian Federation hold negotiations on a new pension agreement possibly determining the matters differently from the agreements in force does not in itself lead to a conclusion that the application of the present regulations is discriminatory.
66. Based on the above considerations, the Court concludes that the applicants are not in a comparable situation with any other group of pensioners, such as, for example, military or civil pensioners of other countries or ordinary Estonian civil pensioners who are eligible for the receipt of an Estonian pension upon completion of at least fifteen years of pensionable employment in Estonia.
67. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the present case.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
68. The Court has also examined the remainder of the applicants’ complaints under Articles 6 § 1 and 14 of the Convention as submitted by them, including a complaint about the lack of impartiality of the courts and Mr V. G.’s complaint about him having been denied access to the Supreme Court owing to his failure to pay the court fee. However, having regard to all the material in its possession, the Court finds that these complaints do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join the applications;
2. Declares the complaint concerning the alleged discrimination under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 4 November 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President


ANNEX
Application no. 14480/08
No. Applicant Nationality Born Number of pensionable years in Estonia as determined by the Estonian authorities in 2006 Supreme Court decision
to reject the appeal
1. OMISSIS Russian 1933 No information 24.09.2007
2. OMISSIS Russian 1936 23.193 24.09.2007
3. OMISSIS Russian 1937 22.635 24.09.2007
4. OMISSIS Estonian 1929 28.278 24.09.2007
5. OMISSIS Estonian 1936 28.368 24.09.2007
6. OMISSIS Russian 1926 22.873 24.09.2007
7. OMISSIS Russian 1923 25.499 24.09.2007
8. OMISSIS Russian 1930 26.493 24.09.2007
9. OMISSIS Estonian 1959 No information -
Application no. 47916/08
No. Applicant Nationality Born Number of pensionable years in Estonia as determined by the Estonian authorities in 2006 Supreme Court decision
to reject the appeal
1. OMISSIS Russian 1936 20.849 30.04.2008
2. OMISSIS Russian 1928 18.435 07.05.2008


3. OMISSIS Russian 1938 18.476 07.05.2008
4. OMISSIS Russian 1929 20.386 07.05.2008
5. OMISSIS Estonian 1925 35.550 30.04.2008
6. OMISSIS Russian 1940 18.735 30.04.2008
7. OMISSIS Estonian 1933 28.553 07.05.2008
8. OMISSIS Russian 1939 20.930 30.04.2008
9. OMISSIS Russian 1933 19.055 30.04.2008
10. OMISSIS Russian 1939 16.540 30.04.2008
11. OMISSIS Russian 1919 28.867 30.04.2008
12. OMISSIS Russian 1925 No information 30.04.2008
13. OMISSIS Russian 1939 21.650 30.04.2008
14. OMISSIS Russian 1919 23.945 30.04.2008
15. OMISSIS Russian 1931 19.868 07.05.2008
16. OMISSIS Russian 1937 16.093 07.05.2008
17. OMISSIS Estonian 1933 30.072 30.04.2008
18. OMISSIS Estonian 1933 19.349 30.04.2008
19. OMISSIS Russian 1937 37.932 30.04.2008
20. OMISSIS Russian 1930 15.878 30.04.2008
21. OMISSIS Russian 1939 17.955 30.04.2008
22. OMISSIS Russian 1928 15.831 07.05.2008
23. OMISSIS Russian 1942 17.088 30.04.2008
24. OMISSIS Russian 1936 23.075 30.04.2008
25. OMISSIS Russian 1924 24.570 07.05.2008
26. OMISSIS Russian 1927 23.389 30.04.2008
27. OMISSIS Russian 1928 16.562 30.04.2008
28. OMISSIS Russian 1937 16.855 07.05.2008
29. OMISSIS Estonian 1935 22.178 30.04.2008
30. OMISSIS Russian 1935 17.278 30.04.2008
31. OMISSIS Russian 1923 29.823 30.04.2008
32. OMISSIS Russian 1927 23.985 30.04.2008
33. OMISSIS Russian 1933 No information 07.05.2008
34. OMISSIS Russian 1933 20.644 30.04.2008
35. OMISSIS Russian 1928 28.403 30.04.2008
36. OMISSIS Russian 1936 21.162 30.04.2008


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1; Resto inammissibile
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA TARKOEV ED ALTRI C. ESTONIA
(Richieste N. 14480/08 e 47916/08)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
4 novembre 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Tarkoev ed Altri c. Estonia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger, Rait Maruste, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, Ganna Yudkivska, giudici,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 12 ottobre 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da due richieste (N. 14480/08 e 47916/08) contro la Repubblica dell'Estonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da quaranta-cinque membri delle Forze Armate del precedente esercito russo (sovietico) (“i richiedenti”), rispettivamente il 24 marzo e il 2 ottobre 2008,. I richiedenti risiedono in Estonia e sono cittadini russi o estoni i cui nomi, insieme alle altre informazioni attinenti sono elencati sotto (Annesso).
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. M. R., un avvocato presso il Centro di Informazioni
Legali per Diritti umani a Tallinn. Il Governo estone (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig.ra M. Kuurberg, del Ministero degli Affari Esteri. Il Governo della Federazione russa non si avvalse del suo diritto ad intervenire sotto l’Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione.
3. Due dei richiedenti originali, il Sig. P. S. ed il Sig. V. R. morirono (rispettivamente il 19 settembre e il 6 novembre 2009,) dopo l'osservazione delle richieste. Il Sig. E. S., il figlio del Sig. P. S., e laSig.ra S. R., la vedova del Sig. V. R., desiderarono intraprendere la causa di fronte alla Corte.
4. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che il rifiuto delle autorità estoni di pagare loro una pensione per il loro periodo di lavoro civile in Estonia a meno che loro non rinunciassero alla loro pensione militare pagata dalla Federazione russa era discriminatoria, in violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
5. Il 4 giugno 2009 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso delle richieste al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo della loro ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 1).
6. Le parti presentarono osservazioni scritte. I richiedenti richiesero alla Camera di tenere un'udienza. La Camera decise, facendo seguito all’Articolo 54 § 3, che nessuna udienza era richiesta.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
7. I richiedenti, quaranta-cinque pensionati militari russi i cui nomi insieme alle altre informazioni attinenti sono elencati sotto (Annesso), vivono in Estonia.
A. Background della causa
8. L’ Estonia e la Federazione russa firmarono un accordo riguardo alla disposizione di garanzie di previdenza sociale al personale militare pensionato delle forze armate della Federazione russa sul territorio dell'Estonia allo stesso tempo della conclusione di un trattato sul ritiro delle truppe russe dal territorio estone, il 26 luglio 1994, (“l'Accordo”). L'Accordo prevedeva che il personale militare pensionato cioè − le persone assolte dal servizio di esercito e che ricevono delle pensioni, avrebbero potuto richiedere dei permessi di soggiorno in Estonia. La Federazione russa accetto di garantire il pagamento di pensioni alle persone riguardate secondo legislazione russa. Inoltre, si convenne che il personale militare pensionato avrebbe potuto richiedere anche per una pensione estone nel qual caso il pagamento della loro pensione russa sarebbe stato sospeso mentre ricevevano una pensione estone, e viceversa.
9. Sino al 1998 la pensione militare russa era, in più casi, notevolmente più alta della pensione di anzianità estone. Poi. dopo il cambio nella situazione economica e l’ emendamento della legge pensionistica, i pensionati militari russi si trovarono di fronte alla situazione in cui loro potevano scegliere di ricevere una pensione militare russa (inferiore della pensione di anzianità media in Estonia) o una pensione di anzianità estone per meno anni di servizio. Nel secondo caso, solamente gli anni di lavoro pensionabili nella sfera civile-e non gli anni di servizio nelle le forze armate russe (sovietiche) -furono presi in considerazione. In ambo i casi le somme erano piuttosto esigue secondo i richiedenti, e non abbastanza per la sopravvivenza in Estonia.
10. Dal gennaio 2006 molti pensionati militari, incluso i richiedenti che avevano lavorato in Estonia nella sfera civile ed avevano adempiuto ai requisiti (in particolare, almeno quindici anni di lavoro pensionabile in Estonia) per ricevere una pensione di anzianità estone, fecero domanda e fu accordata loro , tale pensione per la vita. Dopo uno scambio regolare di informazioni fra le autorità di previdenza sociali estoni e l'Ambasciata russa, le autorità estoni compresero alcuni mesi più tardi, comunque, che l'Ambasciata russa stava continuando a pagare alle persone riguardate delle pensioni militari russe. Le autorità estoni sospesero poi il pagamento della pensione estone alle persone riguardate e richiesero che di fornire loro conferma della sospensione di pagamento della pensione militare russa se loro avessero desideravano che il pagamento della pensione estone venisse ripreso.
11. Secondo il Governo che si riferì alle informazioni pubblicate sulla stampa in lingua russa, la pensione militare media pagata dalla Federazione russa nel 2008 era, a seconda della rango militare della persona, 7,400 5,800 o 5,000 kroon (EEK) al mese (corrispondenti rispettivamente ad approssimativamente 473, 371 o 320 euro (EUR). Allo stesso tempo, la pensione di anzianità media in Estonia era EEK 4,356 (EUR 278). Benché le pensioni pagate dall’Estonia fossero aumentate dal 1994, la pensione militare russa era più alta della pensione media di anzianità estone e definitivamente più alto della pensione minima stabilita in Estonia (EEK 2,008.80 (EUR 128) nel 2009) garantite loro sotto l’Articolo 3 dell'Accordo.
Secondo i richiedenti che si appellarono alle informazioni dall'Ambasciata russa a Tallinn la pensione media di un pensionato militare russo in Estonia nel 2008 era EEK 3,817 (EUR 244) –il che era molto meno della pensione estone media nello stesso periodo.
B. Atti iniziati dai richiedenti
12. I richiedenti impugnarono le decisioni delle autorità di previdenza sociale estoni di sospendere il pagamento della pensione di anzianità estone (nella causa del Sig. V. G. -pensione di invalidità). Dibattendo che loro erano stati discriminati e che i loro diritti di proprietà erano stati violati, loro presentarono reclami presso le corti amministrative competenti contro le decisioni individuali delle autorità di previdenza sociale estoni. Loro richiesero che le corti ordinassero alle autorità di previdenza sociale di riprendere il pagamento della pensione. Le loro azioni di reclamo furono respinte in procedimenti amministrativi separati di corte presso le corti amministrative e la corte d'appello. Nel caso di tutti i richiedenti, ad eccezione del Sig. V. G. la Corte Suprema respinse i ricorsi come manifestamente mal-fondati. Il ricorso del Sig. V. G. fu rifiutato dalla Corte Suprema a causa del suo insuccesso nel pagare la parcella di corte di EEK 400 (EUR 26). La Corte Suprema esaminò la sua richiesta per esenzione e la respinse con una decisione ragionata.
13. Il ragionamento sottostante le decisioni individuali delle autorità di previdenza sociale così come le azioni di reclamo e le sentenze a riguardo di ognuno dei richiedenti erano simili e possono essere riassunte come segue.
14. Le corti trovarono che l’ enunciazione chiara ed inequivocabile dell’ Articolo 5 dell'Accordo prevedeva che solamente uno degli Stati (non entrambi gli Stati simultaneamente), avrebbe dovuto pagare una pensione ai pensionati militare. Il pagamento simultaneo della pensione militare russa e della pensione di anzianità estone era escluso perché l'Atto della Previdenza della Pensione Statale (Riikliku pensionikindlustuse seadus) prevedeva che se un accordo internazionale firmato dalla Repubblica dell'Estonia conteneva delle disposizioni differenti dalle disposizioni di questo Atto per la concessione o il pagamento di pensioni, si applicava l'accordo internazionale (sezione 4(3)). Tramite paragone, le corti notarono, che l'Atto della Previdenza della Pensione Statale generalmente prevedeva che alle persone che avevano diritto a ricevere molte pensioni statali veniva accordata loro una pensione statale a loro scelta. Lo stesso si applica ai membri delle Forze della Dipesa Estone anche se loro avevano la qualità per ricevere simultaneamente una pensione di anzianità e una pensione delle forze della difesa (sezione 196(5) dell’ Atto del Servizio delle Forze della Difesa (Kaitseväeteenistuse seadus)).
15. Le corti non esclusero la possibilità che c'erano persone che vivevano in Estonia che stavano ricevendo pensioni militari da un paese estero e, allo stesso tempo, una pensione statale dall'Estonia. Ciononostante, loro trovarono che i pensionati militari russi non erano mai stati discriminati, siccome la loro situazione non era comparabile a quella di persone che avevano servito gli eserciti di Stati che erano membri delle stesse organizzazioni internazionali come l'Estonia, come la Nato o l'Unione europea. Le corti indicarono che la relazione dell'Estonia con quei paesi era stata stabilita su una base diversa.
16. Le corti respinsero l'argomento riguardo ad una violazione addotta dell’ aspettativa legittima dei richiedenti , notando che loro non potevano avere nessuna aspettativa legittima di ricevere simultaneamente due pensioni, siccome l'Accordo prevedeva e che una persona non potesse ricevere due pensioni allo stesso tempo.
17. Le corti respinsero anche la dichiarazione dei richiedenti che i loro diritti di proprietà erano stati violati, trovando che, siccome loro continuavano a ricevere la loro pensione militare russa, i richiedenti non soddisfacevano le condizioni richieste per ricevere la pensione estone e che perciò loro non avevano diritti di proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 32 della Costituzione estone o dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Le corti enfatizzarono in questo contesto che i richiedenti avevano diritto ad optare per una pensione estone invece della russa in qualsiasi momento loro lo desiderassero.
18. Le corti trovarono che l'essenza dei diritti pensionistici dei richiedenti non era stata danneggiata, siccome a loro veniva garantito un reddito sufficiente per l’esistenza. Loro notarono che, i richiedenti ricevevano almeno una pensione uguale nel valore all'importo della pensione minima secondo l’Articolo 3 dell'Accordo, in Estonia.
19. Infine, le corti notarono che gli Stati che erano parti all'Accordo potevano correggere l'Accordo così che ognuno di loro si impegnava a pagare pensioni secondo gli anni pensionabili di lavoro nel rispettivo paese. Comunque, questa era una questione di volontà politica; l'Accordo effettivo non prevedeva tale possibilità e non c'erano motivi per non applicare l'Accordo.
II. DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE E NAZIONALE E PRATICA ATTINENTI
20. L'Atto della Previdenza della Pensione Statale ((Riikliku pensionikindlustuse seadus), come in vigore al tempo attinente, prevede:
Sezione 4-Diritto a ricevere una pensione statale
“(1) sotto le condizioni previste in questo Atto, le pensioni statali saranno accordate, e pagate a:
1) residenti permanenti dell'Estonia;
2) stranieri residenti in Estonia sulla base di permessi di soggiorno provvisori o un diritto provvisorio di residenza.
...
(2) una pensione statale sarà accordata facendo seguito a questo Atto a meno che una persona riceva una pensione statale facendo seguito ad altri Atti estoni.
(3) se un accordo internazionale firmato dalla Repubblica dell'Estonia contiene disposizioni che differiscono dalle disposizioni di questo Atto per la concessione o il pagamento di pensioni, si applica l'accordo internazionale.”
Sezione 6- Diritto di scelta della pensione
“Alle persone che hanno diritto a ricevere molte pensioni statali sarà accordata una pensione statale a loro scelta...”
Sezione 7-Diritto a ricevere una pensione di anzianità
“(1) le seguenti persone hanno diritto a ricevere una pensione di anzianità:
1) persone che sono giunte ai sessanta-tre anni d’età e
2) il cui periodo qualificato per la pensione come previsto nella sezione 27 di questo Atto e trascorso in Estonia è quindici anni.
...”
Sezione 11-Importo della pensione di anzianità
“(1) una pensione di anzianità consiste di tre componenti:
1) l'importo di base ( baasosa);
2) una componente calcolata sulla base degli anni di servizio pensionabili ( staažiosak), l'importo di cui equivale al numero di anni di servizio pensionabili (pensioniõiguslik staaž) (sezione 28) moltiplicato per il valore finanziario di un anno di servizio pensionabile;
3) una componente di previdenza (kindlustusosak), l'importo di cui equivale alla somma dei fattori annuali di una persona assicurata (sezione 12) moltiplicato col valore finanziario di un anno di servizio pensionabile.
...”
Sezione 27-il periodo qualificato per la Pensione
“(1) un periodo qualificato per la pensione ( pensionistaaž) è un periodo durante il quale una persona assicurata prende parte ad un'attività che merita il diritto di ricevere una pensione statale.
(2) un periodo qualificato per la pensione sarà diviso come segue:
1) gli anni di servizio pensionabili (pensioniõiguslik staaž) che sono calcolati dal 31 dicembre 1998;
2) il periodo di accumulazione (pensionikindlustusstaaž) che è calcolato dal 1 gennaio 1999.
...”
Sezione 28-Tempo incluso negli anni di servizio pensionabile
“(1) Il tempo durante il quale il datore di lavoro di una persona è obbligato a pagare la tassa sociale per la persona sarà incluso negli anni di servizio pensionabile (pensioniõiguslik staaž) della persona.
...”
21. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Accordo che concerne garanzie sociali a personale militare pensionato delle forze armate della Federazione russa sul territorio dell'Estonia, convenuto fra Estonia e la Federazione russa del 26 luglio 1994, prevede come segue:
Articolo 3
“La Federazione russa garantirà le pensioni per pensionati militari sul territorio della Repubblica dell'Estonia nonostante la loro nazionalità, alle condizioni e secondo le norme stabilite dalla legislazione della Federazione russa. La pensione sarà pagata almeno nell'importo della pensione minima nella Repubblica dell'Estonia, incluso il risarcimento.
...”
Articolo 5
“Le autorità della Repubblica dell'Estonia possono stabilire e possono pagare al costo della Repubblica dell’ Estonia delle pensioni a pensionati militare che hanno diritto ad una pensione sotto le leggi della Repubblica dell'Estonia, soggetta ai desideri di quei pensionati militari.
In questo caso il pagamento della pensione che precedentemente era stato stabilito dalla Federazione russa sarà sospeso per il periodo di pagamento delle pensioni da parte delle autorità della Repubblica dell'Estonia, e viceversa.”
22. Un accordo di cooperazione sullo cambio di informazioni sull'esecuzione dell’ Articolo 5 dell'Accordo fu firmato dal Consiglio della Previdenza Sociale estone (Sotsiaalkindlustusamet) e dal Dipartimento Sociale dell'Ambasciata della Federazione russa in Estonia il 7 luglio 2004. Un nuovo accordo riguardo alla stessa questione fu firmato il 20 febbraio 2007.
23. Il 25 giugno 1993, l’ Estonia e la Federazione russa firmarono nel frattempo, un accordo di pensione generale che fu corretto con un protocollo firmato il 5 novembre 2002. Questo accordo ed il suo protocollo entrarono in vigore il 16 ottobre 2007. Questi strumenti prevedevano che, come norma, una persona riceveva una pensione dal suo paese di residenza sulla base della legislazione di quel paese. I pensionati militari, soggetti all'Accordo non ricadevano sotto l'accordo pensionistico generale.
24. Il Governo informò la Corte che l’ Estonia e la Federazione russa stavano sostenendo negoziazioni per firmare un nuovo accordo generale pensionistico invece del corrente che deve scadere nel 2011. Secondo la sua bozza, ogni paese pagherebbe una pensione per gli anni di lavoro pensionabili accumulati sul suo territorio. Questo principio si applicherebbe anche ai pensionati militari invece dell’ Articolo 5 dell'Accordo.
25. In una sentenza del 28 aprile 2008 (causa n. 3-3-1-1-08) la Camera del Diritto amministrativo della Corte Suprema trattò una causa simile a quella dei richiedenti. La Corte Suprema annullò la sentenza della corte inferiore per motivi procedurali e perciò non decise sui meriti della causa. Ciononostante, pronunciò la sua opinione su degli aspetti della questione.
La Corte Suprema considerò che la così definita pensione militare pagata sotto l'Accordo non era una pensione statale e che perciò la sezione 6 dell'Atto della Previdenza della Pensione Statale non era applicabile. Indicò che facendo seguito alla sezione 4(3) dell'Atto, se un accordo internazionale firmato dall'Estonia conteneva disposizioni che differivano dalle disposizioni di questo Atto, l'accordo internazionale aveva la precedenza.
La Corte Suprema trovò che facendo seguito all’ Articolo 5 dell'Accordo non era possibile pagare simultaneamente una pensione per servizio nelle forze armate sovietiche e per un periodo susseguente di lavoro in Estonia. Secondo il Ministero estone degli Affari Esteri che fu invitato a partecipare ai procedimenti, questa era stata l’intesa delle parti all'Accordo fin dalla sua firma. Comunque, le parti erano consapevoli del problema e dal 2002 la parte russa aveva preso l'iniziativa per chiarirlo. Il Ministero estone degli Affari Esteri ammise che sia l'approccio generale e che le circostanze dei fatti erano cambiate fin dalla firma dell'Accordo. Nel redigere i recenti accordi pensionistici il principio di accumulare (non ricoprire) diversi periodi fu applicato allo stesso modo; questo approccio fu usato anche nell'Unione europea. Si notò anche che le parti estoni e russe stavano preparando presumibilmente anche un nuovo accordo pensionistico per risolvere il problema dei pensionati militari.
La Corte Suprema riferì la causa alla Corte d'appello di Tallinn che, in una sentenza del 4 settembre 2008 (causa n. 3-06-2305), respinse il ricorso. Sostenne:
“18. ... Nell'opinione della Corte d'appello, l’Articolo che 5 § 2 dell'Accordo è giustificato, da una parte dall’obbligo e dal bisogno dello Stato di usare economicamente il bilancio statale. Il contesto della conclusione dell'Accordo doveva d'altra parte nel valutare Articolo 5 § 2 dell'Accordo, essere preso in considerazione, in particolare [la] sua relazione al [trattato sul ritiro delle truppe russe dal territorio estone] che fu concluso allo stesso tempo. Il fine di questi “accordi di luglio” era il ritiro dall’ Estonia delle forze armate del paese che aveva occupato l’Estonia. Come compromesso fra i paesi, ai pensionati militari che non rappresentavano una minaccia alla sicurezza del cittadino estone fu accordato il diritto di rimanere in Estonia. In cambio, la Federazione russa si assunse l’ obbligo di garantire ai pensionati militari che restavano in Estonia sotto l'Accordo, una pensione dalla Federazione russa che avrebbe assicurato la loro esistenza. Nel sottoscrivere l'Accordo, l’Estonia aveva diritto ad evitare di correre dei ischi eccessivi col suo bilancio statale in collegamento col rimanente dei pensionati militari in Estonia.
Siccome il reclamante è ed era un cittadino estone, il suo diritto a restare in Estonia era garantito nonostante l'Accordo; comunque, [la] sua nazionalità non gli offriva da sola una qualsiasi garanzia sociale più ampia in confronto agli altri pensionati militari dell’ [Unione sovietica]. La Federazione russa si impegnò ad offrire lo stesso una pensione al reclamante, nonostante la sua nazionalità (Articolo 3 dell'Accordo).
19. Il reclamante come soggetto rientrante sotto l'Accordo firmato dalla Federazione russa non è nella stessa posizione dei pensionati militari che hanno servito gli eserciti di quei paesi appartenenti alle stesse organizzazioni internazionali come l'Estonia, come Nato o l'Unione europea.
...
22. Sulla base di quanto sopra, la Corte d'appello considera, che l’Articolo 5 § 2 dell'Accordo era in conformità alla Costituzione al tempo della sua firma e ratifica.
23. L’ Articolo 5 § 2 dell'Accordo perché sia applicabile nella presente causa, doveva anche adattarsi alla Costituzione al tempo in cui la decisione amministrativa contestata fu presa. Una disposizione di un accordo internazionale può divenire incostituzionale dopo la sua ratifica quando la disposizione che spoglia una persona di un diritto è divenuta nel frattempo irragionevole a causa di circostanze cambiate, ed un termine ragionevole per correggere l'accordo o decisione della questione a livello nazionale è passato.
24. Il Ministero degli Affari Esteri ha ammesso che le basi concettuali degli accordi pensionistici internazionali erano cambiate nel frattempo. Nell'opinione della Corte d'appello questo non dà nessuna base per dibattere che l’Articolo 5 § 2 dell'Accordo adesso è già divenuto incostituzionale. Le basi concettuali degli accordi pensionistici internazionali non corrispondono a principi costituzionali. Lo sviluppo del diritto della previdenza sociale ed internazionale è un processo a lungo termine in cui all’Estonia occorre dare anche tempo considerevole per trovare i le migliori soluzioni legali e politiche. Il materiale a cui si fa riferimento nella sentenza della Corte Suprema nella presente causa conferma che le parti all'Accordo sono impegnate nella questione riguardo alle pensioni dei pensionati militari della precedente [Unione sovietica].
25. Né la Corte d'appello può vedere che l’Articolo 5 § 2 dell'Accordo ha violato o attualmente violi qualsiasi obbligo internazionale.”
Il 5 novembre 2008 la Corte Suprema non accolse un ricorso contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello.
26. In una sentenza del 13 giugno 2008 (causa n. 3-3-1-31-08) la Camera del Diritto amministrativo della Corte Suprema trattò una causa in cui il problema principale era se il reclamante in quel caso era coperto dalle disposizioni dell'Accordo. Fu costretta anche ad interpretare l’Articolo 5 dell'Accordo. Riferendosi alla sua sentenza del 28 aprile 2008 (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra), la Corte Suprema riaffermò che, basandosi sull'interpretazione grammaticale dell’ Articolo 5 e, soprattutto, sulla volontà comune e la comprensione solamente delle parti all'Accordo rispetto all'interpretazione ed all’applicazione di questa disposizione, la sua enunciazione corrente e la volontà delle parti prevedevano la possibilità di ricevere una pensione accordata da uno dei paesi ad un certo tempo.
LA LEGGE
I. OSSERVAZIONE PRELIMINARE
27. Il Governo obiettò alla successione nei procedimenti del Sig. P. S. da parte di suo figlio il Sig. E. S. e del Sig. V. R. da parte della sua vedova la Sig.ra S. R., essendo morti i due richiedenti originali rispettivamente il 19 settembre e il 6 novembre 2009, notando che loro non avevano presentato ei certificati di successione emessi da un notaio ed in qualsiasi caso, i diritti di pensione non erano ereditabili.
28. A questo riguardo, la Corte deve prendere in considerazione i suoi giudizi in una serie di precedenti cause riguardo alla morte di un richiedente (vedere Vääri c. Estonia (dec.), n. 8702/04, 8 luglio 2008 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Nota che il Sig. E. S. e la Sig.ra S. R. erano parenti prossimi del defunto. Prende ulteriormente nota dell'argomento del Governo che i diritti alla pensione non erano trasferibili; comunque, considera che, pur non avendo diritto a qualsiasi ulteriore pagamento della pensione, si può considerare che i membri della famiglia degli originali richiedenti abbiano finora un interesse patrimoniale nella causa, riguardo ai pagamenti che erano stati trattenuti, presumibilmente in violazione dei diritti dei richiedenti, sino alla morte dei richiedenti originali. La Corte è soddisfatta a questo stadio in quanto le sono state presentate copie di documenti che indicano che le persone che cercano di intraprendere la causa sono parenti prossimi dei richiedenti originali, e non dà importanza decisiva al fatto che finora non è stato presentato nessun certificato di successione emesso da un notaio.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
29. I richiedenti si lamentarono di essere stati privati delle loro proprietà e di essere stati discriminati contro l'insuccesso delle autorità estoni di pagare loro le pensioni. Loro si appellarono all’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, preso da solo ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
L’Articolo 14 prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
30. La Corte che è il padrone della caratterizzazione da dare in diritto ai fatti della causa (vedere, per esempio, Scoppola c. Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 54 ECHR 2009 -...) ritiene appropriato esaminare la causa sotto l’Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il Governo
31. Il Governo considerò che i richiedenti erano scontenti dell’ Articolo 5 § 2 dell'Accordo firmato fra l’Estonia e la Federazione russa. Comunque, l'implementazione o l’ emendamento dei trattati bilaterali non era una questione che avrebbe potuto essere trattata sotto la giurisdizione della Corte. Inoltre, il Governo enfatizzò che l’Estonia non poteva essere ritenuta responsabile per il fatto che la pensione che i richiedenti ricevettero dalla Federazione russa non era aumentata allo stesso ritmo delle pensioni pagate dall'Estonia. Perciò, considerò che le richieste erano incompatibili ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
32. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che le richieste erano incompatibili ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione, poiché i richiedenti non avevano alcuna “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Né aveva qualsiasi aspettativa legittima di pagamento di una pensione simultaneamente da parte della Federazione russa e dell'Estonia siccome, dallo stesso inizio, l'Accordo custodiva il principio che la pensione era garantita dalla Federazione russa, e che l’Estonia la pagava solamente nel caso in cui il suo pagamento da parte della Federazione russa veniva sospeso.
33. Alternativamente, il Governo fece appello alla Corte per dichiarare le richieste manifestamente mal-fondate.
(b) I richiedenti
34. I richiedenti reiterarono che loro non si lamentarono di una violazione dell'Accordo estone-russo ma di una violazione da parte delle autorità estoni dei loro diritti garantiti sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e l’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Inoltre, le loro azioni di reclamo non si riferivano all’entità della pensione russa ma piuttosto al pagamento della pensione estone.
35. I richiedenti dibatterono che la loro rivendicazione della pensione era basata sul fatto che loro avevano fatto i pagamenti previdenziali a favore del bilancio statale. Loro indicarono anche che per un periodo limitato nel 2006 le autorità estoni avevano pagato loro la pensione che era stata poi sospesa.
36. Infine, i richiedenti non erano d'accordo con l'opinione del Governo per cui le richieste erano manifestamente mal-fondate.
2. La valutazione della Corte
37. La Corte osserva che i richiedenti si lamentarono del rifiuto da parte delle autorità estoni di pagare loro una pensione per i loro anni di lavoro in Estonia. Loro consideravano che tale rifiuto fosse discriminatorio ed in violazione della Convenzione. Così, questa azione di reclamo si riferisce ad una violazione addotta da parte dello Stato rispondente dei diritti dei richiedenti garantiti sotto la Convenzione e perciò non è incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
38. A riguardo dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte reitera che l’Articolo 14 è complementare alle altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione e dei Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente, poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione al “godimento dei diritti e delle libertà” salvaguardati da quelle disposizioni. L’applicazione dell’ Articolo 14 non presuppone necessariamente la violazione di uno dei diritti effettivi garantiti dalla Convenzione. La proibizione della discriminazione nell’ Articolo 14 si estende così oltre il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà che la Convenzione ed i Protocolli costringono ogni Stato a garantire. Si applica anche a quei diritti supplementari, che rientrano all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi Articolo della Convenzione per il quale lo Stato ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere. È necessario ma è anche sufficiente per i fatti della causa rientrare “all'interno dell'ambito” di uno o più Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito (dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 39 ECHR 2005-X; Andrejeva c. Lettonia [GC], n. 55707/00, § 74 ECHR 2009 -...; e Carson ed Altri c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 42184/05, § 63 del 16 marzo 2010).
39. Benché non c'è obbligo per uno Stato sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 di creare un welfare o schema pensionistico, se un Stato decidesse di decretare la legislazione che prevede di pieno diritto il pagamento di un benefit di welfare o una pensione-sia condizionato o meno dal precedente pagamento di contributi-questa legislazione che genera un interesse di proprietà riservato che rientra all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere considerata per le persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Stec ed Altri (dec.), citata sopra, § 54, e Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 64).
40. In cause come la presente, riguardo ad un'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, al richiedente è stato negato tutto o parte di un particolare benefit su una base discriminatoria coperta dall’ Articolo 14, la prova attinente è se, solo per la condizione di diritto della quale il richiedente si lamenta, avrebbe avuto un diritto esecutivo sotto il diritto nazionale, di ricevere il benefit in oggetto. Benché il Protocollo N.ro 1 non include il diritto di ricevere un pagamento di previdenza sociale di qualsiasi genere, se uno Stato decide di creare un schema di benefit deve farlo in un modo compatibile con l’ Articolo 14 (vedere Stec ed Altri (dec.), citata sopra, § 55). La Corte considera perciò che nella presente causa i fatti rientravano all'interno della sfera dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. Per ciò che riguarda la questione se l'azione di reclamo del Sig. G. dovrebbe essere dichiarata inammissibile per non-esaurimento delle via di ricorso nazionali poiché lui non ha depositato un ricorso presso la Corte Suprema in conformità coi requisiti procedurali applicabili, la Corte considera che, alla luce delle decisioni della Corte Suprema a riguardo dei rimanenti richiedenti, il Sig. G. non aveva nessuna prospettiva di successo di fronte alla Corte Suprema e, di conseguenza, sarebbe sbagliato dichiarare la sua azione di reclamo inammissibile su questa base (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 58).
42. La Corte conclude che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. I meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
43. I richiedenti presentarono che la loro rivendicazione riguardava un periodo di lavoro civile in Estonia susseguente al loro servizio nell'esercito russo (sovietico); così, il loro scopo non era di ricevere due pensioni per lo stesso periodo ma per periodi diversi di lavoro. Loro specificarono che loro non chiedevano nessun importo particolare di pensione; piuttosto, loro richiedevano di percepire la pensione alle stesse condizioni di tutti i pensionati civili in Estonia in conformità con la legge estone senza qualsiasi restrizioni discriminatoria. Secondo i richiedenti, l'essenza del loro diritto ad una pensione era stata minata, poiché loro non ricevevano alcuna pensione dall'Estonia.
44. I richiedenti indicarono che legge estone non permetteva di pagare due pensioni estoni allo stesso tempo ma nessuna regolamentazione proibiva il ricevimento concomitantemente di una pensione estone con una o più pensioni estere, dato che le condizioni per il ricevimento della pensione estone erano state adempiute. Ai richiedenti fu impedito ciononostante, di ricevere simultaneamente una pensione estone ed una pensione estera sulla base dell’ Articolo 5 dell'Accordo -come interpretato dalle autorità estoni-che aveva la precedenza sul diritto nazionale come convenuto dalla sezione 4(3) dell'Atto di Previdenza della Pensione Statale. Comunque, questa disposizione dell'Accordo che era stato firmato quindici anni prima era completamente desueta. I richiedenti notarono che la Federazione russa aveva, in molte occasioni, proposto l'emendamento dell’ Articolo 5 dell'Accordo ma le autorità estoni non aveva accettato queste proposte. Inoltre, l'Accordo era discriminatorio siccome nessun altro accordo bilaterale dell’ Estonia sulla previdenza sociale proibiva l'assegnazione di una pensione estone a persone che erano residenti permanenti dell'Estonia, che avevano completato quindici anni di lavoro atto alla pensionabilità in Estonia ed erano giunti all’età pensionabile.
45. I richiedenti ammisero che, benché un pensionato estone che fu concesso ad una pensione speciale non potesse ricevere simultaneamente una pensione speciale estone (per esempio, una pensione militare) ed una pensione di vecchio-età regolare, lui o lei fu concesso alla pensione di vecchio-età per il periodo intero di suo o il suo lavoro, incluso il periodo che dà diritto alla pensione speciale. Comunque, ripari nel russo (soviet) l'esercito-diversamente da servizio nell'esercito estone-non fu incluso di periodo pensione-qualificativo sotto legge estone.
46. I richiedenti respinsero l'argomento del Governo per cui la Federazione russa poteva pagare loro una pensione per i loro anni di lavoro in Estonia, adducendo che durante il loro lavoro in Estonia loro avevano fatto pagamenti obbligatori nel bilancio di previdenza pensionistica di quel paese. Loro notarono, a turno, che nulla impediva all’ Estonia di prendere in considerazione gli anni di servizio dei richiedenti nell’ esercito russo (sovietico) per il calcolo delle pensioni civili estoni.
47. I richiedenti considerarono che loro erano stati discriminati a causa della loro lingua ed origine etnica (nazionale), e la loro appartenenza ad una minoranza nazionale, dibattendo che la maggior parte dei pensionati militari russi erano russi etnici od oratori natii del russi. Loro considerarono inappropriato comparare i pensionati militari russi con i pensionati militari estoni e consideravano che il gruppo col quale loro avrebbero dovuto essere comparati in modo appropriato era quello dei pensionati militari estero di altri paesi. Loro dibatterono che i pensionati militari russi erano il solo gruppo di persone costrette a rifiutare una pensione estera per ricevere una pensione estone per lavoro civile in Estonia.
48. I richiedenti respinsero l'idea che i pensionati militari russi non costituivano un gruppo speciale comparabile a qualsiasi altro gruppo perché loro erano precedenti membri di un esercito di un paese che aveva occupato l’Estonia. Nella loro prospettiva, simili argomenti dimostravano soltanto l'atteggiamento parziale contro loro.
49. I richiedenti respinsero inoltre le considerazioni budgetarie come giustificazione legittima per il loro trattamento diverso. Loro ammisero che un carico eccessivo sul bilancio statale avrebbe potuto essere un argomento da prendere in considerazione nel contesto della sfera dell’ assistenza sociale ma non si poteva usare per giustificare un trattamento disuguale di individui. Né il fatto dell'esistenza dell'Accordo poteva essere tale da giustificare il loro trattamento svantaggioso che in assenza di qualsiasi giustificazione ragionevole corrispondeva a discriminazione.
(b) Il Governo
50. Il Governo si riferì al contesto storico della conclusione dell'Accordo ed enfatizzò che era connesso da vicino al trattato sul ritiro delle truppe russe dall'Estonia. Secondo l'Accordo, al personale pensionato delle forze armate veniva concesso, come norma, di rimanere a vivere in Estonia se loro avessero desiderato così, con una delle ragioni con la dovuta considerazione che il loro ristabilimento avrebbe potuto provocare problemi pratici ed essere gravoso per la Federazione russa. Dal punto di vista estone i membri delle Forze Armate pensionati non ponevano la stessa minaccia alla sicurezza nazionale estone come persone in servizio attivo.
51. Il Governo enfatizzò che i pensionati militari avevano servito per un periodo significativo della loro vita le forze armate dell'Unione sovietica, il predecessore legale della Federazione russa. Così, era naturale che la Federazione russa si assumesse un obbligo di pagare loro la pensione. Il Governo indicò che l'Accordo offriva una garanzia duplice per loro. Secondo l’Articolo 3 dell'Accordo, la Federazione russa doveva in primo luogo, pagare loro la pensione facendo seguito alla legislazione della Federazione russa almeno dell'importo della pensione minima stabilita in Estonia, quindi, secondo il Governo, nulla impediva alla Federazione russa di prendere in considerazione gli anni di lavoro pensionabile accumulati in Estonia. In qualsiasi caso, anche senza questo che periodo sia stato preso in considerazione, l’entità della pensione militare era comparabile ad una pensione media in Estonia. In secondo luogo, l’Articolo 5 dell'Accordo prevedeva una garanzia supplementare secondo la quale i richiedenti avrebbero potuto optare per una pensione di anzianità estone nel caso in cui non stessero ricevendo una pensione russa. Così i richiedenti ricevevano una pensione dalla Federazione russa o dall'Estonia secondo le loro proprie preferenze. Il Governo enfatizzò anche che, diversamente dalla causa Andrejeva sopra-citata, dove non esisteva nessun accordo fra i paesi, l’Estonia aveva un Accordo bilaterale con la Federazione russa che disciplinava il pagamento di pensioni in modo tale che nessuno soggetto all'Accordo venisse privato delle sue garanzie sociali.
52. Il Governo notò che altri accordi internazionali sulla previdenza pensionistica firmati dalla Federazione russa a quel tempo erano basati allo stesso modo sul principio “un solo Stato paga.” Un accordo del 13 marzo 1992 sulla previdenza pensionistica negli Stati membri del Commonwealth degli Stati Indipendenti (CIS) ed un accordo speciale concernente i pensionati militari, firmato fra i membri del CIS il 15 maggio 1992, servivano come esempi. La sola eccezione nella presente causa, secondo il Governo era che sotto l'Accordo la responsabilità di pagare le pensioni risiedeva presso la Federazione russa e non il paese di residenza. Il Governo non aveva comunque, influenza sui cambi dell'importo della pensione pagata ai richiedenti dalle autorità russe o qualsiasi riforma pensionistica intrapresa da loro.
53. Il Governo fece riferimento ad accordi di previdenza sociale dell’ Estonia con la Lettonia, la Lituania, la Finlandia, il Canada e l'Ucraina e a due accordi con la Federazione russa (l'Accordo ed un accordo di previdenza pensionistica generale) i quali erano tutti necessariamente diverso ma riflettevano i risultati di negoziazioni fra paesi diversi e che disciplinavano situazioni che si erano sviluppate sotto circostanze storiche, economiche e politiche diverse. Inoltre, a riguardo dei Membri degli Stati EU , le regolamentazioni dell’ EU si applicano. Il Governo presentò che gli accordi di previdenza sociale firmati all’inizio degli anni novanta fu caratterizzato dal fatto che l'obbligo di pagare la pensione spetta ad una sola parte; inoltre a parte l'Accordo, lo stesso principio fu custodito anche nell'accordo di previdenza pensionistica generale estone-russo.
54. Inoltre, il Governo informò la Corte di negoziazioni in corso su un nuovo accordo di pensione fra Estonia e Federazione russa (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Comunque, la firma del nuovo accordo e la sua entrata in vigore dipendevano da entrambe le parti.
55. Il Governo contese che i richiedenti non erano stati discriminati sulla base della loro origine etnica o nazionalità. L’Articolo 3 dell'Accordo stabiliva inequivocabilmente che l'Accordo si applicava a pensionati militari della Federazione russa nonostante la loro nazionalità. Avrebbe potuto essere visto anche dalla lista dei richiedenti nella presente causa che erano di diversa origine etnica e nazionalità.
56. Il Governo indicò che i pensionati militari russi non furono trattati differentemente dagli altri pensionati che vivevano in Estonia. Coloro ai quali venia concessa una pensione speciale estone (per esempio, i membri delle forze della difesa, agenti di polizia, giudici ed accusatori) dovevano anche scegliere se loro desiderarono ricevere la pensione speciale o una pensione di anzianità ordinaria; nel secondo caso non veniva concessa loro simultaneamente la pensione speciale.
57. Il Governo considerò che i pensionati militari russi non potevano essere comparati a qualsiasi altro gruppo poiché nessun altro gruppo simile di persone esisteva. Non c'era gruppo identificabile di “pensionati militari di altri paesi a cui non fossero negate le pensioni civili estoni” in Estonia. I pensionati militari russi erano un gruppo unico di persone a cui fu accordato il diritto eccezionale di sospensione in Estonia sulla base dell'Accordo dopo il ritiro di truppe russe. Secondo l'Accordo, la Federazione russa si impegnò di offrire loro garanzie sociali nonostante il fatto che loro non vivessero sul territorio della Federazione russa; l’Estonia si prese solamente la responsabilità di pagare le loro pensioni se loro avessero soddisfatto i criteri per ricevere una pensione estone e a condizione che la persona in oggetto rinunciasse allo status speciale ottenuto come risultato di avere servito le forze armate che prima avevano occupato l’Estonia. Tutti coloro soggetti all'Accordo, incluso i richiedenti erano consapevoli di queste condizioni quando avevano deciso rimanere in Estonia.
2. La valutazione della Corte
58. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua giurisprudenza che solamente la differenza di trattamento basata su una caratteristica identificabile, o “lo status”, è in grado di corrispondere a discriminazione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 14. Inoltre, per trarre un problema sotto l’ Articolo 14 ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in situazioni analoghe o simili. Tale differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; in altre parole, se non intraprende uno scopo legittimo o se non c'è una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo che si cerca di perseguire. Lo Stato Contraente gode di un margine di valutazione nel valutare se ed in che misura differenze in situazioni altrimenti simili giustificano un trattamento diverso. La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, la materia-questione e il background. Un margine ampio viene concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione di solito quando si tratta di misure generali di strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono, in principio, meglio collocate del giudice internazionale per valutare ciò che è nell'interesse pubblico per motivi sociali o economici, e la Corte rispetterà la scelta della politica della legislatura generalmente a meno che non sia “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (vedere Carson ed Altri, citata sopra, § 61, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
59. La Corte richiama che i richiedenti nella presente causa sono membri delle precedenti Forze Armate russe (sovietiche) che dopo il ritiro di truppe russe dall’ Estonia nel 1994 sono rimasti in Estonia sulla base dell'Accordo estone-russo e che ricevevano una pensione militare russa sulla base di quell'Accordo. La Corte nota che il trattamento differente dei richiedenti comparato ad altre persone che hanno completato almeno quindici anni di lavoro pensionabile in Estonia è basato sul fatto che loro stanno ricevendo un'altra pensione che è una pensione pagata dalla Federazione russa sotto la legislazione russa e in conformità con l'Accordo. La Corte osserva che la distinzione in oggetto non è basata sulla nazionalità o l’ origine etnica dei richiedenti e trova discutibile che questa differenza nel trattamento dei richiedenti possa essere considerata basata su qualsiasi altra caratteristica personale o “status.” Comunque, non considera necessario determinare questa questione a causa delle ragioni esposte sotto.
60. I richiedenti dibatterono che loro erano stati trattati differentemente dai pensionati militari di altri paesi, per esempio da quelli dei paesi della Nato. Così, la Corte è chiamata a determinare se i richiedenti sono in una situazione simile ai pensionati militari di altri paesi a riguardo dei quali l’Estonia non ha firmato accordi internazionali che limitano i loro diritti pensionistici o, più generalmente, in confronto a qualsiasi altra persona che ha completato almeno quindici anni di lavoro pensionabile in Estonia e che, di nuovo in assenza di qualsiasi accordo internazionale restrittivo, non è ostacolata nel ricevere molte pensioni da molti paesi allo stesso tempo.
61. Nel fare così, la Corte ha avuto riguardo allo specifico contesto storico della presente causa. Nota che l'Accordo estone-russo è solamente applicabile a persone che già erano andate in pensione al tempo in cui l'Accordo fu firmato nel 1994 e che già ricevevano una pensione militare russa a quel tempo. Inoltre, siccome l'Accordo fu firmato allo stesso tempo della conclusione di un trattato sul ritiro delle truppe russe dall'Estonia, le condizioni a cui le autorità estoni erano d'accordo ad accettare la presenza continuata di pensionati militare russi sul loro territorio dovevano essere viste nel contesto dell'obbligo primario della Federazione russa di garantire il ritiro delle sue forze dal territorio occupato.
62. La Corte osserva che l'Accordo non riguardava qualsiasi ulteriore pensionato militare che si sarebbe trasferito in Estonia dopo che fu firmato. Inoltre, i pensionati militari russi che rimasero in Estonia sulla base dell'Accordo erano completamente consapevoli al tempo e dopo la firma dell'Accordo che se, ricevendo una pensione militare russa, loro avessero cominciato o continuato ad avere un lavoro nella sfera civile in Estonia, simile lavoro non avrebbe dato loro qualsiasi diritto ad un'ulteriore pensione civile estone.
63. La Corte ha avuto anche riguardo ad ai fatti che secondo Articolo 3 dell'Accordo i richiedenti sono garantiti almeno una pensione nell'importo della minima pensione in Estonia e che, secondo le osservazioni delle parti, l'importo della pensione che i pensionati militari russi ricevono è comparabile alla taglia di pensioni di vecchio-età estoni ed ordinarie (secondo le informazioni previste col Governo, la pensione militare russa è più alta di una pensione di vecchio-età estone e media mentre secondo i richiedenti la pensione militare russa era approssimativamente 12% abbassano nel 2008). Inoltre, il valore della pensione militare russa ricevuto coi richiedenti in Estonia, e la sua relazione alla pensione di vecchio-età estone, dipende da una varietà di circostanze, come la taglia di pensioni russe come esponga in giù con legislazione russa, i due paesi ' costi comparativi di vivere, interessi e cambi, i loro tassi comparativi della crescita economica, inflazione la tassazione ed anche la disponibilità di altro welfare trae profitto e l'eleggibilità delle persone riguardò per simile benefici (veda, per paragone, Carson ed Altri, citato sopra, § 86).
64. La Corte nota anche che i richiedenti hanno diritto a fare domanda per la pensione di vecchiaia estone, dato che loro hanno raggiunto l'età di sessanta-tre anni, hanno completato almeno quindici anni di lavoro pensionabile in Estonia e, allo stesso tempo, non stanno ricevendo la pensione militare russa. Mentre è vero che in tal caso i loro anni di servizio nelle forze armate russe (sovietiche) non verrebbero preso in considerazione per il calcolo delle loro pensioni, l’Estonia non può essere considerata responsabile per qualsiasi pagamento della pensione per simile servizio. Il servizio nelle forze armate russe (sovietiche) non forma parte del lavoro pensionabile per chiunque sotto la legislazione estone, così non c'è nessuna possibilità di trovare qualsiasi trattamento diverso dei richiedenti a questo riguardo.
65. Infine, la Corte considera che il fatto che l’Estonia e la Federazione russa sostengano negoziazioni su un nuovo accordo di pensione che determini possibilmente in modo differente le questioni dagli accordi in vigore non conduce di per sé ad una conclusione che l’applicazione delle regolamentazioni presenti sia discriminatoria.
66. Basandosi sulle considerazioni sopra, la Corte conclude che i richiedenti non sono in una situazione comparabile a qualsiasi altro gruppo di pensionati, come, per esempio, i pensionati militari o civili degli altri paesi o i pensionati civili estoni ordinari che sono eleggibili per ricevere una pensione estone previo completamento di almeno quindici anni di lavoro pensionabile in Estonia.
67. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nella presente causa.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
68. La Corte ha esaminato anche il resto delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 14 della Convenzione come presentate da loro, inclusa un'azione di reclamo per la mancanza dell'imparzialità delle corti e l'azione di reclamo del Sig. V. G. per essergli stato negato l’accesso alla Corte Suprema a causa del suo insuccesso di pagare la parcella di corte. Comunque, avendo riguardo a tutto il materiale in suo possesso, la Corte trova, che queste azioni di reclamo non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e delle libertà esposti nella Convenzione o nei suoi Protocolli. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere respinta come manifestamente mal-fondata, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere le richieste;
2. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla discriminazione addotta sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 4 novembre 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere President


ANNESSO
Richiesta n. 14480/08
No Richiedente Nazionalità Nato Numero di anni pensionabili in Estonia come determinati dalle autorità estoni nel 2006 Decisione della Corte suprema di
respingere il ricorso
1. OMISSIS Russo 1933 Niente informazioni 24.09.2007
2. OMISSIS Russo 1936 23.193 24.09.2007
3. OMISSIS Russo 1937 22.635 24.09.2007
4. OMISSIS Estone 1929 28.278 24.09.2007
5. OMISSIS Estone 1936 28.368 24.09.2007
6. OMISSIS Russo 1926 22.873 24.09.2007
7. OMISSIS Russo 1923 25.499 24.09.2007
8. OMISSIS Russo 1930 26.493 24.09.2007
9. OMISSIS Estone 1959 Niente informazioni -
Richiesta n. 47916/08
No Richiedente Nazionalità Nato Numero di anni pensionabili in Estonia come determinati dalle autorità estoni nel 2006 Decisione della Corte suprema di
respingere il ricorso
1. OMISSIS Russo 1936 20.849 30.04.2008
2. OMISSIS Russo 1928 18.435 07.05.2008


3. OMISSIS Russo 1938 18.476 07.05.2008
4. OMISSIS Russo 1929 20.386 07.05.2008
5. OMISSIS Estone 1925 35.550 30.04.2008
6. OMISSIS Russo 1940 18.735 30.04.2008
7. OMISSIS Estone 1933 28.553 07.05.2008
8. OMISSIS Russo 1939 20.930 30.04.2008
9. OMISSIS Russo 1933 19.055 30.04.2008
10. OMISSIS Russo 1939 16.540 30.04.2008
11. OMISSIS Russo 1919 28.867 30.04.2008
12. OMISSIS Russo 1925 Niente informazioni 30.04.2008
13. OMISSIS Russo 1939 21.650 30.04.2008
14. OMISSIS Russo 1919 23.945 30.04.2008
15. OMISSIS Russo 1931 19.868 07.05.2008
16. OMISSIS Russo 1937 16.093 07.05.2008
17. OMISSIS Estone 1933 30.072 30.04.2008
18. OMISSIS Estone 1933 19.349 30.04.2008
19. OMISSIS Russo 1937 37.932 30.04.2008
20. OMISSIS Russo 1930 15.878 30.04.2008
21. OMISSIS Russo 1939 17.955 30.04.2008
22. OMISSIS Russo 1928 15.831 07.05.2008
23. OMISSIS Russo 1942 17.088 30.04.2008
24. OMISSIS Russo 1936 23.075 30.04.2008
25. OMISSIS Russo 1924 24.570 07.05.2008
26. OMISSIS Russo 1927 23.389 30.04.2008
27. OMISSIS Russo 1928 16.562 30.04.2008
28. OMISSIS Russo 1937 16.855 07.05.2008
29. OMISSIS Estone 1935 22.178 30.04.2008
30. OMISSIS Russo 1935 17.278 30.04.2008
31. OMISSIS Russo 1923 29.823 30.04.2008
32. OMISSIS Russo 1927 23.985 30.04.2008
33. OMISSIS Russo 1933 Niente informazioni 07.05.2008
34. OMISSIS Russo 1933 20.644 30.04.2008
35. OMISSIS Russo 1928 28.403 30.04.2008
36. OMISSIS Russo 1936 21.162 30.04.2008




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.