Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF UKRAINE-TYUMEN v. UKRAINE

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 34, 35, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 22603/02/2007
STATO: Ucraina
DATA: 22/11/2007
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - claim dismissed ; Pecuniary damage - reserved
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF UKRAINE-TYUMEN v. UKRAINE
(Application no. 22603/02)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
22 November 2007
FINAL
22/02/2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Ukraine-Tyumen v. Ukraine,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mr P. Lorenzen, President,
Mr K. Jungwiert,
Mr V. Butkevych,
Mrs M. Tsatsa-Nikolovska,
Mr R. Maruste,
Mr J. Borrego Borrego,
Mr M. Villiger, judges,
and Mrs C. Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 23 October 2007,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 22603/02) against Ukraine lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by the Ukraine-T. Joint Stock Company (“the applicant”) on 23 July 2001.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr V. B., its president, and Messrs M. O. and E. U., lawyers practising in Kyiv. The Ukrainian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Y. Zaytsev.
3. On 13 March 2006 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant is a Ukrainian joint venture based in Kyiv, with legal personality under Ukrainian law.
5. In June 1995 the Governor of the Tyumen Region of the Russian Federation submitted a proposal to the President of Ukraine to co-fund a joint venture for strengthening and further improvement of trade links between Ukraine and the Tyumen Region. The Governor also suggested that Ukraine should transfer title to a building in Kyiv to the future company, so that it could be used as its head office.
6. In September 1995 the applicant company was founded by six companies, including the U. State Enterprise.
7. On 20 August 1996 the applicant's articles of association were amended, the number of co-founders having increased to seven entities, including the U. State Enterprise and the State Property Fund of Ukraine (“the Fund”). The Fund was stated to be acting on behalf of the U. State Enterprise (“U.”). Each founder was declared to hold 14.28% of the applicant's share capital. While six companies were to pay equal amounts of money for their shares (USD 71,5421), the Fund undertook to transfer to the applicant company a title to the building valued at USD 71,5422, and belonging, as was stated in the articles of association, to U..
8. On 30 August 1996 U., acting on the Fund's instructions, transferred title to an administrative building in Kyiv to the applicant. U. continued to use the building as its premises.
9. According to the applicant's amended articles of association, it was established mainly for the purposes of obtaining profit for the shareholders and for the creation of an infrastructure for the cooperation between Ukrainian and Tyumen companies pursuant to intergovernmental decisions aiming at improving effectiveness of business links and implementation of joint programmes, such as the sale of oil, gas, wood, agricultural products; legal advice; organisation of exhibitions; other commercial activities necessary for achieving the goals of the company. The applicant company enjoyed all the rights of a separate legal entity. The applicant's shareholders were entitled to take part in its management, to receive a part of its profit, to be informed about its activities etc. The property of the applicant company consisted of the objects and money transferred to its share capital by the shareholders, as well as the funds received by the applicant from other sources. The shareholders did not enjoy separate rights over the objects transferred to the applicant as their contributions.
10. In October 1998 the Kyiv City State Administration (“the City Administration”) instituted proceedings in the Higher Arbitration Court of Ukraine against the Fund, Ukrnaftoprodukt and the applicant company, seeking recovery of title to the building, claiming that it owned the building and alleging that the title to the latter had been transferred to the applicant ultra vires.
11. On 29 December 1998 the court invalidated the transfer of 30 August 1996 and ordered Ukrnaftoprodukt to give the building back to the City Administration. The court found that that the building belonged to the Kyiv City Administration and that the Ukrnaftoprodukt had not been entitled to transfer it to the applicant.
12. Ukranaftoprodukt lodged a request for review of the decision of 29 December 1998 with the panel of the Higher Arbitration Court for the review of judgments, rulings and resolutions (the “Review Panel”).
13. On 11 March 1999 the Review Panel quashed the judgment of 29 December 1998 and rejected the claim of the City Administration. The panel held that the claim had been lodged out of time and that there was no evidence that the City Administration was the lawful owner of the building.
14. On 24 March 2000 the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court rejected the request for supervisory review (the “protest”) of the resolution of 11 March 1999, lodged by the President of that court, as unsubstantiated.
15. On 24 January 2001 the Prosecutor General of Ukraine, following the City Administration's request, lodged a protest with the Plenary Higher Arbitration Court (the “Plenary Court”), seeking supervisory review proceedings in the case. On 15 February 2001 the Plenary Court, in the presence of the representatives of the General Prosecutor's office, allowed the protest, quashed the resolutions of 11 March 1999 and 24 March 2000, and upheld the judgment of 29 December 1998. In its decision, the court summarised the Prosecutor General's arguments and found them substantiated. No other reasons were given for its decision. The parties were not invited to participate in the hearing before the Plenary Court. The applicant's comments on the protest of the Prosecutor General were not examined by the Plenary Court.
16. According to the applicant, on 2 November 2001 its articles of association were amended to the effect that the Ukrainian authorities were no longer a shareholder.
17. The Government contended that the State remained one of the founders of the applicant company and, hence, the owner of 28.56% of its share capital.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Economic Associations (“Companies”) Act of 19 September 1991 (as worded at the material time)
18. The relevant provisions of the Act read as follows:
Article 12. Property of the company
“A company shall be the owner of:
[i] the property which its founders ... transferred to it;
[ii] the objects which it produced...;
[iii] the profit which it received...”
Article 13. Contributions of founders and participants of a company
“Participants and founders of a company may transfer to it as their contribution buildings ..., money ...
The contribution expressed in karbovatsi3 shall constitute the founder's and participant's share in the [company's] statutory fund.”
B. Arbitration Courts Act of 4 June 1991 (repealed as of 1 June 2002)
19. The relevant provisions of the Act read as follows:
Article 1. Administration of justice in economic cases
“In accordance with the Constitution of Ukraine, the arbitration courts shall have jurisdiction over economic cases.
The arbitration court is an independent body with jurisdiction over all economic disputes between entities, public and other bodies, and over litigation arising out of insolvency.”
Article 11. Composition of the Higher Arbitration Court of Ukraine
“The Higher Arbitration Court shall be composed of the President, the First Deputy President, the President's deputies, and the judges and [it] shall sit as:
the Plenary Higher Arbitration Court;
the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court;
the panels for the consideration of disputes and for the review of judgments, rulings, resolutions.”
C. Code of Arbitration Procedure of 6 November 1991 (before the changes introduced on 21 June 2001)
20. The relevant provisions of the Code of Arbitration Procedure provided:
Article 14. Jurisdiction of the Higher Arbitration Court
“The Higher Arbitration Court shall consider cases:
1) in which one of the parties is ... the Kyiv City State Administration...”
Article 91. Grounds for supervisory review of a judgment, ruling or resolution
“The lawfulness and reasoning of a judgment, ruling or resolution of an arbitration tribunal ... may be reviewed under the supervisory procedure upon the party's request or following a protest by a prosecutor or his deputy, in accordance with this Code and other laws of Ukraine.
The party's request for review of a judgment ... shall be examined by ... the panel of the Higher Arbitration Court for the review of judgments, rulings and resolutions.
The following persons are empowered to lodge a protest:
The Prosecutor General and his deputies...”
Article 92. Arbitration court's right to review the lawfulness of a judgment, ruling, resolution under the supervisory procedure on its own initiative
“The arbitration court shall be entitled to review under the supervisory procedure the lawfulness and reasoning of a judgment, ruling, resolution on its own initiative...”
Article 95. Powers of the panel of the Higher Arbitration Court on supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution
“... The panel ... shall review under the supervisory procedure:
1) a judgment and ruling concerning a dispute which was adjudicated by the Higher Arbitration Court...”
Article 96. Supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution by the panel of the Higher Arbitration Court
“A judgment, ruling, resolution shall be reviewed by a panel of the President of the Higher Arbitration Court or his deputy and a judge of the Higher Arbitration Court. If they do not agree on the outcome of the review, the President of the Higher Arbitration Court or his deputy may report to the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court who decides the matter...
A judgment, ruling, resolution shall be reviewed by the President of the Higher Arbitration Court or his deputy and two judges of the panel, if the application of law or assessment of evidence in the case is difficult. In such a case, the decision shall be adopted by a majority of votes.
A judgment or ruling delivered by the Deputy President of the Higher Arbitration Court or delivered in the hearing in which he presided shall be reviewed by the President of the Higher Arbitration Court and two judges of the panel. In such a case, the resolution shall be adopted by a majority of votes.
A judgment or ruling delivered by the President of the Higher Arbitration Court or in the hearing in which he presided shall be reviewed by the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court.
If necessary, the parties may be invited to give their explanations at the panel's hearing.”
Article 97. Right to lodge with the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court a request for supervisory review
“The President of the Higher Arbitration Court, the Prosecutor General of Ukraine or his deputies have a right to lodge with the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court a protest against the resolution delivered by the panel of the Higher Arbitration Court for economic disputes.
A party to the proceedings has a right to lodge with the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court an application for supervisory review of the judgment or ruling delivered by the President of the Higher Arbitration Court in the hearing in which he presided...”
Article 99. Right to lodge with the Plenary Higher Arbitration Court a request for supervisory review of the resolution of the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court concerning an economic dispute
“The President of the Higher Arbitration Court, the Prosecutor General of Ukraine have a right to lodge with the Plenary Higher Arbitration Court a protest against the resolution delivered by the Presidium of the Higher Arbitration Court.
Following its deliberations, the Plenary Higher Arbitration Court shall adopt a resolution...”
Article 100. Lodging of an application for supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution, and [lodging of] a protest by a prosecutor or his deputy
“An application for supervisory review ... shall be lodged with the arbitration court which adjudicated the case. If the supervisory review is to be carried out by the Higher Arbitration Court, the application, together with the case-file, shall be submitted by the relevant arbitration court to the Higher Arbitration Court within five days following the receipt of the application.
The protest ... shall be lodged with the arbitration court competent to review the judgment...
Copies of the application or protest shall be sent to the parties...
The enforcement proceedings shall not be suspended if an application or a protest is lodged, save in the cases where the judgment ... concerns the transfer of money and the forced taking of property...”
Article 102. Deadline for lodging of an application for supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution, and [for lodging of] a protest by a prosecutor
“An application ... and a protest must be lodged within two months of the date of the judgment...”
Article 103. Observations in reply to an application for supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution, and [in reply to] a protest of a prosecutor
“Upon the receipt of a copy of the application for supervisory review ... or of a protest, a party shall send to the arbitration court, other parties ... [its] observations [in reply].
...
The absence of the [parties'] observations ... shall not prevent [a court] from carrying out the review.”
Article 104. Information about the date and time of the supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution. Time-limits of the review [procedure].
“The parties may participate in [the proceedings on] the review... The prosecutor ... shall take part in [the proceedings on] the review, which were initiated upon [his] protest. The non-appearance of the parties or the prosecutor ... shall not prevent [the court] from carrying out the review...
The supervisory review ... shall be completed within two months of the receipt of an application or protest...
A judgment, ruling, resolution of the arbitration court may be reviewed under the supervisory procedure no later than within one year after their delivery.”
Article 106. Powers of the arbitration court, reviewing a judgment, ruling, resolution
“... [T]he arbitration court has power:
[i] to leave a judgment, ruling, resolution without changes;
[ii] to change a judgment, ruling, resolution;
[iii] to quash a judgment, ruling, resolution, and to adopt a new judgment, remit a case for a fresh consideration, discontinue the proceedings, or leave a case without consideration.
A judgment, ruling, resolution ... shall be reviewed as a whole, irrespective of the grounds for an application for supervisory review or a protest.
An arbitration court reviewing a judgment, ruling, resolution under the supervisory procedure shall have all the powers of an arbitration court considering an economic dispute.
The supervisory review of a judgment, ruling, resolution by the Higher Arbitration Court shall be final, save when a party is outside the territory of Ukraine and there is an agreement between the relevant States for a different procedure of review.”
Article 106. Grounds for changing or quashing of a judgment, ruling, resolution
“...
1) incomplete examination of the circumstances relevant to a case;
2) lack of proof of the relevant circumstances established by a court;
3) lack of conformity of the conclusions [of a court] ... with the circumstances of a case;
4) violation or incorrect application of substantive or procedural law...”
Article 115. Finality of a judgment, ruling, resolution and their binding force
“A judgment, ruling, resolution of an arbitration court shall be final and binding on the day of their delivery...”
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENT'S PRELIMINARY OBJECTIONS
A. As to the locus standi of the applicant company
21. The Government submitted that the applicant company did not have the capacity to apply to the Court under Article 34 of the Convention, since the State held 28.56% of its share capital through the Ukrresursy State Enterprise and the State Property Fund. The Government also stated that the applicant company had been established pursuant to an agreement between the Ukrainian and Russian high governmental officials in order to create an infrastructure for the cooperation between the Ukrainian and Tyumen companies and to implement the intergovernmental decisions aiming at improving effectiveness of the cooperation between the businesses of two countries. Thus, the applicant had to be classified, for the purposes of Article 34 of the Convention, as a governmental organisation. The Government further argued that in the case Kosarevskaya and Others v. Ukraine (nos. 29459/03, 4935/04 and 26996/04, 6 December 2005) the Court had found the State responsible for the debts of the company, in which it had held 32.67% of the share capital. The Government suggested that the same approach should be taken in the present case, as moreover the dispute at hand had concerned a building which belonged to the State.
22. The applicant company disagreed, stating that according to Ukrainian law it was a private company, whose aim was to receive profit through business operations and to divide it among its shareholders. The applicant submitted that it acted according to its articles of association which were of an ordinary private-law nature, that the State's share did not allow it to control the applicant, and that it did not perform any public-law functions. The mere fact that originally there were two State entities among its founders could not deprive the applicant of its right to have recourse to the Court under Article 34 of the Convention.
23. In its further submissions, the applicant stated that as of 2 November 2001 none of its shares belonged to the State.
24. In reply, the Government contended that the State remained one of the founders of the applicant company and, consequently, the owner of 28.56% of its share capital.
25. The Court observes that whilst it is not contested that one of the original founders of the applicant company was a State Enterprise, and that the State was also responsible for the State Property Fund, which became a co-founder of the company in August 1996, it is not clear from the parties' submissions whether the State retained a share in the applicant company from 2 November 2001 onwards. Nonetheless, the Court does not find it necessary to determine that particular issue, as in any event it considers that the applicant company has standing before the Court for the following reasons.
26. The Court recalls that a legal entity “claiming to be the victim of a violation by one of the High Contracting Parties of the rights set forth in the Convention and the Protocols thereto” may submit an application to it, provided that it is a “non-governmental organisation” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. The term “governmental organisation”, as opposed to “non-governmental organisation”, includes legal entities which participate in the exercise of governmental powers or run a public service under Government control (see Radio France and Others v. France (dec.), no. 53984/00, ECHR 2003-X). When determining whether a particular entity falls into one of the abovementioned categories, the Court has regard to its legal status, the nature of the activity it carries out, the context in which it is carried out, and the degree of the entity's independence from the political authorities.
27. The Court observes that according to Ukrainian law and its articles of association the applicant company enjoys institutional autonomy; it is governed by company law and it is under the control and management of its founders (see paragraphs 9 and 18 above). Even assuming that the State still owns around a third of the applicant's share capital, no evidence has been submitted which could indicate that the State is entitled to a greater role in managing the company that the other shareholders. Moreover, there is nothing in the case-file to suggest that the applicant company carried out activities other than those which could be classified as business, irrespective of the fact that some provisions of its articles of association could be construed as to entrust the applicant with a public-service mission, namely to implement “intergovernmental decisions” in the field of business cooperation.
28. The Court accordingly concludes that the applicant company is a “non-governmental organisation” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention and that the Government's objection should be dismissed.
B. As to the compliance with the six-month rule
29. The Government pleaded non-compliance with the six-month rule. They stated that the final decision in the applicant's case, within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, was given by the Higher Arbitration Court on 29 December 1998, i.e. more than six months before the application was lodged with the Court. The Government maintained that the subsequent review of this decision could not be taken into account as it was effected in the course of the extraordinary procedure. The applicant disagreed.
30. The Court notes that on 11 March 1999 the Review Panel overruled the judgment of 29 December 1998 and adopted a resolution favourable to the applicant. The latter resolution was subsequently quashed by the Plenary Court on 15 February 2001, which also reviewed the case on the merits and upheld the judgment of 29 December 1998. The applicant's complaints are essentially directed against the resolution of the Plenary Court, which was delivered less than six months before the applicant company lodged the present application with the Court (23 July 2001). The Government have failed to advance any argument as to why the Court should disregard that decision (see, mutatis mutandis, Tregubenko v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 61333/00, 21 October 2003). Accordingly, the Court is not prevented by the six-month rule from considering the application.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
31. The applicant company complained about the quashing of the resolution of the Review Panel of 11 March 1999, stating that the latter had been the final and binding decision given in its favour. It alleged that the procedure before the Plenary Court had been incompatible with the principles of legal certainty, equality of arms and a public hearing. The applicant invoked Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which provides, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing ... by an independent and impartial tribunal ...”
A. Admissibility
32. The Court finds that in the absence of the parties' comments on the admissibility of the applicant's complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, apart from those discussed above (see paragraphs 21-30 above), these complaints raise issues of fact and law under the Convention, the determination of which requires an examination of the merits. It discerns no ground for declaring them inadmissible.
B. Merits
33. In their observations on the merits of this part of the application, the Government stated that the applicant's rights under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention had not been infringed. In particular, they argued that the Prosecutor General had acted on behalf of one of the parties to the impugned proceedings, the Kyiv State Administration, when he had lodged a protest with the Plenary Court. His intervention to the proceedings was in the interests of the State and, thus, lawful.
34. The Government further argued that the applicant, which had first benefited from the extraordinary review of the judgment favourable to another party to the proceedings (see paragraph 13 above), was not entitled to bring into question the compliance of the same procedure, as a result of which it had finally lost the case, with the Convention. The Government referred to the “clean hands” doctrine in international law, according to which the responsibility of a State is not engaged when the complainant himself has acted in breach of the law, international or domestic.
35. The applicant disagreed, stating that the review of its case by the Review Panel had been a part of the ordinary court procedure for the purposes of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and had not contravened the principle of legal certainty. In contrast, the review of its case by the Plenary Court was an extraordinary procedure which contravened Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
36. The Court recalls that in its decision concerning the admissibility of an application involving similar issues, it found that the procedure of supervisory review of a first instance court's judgment by the Review Panel, which existed before changes had been introduced to the Code of Arbitration Procedure on 21 June 2001, did not run counter the principle of legal certainty and that the applicant's recourse to that procedure had been necessary for the purposes of exhaustion of domestic remedies under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 48553/99, 27 September 2001). In that case, the Court noted that this procedure had been directly available to each party to the case and that it had not depended on the discretionary power of a State authority.
37. The Court finds no ground to depart from the conclusions it reached, in a different context, in the Sovtransavto case. It also notes that according to Articles 97, 100, 102-104 of the Code of Arbitration Procedure, as worded at the material time, the first instance arbitration court's judgment could not be challenged before the Review Panel indefinitely, but within a period prescribed by law, namely, within two months following the adoption of the first instance court's judgment; that the relevant procedural rules provided for the communication of a party's or prosecutor's request for review to another party and the latter's right to submit its comments in reply; and that the Review Panel could reconsider the first instance court's judgment only within a year from the date of its adoption (see paragraph 20 above). Accordingly, the Court finds that the resolution of the Review Panel of 11 March 1999 was the “final decision” in the case, within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, and the Court rejects the Government's submission that the applicant company's application to the Review Panel disqualified it from complaining about subsequent events.
38. The procedure of review of the case by the Plenary Court, however, was distinct from that by the Review Panel. In particular, under Article 99 of the Code of Arbitration Procedure it was only the President of the Higher Arbitration Court and the Prosecutor General who had power to introduce a request for supervisory review of the case by the Plenary Court (see paragraph 20 above). The exercise of those powers was not subject to any time-limit and there was no obligation on the Plenary Court to consult the parties before deciding on the submissions of the President of the Higher Arbitration Court or the Prosecutor General.
39. The Court has already found in similar cases before it that the supervisory review of final and binding judgments, which was not directly accessible to parties, nor subject to any time-limit, nor justified by substantial and compelling circumstances, was not compatible with the principle of legal certainty that is one of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law for the purposes of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see, for instance, Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52-58, ECHR 2003-IX, Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine, no. 48553/99, § 77, ECHR 2002-VII, and Agrotehservis v. Ukraine, no. 62608/00, §§ 42-43, 5 July 2005).
40. In the absence of any special factors which could justify the use of a supervisory review in the applicant's case, the fact that the latter procedure was used to set aside the resolution of the Review Panel of 11 March 1999, given in the applicant's favour, is sufficient to enable the Court to rule that its “right to a court” under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention was infringed.
41. The Court does not find it necessary to consider separately whether the procedural guarantees of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, in particular, equality of arms and public hearing, were respected during the proceedings before the Plenary Court.
42. There has accordingly been a violation of that Article.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
43. The applicant company further complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that it had been unlawfully deprived of its possessions as a result of the quashing of the decision of the Review Panel of 11 March 1999. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
44. The applicant company submitted that it had been deprived of its building unlawfully, alleging that such deprivation had been based on the resolution of the Plenary Court of 15 February 2001 which had contravened the principle of rule of law. It further submitted that there had been no public interest which could have justified the deprivation of its possessions.
45. The Government did not contest that the impugned building had been the applicant's property for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 at a time when the domestic courts had ruled otherwise. They argued that the applicant had been deprived of that property lawfully and in the public interest. In particular, such deprivation was envisaged by the final judgment and was necessary to ensure the observance of the right of the Kyiv community to enjoy its municipal property.
A. Admissibility
46. The Court notes that in the absence of the parties' comments on the admissibility of this part of the application, other than those discussed above (see paragraphs 21-30 above), it is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Whether there was an interference with the right of property
47. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: “the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, among other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest ... The three rules are not, however, 'distinct' in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule” (see, for instance, Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 78, ECHR 2005-...).
48. The Court notes that it is not disputed that the applicant company suffered an interference with its right of property which amounted to a “deprivation” of possessions within the meaning of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court must therefore examine whether the interference was justified under that provision.
2. Justification for the interference with the right of property
a. “Provided for by law”
49. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Amuur v. France, judgment of 25 June 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-III, pp. 850-51, § 50; Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000-XII; and Malama v. Greece, no. 43622/98, § 43, ECHR 2001-II).
50. The Government argued that the interference had been lawful, since it had been sanctioned by the court's final decision, while, according to the applicant, that decision had been delivered in violation of the principle of legal certainty and, thus, it could not have served as a legitimate ground for the interference with the applicant's right to property.
51. Although the Court is generally not entitled to call into question the decisions reached by the domestic courts and tribunals, it notes that the principle of lawfulness requires the State to afford judicial procedures that offer the necessary procedural guarantees and therefore enable the domestic courts and tribunals to adjudicate effectively and fairly any disputes between private persons (see Sovtransavto, cited above, § 96).
52. However, not every procedural shortcoming in a case will take an interference with the right to possessions outside the scope of the “principle of lawfulness”. In the present circumstances, the Court is not required to take a position on this issue as the deprivation of possessions was in any event not compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for the reasons set out below.
b. “In the public interest”
53. The Court notes that the resolution of the Plenary Higher Arbitration Court, by which the applicant company was deprived of the building, was based on formal grounds, namely, that a State authority, the State Property Fund, had transferred the building to the applicant ultra vires, since it belonged to a local authority.
54. The Court considers that the doctrine of ultra vires provides an important safeguard against errors by the authorities acting beyond the competence given to them under domestic law. The Court does not dispute the purpose or usefulness of this doctrine which indeed reflects the notion of the rule of law underlying much of the Convention itself (see Stretch v. the United Kingdom, no. 44277/98, § 38, 24 June 2003). Thus, notwithstanding the applicant company's submissions to the contrary, the Court is of the view that the taking of the applicant's property by application of the doctrine of ultra vires was capable of serving the public interest. The Court however must also verify whether the principle of proportionality was respected in this case.
c. Proportionality of the interference
55. The Court reiterates that an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, judgment of 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52, p. 26, § 69). The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole, including therefore the second sentence, which is to be read in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first sentence. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measure depriving a person of his possessions (see Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, judgment of 20 November 1995, Series A no. 332, p. 23, § 38).
56. In determining whether this requirement is met, the Court recognises that the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing how the measures are to be implements and to ascertaining whether the consequences of implementation are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question. Nevertheless, the Court cannot fail to exercise its power of review and must determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicant's right to “the peaceful enjoyment of [its] possessions”, within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Zvolský and Zvolská v. the Czech Republic, no. 46129/99, § 69, ECHR 2002-IX).
57. Compensation terms under the relevant legislation are material to the assessment whether the contested measure respects the requisite fair balance and, notably, whether it imposes a disproportionate burden on the applicants. In this connection, the Court has already found that the taking of property without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value will normally constitute a disproportionate interference and a total lack of compensation can be considered justifiable under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in exceptional circumstances (see Holy Monasteries (The) v. Greece, judgment of 9 December 1994, Series A no. 301-A, p. 35, § 71; Former King of Greece, cited above, § 89; and Zvolský and Zvolská, cited above, § 70).
58. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the applicant company acquired the building as consideration for its shares in good faith, without knowing that the State Property Fund had no power to transfer it, and it has not been suggested that it should have known. Even though Ukranaftoprodukt continued to use the building, it formed part of the assets of the applicant company in the same way as any other asset, and the company had, at the very least, a legitimate expectation that it would be able to use the building as part of its commercial operations.
59. The effect of the decision to quash the transfer of the building from Ukranaftoprodukt to the applicant company was thus to deprive the latter of part of its initial capital, and hence of part of its assets. There has been no suggestion that that it was open to the applicant company to seek any form of compensation to make up for that loss.
60. The Court discerns no exceptional circumstances capable of justifying the absence of compensation in the present case and finds that the applicant company has thus had to bear an individual and excessive burden which has upset the fair balance that should be maintained between the demands of the public interest on the one hand and protection of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions on the other.
61. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
62. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
63. The applicant company submitted that it suffered some pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage because of the violation of its Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 rights. However, it did not specify the amount of its claim. It further sought the return of the building, of which it had been deprived, as a part of compensation for the pecuniary damage it had suffered.
64. The Government maintained that the applicant's claims had been unsubstantiated and had to be rejected in their entirety.
65. The Court notes that the applicant's claim for non-pecuniary damage is unspecified and, therefore, rejects it as unsubstantiated.
66. The Court further considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of the applicant's claim for pecuniary damage is not ready for decision. It is therefore necessary to reserve the matter, due regard being had to the possibility of an agreement between the respondent Government and the applicant company (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
67. The applicant company did not specify its claim under this head. The Court therefore makes no award.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision in so far as the applicant has claimed pecuniary damage and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be;
5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 November 2007, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President
1. Around 61,310 euros – “EUR”.

2. Around EUR 61,310.

3. The former transitional currency of Ukraine before September 1996.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; danno Non-patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta; danno Patrimoniale - riservato
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA UCRAINA-TYUMEN C. UCRAINA
(Richiesta n. 22603/02)
SENTENZA
( meriti)
STRASBOURG
22 novembre 2007
DEFINITIVA
22/02/2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitivo nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Ucraina-Tyumen c. Ucraina,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Il Sig. P. Lorenzen, Presidente, il
Sig. K. Jungwiert, il Sig. V. Butkevych, la Sig.ra M. Tsatsa-Nikolovska, il Sig. R. Maruste, il Sig. J. Borrego Borrego, il Sig. M. Villiger, giudici, e la Sig.ra C. Westerdiek, Sezione Cancelliere,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 23 ottobre 2007,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 22603/02) contro l'Ucraina depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) dalla Società per azioni Ucraina-T. (“la richiedente”) il 23 luglio 2001.
2. La richiedente fu rappresentata dal Sig. V. B., il suo presidente, e M. O. ed E. U., avvocati che praticano a Kyiv. Il Governo ucraino (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Y. Zaytsev.
3. 13 marzo 2006 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni di Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo come la sua ammissibilità.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. La richiedente è un'impresa congiunta ucraina con sede a Kyiv, con personalità legale sotto legge ucraina.
5. Nel giugno 1995 il Governatore della Regione di Tyumen della Federazione russa presentò una proposta al Presidente dell'Ucraina per co-finanziare una joint venture per il potenziamento e l'ulteriore miglioramento dei collegamenti commerciali fra Ucraina e la Regione di Tyumen. Il Governatore suggerì anche che l’Ucraina avrebbe dovuto trasferire il titolo di proprietà di un edificio a Kyiv alla futura società, così che si sarebbe potuto usare come sua sede centrale.
6. Nel settembre 1995 la società richiedente fu fondata da sei società, inclusa l' Impresa statale U..
7. Il 20 agosto 1996 gli articoli della richiedente dell'associazione furono corretti, il numero di co-fondatori era aumentato alle sette entità, incluso l' Impresa statale U. ed il Fondo Statale Immobiliare dell'Ucraina (“il Fondo”). Si dichiarò che il Fondo agiva a favore dell' Impresa statale U. (“U.”). Si dichiarò che ogni fondatore deteneva il 14.28% del capitale di quota della richiedente. Mentre sei società dovevano pagare uguali importi di denaro per le loro quote (USD 71,5421), il Fondo si impegnò a trasferire alla società richiedente un titolo di proprietà sull'edificio valutato a USD 71,5422, ed appartenente, come fu affermato negli articoli dell'associazione, a U..
8. Il30 agosto 1996 U., agendo su istruzionedel Fondo, trasferì alla richiedente il titolo di proprietà su un edificio amministrativo a Kyiv. U. continuò ad usare l'edificio come se fossero i suoi locali.
9. Secondo le norme corrette dell'associazione della richiedente, fu stabilito principalmente ai fini di ottenere profitto per gli azionisti e per la creazione di un'infrastruttura per la cooperazione fra le società dell’Ucraina e del Tyumen facendo seguito alle decisioni intergovernative tese a migliorare l’efficacia dei collegamenti degli affari e l’ implementazione di programmi congiunti , come la vendita di petrolio di benzina,di legno e di prodotti agricoli; consulenza legale; l’organizzazione di esposizioni; altre attività commerciali necessarie per realizzare gli obiettivi della società. La società richiedente godeva di tutti i diritti di una persona giuridica separata. Agli azionisti della richiedente fu data la facoltà di prendere parte alla sua gestione, di ricevere una parte del suo profitto e di essere informati delle sue attività e ecc. La proprietà della società richiedente consisteva in oggetti e denaro trasferiti nel suo capitale di quota dagli azionisti, così come da finanziamenti ricevuti dalla richiedente da altre fonti. Gli azionisti non godevano di diritti separati sugli oggetti trasferiti alla richiedente come loro contributi.
10. Nell’ ottobre 1998 l’ Amministrazione Statale della Città di Kyiv (“l'Amministrazione Urbana”) avviò procedimenti presso il più Alto Tribunale arbitrale dell'Ucraina contro il Fondo, Ukrnaftoprodukt e la società richiedente, chiedendo il recupero del titolo di proprietà sull'edificio rivendicando che possedeva l'edificio ed adducendo che il titolo al secondo era stato trasferito alla richiedente ultra vires.
11. Il 29 dicembre 1998 la corte invalidò il trasferimento del 30 agosto 1996 ed ordinò che l’Ukrnaftoprodukt restituisse di nuovo l'edificio all'Amministrazione Urbana. La corte trovò che quell’edificio apparteneva all’ Amministrazione Urbana di Kyiv e che all'Ukrnaftoprodukt non era stato concesso di trasferirlo alla richiedente.
12. L’Ukranaftoprodukt depositò una richiesta per revisione della decisione del 29 dicembre 1998 presso pannello del più Alto Tribunale arbitrale per la revisione delle sentenze, delle direttive e delle decisioni (il “Pannello delle Revisioni”).
13. L’ 11 marzo 1999 il Pannello delle Revisione annullò la sentenza del 29 dicembre 1998 e respinse la rivendicazione dell'Amministrazione Urbana. Il pannello sostenne che la rivendicazione era stata depositata fuori termine e che non c'era prova che l'Amministrazione Urbana fosse la proprietaria legittima dell'edificio.
14. Il 24 marzo 2000 il Presidium del più Alto Tribunale arbitrale respinse la richiesta per la revisione direttiva ( “reclamo”) della decisione dell’ 11 marzo 1999, depositata dal Presidente di quella corte, come non comprovata.
15. Il 24 gennaio 2001 l'Accusatore Generale dell'Ucraina, in seguito alla richiesta dell'Amministrazione Urbana, depositò una reclamo presso il Tribunale arbitrale Assoluto ( “Corte Assoluta”), chiedendo procedimenti di revisione direttivi nella causa. Il 15 febbraio 2001 la Corte Assoluta, in presenza dei rappresentanti dell'ufficio del Generale Accusatore accolse il reclamo, annullò le decisioni del 111 marzo 999 e del 24 marzo 2000, e sostenne la sentenza del 29 dicembre 1998. Nella sua decisione, la corte riassunse gli argomenti dell'Accusatore Generale e li trovò provato. Nessuna altra ragione fu data per la sua decisione. Le parti non furono invitate a partecipare all'udienza di fronte alla Corte Assoluta. I commenti della richiedente sul reclamo dell'Accusatore Generale non furono esaminati dalla Corte Assoluta.
16. Il 2 novembre 2001 le norme articoli della sua associazione furono corrette per far sì che, secondo la richiedente, le autorità ucraine non fossero più azionisti.
17. Il Governo contese che lo Stato rimaneva uno dei fondatori della società richiedente e, quindi, il proprietario del 28.56% del suo capitale di quota.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Atto delle Associazioni Economiche (“le Società”) del 19 settembre 1991 (come formulato al tempo attinente)
18. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto recitano come segue:
Articolo 12. Proprietà della società
“Una società sarà la proprietaria di:
[i] la proprietà che i suoi fondatori... le hanno trasferito;
[ii] gli oggetti che produce...;
[iii] il profitto che ha ricevuto...”
Articolo 13. Contributi dei fondatori e dei partecipanti di una società
“Partecipanti e fondatori di una società possono trasferire questa come contributo edifici..., soldi...
Il contributo espresso in karbovatsi3 costituirà la quota del fondatore e del partecipante nel finanziamento legale della[società].”
B. Atto dei Tribunali arbitrali del 4 giugno 1991 (abrogato dal 1 giugno 2002)
19. Le disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto recitano come segue:
Articolo 1. Amministrazione della giustizia in cause economiche
“In conformità con la Costituzione dell'Ucraina, i tribunali arbitrali avranno giurisdizione su cause economiche.
Il tribunale arbitrale è un corpo indipendente con giurisdizione su tutte le controversie economiche fra le entità, pubbliche e gli altri corpi, e su cause generate da insolvenza.”
Articolo 11. Composizione del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto dell'Ucraina
“Il Tribunale arbitrale più Alto sarà composto dal Presidente, il primo Sostituto Presidente, i sostituti del Presidente, ed i giudici e [questo] si riunirà come:
il Tribunale arbitrale più Alto ed Assoluto;
il Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto;
i pannelli per la considerazione di controversie e per la revisione di sentenze, direttive, decisioni.”
C. Codice di Procedura di Arbitrato del 6 novembre 1991 (prima dei cambi introdotti il 21 giugno 2001)
20. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice di Procedura dell’ Arbitrato prevedevano:
Articolo 14. Giurisdizione del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto
“Il Tribunale arbitrale più Alto considererà cause:
1) in cui una delle parti è... l’ Amministrazione Statale della Città di Kyiv...”
Articolo 91. I motivi per la revisione direttiva di una sentenza, direttiva o di una decisione
“La legalità e il ragionamento di una sentenza, direttiva o di una decisione di un tribunale di arbitrato... possono essere revisionati sotto la procedura direttiva su richiesta della parte o in seguito ad un reclamo da parte di un accusatore o del suo sostituto, in conformità con questo Codice e altre leggi dell'Ucraina.
La richiesta della parte per una revisione di una sentenza... sarà esaminata dal... pannello del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto per la revisione di sentenze, direttive e decisioni.
Alle seguenti persone sono conferiti poteri per depositare un reclamo:
L'Accusatore Generale ed i suoi sostituti...”
Articolo 92. Il diritto del tribunale arbitrale di revisionare la legalità di una sentenza, di una norma , di una decisione sotto la procedura direttiva di sua propria iniziativa
“Al tribunale arbitrale sarà concesso di revisionare sotto la procedura direttiva la legalità e il ragionamento di una sentenza, norma e decisione di sua propria iniziativa...”
Articolo 95. I poteri del pannello del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto su una revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma , decisione
“... Il pannello... farà una revisione sotto la procedura direttiva:
1) una sentenza e un ragionamento riguardo ad una controversia che fu aggiudicata dal Tribunale arbitrale più Alto...”
Articolo 96. Revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma, decisione da parte del pannello del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto
“Una sentenza, norma, decisione saranno revisionate da un pannello del Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto o del suo sostituto e da un giudice del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto. Se loro non concordano sul risultato della revisione, il Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto o il suo sostituto può far rapporto al Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto che decide la questione...
Una sentenza, norma e decisione saranno revisionate dal Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto o dal suo sostituto e da due giudici del pannello, se l’applicazione della legge o della valutazione delle prove nella causa è difficile. In tal caso, la decisione sarà adottata con una maggioranza di voti.
Una sentenza o norma consegnata dal Presidente Aggiunto del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto o consegnata all'udienza in cui ha presieduta saranno revisionate dal Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto e da due giudici del pannello. In tal caso, la decisione sarà adottata con una maggioranza di voti.
Una sentenza o norma consegnata dal Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto o nell'udienza in cui ha presieduto saranno revisionate dal Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto.
Se necessario, le parti possono essere invitate a dare i loro chiarimenti all’udienza del pannello.”
Articolo 97. Diritto di depositare presso il Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto una richiesta per revisione direttiva
“Il Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto, l'Accusatore Generale dell’ Ucraina o i suoi sostituti hanno diritto a depositare presso il Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto un reclamo contro la decisione consegnata dal pannello del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto per controversie economiche.
Una parte ai procedimenti ha diritto a depositare presso il Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto una richiesta per revisione direttiva della sentenza o della norma consegnata dal Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto nell'udienza in cui ha presieduto...”
Articolo 99. Diritto di depositare presso il Tribunale arbitrale Assoluto più Alto una richiesta per revisione direttiva della decisione del Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto riguardo ad una controversia economica
“Il Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto, l'Accusatore Generale dell'Ucraina ha diritto a depositare presso il Tribunale arbitrale Assoluto più Alto un reclamo contro la decisione consegnata dal Presidium del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto.
In seguito alle sue deliberazioni, il Tribunale arbitrale Assoluto più Alto adotterà una decisione...”
Articolo 100. Deposito di una richiesta per revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma, decisione e [deposito di] un reclamo da parte di un accusatore o del suo sostituto
“Una richiesta per revisione direttiva... sarà depositata presso il tribunale arbitrale che giudicò la causa. Se la revisione direttiva sarà eseguita dal Tribunale arbitrale più Alto, la richiesta, insieme con l’archivio della causa saranno presentati presso il tribunale arbitrale attinente al Tribunale arbitrale più Alto entro i cinque giorni seguenti la ricevuta della richiesta.
Il reclamo... sarà depositato presso il tribunale arbitrale competente fare una revisione della sentenza...
Copie della richiesta o del reclamo saranno spedite alle parti...
I procedimenti di esecuzione non saranno sospesi se una richiesta o un reclamo verranno depositati, salvo nel caso in cui la sentenza... riguarda il trasferimento di soldi e la presa forzata di proprietà...”
Articolo 102. Termine massimo per depositare una richiesta per revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma, decisione e [per depositare] un reclamo da parte di un accusatore
“Una richiesta... ed un reclamo devono essere depositati entro due mesi dalla data della sentenza...”
Articolo 103. Osservazioni in replica ad una richiesta per revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma, decisione e [in replica a] un reclamo di un accusatore
“Su ricevimento di una copia della richiesta per revisione direttiva... o di un reclamo, una parte spedirà al tribunale arbitrale,al le altre parti... le [sue] osservazioni [in replica].
...
L’ assenza delle osservazioni [delle parti]... non impedirà [ad una corte] di eseguire la revisione.”
Articolo 104. Informazioni della data e del tempo della revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma, decisione. Tempo limite della revisione [procedura].
“Le parti possono partecipare a [ procedimenti sula] revisione... L'accusatore... prenderà parte a [procedimenti sulla] revisione che fu iniziata sul [suo] reclamo. La contumacia delle parti o dell'accusatore... non impedirà [alla corte] di eseguire la revisione...
La revisione direttiva... sarà completata entro due mesi dal ricevimento di una richiesta o reclamo...
Una sentenza, norma e decisione del tribunale arbitrale possono essere revisionate sotto la procedura direttiva non più tardi di un anno dopo la loro consegna.”
Articolo 106. I poteri del tribunale arbitrale, revisionando una sentenza, noram, decisione
“... [Il tribunale arbitrale ] ha il potere di :
[i] lasciare una sentenza, norma, decisione senza cambi;
[ii] cambiare una sentenza, norma, decisione;
[iii] annullare una sentenza, norma, decisione ed adottare una nuova sentenza, rinviare una causa per una nuova considerazione, chiudere i procedimenti, o lasciare una causa senza considerazione.
Una sentenza, norma , decisione... saranno revisionate nell'insieme, a prescindere dai motivi per una richiesta di revisione direttiva o un reclamo.
Un tribunale arbitrale che fa una revisione di una sentenza, norma o decisione sotto la procedura direttiva avrà tutti i poteri di un tribunale arbitrale in considerazione di una controversia economica.
La revisione direttiva di una sentenza, norma e decisione del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto sarà definitiva, salvo quando una parte è fuori dal territorio dell'Ucraina e c'è un accordo fra gli Stati attinenti per una procedura diversa di revisione.”
Articolo 106. I motivi per cambiare o annullare una sentenza, norma, decisione
“...
1) esame incompleto delle circostanze attinenti ad una causa;
2) mancanza di prove delle circostanze attinenti stabilita da una corte;
3) mancanza di conformità delle conclusioni [di una corte]... con le circostanze di una causa;
4) violazione o applicazione incorretta di legge effettiva o procedurale...”
Articolo 115. La finalità di una sentenza, decidendo, decisione ed il loro vigore vincolante
“Una sentenza, norma e decisione di un tribunale arbitrale saranno definitive e vincolanti nel giorno della loro consegna...”
LA LEGGE
I. LE ECCEZIONI PRELIMINARI DEL GOVERNO
A. In merito al locus standi della società richiedente
21. Il Governo presentò che la società richiedente non aveva la qualità di fare domanda alla Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione, poiché lo Stato deteneva il 28.56% del suo capitale di quota tramite l' Impresa Statale Ukrresursy ed il Fondo Statale delle Proprietà. Il Governo affermò anche che la società richiedente era stata costituita facendo seguito ad un accordo fra gli alti ufficiali governativi ucraini e russi per creare un'infrastruttura per la cooperazione fra le società ucraine e di Tyumen ed implementare le decisioni intergovernative tese a migliorare l’efficacia della cooperazione fra le società dei due paesi. Così, la richiedente doveva essere classificata, ai fini dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione, come un'organizzazione governativa. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che nella causa Kosarevskaya ed Altri c. Ucraina (N. 29459/03, 4935/04 e 26996/04 del 6 dicembre 2005) la Corte aveva trovato lo Stato responsabile per i debiti della società in cui deteneva il 32.67% del capitale di quota. Il Governo suggerì che lo stesso approccio avrebbe dovuto essere preso nella presente causa, siccome inoltre la controversia in oggetto riguardava un edificio appartenente allo Stato.
22. La società richiedente non era d'accordo, affermando che secondo la legge ucraina era una società privata il cui scopo era ricevere profitto per operazioni di affari e dividerlo fra i suoi azionisti. La richiedente presentò che agiva secondo le sue norme dell’ associazione che erano di natura di legge privata ordinaria, che la quota dello Stato non gli permetteva di controllare la richiedente, e che non aveva nessuna funzione di legge pubblica. Il mero fatto che c'erano originalmente due entità statali fra i suoi fondatori non poteva spogliare la richiedente del suo diritto di ricorrere alla Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione.
23. Nelle sue ulteriori osservazioni, la richiedente affermò, che dal 2 novembre 2001 nessuna delle sue quote apparteneva allo Stato.
24. In replica, il Governo contese, che lo Stato rimase uno dei fondatori della società richiedente e, di conseguenza, il proprietario del 28.56% del suo capitale di quota.
25. La Corte osserva che mentre non si contesta che uno dei fondatori originali della società richiedente era una Impresa Statale, e che lo Stato era anche responsabile per il Fondo Statale di Proprietà che divenne un co-fondatore della società nell’ agosto 1996 non è chiaro dalle osservazioni delle parti se lo Stato mantenne una quota nella società richiedente dal 2 novembre 2001 in avanti. Nondimeno, la Corte non trova necessario determinare questo particolare problema siccome in qualsiasi caso considera che la società richiedente ha qualità di fronte alla Corte per le ragioni seguenti.
26. La Corte richiama che una persona giuridica “che rivendica di essere vittima di una violazione da parte di una delle Alte Parti Contraenti dei diritti garantiti dalla Convenzione e dai Protocolli” può presentarle una richiesta, purché sia un’ “organizzazione non-governativa” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Il termine “organizzazione governativa”, come opposto a “organizzazione non-governativa”, include persone giuridiche che partecipano nell'esercizio dei poteri governativi o gestiscono un servizio pubblico sotto il controllo del Governo (vedere Radio Francia ed Altri c. Francia (dec.), n. 53984/00, ECHR 2003-X). Determinando se una particolare entità rientra in una delle categorie sopra menzionate, la Corte ha riguardo alla sua condizione giuridica, alla natura dell'attività che porta avanti, al contesto in cui vengono eseguite ed al grado d'indipendenza dell'entità dalle autorità politiche.
27. La Corte osserva che secondo legge ucraina e le sue norme di associazione la società richiedente gode dell'autonomia istituzionale; è governata dal diritto azionario ed è sotto il controllo e la gestione dei suoi fondatori (vedere paragrafi 9 e 18 sopra). Presumendo anche che lo Stato possegga ancora circa un terzo del capitale di quota della richiedente, nessuna prova è stata presentata tale da indicare che allo Stato sia concesso un ruolo più grande nella gestione della società rispetto agli altri azionisti. Non c'è inoltre, nulla nell’archivio della causa che suggerisca che la società richiedente abbia eseguito attività diverse da quelle che potrebbero essere classificate come affari, a prescindere dal fatto che delle disposizioni delle sue norme di associazione potrebbero essere costruite in modo da affidare alla richiedente una missione di pubblico-servizio, vale a dire implementare delle “decisioni intergovernative” nel campo della cooperazione degli affari.
28. La Corte conclude di conseguenza che la società richiedente è un’ “organizzazione non-governativa” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione e che l'eccezione del Governo dovrebbe essere respinta.
B. In merito all'ottemperanza con la norma dei mesi
29. Il Governo ha rivendicato l'inadempienza con la norma dei sei mesi. Affermò che la decisione definitiva nella causa della richiedente, all'interno del significato dell0 Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, fu data dal Tribunale arbitrale più Alto il 29 dicembre 1998, cioè più di sei mesi prima che la richiesta fosse depositata presso la Corte. Il Governo sostenne che la susseguente revisione di questa decisione non poteva essere presa in considerazione siccome fu effettuata nel corso della procedura straordinaria. La richiedente non era d'accordo.
30. La Corte nota che l’11 marzo 1999 il Pannello di Revisione annullò la sentenza del 29 dicembre 1998 ed adottò una decisione favorevole alla richiedente. Quest’ultima decisione fu annullata successivamente il 15 febbraio 2001 dalla Corte Assoluta che fece anche una revisione della causa sui meriti e sostenne la sentenza del 29 dicembre 1998. Le azioni di reclamo della richiedente essenzialmente sono dirette contro la decisione della Corte Assoluta che fu consegnata meno di sei mesi prima che la società richiedente depositasse la presente richiesta presso la Corte (23 luglio 2001). Il Governo è andato a vuoto nell’ avanzare qualsiasi argomento in merito al perché la Corte dovrebbe trascurare questa decisione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Tregubenko c. Ucraina (dec.), n. 61333/00, 21 ottobre 2003). Di conseguenza, la Corte non è ostacolata dall'articolo dei sei - mesi nella considerazione della richiesta.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
31. La società richiedente si lamentò dell'annullamento della decisione del Pannello di Revisione dell’ 11 marzo 1999, affermando che quest’ultima era la decisione vincolante e definitiva e resa a suo favore. Addusse che la procedura di fronte alla Corte Assoluta era stata incompatibile coi principi della certezza legale, dell’uguaglianza dei mezzi e di un'udienza pubblica. La richiedente invocò l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che prevede, nella parte attinente, come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale indipendente ed imparziale ….”
A. Ammissibilità
32. La Corte costata che in assenza di commenti delle parti sull'ammissibilità delle azioni di reclamo della richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, separatamente da quelli discussi sopra (vedere paragrafi 21-30 sopra), queste azioni di reclamo sollevano problemi di fatto e diritto sotto la Convenzione, la cui determinazione richiede un esame dei meriti. Non discerne nessuna base per dichiararli inammissibili.
B. Meriti
33. Nelle loro osservazioni sui meriti di questa parte della richiesta, il Governo affermò, che i diritti della richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione non erano stati infranti. In particolare dibatté che l'Accusatore Generale aveva agito a favore di una delle parti ai procedimenti contestati, l’Amministrazione Statale di Kyiv, quando aveva depositato un reclamo presso la Corte Assoluta. Il suo intervento ai procedimenti era negli interessi dello Stato e, così, legale.
34. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che alla richiedente che prima aveva tratto profitto dalla revisione straordinaria della sentenza favorevole ad un'altra parte ai procedimenti (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra), non fu dato titolo di rimettere in questione l'ottemperanza della stessa procedura, come risultato del quale infine aveva perso la causa, con la Convenzione. Il Governo fece riferimento alla dottrina di “mani pulite” in diritto internazionale secondo la quale la responsabilità di un Stato non è impegnata quando il reclamante stesso ha agito in violazione della legge, internazionale o nazionale.
35. La richiedente non era d'accordo, affermando che la revisione della sua causa da parte del Pannello di Revisione era stata una parte della procedura di corte ordinaria ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e non aveva contravvenuto al principio della certezza legale. In contrasto, la revisione della sua causa della Corte Assoluta era una procedura straordinaria che aveva contravvenuto all’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
36. La Corte richiama che nella sua decisione riguardo all'ammissibilità di problemi simili che riguardano simili questioni, ha trovato che la procedura di revisione direttiva della sentenza di un primo giudice di prima istanza del Pannello di Revisione, che esisteva prima che dei cambi fossero stati introdotti al Codice di Procedura di Arbitrato il 21 giugno 2001, non andava contro il principio della certezza legale e che il ricorso della richiedente a questa procedura era stato necessario al fine dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Sovtransavto Holding c. Ucraina (dec.), n. 48553/99, 27 settembre 2001). In quella causa, la Corte notò che questa procedura era stata direttamente disponibile ad ogni parte alla causa e che non era dipesa dal potere discrezionale di un'autorità Statale.
37. La Corte non trova nessuna base per abbandonare le conclusioni raggiunte, in un contesto diverso, nella causa Sovtransavto. Nota anche che secondo gli Articoli 97, 100, 102-104 del Codice di Procedura di Arbitrato come enunciato al tempo attinente, il giudizio di prima istanza del tribunale arbitrale non poteva essere impugnato indefinitamente di fronte al Pannello di Revisione, ma entro un periodo prescritto dalla legge, vale a dire entro i due mesi seguenti l'adozione della sentenza del primo giudice di prima istanza; che le norme procedurali attinenti prevedevano la comunicazione della richiesta di una parte o di accusatore per revisione ad un'altra parte ed il diritto di quest’ultima di presentare i suoi commenti in replica; e che il Pannello di Revisione poteva riconsiderare la sentenza del giudice di prima istanza solamente entro un anno dalla data della sua adozione (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Di conseguenza, Corte costata che la decisione del Pannello di Revisione dell’ 11 marzo 1999 era la “decisione definitiva” nella causa, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, e la Corte respinge l'osservazione del Governo per la quale la richiesta della società richiedente al Pannello di Revisione le impediva di lamentarsi dei susseguenti eventi.
38. La procedura di revisione della causa della Corte Assoluta, comunque era distinta da quella da parte del Pannello di Revisione . In particolare, sotto l’Articolo 99 del Codice di Procedura di Arbitrato era solamente il Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto e l'Accusatore Generale che avevano il potere di introdurre una richiesta per revisione direttiva della causa presso la Corte Assoluta (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). L'esercizio di quei poteri non era soggetto a qualsiasi tempo-limite e non c'era obbligo per la Corte Assoluta di consultare le parti prima di decidere sulle osservazioni del Presidente del Tribunale arbitrale più Alto o l'Accusatore Generale.
39. La Corte ha già trovato in cause simili di fronte a sé che la revisione direttiva di sentenze vincolanti e definitive e che non erano direttamente accessibili a parti né soggette a qualsiasi tempo-limite, né giustificate da circostanze sostanziali ed impellenti, non era compatibile col principio di certezza legale che è uno degli aspetti fondamentali della preminenza del diritto ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Ryabykh c. Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52-58, ECHR 2003-IX Sovtransavto Holding c. Ucraina, n. 48553/99, § 77, ECHR 2002-VII, ed Agrotehservis c. Ucraina, n. 62608/00, §§ 42-43 del 5 luglio 2005).
40. In mancanza di qualsiasi fattore speciale che potrebbe giustificare l'uso di una revisione direttiva nella causa della richiedente, il fatto che quest’ultima la procedura fu usata per accantonare la decisione del Pannello di Revisione dell’ 11 marzo 1999, determinata a favore della richiedente, è sufficiente per abilitare la Corte a decidere che il suo “diritto ad una corte” sotto l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione fu infranto.
41. La Corte non trova necessario considerare separatamente se le garanzie procedurali dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, in particolare, l'uguaglianza dei mezzi ed udienza pubblica, furono rispettate durante i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Assoluta.
42. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di quell'Articolo.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
43. La società richiedente si lamentò inoltre sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che era stata privata illegalmente delle sue proprietà come risultato dell'annullamento della decisione del Pannello di Revisione dell’ 11 marzo 1999. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
44. La società richiedente presentò di essere stata privata illegalmente del suo edificio, adducendo che simile privazione era stata basata sulla decisione della Corte Assoluta del 15 febbraio 2001 che aveva contravvenuto al principio della preminenza del diritto. Presentò inoltre che non c'era stato nessun interesse pubblico che avrebbe potuto giustificare la privazione delle sua proprietà.
45. Il Governo non contesta che la costruzione in contenzioso era stata la proprietà della richiedente ai fini dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in un tempo in cui le corti nazionali avevano deciso altrimenti. Dibatté che la richiedente era stata privata di quella proprietà legalmente e nell'interesse pubblico. In particolare, simile privazione era prevista dalla sentenza definitiva ed era necessaria per assicurare l'osservanza del diritto della comunità di Kyiv per godere della sua proprietà municipale.
A. Ammissibilità
46. La Corte nota che in mancanza di commenti delle parti sull'ammissibilità di questa parte della richiesta, differenti da quelli discussi sopra (vedere paragrafi 21-30 sopra), non è manifestamente mal-fondato all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Se c'era un'interferenza col diritto di proprietà
47. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: “il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo della proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti è concesso, fra le altre cose, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale... Comunque, i tre articoli non sono 'distinti' nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano i particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo” (vedere, per esempio, Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 78 ECHR 2005 -...).
48. La Corte nota che non è contestato che la società richiedente soffrì di un'interferenza col suo diritto di proprietà al quale corrispose una “privazione” di proprietà all'interno del significato della seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte deve esaminare perciò se l'interferenza era giustificata sotto quella disposizione.
2. La giustificazione per l'interferenza col diritto di proprietà
a. “Prevista dalla legge”
49. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione di proprietà solamente “soggetta alle condizioni previste dalla legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso della proprietà eseguendo “leggi.” Inoltre, la preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Amuur c. Francia, sentenza del 25 giugno 1996, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-III, pp. 850-51, § 50; Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000-XII; e Malama c. Grecia, n. 43622/98, § 43 ECHR 2001-II).
50. Il Governo dibatté che l'interferenza era stata legale, poiché era stata sanzionata dalla decisione definitiva della corte, mentre, secondo la richiedente questa decisione era stata consegnata in violazione del principio della certezza legale e, così, non poteva servire come base legittima per l'interferenza col diritto alla proprietà della richiedente.
51. Benché alla Corte non è concesso generalmente chiamare in questione le decisioni a cui sono giunti le corti nazionali e i tribunali, nota che il principio della legalità costringe lo Stato a riconoscere procedure giudiziali che offrono le garanzie procedurali necessarie e perciò abilitano le corti nazionali e i tribunali ad giudicare efficacemente ed equamente qualsiasi controversia fra persone private (vedere Sovtransavto, citata sopra, § 96).
52. Ogni difetto procedurale in una causa non porterà comunque, un'interferenza col diritto alla proprietà fuori della sfera del “principio della legalità.” Nelle presenti circostanze, la Corte non è costretta a prendere una posizione su questo problema siccome la privazione di proprietà era in qualsiasi caso non compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per le ragioni esposte
sotto.
b. “Nell'interesse pubblico”
53. La Corte nota che la decisione del Tribunale arbitrale Assoluto più Alto con la quale la società richiedente fu privata dell'edificio, era basato su motivi formali, vale a dire che un'autorità Statale, il Fondo Statale della Proprietà aveva trasferito l'edificio alla richiedente ultra vires, poiché apparteneva ad un'autorità locale.
54. La Corte considera che la dottrina dell’ultra vires offre un'importante salvaguardia contro errori da parte delle autorità che agiscono oltre la competenza data a loro sotto il diritto nazionale. La Corte non contesta il fine o l'utilità di questa dottrina che davvero riflette la nozione della preminenza del diritto che è sottostante alla stessa Convenzione (vedere Stretch c. Regno Unito, n. 44277/98, § 38 24 giugno 2003). Nonostante le osservazioni della società richiedente al contrario, la Corte è così, della prospettiva che la presa della proprietà della richiedente tramite applicazione della dottrina ultra vires era capace di servire l'interesse pubblico. La Corte deve verificare comunque anche se il principio della proporzionalità fu rispettato in questa causa.
c. La proporzionalità dell'interferenza
55. La Corte reitera che un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della proprietà deve prevedere un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, sentenza di 23 settembre 1982 Serie A n. 52, p. 26, § 69). La preoccupazione di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nell'insieme, inclusa perciò la seconda frase che sarà letta alla luce del principio generale enunciato nella prima frase. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo perseguito con qualsiasi misura che spoglia una persona delle sue proprietà (vedere Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. Belgio, sentenza di 20 novembre 1995 Serie A n. 332, p. 23, § 38).
56. Nel determinare se questo requisito è soddisfatto, la Corte riconosce che lo Stato gode di un ampio margine di valutazione riguardo sia alla scelta delle misure che devono essere implementate ed alla verifica se le conseguenze dell’ attuazione sono giustificate nell'interesse generale al fine di realizzare l'oggetto della legge in oggetto. Ciononostante, la Corte non può andare a vuoto nell’esercitare il suo potere di revisione e deve determinare se l'equilibrio richiesto fu sostenuto in una maniera conforme col diritto della richiedente al godimento tranquillo della [sua] proprietà”, all'interno del significato della prima frase dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Zvolský e Zvolská c. Repubblica ceca, n. 46129/99, § 69 ECHR 2002-IX).
57. I termini del risarcimento sotto la legislazione attinente sono attinenti alla valutazione se la misura contestata rispetta l'equilibrio equo richiesto e, in particolare, se impone un carico sproporzionato sui richiedenti. In questo collegamento, la Corte ha già trovato, che la presa di proprietà senza pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente riferito al suo valore normalmente costituirà un'interferenza sproporzionata ed una mancanza totale di risarcimento possono essere considerate giustificabili sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente in circostanze eccezionali (vedere Conventi Santi (Il) c. Grecia, sentenza di 9 dicembre 1994 Serie A n. 301-A, p. 35, § 71; Re Precedente della Grecia, citata sopra, § 89; e Zvolský e Zvolská, citata sopra, § 70).
58. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota che la società richiedente acquisì l'edificio come considerazione per le sue quote in buon fede, senza sapere che il Fondo Statale di Proprietà non aveva nessun potere per trasferirlo, e non è stato suggerito che avrebbe dovuto saperlo. Anche se l’Ukranaftoprodukt continuò ad usare l'edificio, costituiva parte dei beni della società richiedente allo stesso modo di qualsiasi altro bene, e la società aveva, almeno, un'aspettativa legittima che sarebbe stata in grado di usare l'edificio come parte delle sue operazioni commerciali.
59. L'effetto della decisione di annullare il trasferimento dell'edificio dalla Ukranaftoprodukt alla società richiedente doveva privare così quest’ultima di parte del suo capitale d'apporto, e quindi di parte dei suoi beni. Non c'è stato suggerimento del fatto che fosse aperto alla società richiedente chiedere qualsiasi forma di risarcimento per compensare quella perdita.
60. La Corte non discerne circostanze eccezionali capaci di giustificare l'assenza del risarcimento nella presente causa e costata che la società richiedente ha dovuto sopportare così un carico individuale eccessivo che ha sconvolto l'equilibrio equo che dovrebbe essere mantenuto fra le richieste dell'interesse pubblico da una parte e la protezione del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà dall’altra.
61. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
62. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
63. La società richiedente presentò che soffrì di un danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale a causa della violazione dei suoi diritti sotto l’ Articolo 6 e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Comunque, non specificò l'importo della sua rivendicazione. Chiese inoltre la restituzione dell'edificio del quale era stata privata, come una parte del risarcimento per il danno patrimoniale che aveva subito.
64. Il Governo sostenne che le rivendicazioni della richiedente erano non comprovate e dovevano essere respinte nella loro interezza.
65. La Corte nota che la rivendicazione della richiedente per danno non-patrimoniale non è specificata e, perciò, la respinge come non comprovata.
66. La Corte considera inoltre che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 riguardo la rivendicazione della richiedente per danno patrimoniale non è pronta per decisione. È perciò necessario per riservare la questione, avendo riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo fra il Governo rispondente e la società richiedente (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
B. Costi e spese
67. La società richiedente non specificò la sua rivendicazione sotto questo capo. La Corte non fa perciò assegnazione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
4. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione nella misura in cui la richiedente ha chiesto il danno patrimoniale e di conseguenza,
(a) riserve la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed la richiedente a presentare, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale loro possono giungere;
(c) riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza;
5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della richiedente per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificata per iscritto il 22 novembre 2007, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente
1. Circa 61,310 euro-“EUR.”

2. Circa EUR 61,310.

3. La precedente valuta di transizione dell'Ucraina prima del settembre 1996.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.