Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF JAFARLI AND OTHERS v. AZERBAIJAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 34, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 36079/06/2010
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 29/07/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Remainder inadmissible
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF JAFARLI AND OTHERS v. AZERBAIJAN
(Application no. 36079/06)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
29 July 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Jafarli and Others v. Azerbaijan,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 6 July 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 36079/06) against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three Azerbaijani nationals, OMISSIS (“the applicants”), on 8 August 2006.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by Mr M. M. and Mr A. H., lawyers practising in Baku. The Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. Asgarov.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the delay in the execution of the judgment of 9 July 2002 had violated their right to a fair trial and their property rights, as guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 14 March 2007 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants are Azerbaijani nationals who were born in 1951, 1956 and 1978 respectively and live in Nakhchivan, Azerbaijan.
6. The applicants were members of a cooperative (“Əlincə” Kooperativi – “the Cooperative”) incorporated in Nakhchivan. The Cooperative was created by a decision of a general meeting of 5 April 1989 and was initially composed of five members, including the first applicant.
7. The Cooperative’s charter was officially registered on 19 September 1994 by the Ministry of Justice of the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic. According to this charter, the Cooperative was to be liquidated, inter alia, if the number of its members dropped to less than three.
8. According to the minutes of the Cooperative’s general meetings available in the case file, there were subsequently some changes in the membership of the Cooperative. Following the departure of four members of the Cooperative, on 18 December 1996 the second and third applicants became its new members and the total number of the members amounted to three. In all these documents the first applicant was mentioned as the chairman of the Cooperative.
9. Pursuant to a number of contracts concluded in the period from 1997 to 2000, the Cooperative supplied one of the units of the Chief Department of Border Troops of the Ministry of National Security (“the Department of Border Troops”) with various foodstuffs.
10. Although the Cooperative had fulfilled its contractual obligations, it was not fully paid.
11. On an unspecified date the Cooperative brought an action against the Department of Border Troops and Border Troops Unit No. 2006, asking for payment of an accrued debt in the amount of 290,167,334 old Azerbaijani manats (AZM) plus 10% interest, as stipulated by the contract.
12. On 9 July 2002 Local Economic Court No. 1 dismissed the claim against the Department of Border Troops. However, Local Economic Court No. 1 upheld the claim against Border Troops Unit No. 2006 and ordered the latter to pay AZM 319,183,067 in total to the Cooperative. This amount included the principal debt of AZM 290,167,334 and the penalty charge of AZM 29,016,733.
13. No appeals were lodged against that judgment and, pursuant to the domestic law, it became enforceable within one month of its delivery.
14. On 21 October 2002 Local Economic Court No. 1 issued a writ of execution of the judgment. However, Border Troops Unit No. 2006 refused to comply with the judgment and, despite the applicants’ complaints to various authorities, it was not enforced.
15. In the meantime the Department of Border Troops was reorganised and renamed as the State Border Service.
16. The documents in the case file show that, on the basis of a request by the Cooperative dated 9 March 2004, signed by the first applicant, the Cooperative’s activity as a taxpayer was ceased and this fact was recorded by the Ministry of Taxes.
17. On an unspecified date in 2005 the Cooperative brought an action against the State Border Service and the Ministry of Finance complaining about the non-enforcement of the judgment of 9 July 2002. The Cooperative claimed AZM 58,033,446 for lost earnings, AZM 649,900,896 for material damage and AZM 300,000,000 for non-pecuniary damage.
18. On 7 November 2005 Local Economic Court No. 1 dismissed the claim, finding that neither of the defendants could be held responsible for the non-enforcement of the judgment, because the amount awarded to the Cooperative by the judgment of 9 July 2002 had not been paid due to the refusal of the State Treasury to allocate state funds for this purpose.
19. On 6 February 2006 the Economic Court and on 16 June 2006 the Supreme Court upheld the first-instance court’s judgment.
20. In the period from March to August 2006, the judgment of 9 July 2002 was fully executed and the total amount of AZM 319,183,067 was paid into the bank account that the Cooperative held at the Kapital Bank.
21. By a decision of 1 May 2007 the Economic Court of the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic terminated the enforcement proceedings owing to the execution of the judgment of 9 July 2002.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
22. The Law on Cooperation in the USSR of 26 May 1988 of the USSR provided that a cooperative was established on a voluntary basis. The number of members of a cooperative could not be less than three (Article 11).
23. The Law of 28 October 1992 on the temporary remaining in force of former USSR laws on the territory of the Republic of Azerbaijan and their application provided a list of former USSR laws which would remain in force in Azerbaijan until the relevant laws of the Republic of Azerbaijan were adopted. The Law on Cooperation in the USSR of 26 May 1988 appeared on this list. This Law ceased to apply on 12 October 2001.
24. The Civil Code of 1 September 2000 provides that a cooperative is a type of commercial company which is a voluntary union of individuals or legal entities established for the purpose of satisfying material and other needs of its members through consolidation of their material contributions (Article 109.1). A cooperative can be established by at least five members (Article 109-1.1).
25. Members of a cooperative, in essence, enjoy rights similar to those of founders or shareholders of other types of legal entities, including the right to participate in the management of the cooperative and to receive a share of its profits (Articles 109.2 and 109.4 in fine). The cooperative’s property is divided among the members in accordance with its charter (Article 110). The cooperative’s profits are distributed to the members in accordance with their shares, as well as the extent of their participation in the function of the cooperative, by way of contributing personal labour or otherwise (Article 110-2).
26. The supreme management body of a cooperative is the general meeting of members. Each member has one vote at the general meeting regardless of the size of his or her contribution to the cooperative’s capital fund (Articles 111.1 and 111.5).
27. The executive bodies of a cooperative are a management board and/or a chairman. A cooperative’s chairman may only be elected from among the cooperative’s members. The chairman is elected for a specified term at the general meeting of members and has the right to represent the cooperative (Articles 111.1 and 111.10). A cooperative may be voluntarily reorganised or liquidated by a decision of its members’ general meeting (Article 113.1).
28. Article 69.2 of the Code of Civil Procedure provides that legal entities can be represented before courts by their bodies, acting within the scope of powers conferred on them by law, regulations or constitutive documents of the legal entity, or by representatives acting on the basis of a power of attorney.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 AND ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 IN RESPECT OF THE DELAY IN THE EXECUTION OF THE JUDGMENT OF 9 JULY 2002
29. Relying on Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the applicants complained about the delay in the enforcement of the judgment of 9 July 2002 of Local Economic Court no. 1. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention reads as follows:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 13 of the Convention reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The applicants’ victim status
30. The Government contested the applicants’ victim status, noting that they had not been a party to the domestic proceedings and could not claim to be victims. In this connection, the Government submitted that there was no information concerning the ownership of the Cooperative by the applicants or any documents proving their membership of it. The Government further alleged that the applicants could not be considered the only owners of the Cooperative, because according to the domestic law a cooperative should be composed of at least five members.
31. The applicants alleged that they did not lodge the application with the Court only as individuals, but also on behalf of the Cooperative, because the application was signed by the person who was entitled to represent the Cooperative. They submitted that as the Cooperative had ceased its activity on 9 March 2004 the application had been lodged with the Court by all of its members.
32. The applicants further submitted that there was no member of the Cooperative other than them and that, jointly, they were the full owners of it. In this regard, the applicants produced minutes of the Cooperative’s general meetings showing the changes in the membership of the Cooperative. The applicants also produced documents, signed by the previous members of the Cooperative and confirmed by the public notary, stating that the previous members had no claim to the Cooperative. The applicants argued that, in accordance with the domestic law in force at the time of the establishment of the Cooperative, a cooperative could be composed of three members.
33. The Court reiterates at the outset that the term “victim” in Article 34 of the Convention denotes the person directly affected by the act or omission which is at issue (see Eckle v. Germany, 15 July 1982, § 66, Series A no. 51). It further notes that disregarding a company’s legal personality as regards the question of being a “victim” will be justified only in exceptional circumstances, in particular where it is clearly established that it is impossible for the company to apply to the Court through the organs set up under its articles of incorporation or – in the event of liquidation or bankruptcy – through its liquidators or trustees in bankruptcy (see Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria (dec.), no. 49429/99, 9 September 2004; Camberrow MM5 AD v. Bulgaria (dec.), no. 50357/99, 1 April 2004; and Agrotexim and Others v. Greece, 24 October 1995, § 66, Series A no. 330-A).
34. On the other hand, the Court reiterates that the sole owner of a company can claim to be a “victim” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention in so far as the impugned measures taken with regard to his or her company are concerned, because in the case of a sole owner there is no risk of differences of opinion among shareholders or between shareholders and a board of directors as to the existence and nature of infringements of the Convention rights or the most appropriate way of reacting to such infringements (see Ankarcrona v. Sweden (dec.), no. 35178/97, 27 June 2000). However, the executive director of or a minority shareholder in a company cannot claim to be a “victim” of a violation of the Convention, having lodged an application in his or her own name rather than on behalf of the company, if the company and not the applicant was a party to the domestic proceedings at issue (see Rahimov v. Azerbaijan (dec.), no. 22759/04, 3 January 2008).
35. The Court observes that in the present case the Cooperative was a party to the domestic proceedings and the judgment of 9 July 2002 was delivered in its favour.
36. Having thoroughly examined the applicants’ submissions, the Court finds that it does not transpire from these submissions that the applicants intended to lodge the present application on behalf of the Cooperative. On the contrary, the applicants lodged the application solely in their own names and complained of violations of their personal rights as the members of the Cooperative. In this connection, the Court notes that any company under Azerbaijani law possesses a legal personality which is distinct from those of its directors and shareholders (see Rahimov, cited above) and, in so far as the application has been lodged by the applicants in their own names, it remains to be seen whether there were any exceptional circumstances, such as bankruptcy or liquidation of the Cooperative, allowing the applicants to claim to be “victims” of the alleged violations in disregard of the Cooperative’s legal personality or whether recognition of the applicants’ victim status would risk affecting the interests of other persons (in other words, whether they are the only owners of the Cooperative in question).
37. The Court cannot agree with the applicants’ argument that they lodged the application with the Court in their names because the Cooperative had ceased its activity. The Court observes that the Cooperative ceased its activity only as a taxpayer. It appears that this had not made an impact on its legal personality, as the Cooperative brought an action against the State Border Service and the Ministry of Finance after 9 March 2004 and was a party to the domestic proceedings in 2005 and in 2006. Moreover its bank account was operational in 2006 when the judgment of 9 July 2002 had been executed. Therefore, the Court finds that the deregistration of the Cooperative as a taxpayer did not deprive it of its legal personality or of its capacity to lodge an application with the Court.
38. Turning to the question whether the applicants were the only owners of the Cooperative, the Court notes that, according to the minutes of the Cooperative’s general meeting submitted by the applicants, all three applicants were members of the Cooperative and there was no member other than them. Moreover, according to these documents, the first applicant was the Cooperative’s chairman, competent to act on its behalf in the domestic proceedings.
39. The Court agrees with the Government on the point that there is no detailed information in the case file concerning the share of each applicant in the Cooperative’s property. However, that point is not relevant. According to the minutes of the Cooperative’s general meeting and in the absence of any document contesting the information described in the above-mentioned minutes, it appears that the applicants are the only three members of the Cooperative. Furthermore, in the light of the particular circumstances of the instant case, the Court also finds the Government’s argument that at least five members were required for establishment of a cooperative irrelevant. The Court observes that according to the Cooperative’s charter as registered by the domestic authorities and the relevant domestic law in force at the time of the establishment of the Cooperative, at least three members were required for its establishment and this rule was not infringed. There is no evidence to prove that, at any time, the domestic authorities ceased to recognise the Cooperative as a legal entity based on this ground (number of members).
40. In contrast to the situation in the Rahimov case, in which the applicant was the chairman of a cooperative and there was no information about other members of that cooperative, in the present case all the applicants are the members of the Cooperative and it has been established that there was no other member than them.
41. Taking into consideration that a cooperative’s property and profits belong to its members (Article 110 and 110-2 of the Civil Code) and having regard to the absence of competing interests which could create difficulties, for example, in determining who is entitled to apply to the Court, and in the light of the circumstances of the case as a whole, the Court considers that the applicants can reasonably claim to be “victims” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention, in so far as the impugned measures taken with regard to their Cooperative are concerned (see, mutatis mutandis, Ankarcrona, cited above).
42. Accordingly, the Court rejects the Government’s objection.
2. Loss of the applicants’ victim status due to the enforcement of the judgment
43. The Government argued that as the judgment of 9 July 2002 had been fully enforced the applicants could no longer be considered as “victims” within the meaning of the Convention.
44. The applicants contested the Government’s objection and maintained their complaints.
45. The Court reiterates that a decision or measure favourable to an applicant is not in principle sufficient to deprive him of his status as a “victim” unless the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded redress for, the breach of the Convention (see Amuur v. France, 25 June 1996, § 36, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-III, and Dalban v. Romania [GC], no. 28114/95, § 44, ECHR 1999-VI). Only when these conditions are satisfied does the subsidiary nature of the protective mechanism of the Convention preclude examination of an application.
46. The Court notes that the mere fact that the authorities finally carried out the payment of the debt after a significant delay cannot be viewed as automatically depriving the applicants of their victim status under the Convention. The full enforcement of the judgment of 9 July 2002, after about four years, may have arguably constituted an acknowledgment by the authorities of the alleged violations of the Convention.
47. However, even assuming that there has been such an acknowledgment, the Court notes that no compensation was awarded to the applicants in respect of the alleged violation of the Convention, namely, the lengthy delay in the enforcement of the judgment of 9 July 2002. Therefore, the Court finds that the measures taken in the applicants’ favour were insufficient to deprive them of their “victim” status in the present case (see, mutatis mutandis, Ramazanova and Others v. Azerbaijan, no. 44363/02, §§ 36-38, 1 February 2007, and Efendiyeva v. Azerbaijan, no. 31556/03, §§ 48-50, 25 October 2007).
48. Accordingly, the Court rejects the Government’s objection as to the applicants’ loss of victim status.
3. Conclusion
49. The Court considers that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention or inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
50. The Government did not make any submissions on the merits of the case.
51. The applicants reiterated their complaints, noting that the delay in the enforcement of the judgment of 9 July 2002 had infringed their right to a fair trial and their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention
52. At the outset, the Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal; in this way it embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect. However, that right would be illusory if a Contracting State’s domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. It would be inconceivable that Article 6 § 1 should describe in detail procedural guarantees afforded to litigants – proceedings that are fair, public and expeditious – without protecting the implementation of judicial decisions; to construe Article 6 as being concerned exclusively with access to a court and the conduct of proceedings would be likely to lead to situations incompatible with the principle of the rule of law which the Contracting States undertook to respect when they ratified the Convention. Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 (see Hornsby v. Greece, 19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II).
53. The Court further notes that a delay in the execution of a judgment may be justified in particular circumstances. But the delay may not be such as to impair the essence of the right protected under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 35, ECHR 2002-III). The Court observes that in the present case the judgment of 9 July 2002 was enforced in full only in August 2006, about four years after its delivery (compare Timofeyev v. Russia, no. 58263/00, §§ 41-42, 23 October 2003). No reasonable justification was advanced by the Government for this delay.
54. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
55. In view of the above finding, the Court does not consider it necessary to rule on the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention because Article 6 is lex specialis in regard to this part of the application (see, for example, Efendiyeva, cited above, § 59, and Jasiūnienė v. Lithuania, no. 41510/98, § 32, 6 March 2003).
(b) Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
56. The Court reiterates that a “claim” can constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 if it is sufficiently established to be enforceable (see Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301-B ).
57. The judgment of 9 July 2002 of Local Economic Court no. 1 became enforceable and final one month after its delivery. The impossibility of obtaining execution of this judgment for such a long period of time constituted an interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Burdov, cited above, § 40, and Jasiūnienė, cited above, § 45). The Government have not advanced any acceptable justification for this interference.
58. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that there has also been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION IN RESPECT OF UNFAIRNESS OF THE PROCEEDINGS CONCERNING THE APPLICANTS’ COMPENSATION CLAIM FOR THE DELAY IN THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE JUDGMENT OF 9 JULY 2002
59. Relying on Article 6 of the Convention, the applicants complained that the proceedings concerning their compensation claim for the delay in the enforcement of the judgment of 9 July 2002 were unfair and that the domestic courts had misinterpreted the domestic law.
60. In the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court considers that this part of the application does not disclose any appearance of a violation of the Convention. It follows that it is inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
61. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
62. The applicants did not submit a claim for just satisfaction in the manner required by Rule 60 of the Rules of Court. Accordingly, the Court considers that there is no call to award them any sum on that account.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (in respect of the delay in the execution of the judgment of 9 July 2002) admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 July 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; Rimanente inammissibile
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA JAFARLI ED ALTRI C. AZERBAIJAN
(Richiesta n. 36079/06)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
29 luglio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Jafarli ed Altri c. Azerbaijan,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta di:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 6 luglio 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 36079/06) contro la Repubblica del’ Azerbaijan depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da tre cittadini dell’ Azerbaijani, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti”), l’8 agosto 2006.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stato accordato il patrocinio gratuito furono rappresentati dal Sig. M. M. ed dal Sig. A. H., avvocati che praticano a Baku. Il Governo dell’ Azerbaijani (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Ç. Asgarov.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che il ritardo nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 aveva violato il loro diritto ad un processo equo ed i loro diritti di proprietà, come garantiti dall’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. Il 14 marzo 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I richiedenti sono cittadini dell’ Azerbaijani che nacquero rispettivamente nel 1951, 1956 e 1978 e vivono a Nakhchivan, Azerbaijan.
6. I richiedenti erano membri di una cooperativa (“Əlinc” Kooperativi-“la Cooperativa”) registrata a Nakhchivan. La Cooperativa fu creata tramite una decisione di un'assemblea generale del 5 aprile 1989 ed era composta inizialmente da cinque membri, incluso il primo richiedente.
7. Lo statuto della Cooperativa fu registrato ufficialmente il 19 settembre 1994 dal Ministero della Giustizia della Repubblica Autonoma di Nakhchivan. Secondo questo statuto, la Cooperativa sarebbe stata liquidata, inter alia, se il numero dei suoi membri fosse sceso a meno di tre.
8. Secondo le note delle assemblee generali della Cooperativa disponibili nell'archivio della causa, ci furono successivamente dei cambi nei membri della Cooperativa. In seguito alla partenza di quattro membri della Cooperativa, il 18 dicembre 1996 il secondo e il terzo richiedente divennero i suoi membri nuovi ed il numero totale dei membri corrispose a tre. In tutti questi documenti il primo richiedente è stato menzionato come il presidente della Cooperativa.
9. Facendo seguito ad un numero di contratti conclusi nel periodo dal 1997 al 2000, la Cooperativa fornì una delle unità del Dipartimento Principale delle Truppe di Confine del Ministero della Sicurezza Nazionale (“il Settore delle Truppe di Confine”) coi vari generi alimentari.
10. Benché la Cooperativa avesse adempiuto ai suoi obblighi contrattuali, non fu pagata pienamente.
11. In una data non specificata la Cooperativa introdusse un'azione contro il Settore delle Truppe di Confine e l’ Unità delle Truppe del Confine N.ro 2006, chiedendo il pagamento di un debito accumulato nell'importo di 290,167,334 di vecchi manat dell’ Azerbaijani (AZM) più 10% interesse, come convenuto da contratto.
12. Il 9 luglio 2002 la Corte Economica Locale N.ro 1 respinse la rivendicazione contro il Settore delle Truppe di Confine. Comunque, la Corte Economica Locale N.ro 1 sostenne la rivendicazione contro l’Unità delle Truppe del Confine N.ro 2006 ed ordinò a quest’ultima di pagare AZM 319,183,067 in totale alla Cooperativa. Questo importo includeva il debito principale di AZM 290,167,334 e l’onere della sanzione penale di AZM 29,016,733.
13. Nessun ricorso fu depositato contro questa sentenza e, facendo seguito al diritto nazionale, divenne esecutiva entro un mese dalla sua consegna.
14. Il21 ottobre 2002 la Corte Economica Locale N.ro 1 emise un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza. Comunque, l’Unità delle Truppe del Confine N.ro 2006 si rifiutò di attenersi con la sentenza e, nonostante le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti nei confronti varie autorità, non fu eseguita.
15. Nel frattempo il Settore delle Truppe di Confine fu riorganizzato e cambiò il nome in Servizio di Confine Statale.
16. I documenti nei file della causa mostrano che, sulla base di una richiesta della Cooperativa del 9 marzo 2004, firmata dal primo richiedente, l'attività della Cooperativa come contribuente fu cessata e questo fatto fu registrato dal Ministero di Tasse.
17. In una data non specificata nel 2005 la Cooperativa introdusse un'azione contro il Servizio di Confine Statale ed il Ministero delle Finanze lamentandosi della non-esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002. La Cooperativa chiese AZM 58,033,446 per guadagni perduti, AZM 649,900,896 per danno materiale ed AZM 300,000,000 per danno non-patrimoniale.
18. Il 7 novembre 2005 la Corte Economica Locale N.ro 1 respinse la rivendicazione, trovando che nessuno degli imputati avrebbe potuto essere ritenuto responsabile per la non-esecuzione della sentenza, perché l'importo assegnato alla Cooperativa con la sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 non era stato pagato a causa al rifiuto della Tesoreria Statale di assegnare finanziamenti statali a questo fine.
19. Il 6 febbraio 2006 la Corte Economica e il 16 giugno 2006 la Corte Suprema sostennero la sentenza della corte di prima -istanza.
20. Nel periodo dal marzo all’ agosto 2006 la sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 fu eseguita pienamente, e l'importo totale di AZM 319,183,067 fu pagato sul conto bancario che la Cooperativa deteneva presso la Banca Kapital.
21. Con una decisione del 1 maggio 2007 la Corte Economica della Repubblica Autonoma di Nakhchivan terminò i procedimenti di esecuzione grazie all'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
22. La Legge sulla Cooperazione nell'URSS del 26 maggio 1988 dell'URSS prevedeva che una cooperativa fosse stabilita su una base volontaria. Il numero dei membri di una cooperativa non poteva essere meno di tre (Articolo 11).
23. La Legge del 28 ottobre 1992 sul rimanere provvisorio in vigore delle precedenti leggi dell’URSS sul territorio della Repubblica dell’ Azerbaijan e la loro applicazione forniva una lista delle precedenti leggi dell’URSS che sarebbero rimaste in vigore nell’ Azerbaijan finché non si fossero adottate le attinenti leggi della Repubblica dell’ Azerbaijan. La Legge sulla Cooperazione nell'URSS del 26 maggio 1988 compariva su questa lista. Questa Legge cessò di essere applicata il 12 ottobre 2001.
24. Il Codice civile del 1 settembre 2000 prevede che una cooperativa è un tipo di società commerciale che è un'unione volontaria di individui o di persone giuridiche stabilita al fine di soddisfare le necessità materiali e le altre necessità dei suoi membri tramite il consolidamento dei loro contributi materiali (Articolo 109.1). Una cooperativa può essere stabilita da almeno cinque membri (Articolo 109-1.1).
25. I membri di una cooperativa, in essenza godono diritti simili a quelli dei fondatori o degli azionisti di altri tipi di persone giuridiche, incluso il diritto di partecipare alla gestione della cooperativa e ricevere una quota dei suoi profitti (Articoli 109.2 e 109.4 in fine). La proprietà della cooperativa è divisa fra i membri in conformità col suo statuto (Articolo 110). I profitti della cooperativa sono distribuiti tra i membri in conformità con le loro quote, così come la misura della loro partecipazione nella funzione della cooperativa, per mezzo del personale contributo di manodopera o altrimenti (Articolo 110-2).
26. Il corpo della gestione suprema di una cooperativa è l'assemblea generale dei membri. Ogni membro ha un voto all'assemblea generale a prescindere dalla misura del suo contributo al finanziamento del capitale della cooperativa (Articoli 111.1 e 111.5).
27. I corpi esecutivi di una cooperativa sono un consiglio d’amministrazione e un presidente. Il presidente di una cooperativa può essere eletto solamente fra i membri della cooperativa. Il presidente è eletto per un termine specificato dall'assemblea generale dei membri e ha diritto a rappresentare la cooperativa (Articoli 111.1 e 111.10). Una cooperativa può essere riorganizzata volontariamente o può essere liquidata tramite una decisione dei suoi membri dell'assemblea generale (Articolo 113.1).
28. L’ Articolo 69.2 del Codice di Procedura Civile prevede che persone giuridiche possono essere rappresentate di fronte a corti dai loro corpi, agendo all'interno della sfera dei poteri conferiti loro dalla legge, regolamentazioni o documenti costitutivi della persona giuridica, o da rappresentanti che agiscono sulla base di una procura.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 6 § 1 E DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 A RIGUARDO DEL RITARDO NELL'ESECUZIONE DELLA SENTENZA DEL 9 LUGLIO 2002
29. Appellandosi agli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione e all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, i richiedenti si lamentarono del ritardo nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 della Corte Economica Locale n. 1. L’Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale … .”
L’Articolo 13 della Convenzione recita come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Status di vittime dei richiedenti
30. Il Governo contestò lo status di vittime dei richiedenti, notando che loro non erano stati una parte ai procedimenti nazionali e non potevano pretendere di essere vittime. In questo collegamento, il Governo presentò, che non c'erano informazioni riguardo alla proprietà della Cooperativa da parte dei richiedenti o qualsiasi documento che provasse la loro appartenenza a questa. Il Governo addusse inoltre che i richiedenti non potevano essere considerati i soli proprietari della Cooperativa, perché secondo il diritto nazionale una cooperativa avrebbe dovuto essere composta da almeno cinque membri.
31. I richiedenti addussero che loro non depositarono la richiesta presso la Corte solamente come individui, ma anche a favore della Cooperativa, perché la richiesta fu firmata dalla persona a cui era permesso rappresentare la Cooperativa. Loro presentarono che siccome la Cooperativa aveva cessato la sua attività il 9 marzo 2004 la richiesta era stata depositata presso la Corte da tutti i suoi membri.
32. I richiedenti presentarono inoltre che non c'era nessun membro della Cooperativa a parte loro e che, loro ne erano congiuntamente, i pieni proprietari. A questo riguardo, i richiedenti produssero note delle assemblee generali della Cooperativa che mostravano i cambi nell'appartenenza della Cooperativa. I richiedenti produssero anche documenti, firmati dai precedenti membri della Cooperativa e confermati dal notaio pubblico, affermando che i precedenti membri non avevano rivendicazione sulla Cooperativa. I richiedenti dibatterono che, in conformità col diritto nazionale in vigore al tempo della costituzione della Cooperativa, una cooperativa avrebbe potuto essere composta da tre membri.
33. La Corte reitera all'inizio che il termine “vittima” nell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione denota la persona colpita direttamente dall'atto o dall’ omissione in questione (vedere Eckle c. Germania, 15 luglio 1982, § 66 Serie A n. 51). Nota inoltre che trascurare la personalità legale di una società in merito alla questione di essere una “vittima” sarà giustificato solamente in circostanze eccezionali, in particolare dove chiaramente è stabilito che è impossibile per la società fare domanda alla Corte tramite gli organi stabiliti sotto i suoi statuti societari o- nel caso di liquidazione o di fallimento- tramite i suoi liquidatori o amministratori di fallimento (vedere Capital Bank Ad c. Bulgaria (dec.), n. 49429/99, 9 settembre 2004; Camberrow MM5 Ad c. Bulgaria (dec.), n. 50357/99, 1 aprile 2004; ed Agrotexim ed Altri c. la Grecia, 24 ottobre 1995, § 66 Serie A n. 330-A).
34. D'altra parte la Corte reitera che solo proprietario di una società può chiedere di essere una “vittima” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione nella misura in cui sono riguardate le misure contestate prese riguardo alla sua società, perché nel caso di un solo proprietario non c'è nessun rischio di divergenza di opinione fra azionisti o fra azionisti ed un consiglio di amministrazione in merito all'esistenza e alla natura delle violazioni dei diritti della Convenzione o al modo più appropriato di reagire a simili violazioni (vedere Ankarcrona c. Svezia (dec.), n. 35178/97, 27 giugno 2000). Comunque, il direttore esecutivo o un azionista di minoranza di una società non può pretendere di essere una “vittima” di una violazione della Convenzione, avendo depositato una richiesta a suo proprio nome piuttosto che a favore della società, se la società e non il richiedente era una parte ai procedimenti nazionali in questione (vedere Rahimov c. Azerbaijan (il dec.), n. 22759/04, 3 gennaio 2008).
35. La Corte osserva che nella presente causa la Cooperativa era una parte ai procedimenti nazionali e la sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 fu consegnata a suo favore.
36. Avendo esaminato completamente le osservazioni dei richiedenti , la Corte costata che non traspira da queste osservazioni che i richiedenti hanno inteso depositare la presente richiesta a favore della Cooperativa. Al contrario, i richiedenti depositarono solamente la richiesta a proprio nome e si lamentarono delle violazioni dei loro diritti personali come membri della Cooperativa. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che qualsiasi società sotto la legge dell’ Azerbaijani possiede una personalità legale che è distinta da quella dei suoi direttori ed azionisti (vedere Rahimov, citata sopra) e, nella misura in cui la richiesta è stata depositata dai richiedenti a loro proprio nome, rimane da vedere se c'era una qualsiasi circostanza eccezionale, come il fallimento o la liquidazione della Cooperativa da permettere ai richiedenti di pretendere di essere “vittime” delle violazioni addotte nella noncuranza della personalità legale della Cooperativa o se il riconoscimento dello status di vittima dei richiedenti rischierebbe di danneggiare gli interessi di altre persone (in altre parole, se loro sono i soli proprietari della Cooperativa in oggetto).
37. La Corte non può confarsi con l'argomento dei richiedenti per cui depositarono la richiesta presso la Corte a loro nome perché la Cooperativa aveva cessato la sua attività. La Corte osserva che la Cooperativa cessò la sua attività solamente come contribuente. Sembra che questo non aveva avuto un impatto sulla sua personalità legale, siccome la Cooperativa introdusse un'azione contro il Servizio di Confine Statale ed il Ministero delle Finanze dopo 9 marzo 2004 ed era una parte ai procedimenti nazionali nel 2005 e nel 2006. Inoltre il suo conto bancario era operativo nel 2006 quando la sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 era stata eseguita. Perciò, la Corte trova che la cancellazione della Cooperativa come contribuente non la spogliarono della sua personalità legale o della sua qualità per depositare una richiesta presso la Corte.
38. Rivolgendosi alla questione se i richiedenti erano i soli proprietari della Cooperativa, la Corte nota che, secondo le note dell'assemblea generale della Cooperativa presentate dai richiedenti, tutti i tre richiedenti erano membri della Cooperativa e non c'era altro membro a parte loro. Secondo questi documenti, il primo richiedente era inoltre, il presidente della Cooperativa, abilitato ad agire per proprio conto nei procedimenti nazionali.
39. La Corte si confà col Governo sul punto che non ci sono informazioni particolareggiate nell'archivio della causa riguardo alla quota di ogni richiedente nella proprietà della Cooperativa. Comunque, questo punto non è attinente. Secondo le note dell'assemblea generale della Cooperativa e in mancanza di qualsiasi documento che contesta le informazioni descritte nelle note summenzionate, sembra, che i richiedenti sono i soli tre membri della Cooperativa. Alla luce delle particolari circostanze della presente causa, la Corte trova inoltre l'argomento del Governo che erano richiesti almeno cinque membri per costituzione di una cooperativa anche irrilevante. La Corte osserva che secondo lo statuto della Cooperativa come registrato dalle autorità nazionali ed il diritto nazionale attinente in vigore al tempo della costituzione della Cooperativa, erano richiesti almeno tre membri per la sua costituzione e questa norma non fu infranta. Non c'è nessuna prova che provi che in qualsiasi tempo, le autorità nazionali cessarono di riconoscere la Cooperativa come una persona giuridica su questa base (numero dei membri).
40. In contrasto alla situazione nella causa Rahimov nella quale il richiedente era il presidente di una cooperativa e non c'erano informazioni degli altri membri di quella cooperativa, nella presente causa tutti i richiedenti sono membri della Cooperativa ed è stato stabilito che non c'era nessun altro membro a parte loro.
41. Prendendo in esame che la proprietà di una cooperativa ei profitti appartengono ai suoi membri (Articolo 110 e 110-2 del Codice civile) ed avendo riguardo all'assenza di interessi in competizione che avrebbero potuto creare difficoltà, per esempio nel determinare a chi è concesso fare domanda alla Corte, e alla luce delle circostanze della causa nell'insieme, la Corte considera che i richiedenti possono pretendere ragionevolmente di essere “vittime” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione, nella misura in cui sono riguardate le misure contestate prese con riguardo alla loro Cooperativa (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Ankarcrona citata sopra).
42. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo.
2. Perdita dello status di vittima dei richiedenti status a causa dell'esecuzione della sentenza
43. Il Governo dibatté che siccome la sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 era stata eseguito pienamente i richiedenti non potrebbero essere più considerati come “vittime” all'interno del significato della Convenzione.
44. I richiedenti contestarono l'eccezione del Governo e mantennero le loro azioni di reclamo.
45. La Corte reitera che una decisione o una misura favorevole ad un richiedente non è in principio sufficiente a spogliarlo del suo status di “vittima” a meno che le autorità nazionali abbiano ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconosciuto una compensazione per la violazione della Convenzione (vedere Amuur c. Francia, 25 giugno 1996 § 36, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-III e Dalban c. Romania [GC], n. 28114/95, § 44 ECHR 1999-VI). Solamente quando queste condizioni sono soddisfatte la natura sussidiaria del meccanismo protettivo della Convenzione preclude l’esame di una richiesta.
46. La Corte nota che il mero fatto che le autorità infine eseguirono il pagamento del debito dopo che un ritardo significativo non può essere visto come se spogliasse automaticamente i richiedenti del loro status di vittima sotto la Convenzione. La piena esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002, dopo approssimativamente quattro anni, ha potuto costituire discutibilmente un riconoscimento da parte delle autorità delle violazioni addotte della Convenzione.
47. Comunque, presumendo anche che ci sia stato tale riconoscimento, la Corte nota che nessun risarcimento fu assegnato ai richiedenti a riguardo della violazione addotta della Convenzione, vale a dire il lungo ritardo nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002. Perciò, la Corte trova che le misure prese a favore dei richiedenti siano insufficienti a spogliarli del loro status di “vittima” nella causa presente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Ramazanova ed Altri c. Azerbaijan, n. 44363/02, §§ 36-38, 1 febbraio 2007, ed Efendiyeva c. Azerbaijan, n. 31556/03, §§ 48-50 25 ottobre 2007).
48. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo in merito alla perdita dello staus di vittime dei richiedenti .
3. Conclusione
49. La Corte considera che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione o inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
50. Il Governo non fece nessuna osservazione sui meriti della causa.
51. I richiedenti reiterarono le loro azioni di reclamo, notando che il ritardo nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 aveva infranto il loro diritto ad un processo equo ed il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione
52. All'inizio, la Corte reitera, che l’Articolo 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto di portare qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi di fronte ad una corte o ad tribunale; essendo così incarna il “diritto ad una corte” di cui il diritto di accesso cioè è il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte a corti in questioni civili ne costituisce un aspetto. Comunque, questo diritto sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di un Stato Contraente permettesse che una decisione giudiziale definitiva,e vincolante rimanga non operante a danno di una parte. Sarebbe inconcepibile che l’Articolo 6 § 1 debba descrivere in dettaglio garanzie procedurali riconosciute ai contendenti-procedimenti che sono equi, pubblici e veloci-senza proteggere l'attuazione di decisioni giudiziali; sarebbe probabile che costruire Articolo 6 preoccupandosi esclusivamente dell’accesso ad una corte e della condotta dei procedimenti conduca a situazioni incompatibili col principio della preminenza del diritto che gli Stati Contraenti si impegnarono a rispettare quando ratificarono la Convenzione. L’esecuzione di una data sentenza da parte di qualsiasi corte deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, 19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II).
53. La Corte nota inoltre che un ritardo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza può essere giustificato in particolari circostanze. Ma il ritardo non può essere tale da danneggiare l'essenza del diritto protetto sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 35 ECHR 2002-III). La Corte osserva che nella presente causa la sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 fu eseguita in pieno solamente nell’agosto 2006, approssimativamente quattro anni dopo la sua consegna (confronta Timofeyev c. Russia, n. 58263/00, §§ 41-42 del 23 ottobre 2003). Nessuna giustificazione ragionevole fu proposta dal Governo per questo ritardo.
54. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
55. Nella prospettiva della costatazione sopra, la Corte non considera necessario decidere sull'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione perché l’Articolo 6 lex specialis riguardo a questa parte della richiesta (vedere, per esempio, Efendiyeva, citata sopra, § 59, e Jasiūnienė c. Lituania, n. 41510/98, § 32 del 6 marzo 2003).
(b) Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
56. La Corte reitera che una “rivendicazione” può costituire una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 se viene stabilita sufficientemente da essere esecutiva (vedere Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 Serie A n. 301-B).
57. La sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 della Corte Economica Locale n. 1 divenne esecutiva e finale un mese dopo la sua consegna. L'impossibilità di ottenere l’esecuzione di questa sentenza per un periodo di tempo così lungi costituì un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà, come esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, § 40, e Jasiūnienė, citata sopra, § 45). Il Governo non ha avanzato nessuna giustificazione accettabile per questa interferenza.
58. Le precedenti considerazioni sono sufficienti per permettere alla Corte di concludere che c'è stata anche una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE A RIGUARDO DELL'INIQUITÀ DEI I PROCEDIMENTI RIGUARDO ALLA RIVENDICAZIONE DI RISARCIMENTO DEI RICHIEDENTI PER IL RITARDO NELL'ESECUZIONE DELLA SENTENZA DEL 9 LUGLIO 2002
59. Appellandosi all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, i richiedenti si lamentarono che i procedimenti riguardanti la loro rivendicazione di risarcimento per il ritardo nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002 erano ingiusti e che le corti nazionali avevano interpretato male il diritto nazionale.
60. Alla luce di tutto il materiale i suo possesso, ed nella misura in cui le questioni di cui ci si lamenta sono all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte considera che questa parte della richiesta non rivela qualsiasi comparizione di violazione della Convenzione. Ne segue che è manifestamente inammissibile sotto l’Articolo 35 § 3 come mal-fondata e deve essere respinta facendo seguito all’Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
61. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
62. I richiedenti non presentarono una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa nelle modalità richieste dall’ Articolo 60 dell’Ordinamento di Corte. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna necessità di assegnare loro nessuna la somma a questo proposito .
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (a riguardo del ritardo nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 9 luglio 2002) ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 luglio 2010, facendo all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.