Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF TCHITCHINADZE v. GEORGIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 18156/05/2010
STATO: Georgia
DATA: 27/05/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction partially reserved ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF TCHITCHINADZE v. GEORGIA
(Application no. 18156/05)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
27 May 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Tchitchinadze v. Georgia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Ireneu Cabral Barreto,
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
András Sajó,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Kristina Pardalos, judges,
and Sally Dollé, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 May 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 18156/05) against Georgia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr S. T. (“the applicant”), on 12 April 2005. Having originally raised the issue of his inability to enjoy the possession of property granted to him by the Batumi City Court’s final and enforceable decision of 18 November 2004, the applicant supplemented his application, on 12 August and 6 November 2006, with complaints about the quashing of that decision on 27 October 2005 and the reopening of the civil proceedings.
2. The applicant was granted leave to present his own case in the Georgian language in the written proceedings before the Court, in accordance with Rules 34 § 3 and 36 § 2 in fine of the Rules of Court. The Georgian Government were represented by their former Agent, Mr David Tomadze of the Ministry of Justice.
3. On 5 November 2007 the Court decided to give notice to the Georgian Government of complaints under Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerning the quashing of the aforementioned decision of 18 November 2004. The Russian Government were invited to intervene as a third party (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 of the Rules of Court). It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
4. The Georgian Government (“the Government”) and the applicant each filed observations on the admissibility and merits of the communicated complaints (Rule 54A of the Rules of Court). The Russian Government informed the Court that they did not wish to intervene as a third party.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. The background
5. The applicant was born in 1952 and currently lives in Belgorod, in the Russian Federation.
6. He owned a house located at 54 Mazniashvili Street in Batumi, in the Ajarian Autonomous Republic (“the AAR”), Georgia. The house and its adjacent premises were located on a plot of land of some 284 square meters.
7. Under a contract of 8 April 1994 (“the contract of sale”), the applicant ceded to Mr G., by then the Ajarian Deputy Minister of the Interior, half of his house (“the Mazniashvili estate”) for the price of 150,000,000 coupons (the provisional Georgian currency introduced at the beginning of the 1990s for purposes of monetary reform). According to the case file, the purchasing power of that sum corresponded to some 300 euros (EUR) at the material time. The contract of sale was certified by a notary. As further disclosed by a written statement of a witness to that transaction, after the signing of the contract Mr G. gave the applicant 3,000 United States dollars (EUR 2,1991) in cash. Shortly after the sale of the Mazniashvili estate, the applicant left Batumi and settled, together with his family, in the Russian Federation. Allegedly, a reason for that hasty departure was Mr G.’s continuous pressure on the applicant to cede the remaining part of the house.
8. As a result of tensions between the central and local authorities (see The Georgian Labour Party v. Georgia, no. 9103/04, § 52, 8 July 2008), members of the Ajarian government, including Mr G., fled the country in May 2004.
B. The emergence of the applicant’s title to the Mazniashvili estate
9. On 7 June 2004 the applicant brought a civil action against Mr G., requesting that the contract of sale be declared null and void for having been entered into under duress (“the civil case”). In particular, the applicant, referring to the relevant factual circumstances, claimed that the respondent, by then an extremely powerful person in the AAR, had forced him to cede the Mazniashvili estate for a ludicrously small price under threats to his person and family. The applicant also sought an injunction to have the estate attached until after the final resolution of the dispute.
10. In a decision of 30 June 2004, the Batumi City Court granted the injunction and ordered the attachment of the Mazniashvili estate. The City Court transmitted its decision, describing the facts of the dispute, to the Chamber of Notaries of the Ajarian Ministry of Justice for enforcement. In the absence of an appeal, the decision became final after five days, and, as disclosed by the case file, the relevant attachment record was duly entered in the Land Register.
11. On 25 August 2004 the Ajarian Public Prosecutor’s Office opened a criminal case against Mr G. for various offences committed in public office. On the basis of those criminal proceedings, the prosecutor requested the Ajarian High Court to confiscate the movable and immovable property of the accused, including the Mazniashvili estate, under Article 37(1) of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCP”, “the confiscation proceedings”). According to the prosecutor’s submissions, the Mazniashvili estate measured some 68 square meters and was valued at GEL 50,000 (EUR 21,275).
12. On 10 September 2004 the Ajarian Supreme Court partially allowed the prosecutor’s request, ordering the confiscation of some of Mr G.’s property, including the Mazniashvili estate. The prosecutor appealed against that partial confiscation to the Supreme Court of Georgia.
13. On 18 November 2004 the Batumi City Court, in the absence of the respondent Mr G., allowed the applicant’s action of 7 June 2004. The court annulled the contract of sale, confirmed the applicant’s title to the Mazniashvili estate and ordered the Batumi Land Registry, which formed part of the Ajarian Ministry of Justice, to proceed with the necessary registration formalities. The decision further noted that it would become final ten days after being served on the respondent. There being no appeal within that statutory period, the decision became final on an unspecified date.
14. On 7 December 2004 the applicant, relying on the already binding decision of 18 November 2004, requested the Supreme Court of Georgia to discontinue the confiscation proceedings with respect to the Mazniashvili estate.
15. Either on 27 December 2004 or 26 January 2005 the Batumi Land Registry recorded the applicant’s title to the Mazniashvili estate, amounting to some 68 square meters, on the basis of the final decision of 18 November 2004 (the case file contains a copy of that official record which bears two different dates). On 18 February 2005 the Registry issued another certificate, confirming the applicant’s title to the real estate.
16. On 17 January 2005 the Supreme Court of Georgia, after having conducted a hearing in the presence of representatives of both the Prosecutor General’s Office (“the PGO”) and Mr G., overturned the decision of 10 September 2004 in the part concerning the confiscation of the Mazniashvili estate, and upheld the remainder. The court acknowledged that the estate, valued at GEL 50,000 (EUR 21,275), represented the applicant’s property by virtue of the binding decision of 18 November 2004. The Supreme Court instructed the Ajarian High Court to examine the issue of discontinuation of the confiscation proceedings concerning the Mazniashvili estate.
17. On 18 March 2005 the Batumi Land Registry addressed a letter to the Ajarian prosecutor, demanding clarification with respect to the situation of the Mazniashvili estate. The Register appeared to be confused by the fact that the estate represented both the applicant’s property by virtue of the binding decision of 18 November 2004 and yet was an object of the pending confiscation proceedings. Furthermore, contrary to what had been confirmed by the record of 27 January 2005 and the certificate of 18 February 2005 (see paragraph 15 above), the Registry informed the prosecutor that the applicant’s title to the Mazniashvili estate had not yet been formally recorded.
18. In a letter dated 31 March 2005, the Deputy Minister of Justice confirmed that the applicant was the owner of the Mazniashvili estate on the basis of the final decision of 18 November 2004, adding that the process of registration of his property title had been suspended.
C. The quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004
19. On 24 March 2005 the Ajarian prosecutor filed with the Batumi City Court a request to quash the final decision of 18 November 2004 and to reopen the civil case, under Article 422 § 1 (b) of the Code of Civil Procedure (“the CCP”). The prosecutor stated that the confiscation of the Mazniashvili estate, indicated by the Ajarian High Court’s decision of 10 September 2004, had already been confirmed by the Supreme Court of Georgia. However, the enforcement of the confiscation was impossible owing to the existence of the conflicting decision of 18 November 2004. The prosecutor complained that the Batumi City Court should have involved him as a third party in the civil case which, moreover, should have been suspended pending the outcome of the confiscation proceedings.
20. On 7 April and 18 June 2005, the applicant submitted written comments in reply to the Ajarian prosecutor’s request for quashing. He argued that the prosecution authority, being a party to the confiscation proceedings, had learnt of the decision of 18 November 2004 in the course of the Supreme Court’s hearing of 17 January 2005 at the latest. Consequently, the Ajarian prosecutor’s request for quashing was belated, as provided by Article 426 §§ 1 and 2 of the CCP. He further noted that the Mazniashvili estate had never been State property and, consequently, the Batumi City Court could not have been expected to join the prosecutor as a third party to the civil case. If the Ajarian prosecutor had acted with minimum diligence, by having consulted, for instance, the Batumi Land Registry prior to the institution of the confiscation proceedings against Mr G. on 25 August 2004, he would have learnt that the Mazniashvili estate had already been attached, by virtue of the injunction of 30 June 2004, in the course of the civil case. The applicant also challenged the prosecutor’s misleading assertion that the confiscation of the Mazniashvili estate had been confirmed by the Supreme Court of Georgia.
21. Reiterating the above arguments, the applicant also requested the PGO, on 12 September 2005, to open a criminal case against the Ajarian prosecutor for abuse of power.
22. On 23 September 2005 Judge V. of the Batumi City Court summoned the applicant, who was residing in Belgorod, by telegram to appear on 30 September 2005 as a respondent in the quashing proceedings brought by the Ajarian prosecutor. The applicant telegraphed back on 27 September 2005 to request adjournment of the hearing in view of his health problems.
23. On 17 October 2005 Judge V. summoned the applicant by telegram to appear on 27 October 2005 “as a respondent in the proceedings brought by a notary public of Batumi”. The telegram noted that the claimant’s submissions were being dispatched by registered post.
24. On 18 October 2005 the Ajarian Prosecutor’s Office replied to the applicant’s criminal complaint of 12 September 2005 in the following terms:
“As you already know, the Batumi City Court has granted the Ajarian prosecutor’s request and reopened the case. Consequently, your allegations of abuse of power by the prosecutor are ill-founded, ... and you have the right to plead before the court as a respondent”.
25. On 25 October 2005 the applicant notified Judge V. by telegram of his inability to travel from the Russian Federation to Georgia for the forthcoming hearing on 27 October 2005 in view of his health problems. He noted that he was sending the supporting medical documentation by post and that the notary public’s submissions had not reached him so far.
26. On 1 November 2005 the applicant received the Batumi City Court’s dispatch of 17 October 2005 (see paragraph 23 above). He learnt that the notary public who had certified the contract of sale on 8 April 1994 had requested, on 10 October 2004, the quashing of the binding decision of 18 November 2004 under Article 422 § 1 (b) of the CCP. The notary complained that she should have been involved in the civil case as a respondent, in so far as, pursuant to the Notaries Public Act of 3 May 1996, she had been personally responsible for the validity of the contract in question. As to compliance with the statutory time-limit of one month, the notary claimed that she had first learnt of the existence of the decision of 18 November 2004 from a local newspaper, Batumelebi, on 28 September 2005. The relevant article, published on the latter date, had described the details of the confiscation proceedings and the civil case, noting the existence of the conflicting interests of the applicant and of the Ajarian prosecutor over the Mazniashvili estate.
27. On 9 November 2005 Judge V. summoned the applicant by telegram to appear on 14 November 2005 as a respondent “in the proceedings brought by the notary public.” The applicant telegraphed back on the following day, requesting an adjournment of the hearing in view of his state of health. He also informed Judge V. that he was dispatching by post his comments on the notary’s request for quashing. As disclosed by those comments, received at the City Court on 8 December 2005, the applicant denounced the notary as lacking the requisite locus standi to call into question the outcome of the terminated civil case.
28. On 25 November 2005 the applicant requested the initiation of disciplinary proceedings against Judge V. He complained that, by summoning him by telegraph only a few days before the scheduled hearings, without giving him an opportunity to obtain knowledge of and comment on the claimant’s submissions, the judge had breached the principle of the equality of arms.
29. On 30 November 2005 Judge V. once again requested the applicant to appear at a hearing on 6 December 2005 in the reopening proceedings brought by the notary public. Another request for an adjournment followed from the applicant on 5 December 2005.
30. On 14 March 2006 the applicant received by parcel two decisions of the Batumi City Court dated 30 September and 27 October 2005. As shown by the postmark on the envelope, the parcel had been dispatched by Judge V. on 2 March 2006.
31. In a decision of 27 October 2005, Judge V. ruled that the notary public’s request for quashing of 10 October 2005 was well-founded and that the decision of 18 November 2004 ought to be annulled and the civil case reopened under Article 422 § 1 (b) of the CCP. The judge based her decision on the notary’s written and oral pleadings only and did not explain the reason for having dispensed with the need for submissions from the applicant. Without giving any additional reasons, the judge endorsed the notary’s procedural and substantive arguments, in particular that the request for quashing had been lodged in due time and that the notary should indeed have been involved in the civil case. The operative part of the decision noted that no appeal lay against it.
32. As to the decision of 30 September 2005, it concerned the request for quashing of 24 March 2005 from the Ajarian prosecutor. Judge V. first noted that, despite having been properly summoned to the oral hearing, the applicant had failed to appear and that his explanation in that regard – the reference to health problems – was not substantiated by medical documentation. However, the judge took into account the applicant’s written submissions (see paragraph 20 above), and concluded that the prosecutor’s request for quashing should be rejected as time-barred.
D. The subsequent proceedings
33. On 24 March 2006 Judge V. summoned the applicant by telegram to appear as a claimant in the reopened civil case. The judge specified that Mr G. and the notary were co-respondents in the case, whilst the Ajarian prosecutor had been admitted as a third party. In a telegram dated 28 March 2006, the applicant requested an adjournment in view of his persistent health problems. He noted that the supporting medical documents as well as his request for the replacement of Judge V. were being dispatched by post.
34. On 19 April 2006 the applicant lodged with the Kutaisi Regional Court an appeal against the decision of 27 October 2005. Referring to the fact that Judge V. had summoned him to the relevant quashing proceedings even after 27 October 2005, the applicant accused her of having forged the decision in question by backdating it. On the same day he also requested the Batumi City Court to send him a copy of the ruling by which the notary and the Ajarian prosecutor had been permitted to participate in the reopened civil case. As disclosed by the case file, no reply was forthcoming from either court.
35. Between February and December 2006, the applicant filed numerous letters with the PGO and the judicial and other authorities, complaining that the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 had violated his property rights. He also requested that Judge V. and the notary be prosecuted for abuse of power or that, at least, the judge be removed from further examination of his civil case. Those letters were either left unanswered or, in so far as the criminal complaints were concerned, rejected by the PGO as ill-founded.
36. In February 2007, the applicant learnt from his sister, who lived in Batumi and had frequent contacts with the Registry of the Batumi City Court, that Judge V. had ruled, on an unknown date, to leave his reopened civil case without examination. On 2 February 2007 he requested the Batumi City Court and the Supreme Court of Georgia to provide him with a copy of that ruling. According to the case file, the courts did not reply.
37. In a letter of 7 February 2007, the Batumi Land Registry informed the applicant that the Mazniashvili estate had been registered as State property on the basis of a writ of enforcement issued by the Ajarian High Court on 10 March 2006. The applicant then requested, on 4 March 2007, additional clarification with respect to that writ, but no reply followed.
38. By a letter of 21 April 2008, the Batumi Land Registry, contrary to the information contained in its previous letter (see the preceding paragraph) informed the applicant’s sister that, according to the available records, the Mazniashvili estate had been registered as Mr G.’s property on the basis of the contract of sale.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Code of Civil Procedure as it stood at the material time
39. The relevant provisions of the Code concerning the quashing of final and enforceable decisions and the reopening of civil cases, read as follows:
Article 421 § 1 – Types of reopening
“Proceedings terminated by a final judgment (decision) may be reopened only if there are grounds for bringing either a request to render the final judgment null and void (Article 422) or a request to reopen the proceedings in view of newly discovered circumstances (Article 423).”
Article 422 §§ 1 (a) and (b) and 2 - Request to render a final judgment (decision) null and void
“1. A final and binding judgment (decision) may be quashed at the request of the interested party, if:
(a) A judge who participated in the deliberations in the case was barred from doing so by operation of law;
(b) One of the parties, or its representative in law, had not been invited to participate in the examination of the case.
2. The request to render a final judgment null and void on the above-mentioned grounds shall not be entertained if the requesting party could have referred to those grounds during the proceedings, before the first instance, appeal or cassation courts.”
Pursuant to Article 426 §§ 1 and 2 of the CCP, a request for reopening of proceedings should be lodged within one month after the party concerned learns of the grounds which might either render the final decision null and void or represent newly discovered circumstances within the meaning of Article 421 § 1. That period was not extendable. Article 426 § 3 further specified that, in a situation envisaged by Article 422 § 1 (b), the period of one month started to run following the formal notification of the decision to the party to the proceedings or, if appropriate, its representative in law.
Article 429 § 2 of the CCP stated that an appeal lay against a decision dismissing a request for quashing. However, neither that Article nor any other provision in the Code provided for the possibility of appealing against a decision granting such a request. Pursuant to Article 430, the merits of a request for quashing must be examined at an oral hearing.
B. The Code of Criminal Procedure as it stood at the material time
40. Article 37(1), inserted into the Code of Criminal Procedure on 13 February 2004, stated that, if there was a reasonable suspicion about the origins of property of a person charged with misconduct in public office, a prosecutor was entitled to bring an action for confiscation of that property.
C. The Notaries Public Act of 3 May 1996 as it stood at the material time
41. Pursuant to sections 1 and 5 of the Notaries Public Act, notaries public formed a public-law institution which was directed by the Ministry of Justice.
According to section 3 §§ 1 and 6, a notary public, whilst being an independent professional, exercised State authority. However, the State could not be held liable for any harm caused by a notary’s actions.
Pursuant to sections 4 § 1 and 32-33, all notaries public were obliged to be members of the Chamber of Notaries, a public-law association, created for the purposes of protecting its members’ interests and coordinating their activities, and which had its own legal personality.
Section 11 described the system of supervision of the professional activities of individual notaries public by the Minister of Justice, through the Chamber of Notaries.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
42. The applicant complained that the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 by the Batumi City Court on 27 October 2005 had violated his rights under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Those provisions read, in their relevant parts, as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law....”
A. Admissibility
43. The Government submitted that the applicant had not exhausted domestic remedies with respect to his complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as he had failed to pursue the reopened civil case concerning the determination of his property rights (see also paragraph 67 below).
44. The applicant disagreed.
45. The Court notes that the issue in the present case is not the determination of the applicant’s claim in the course of the reopened civil case but the quashing of the final and enforceable decision of 18 November 2004. Having due regard to its well-established case-law on the matter, the Court reiterates that, owing to the very nature of the act of quashing, the ensuing reopened proceedings, even if they result in the reiteration of the quashed decision, cannot provide a relevant remedy for the purposes of either Article 6 § 1 of the Convention or Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (compare, for instance, The Mrevli Foundation v. Georgia (dec.), no. 25491/04, 5 May 2009, and Popov v. Moldova (no. 2), no. 19960/04, § 35, 6 December 2005). Consequently, the Government’s objection must be dismissed.
46. The Court thus concludes that the applicant’s complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are neither manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention nor inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
47. The Government submitted that the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 had been a lawful and justifiable measure. The lawfulness followed from the fact that the quashing was based on Article 422 § 1 (b) of the CCP, which directly stated that the failure to have one of the parties to the proceedings properly summoned to the examination of the case would render the final decision null and void. Furthermore, the legitimate purpose of that legislative mechanism was to protect the principle of equality of arms. In the present case, the Government stated, the quashing was aimed at the protection of the notary’s right to have that principle upheld.
48. The Government further submitted that the quashing decision of 27 October 2005 could not be said to have been based on arbitrary reasoning. Thus, the Batumi City Court had duly examined both the procedural criterion of the notary’s request for quashing – compliance with the statutory period of one month – and its substantive well-foundedness. Whilst examining the latter element, the City Court had found that the notary had had a legitimate interest in the civil case. Since she had been directly responsible for the validity of the transaction in question, the finding of the nullity of the contract of sale could have tarnished the notary’s professional reputation by suggesting that she had participated in Mr G.’s unlawful deeds. The Government also argued that, if the Batumi City Court had rejected the notary’ request for quashing, it would have unjustifiably limited her right of access to a court. Moreover, the notary’s participation could have provided additional information allowing a better adjudication of the civil case.
49. The Government also asked the Court to pay attention to the fact that the quashing in the present case had not occurred either at the request of a State official (see, a contrario, Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 52, ECHR 2003-IX) or on the basis of subsequently emerging, new circumstances. Rather, the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 was genuinely aimed at the correction of a judicial mistake and could not thus amount to a violation of either Article 6 § 1 of the Convention or Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
50. The applicant replied that the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 under Article 422 § 1 (b) had clearly been unlawful and arbitrary, in so far as the notary had never been a party to the civil case in question. The only parties to the dispute over the contract of sale were himself, as the claimant, and Mr G., as the respondent. The applicant added that he had had no contention against the notary whatsoever, as the latter could hardly have been aware of the duress exercised by Mr G. on him at the time of the disputed contract. However, if the notary had felt offended by the applicant’s actions, she could always have lodged a separate civil action against him.
51. If the notary had been so concerned about the fate of the contract of sale of 8 April 1994, on the basis of which Mr G. had become the owner of the Mazniashvili estate, then, the applicant continued, it was not clear why she had never attempted to become involved in the confiscation proceedings as well. The applicant also claimed that the Ajarian prosecutor had induced the notary public to request the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 and that the publication in the local newspaper had also been staged (see paragraph 26 above). He further argued that, pursuant to the relevant provisions of the Notaries Public Act of 3 May 1996 (see paragraph 41 above), a notary should be treated as a State official.
52. The applicant also complained that Judge V. had quashed the final decision of 18 November 2004 on the basis of the notary’s submissions only, without giving him a chance to submit written or oral comments in reply. He further claimed that, in reality, no hearing had ever been held on 27 October 2005 at the Batumi City Court and that the relevant decision had been backdated by the judge in February or March 2006. The applicant referred in that connection to the suspicious fact that the same judge had continued summoning him to the relevant proceedings even after the above-mentioned date and had dispatched the decision of 27 October 2005 in early March 2006 (see paragraphs 27 and 28 above).
2. The Court’s assessment
53. The Court reiterates that the right to a fair hearing before a tribunal as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which, in its relevant part, declares the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, among other things, that where the courts have finally determined an issue, their ruling should not be called into question (see Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999-VII). This principle underlines that no party is entitled to seek a review of a final and binding judgment merely for the purpose of obtaining a rehearing and a fresh determination of the case. Review by higher courts should not be treated as an appeal in disguise, and the mere possibility of there being two views on the subject is not a ground for re-examination. A departure from that principle is justified only when made necessary by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character (see Ryabykh, cited above, § 52). In addition, the existence of a property interest confirmed by a binding and enforceable judgment constitutes the judgment beneficiary’s “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Quashing of such a judgment amounts to an interference with his or her right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see, among other authorities, Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 40, ECHR 2002-III).
54. The Court first notes that the final and enforceable decision of 18 November 2004 established the applicant’s title to the Mazniashvili estate. Consequently, by quashing that decision on 27 October 2005, the Batumi City Court interfered with the applicant’s right to legal certainty and to the peaceful enjoyment of the estate. It remains to be seen whether that double interference was justifiable within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
55. The Court considers that the procedure for the re-opening of finally settled civil proceedings under Article 422 § 1 of the CCP cannot, as such, be deemed to be incompatible with the Convention, as it aims at the correction of two fundamental judicial errors (see, mutatis mutandis, Popov (no. 2), cited above, §§ 46 and 47). The first of these errors, which affects, in the Court’s view, the principle of a trial “by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law”, is the fact of a judge’s unlawful or otherwise undue participation in the case (Article 422 § 1 (a) of the CCP). The second judicial error negates, as the Government noted, the principle of equality of arms, since it concerns the situation where a final decision has been delivered in the unjustified absence of one of the parties to the proceedings (Article 422 § 1 (b) of the CCP). The Court’s task is thus to determine whether, on the facts of the present case, the procedure was exercised in an appropriate manner, that is to ensure that the quashing was not applied for a purpose other than those for which it had been prescribed under the relevant provisions of the CCP.
56. The Court finds it untoward that the Batumi City Court contented itself, in its decision of 27 October 2005, with the notary public’s arguments alone, without seeking the applicant’s submissions in reply, as required by Article 430 of the CCP, at an oral hearing or, at least, by way of a written procedure. The City Court did not even take the trouble to give reasons for that serious procedural irregularity which, as made clear by the relevant circumstances, was attributable to its own conduct (see paragraphs 23 and 25-27 above). Consequently, the applicant was placed in an unjustifiably disadvantageous position vis-à-vis his opponent in the proceedings, which directly affected his rights under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, Dombo Beheer B.V. v. the Netherlands, 27 October 1993, § 33, Series A no. 274; Hentrich v. France, 22 September 1994, § 56, Series A no. 296-A). Furthermore, whilst the case file does not contain sufficient proof to allow the conclusion that the decision of 27 October 2005 was, as asserted by the applicant, fabricated, the Court cannot overlook the vexing fact that the Batumi City Court summoned the applicant to the relevant proceedings even after the above-mentioned date (see paragraphs 27 and 28 above).
57. The Court further observes that the Batumi City Court did not critically address the notary public’s assertion that she had learnt of the final decision of 18 November 2004 for the first time from the local newspaper on 28 September 2005. By analogy to its similar case-law about the quashing of final decisions and the reopening of proceedings, and noting that such a rule was also explicitly contained in Article 422 § 2 of the CCP, the Court considers that the notary’s assertion should have been examined in the light of the relevant “due diligence” rule. Notably, the notary should have shown that, despite having acted with due diligence, she could not have obtained knowledge of or referred to the facts allegedly constituting a limitation of her right under Article 422 § 1 (b) of the CCP earlier (see, for instance, Pravednaya v. Russia, no. 69529/01, §§ 17 and 27, 18 November 2004, and Popov (no. 2), cited above, §§ 26-28 and 49-51). In this connection, the Court notes that, pursuant to the Notaries Public Act of 3 May 1996, individual notaries, united in the Chamber of Notaries, were directly supervised by the Ministry of Justice (see paragraph 41 above). However, the facts of the case clearly show that the Ministry, acting through its two subordinate agencies – the very same Chamber of Notaries and the Land Registry – was duly aware of the existence of the applicant’s civil case, both whilst it was still pending before the Batumi City Court as well as shortly after the decision of 18 November 2004 became binding and the applicant obtained an enforceable title to the Mazniashvili estate (see paragraphs 10, 13 and 17-18 above). In such circumstances, the Court finds it difficult to accept that the notary discharged, in her request for the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004, the requisite burden of proof under Article 422 § 2 of the CCP, by showing that it would have been objectively impossible for her to obtain knowledge of the civil case earlier. It is particularly regrettable that, in its decision of 27 October 2005, the Batumi City Court omitted to examine this important issue prior to arriving at the conclusion that the request for quashing was timely and well-founded (see Eugenia and Doina Duca v. Moldova, no. 75/07, § 35-37, 3 March 2009; Popov (no. 2), cited above, § 50; Kumkin and Others v. Russia, no. 73294/01, § 33, 5 July 2007).
58. The most disturbing point for the Court is the fact that the notary public, who had never been a party to the initial civil case, obtained the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004 on the basis of Article 422 § 1 (b) of the CCP. In reality, that provision was strictly tailored for the actual parties to the proceedings, to ensure, as the Government noted themselves, that their procedural right to the equality of arms and adversarial proceedings was protected. Logically, a person who was not a party to the proceedings could not subsequently claim to have been a victim of a breach of procedural rights in the course of those proceedings. Even assuming that the applicant’s civil action had offended the notary’s professional reputation, then, instead of such a harsh measure as the quashing of the final and enforceable decision, a more proportionate course of action would have been for the Batumi City Court to advise the notary to sue the applicant in a separate set of proceedings. The Court reiterates in this regard that the power to quash a final decision should be exercised by the authorities with extreme caution, so that a fair balance between the various interests at stake is always struck to the maximum extent possible (see, for instance, Mitrea v. Romania, no. 26105/03, § 25, 29 July 2008, and, mutatis mutandis, Nikitin v. Russia, no. 50178/99, § 57, ECHR 2004-VIII).
59. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court concludes that the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004, which infringed the principle of legal certainty and interfered with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of the Mazniashvili estate, was a misuse of the reopening procedure under Article 422 § 1 of the CCP, not being justified by circumstances of a substantial and compelling character, and that it imposed an excessive and disproportionate burden on the applicant (see, Smirnitskaya and Others v. Russia, no. 852/02, §§ 45 and 53, 5 July 2007; Gavrilenko v. Russia, no. 30674/03, §§ 37 and 41, 15 February 2007; Rahmanova v. Azerbaijan, no. 34640/02, §§ 65 and 73, 10 July 2008).
60. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
61. Relying on Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention, the applicant challenged the length of the reopened proceedings and complained that he had not had an effective domestic remedy against the quashing decision of 27 October 2005.
62. The Court first notes that, given the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004, the length of the consequently reopened proceedings becomes just one element of the applicant’s prolonged inability to enjoy possession of the property granted to him by the quashed decision. Consequently, there is no call to take up this issue separately under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see Vrioni and Others v. Albania, no. 2141/03, § 64, 24 March 2009).
63. Nor is it necessary to rule on the applicant’s complaint under Article 13 of the Convention, in so far as this matter has been absorbed by the complaint about the principle of legal certainty (see, among other authorities, Popov (no. 2), cited above, § 55, and Nikolay Zaytsev v. Russia, no. 3447/06, § 24, 18 February 2010).
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
64. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
65. The applicant claimed compensation in respect of the Mazniashvili estate. He relied on expert opinions issued by Economics-Audit Ltd, a private Georgian firm specialised in auditing. The first opinion, dated 29 November 2007, valued the whole house at 54 Mazniashvili Street, with a total surface area of 212.7 square meters, at USD 180,000 (EUR 132,752). The second opinion, dated 15 April 2008, stated that the value of the whole house, which measured some 207.94 square meters, was EUR 320,000. The applicant explained that the difference in price was caused by the fact that the first expert opinion had omitted to include in its assessment the value of the land on which the house was situated. In addition, the applicant claimed that there had been a boom in real estate prices in Batumi in the period between the first and second expert assessments. Relying on advertisement information from a real estate agency, the applicant further asserted that the price of flats in the relevant district in Batumi started at USD 2,200 (EUR 1,622) per square meter.
66. In addition, the applicant claimed EUR 50,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
67. The Government stated that the expert opinions submitted were not reliable and that the applicant’s claims for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage were unsubstantiated and highly excessive. They argued that, for the purposes of Article 41 of the Convention, the value of the Mazniashvili estate at the time of the alleged violation should be taken into account. The Government also asked the Court that, if a violation of the applicant’s rights under the Convention was found, the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention be reserved. They explained in that regard that, after the quashing of the final decision of 8 November 2004 and the reopening of the proceedings, the applicant’s case against Mr G. had been left without examination owing to the parties’ continuous inability to appear before the Batumi City Court. However, the applicant could always bring a fresh action for recovery of possession of the Mazniashvili estate, in which case the respondent State might be ready to reach a friendly settlement with him.
68. The Court first notes that the applicant cannot be expected to exhaust domestic remedies anew with respect to his claims for just satisfaction under Article 41 of the Convention (see De Wilde, Ooms and Versyp v. Belgium (Article 50), 10 March 1972, § 16, Series A no. 14, and Mancheva v. Bulgaria, no. 39609/98, § 72, 30 September 2004). As to the expert opinions submitted, the Court notes that they concern the value of the whole house which measured either 207.94 or 212.7 square meters. However, what is at stake in the present case is not the entire house at 54 Mazniashvili Street in Batumi but only part of it, representing an area which, according to the material before the Court, is limited to some 68 square meters (see paragraphs 7, 11 and 15-16 above). Furthermore, whilst assuming that there might indeed have been an increase in prices on the Batumi property market, the fact that two valuations of the same real estate within a period of only five months gave a difference in price of EUR 188,000 (see paragraph 65 above) casts legitimate doubt on the qualification and good faith of the assessing experts. Having duly examined the two opinions, the Court further notes that they do not indicate with sufficient clarity how the valuations were determined. Consequently, the Court cannot accept these expert opinions as reliable evidence. Nor could the applicant’s reference to the advertisements of a private real estate agency be confirmed as a legitimate source of information about the genuine price of real property in Batumi.
69. In any event, the Court reiterates that, normally, the priority under Article 41 of the Convention is restitutio in integrum, as the respondent State is expected to make all feasible reparation for the consequences of the violation in such a manner as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see, among other authorities, Apostol v. Georgia, no. 40765/02, § 71, ECHR 2006-XIV; FC Mretebi v. Georgia, no. 38736/04, § 61, 31 July 2007; Assanidze v. Georgia [GC], no. 71503/01, § 198). Consequently, having due regard to its findings in the instant case, the Court considers that the most appropriate form of redress would be to restore to the applicant his title to the Mazniashvili estate, as established by the Batumi City Court decision of 18 November 2004. Alternatively, should this prove impossible, the Court is of the view that the applicant’s claim could also be satisfied by paying him reasonable compensation for the loss of the property title to the Mazniashvili estate, the amount of which should be agreed on by the parties within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. However, should the parties fail to reach agreement within that period, the Court reserves the right to fix the further procedure under Article 41 of the Convention, in order to determine itself the amount of such compensation (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
70. In addition, the Court has no doubt that the applicant suffered distress and frustration on account of the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004. The resulting non-pecuniary damage would not be adequately compensated by the mere finding of a violation. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 5,000 under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
71. The applicant also claimed RUB 120,000 (EUR 2,956) for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and this Court on account of his representation by a certain Mr S. K., a Russian lawyer practising in Belgorod.
72. The Government submitted that the claim was unsubstantiated.
73. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum (see, amongst others, Donadze v. Georgia, no. 74644/01, § 48, 7 March 2006; Gurgenidze v. Georgia, no. 71678/01, § 83, 17 October 2006). As disclosed by the materials in the present case, the applicant personally drafted all his pleadings, both in the domestic and Court proceedings. Furthermore, having been granted leave to present his own case before the Court (see paragraph 2 above), the applicant did not explain the manner in which Mr K. had purportedly assisted him; the case file does not contain any document showing the volume and nature of the work actually completed by this person. Consequently, the Court does not find it established that Mr K. has ever worked on the case and that the applicant is under an obligation to remunerate him in this regard (see, a contrario, Ghavtadze v. Georgia, no. 23204/07, § 120, 3 March 2009). As to other various procedural costs, the applicant did not make any claim under this head.
74. In these circumstances, the Court concludes that there is no ground upon which to award the applicant the reimbursement of costs and expenses
C. Default interest
75. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares admissible the complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerning the quashing of the decision of 18 November 2004;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the quashing of the final decision of 18 November 2004;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine the remaining complaints under Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention;
4. Holds
(a) that should the return of the Mazniashvili estate prove impossible, the respondent State is to pay the applicant, under a mutual agreement (see paragraph 69 above), reasonable compensation in the national currency of the respondent State, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention;
(b) should the parties fail to reach agreement on the amount of the monetary compensation, the Court will determine itself the sum to be paid by the Government (see paragraph 69 above);
accordingly,
(i) reserves the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention in part;
(ii) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement which they may reach;
(iii) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into the national currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 27 May 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Registrar President
1 Here and elsewhere, approximate conversions are given in accordance with the exchange rate of the United States dollar (USD), the Georgian lari (GEL) and the Russian rouble (RUB) to the euro on 8 March 2010.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; soddisfazione Equa in parte riservata; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA TCHITCHINADZE C. GEORGIA
(Richiesta n. 18156/05)
SENTENZA
(meriti)
STRASBOURG
27 maggio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Tchitchinadze c. Georgia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, Ireneu Cabral Barreto, Danutė Jočienė, Dragoljub Popović, András Sajó, Nona Tsotsoria, Kristina Pardalos, giudici,
e Sally Dollé, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 4 maggio 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 18156/05) contro la Georgia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, il Sig. S. T. (“il richiedente”), il 12 aprile 2005. Avendo sollevato originalmente il problema della sua incapacità di godere il possesso della proprietà accordatagli dalla decisione definitiva ed esecutiva della Corte della Città di Batumi del 18 novembre 2004, il richiedente completò la sua richiesta, il 12 agosto e 6 novembre 2006, con azioni di reclamo in merito all’annullamento di questa decisione del 27 ottobre 2005 e la riapertura dei procedimenti civili.
2. Al richiedente fu accordato permesso di presentare la sua propria causa in lingua Georgiana nei procedimenti scritti di fronte alla Corte, in conformità con gli Articoli 34 § 3 e 36 § 2 in fine dell’Ordinamento di Corte. Il Governo Georgiano fu rappresentato dal suo Agente precedente, il Sig. David Tomadze del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. Il 5 novembre 2007 la Corte decise di dare avviso al Governo Georgiano delle azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione e sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo all’annullamento della decisione summenzionata del 18 novembre 2004. Il Governo russo fu invitato ad intervenire come terza parte (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 dell’Ordinamento di Corte). Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
4. Il Governo Georgiano (“il Governo”) ed il richiedente entrambi registrarono osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e i meriti delle azioni di reclamo comunicate (Articolo 54A dell’Ordinamento di Corte). Il Governo russo informò la Corte ch non desiderava intervenire come terza parte.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. Il Background
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1952 ed attualmente vive a Belgorod, nella Federazione russa.
6. Possedeva un alloggio localizzato al 54 di Strada Mazniashvili a Batumi, nella Repubblica Autonoma di Ajarian (“AAR”), Georgia. L'alloggio ed i suoi locali adiacenti erano localizzati su un'area di terreno di circa 284 metri quadrati.
7. Sotto un contratto dell’ 8 aprile 1994 (“il contratto di vendita”), il richiedente cedette al Sig. G., dall’allora Sostituto Ministro dell'Interno dell'Ajarian la metà del suo alloggio (“la proprietà Mazniashvili”) per il prezzo di 150,000,000 coupon (la valuta Georgiana provvisoria introdotta all'inizio degli anni novanta ai fini della riforma monetaria). Secondo l'archivio della causa, il potere d'acquisto di questa somma corrispondeva a circa 300 euro (EUR) al tempo attinente. Il contratto di vendita fu certificato da un notaio. Come inoltre rivelato da una dichiarazione scritta di un testimone a questa operazione, dopo la firma del contratto il Sig. G. diede al richiedente 3,000 dollari degli Stati Uniti (EUR 2,1991) in contanti. Subito dopo la vendita dell'appezzamento della proprietà Mazniashvili, il richiedente lasciò Batumi e si stabilì, insieme alla sua famiglia, nella Federazione russa. Presumibilmente, una ragione per questa partenza affrettata era la continua pressione del Sig. G. sul richiedente per cedere la parte rimanente dell'alloggio.
8. Come risultato delle tensioni fra le autorità centrali e locali (vedere La Festa del Lavoro della Georgia c. la Georgia, n. 9103/04, § 52 del 8 luglio 2008), i membri del governo di Ajarian, incluso il Sig. G. abbandonarono il paese nel maggio 2004.
B. La comparsa del titolo di proprietà del richiedente sull’appezzamento della proprietà Mazniashvili
9. Il 7 giugno 2004 il richiedente introdusse un'azione civile contro il Sig. G., richiedendo che il contratto di vendita venisse dichiarato privo di valore legale per essere stato contratto sotto costrizione (“giudizio civile”). In particolare, il richiedente, riferendosi alle circostanze fattuali attinenti, affermò che il convenuto, tramite una persona allora estremamente potente nell'AAR l'aveva costretto a cedere la proprietà di Mazniashvili per un prezzo ridicolmente piccolo sotto minacce alla sua persona e alla sua famiglia. Il richiedente ha cercato anche un'ingiunzione per far annettere la proprietà sino a dopo la decisione definitiva della controversia.
10. In una decisione del 30 giugno 2004, la Corte della Città di Batumi accordò l'ingiunzione ed ordinò il sequestro della proprietà di Mazniashvili. La Corte Urbana trasmise la sua decisione, descrivendo i fatti della controversia, alla Camera dei Notai del Ministero di Giustizia di Ajarian per esecuzione. In assenza di un ricorso, la decisione divenne definitiva dopo cinque giorni, e, come mostrato dall'archivio della causa, il documento di sequestro attinente fu registrato debitamente nel Registro Fondiario.
11. Il 25 agosto 2004 l'Ufficio dell’ Accusatore Pubblico dell'Ajarian aprì una causa penale contro il Sig. G. per vari reati commessi in pubblico ufficio. Sulla base di quei procedimenti penali, l'accusatore richiese all’Alta Corte dell'Ajarian di confiscare la proprietà mobile e immobile dell'accusato, incluso la proprietà Mazniashvili sotto l’Articolo 37(1) del Codice di Procedura penale (“CCP”, “procedimenti di sequestro”). Secondo le osservazioni dell'accusatore, la proprietà Mazniashvili misurava 68 metri di piazza ed era valutato Gel 50,000 (EUR 21,275).
12. Il 10 settembre 2004 la Corte Suprema dell'Ajarian accolse in parte la richiesta dell'accusatore, ordinando il sequestro di parte della proprietà del Sig. G. , inclusa la proprietà Mazniashvili. L'accusatore fece appello contro questo sequestro parziale presso la Corte Suprema della Georgia.
13. Il 18 novembre 2004 la Corte della Città di Batumi, in assenza del convenuto il Sig. G., accolse l'azione del richiedente del 7 giugno 2004. La corte annullò il contratto di vendita, confermò il titolo del richiedente sulla proprietà Mazniashvili ed ordinò alla Cancelleria Fondiaria di Batumi che era parte del Ministero di Giustizia dell’ Ajarian di procedere con le formalità di registrazione necessarie. La decisione portava inoltre annotazione che sarebbe divenuta definitivo dieci giorni dopo essere stata notificata al convenuto. Non essendoci stati ricorso entro quel periodo legale, la decisione divenne definitiva in una data non specificata.
14. Il 7 dicembre 2004 il richiedente, appellandosi alla decisione già vincolante del 18 novembre 2004, richiese alla Corte Suprema della Georgia di cessare i procedimenti di sequestro riguardo alla proprietà Mazniashvili.
15. Il 27 dicembre 2004 o il 26 gennaio 2005 la Cancelleria Fondiaria di Batumi registrò il titolo del richiedente sulla proprietà Mazniashvili, corrispondente a circa 68 metri quadrati, sulla base della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 (l'archivio di causa contiene una copia di questo documento ufficiale che porta due date diverse). Il 18 febbraio 2005 la Cancelleria emise un altro certificato, confermando il titolo del richiedente sui beni immobili.
16. Il 17 gennaio 2005 la Corte Suprema della Georgia, dopo avere condotto un'udienza in presenza dei rappresentanti sia dell'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale (“PGO”) che del Sig. G., rovesciò la decisione del 10 settembre 2004 nella parte riguardo al sequestro della proprietà Mazniashvili, e sostenne il resto. La corte ammise che l'appezzamento del terreno, valutato a Gel 50,000 (EUR 21,275), rappresentava la proprietà del richiedente in virtù della decisione vincolante del 18 novembre 2004. La Corte Suprema istruì l’Alta Corte dell'Ajarian Corte di esaminare il problema dell’ interruzione dei procedimenti di sequestro riguardo alla proprietà Mazniashvili.
17. Il 18 marzo 2005 la Cancelleria Fondiaria di Batumi rivolse una lettera all'accusatore dell’Ajarian, esigendo chiarificazione riguardo alla situazione della proprietà Mazniashvili. Il Registro sembrava essere confuso dal fatto che la proprietà rappresentava la proprietà del richiedente in virtù della decisione vincolante del 18 novembre 2004 ma era ancora oggetto dei procedimenti di sequestro pendenti. Inoltre, contrariamente a ciò che era stato confermato col documento del 27 gennaio 2005 ed il certificato del 18 febbraio 2005 (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra), la Cancelleria informò l'accusatore che il titolo del richiedente sulla proprietà Mazniashvili non era ancora stato registrato formalmente.
18. In una lettera del 31 marzo 2005, il Ministro Aggiunto di Giustizia confermò che il richiedente era il proprietario della proprietà Mazniashvili sulla base della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004, aggiungendo che il processo di registrazione del suo titolo di proprietà era stato sospeso.
C. L'annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004
19. Il 24 marzo 2005 l'accusatore dell’ Ajarian registrò presso Corte della Città di Batumi una richiesta per l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 e la riapertura del giudizio civile, sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del Codice di Procedura Civile (“CCP”). L'accusatore affermò che il sequestro della proprietà Mazniashvili, indicato dalla decisione dell’Alta Corte dell'Ajarian del 10 settembre 2004 era già stato confermato dalla Corte Suprema della Georgia. Comunque, l'esecuzione del sequestro era impossibile a causa dell'esistenza della decisione contraddittoria del 18 novembre 2004. L'accusatore si lamentò che la Corte della Città di Batumi l'avrebbe dovuto coinvolgere come terza parte nel giudizio civile che, inoltre, avrebbe dovuto essere sospeso durante la pendenza dei procedimenti di sequestro.
20. Il richiedente presentò commenti scritti in replica alla richiesta dell'accusatore dell’ Ajarian per annullamento il 7 aprile e il 18 giugno 2005. Lui dibatté che l'autorità dell’ accusa, essendo una parte ai procedimenti di sequestro, aveva appreso della decisione del 18 novembre 2004 al massimo nel corso dell’udienza della Corte Suprema del 17 gennaio 2005. Di conseguenza, la richiesta dell'accusatore dell’ Ajarian di annullamento era tarda, come previsto dall’ Articolo 426 §§ 1 e 2 del CCP. Lui notò inoltre che la proprietà Mazniashvili non era mai stata proprietà Statale e, di conseguenza, la Corte della Città di Batumi non poteva essere aspettatasi di unirsi all'accusatore come terza parte nel giudizio civile. Se l'accusatore dell’ Ajarian avesse agito con la minima diligenza, avendo consultato, per esempio la Cancelleria Fondiaria di Batumi prima dell'istituzione dei procedimenti di sequestro contro il Sig. G. del 25 agosto 2004, avrebbe appreso che la proprietà Mazniashvili era già stata annessa, in virtù dell'ingiunzione del 30 giugno 2004, nel corso del giudizio civile. Il richiedente impugnò anche l' asserzione fuorviante dell’accusatore per la quale il sequestro della proprietà Mazniashvili era stato confermato dalla Corte Suprema al PGO, il 12 settembre 2005, di aprire una causa penale contro l'accusatore dell’ Ajarian per abuso di potere.
22. Il23 settembre 2005 il Giudice V. della Corte della Città di Batumi chiamò in causa il richiedente che risiedeva a Belgorod tramite telegramma per comparire il 30 settembre 2005 come convenuto nei procedimenti di annullamento introdotti dall'accusatore dell’Ajarian. Il richiedente telegrafò di nuovo il 27 settembre 2005 per richiedere un posticipo dell'udienza nella prospettiva dei suoi problemi di salute.
23. Il 17 ottobre 2005 il Giudice V. chiamò in causa il richiedente tramite telegramma per comparire il 27 ottobre 2005 “come convenuto nei procedimenti introdotti da un notaio pubblico di Batumi.” Il telegramma portava annotazione che le osservazioni del rivendicatore erano state inviate tramite raccomandata.
24. Il 18 ottobre 2005 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore dell’ Ajarian rispose all'azione di reclamo penale del richiedente del 12 settembre 2005 nei seguenti termini:
“Come Lei già sapeva, la Corte della Città di Batumi ha accolto la richiesta dell'accusatore dell’ Ajarian e ha riaperto la causa. Di conseguenza, le Sue dichiarazioni di abuso di potere da parte dell'accusatore sono mal-fondate,... e Lei ha diritto a replicare di fronte alla corte come convenuto.”
25. Il 25 ottobre 2005 il richiedente notificò al Giudice V. tramite telegramma la sua impossibilità a viaggiare dalla Federazione russa alla Georgia per l'udienza imminente del 27 ottobre 2005 nella prospettiva dei suoi problemi di salute. Lui notò di aver spedito la documentazione medica a sostegno tramite posta e di non aver ancora ricevuto le osservazioni del notaio pubblico .
26. Il 1 novembre 2005 il richiedente ricevette il messaggio della Corte della Città di Batumi del 17 ottobre 2005 (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra). Lui apprese che il notaio pubblico che aveva certificato il contratto di vendita dell’8 aprile 1994 aveva richiesto, il 10 ottobre 2004, l’annullamento della decisione vincolante del 18 novembre 2004 sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del CCP. Il notaio si lamentava che avrebbe dovuto essere coinvolto nel giudizio civile come convenuto, nella misura in cui, facendo seguito all'Atto dei Notai Pubblici del 3 maggio 1996, era personalmente responsabile per la validità del contratto in oggetto. In ottemperanza col tempo-limite legale di un mese, il notaio affermò, di aver appreso per la prima volta dell'esistenza della decisione del 18 novembre 2004 da un giornale locale , Batumelebi , il 28 settembre 2005. L'articolo attinente, pubblicato in quest’ultima data aveva descritto i dettagli dei procedimenti di sequestro ed il giudizio civile, notando l'esistenza di interessi contraddittori del richiedente e dell'accusatore dell’ Ajarian sulla proprietà Mazniashvili.
27. Il9 novembre 2005 il Giudice V. chiamò in causa il richiedente con un telegramma per comparire il 14 novembre 2005 come convenuto “nei procedimenti introdotti dal notaio pubblico.” Il richiedente telegrafò di nuovo il giorno seguente, richiedendo un posticipo dell'udienza nella prospettiva del suo stato di salute. Lui informò anche Giudice V. che avrebbe inviato tramite posta i suoi commenti sulla richiesta del notaio per l’annullamento. Come mostrato da quei commenti, ricevuti dalla Corte Urbana il 8 dicembre 2005 il richiedente denunciò il notaio come mancante del requisito locus standi per sollevare la questione del risultato del giudizio civile terminato.
28. Il 25 novembre 2005 il richiedente richiese l'inizio di procedimenti disciplinari contro il Giudice V. lamentandosi che, chiamandolo in causa tramite telegrafo solamente alcuni giorni prima delle udienze programmato, senza dargli l’opportunità di ottenere conoscenza e di fare commenti sulle osservazioni del rivendicatore il giudice aveva violato il principio dell'uguaglianza dei mezzi.
29. Il 30 novembre 2005 il Giudice V. richiese ancora una volta al richiedente di comparire ad un'udienza il 6 dicembre 2005 nei procedimenti di riapertura introdotti dal pubblico notaio. Un'altra richiesta per un posticipo chiesto dal richiedente il 5 dicembre 2005.
30. Il 14 marzo 2006 il richiedente ricevette tramite un pacco due decisioni della Corte della Città di Batumi del 30 settembre e del 27 ottobre 2005. Come mostrato dal timbro sulla busta, il pacchetto era stato inviato dal Giudice V. il 2 marzo 2006.
31. In una decisione del 27 ottobre 2005, il Giudice V. decise, che la richiesta del pubblico notaio per l’annullamento del 10 ottobre 2005 era fondata e che la decisione del 18 novembre 2004 avrebbe dovuto essere annullata ed il giudizio civile riaperto sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del CCP. Il giudice basava la sua decisione solo sulle osservazioni scritte e orali del notaio e non spiegò la ragione di essersi dispensato dal bisogno di osservazioni dal richiedente. Senza dare qualsiasi ragione supplementare, il giudice sottoscrisse gli argomenti procedurali ed effettivi del notaio, in particolare che la richiesta per l’annullamento era stata depositata in dovuto tempo e che il notaio avrebbe dovuto essere coinvolto davvero nel giudizio civile. La parte operativa della decisione notò che nessun ricorso fu introdotto contro questo.
32. In merito alla decisione del 30 settembre 2005, concernente la richiesta per l’annullamento del 24 marzo 2005 dall'accusatore dell’ Ajarian. il Giudice V. prima notò che, nonostante essere stato chiamato in causa all'udienza orale in modo appropriato, il richiedente non era riuscito a comparire e che il suo chiarimento a questo riguardo -il riferimento a problemi di salute-non fu provato da documentazione medica. Comunque, il giudice prese in considerazione le osservazioni scritte del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra), e concluse che la richiesta dell'accusatore per l’annullamento avrebbe dovuto essere respinta perché caduta in prescrizione .
D. I susseguenti procedimenti
33. Il 24 marzo 2006 il Giudice V. chiamò in causa il richiedente tramite telegramma per comparire rivendicatore nel giudizio civile riaperto. Il giudice specificò che il Sig. G. ed il notaio erano co-convenuti nella causa, mentre l'accusatore dell’ Ajarian era stato ammesso come terza parte. In un telegramma del 28 marzo 2006, il richiedente richiese un posticipo nella prospettiva dei suoi persistenti problemi di salute. Lui notò che i documenti medici a sostegno così come la sua richiesta per la sostituzione del Giudice V. erano stati inviati tramite posta.
34. Il 19 aprile 2006 il richiedente depositò presso la Corte Regionale di Kutaisi un ricorso contro la decisione del 27 ottobre 2005. Riferendosi al fatto che il Giudice V. l'aveva chiamato in causa negli attinenti procedimenti di annullamento persino dopo il 27 ottobre 2005, il richiedente l'accusò di avere contraffatto la decisione in oggetto retrodatandola. Lo stesso giorno lui richiese anche alla Corte della Città di Batumi di spedirgli una copia della direttiva con cui al notaio e all'accusatore dell’ Ajarian era stato permesso di partecipare al giudizio civile riaperto. Come mostrato dall'archivio di causa, nessuna replica provenne da entrambi corte.
35. Fra il febbraio e il dicembre 2006, il richiedente registrò numerose lettere presso PGO ed i e altre autorità giudiziali, lamentandosi che l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 aveva violato i suoi diritti di proprietà. Lui richiese anche che il Giudice V. ed il notaio fossero perseguiti per abuso di potere o che, almeno, il giudice venisse rimosso dall'ulteriore esame del suo giudizio civile. Quelle lettere furono lasciate senza risposte o, nella misura in cui erano riguardate le azioni di reclamo penali, respinte dal PGO come mal-fondate.
36. Nel febbraio 2007, il richi9edente apprese da sua sorella che viveva a Batumi ed aveva contatti frequenti con la Cancelleria della Corte della Città di Batumi che il Giudice V. aveva deciso, in una data ignota di lasciare senza esame il suo giudizio civile riaperto. Il 2 febbraio 2007 lui richiese alla Corte della Città di Batumi e alla Corte Suprema della Georgia di fornirgli una copia di quella decisione. Secondo l'archivio della causa, le corti non risposero.
37. In una lettera del 7 febbraio 2007, la Cancelleria Fondiria di Batumi informò il richiedente che la proprietà Mazniashvili era stata registrata come proprietà Statale sulla base di un documento di esecuzione emesso dall’Alta Corte dell'Ajarian il 10 marzo 2006. Il richiedente richiese poi, il 4 marzo 2007, la chiarificazione supplementare riguardo a quel documento, ma nessuna replica seguì.
38. Con una lettera del 21 aprile 2008, la Cancelleria Fondiaria di Batumi, contrariamente alle informazioni contenute nella sua precedente lettera (vedere il paragrafo precedente) informò la sorella del richiedente che, secondo i documenti disponibili, la proprietà Mazniashvili era stata registrata come proprietà del Sig. G. sulla base del contratto di vendita.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Il Codice di Procedura Civile come era al tempo attinente
39. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice riguardo all’annullamento di decisioni definitive e esecutive e la riapertura di giudizi civili, recita come segue:
Articolo 421 § 1-Tipi di riapertura
“I procedimenti terminati con una sentenza definitiva (la decisione) possono essere riaperti solamente se ci sono motivi o richieste per rendere la sentenza definitiva priva di valore legale (Articolo 422) o una richiesta per riaprire i procedimenti nella prospettiva di circostanze recentemente scoperte (Articolo 423).”
Articolo 422 §§ 1 (a) e (b) e 2 - Richiesta per rendere una sentenza definitiva (la decisione) priva di valore legale
“1. Un sentenza definitiva e vincolante (la decisione) può essere annullata su richiesta della parte interessata, se:
(a) Ad un giudice che partecipava alle deliberazioni nella causa non era permesso di agire così da operazione di legge;
(b) Una delle parti, o il suo rappresentante legale, non erano stati invitati a partecipare all'esame della causa.
2. La richiesta per rendere una sentenza definitiva priva di valore legale pe i motivi summenzionati non sarà accolta se la parte richiedente avrebbe potuto far riferimento a quei motivi durante i procedimenti, di fronte alla prima istanza, ricorso o corti di cassazione.”
Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 426 §§ 1 e 2 del CCP, una richiesta di riapertura di procedimenti dovrebbe essere depositata entro un mese dopo che la parte riguardata apprende dei motivi che renderebbero la decisione definitivo priva di valore legale o che rappresenterebbero circostanze recentemente scoperte all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 421 § 1. Questo periodo non era prolungabile. L’ Articolo 426 § 3 ha specificato inoltre che, in una situazione prevista dall’ Articolo 422 § 1 (b), il periodo di un mese incominciava a decorrere in seguito alla notifica formale della decisione alla parte ai procedimenti o, se appropriato, al suo rappresentante legale.
L’Articolo 429 § 2 del CCP ha affermato che una disposizione di ricorso contro una decisione respinge una richiesta per annullamento. Comunque, né questo Articolo né qualsiasi altra disposizione nel Codice prevedeva la possibilità di fare appello contro una decisione che accordava tale richiesta. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 430, i meriti di una richiesta per annullamento devono essere esaminati in un'udienza orale.
B. Il Codice di Procedura penale come era al tempo attinente
40. L’Articolo 37(1), inserito nel Codice Procedura penale il 13 febbraio 2004, determinava che, se c'era un ragionevole sospetto delle origini della proprietà di una persona accusata di cattiva condotta nel pubblico ufficio, ad un accusatore era concesso di introdurre un'azione per il sequestro di quella proprietà.
C. L'Atto dei Notai Pubblici del 3 maggio 1996 come era al tempo attinente
41. Facendo seguito alle sezioni 1 e 5 dell'Atto dei Notai Pubblici, i notai pubblici formavano un'istituzione di legge pubblica diretta dal Ministero della Giustizia.
Secondo la sezione 3 §§ 1 e 6, un notaio pubblico, sebbene essendo un professionista indipendente, esercitava l’autorità Statale. Comunque, lo Stato non poteva essere ritenuto responsabile per qualsiasi danno causato dalle azioni di un notaio.
Facendo seguito alle sezioni 4 § 1 e 32-33, ogni notaio pubblico era obbligato a essere membro della Camera dei Notai, un'associazione di legge pubblica, creata ai fini di proteggere gli interessi dei suoi membri e coordinare le loro attività e che aveva la sua propria personalità legale.
La Sezione 11 descriveva il sistema di soprintendenza delle attività professionali dei notai individuali pubblici da parte del Ministro della Giustizia, tramite la Camera di Notai.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
42. Il richiedente si lamentò che l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 da parte della Corte della Città di Batumi del 27 ottobre 2005 aveva violato i suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Quelle disposizioni recitavano, nelle loro parti attinenti, come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ….”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale….”
A. Ammissibilità
43. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali riguardo alla sua azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, siccome lui non era riuscito ad perseguite il giudizio civile riaperto riguardo alla determinazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà (vedere anche paragrafo 67 sotto).
44. Il richiedente non era d'accordo.
45. La Corte nota che il problema nella causa presente non è la determinazione della rivendicazione del richiedente nel corso del giudizio civile riaperto ma l’annullamento della decisione definitiva ed esecutiva del 18 novembre 2004. Avendo dovuto riguardo alla sua giurisprudenza ben consolidata sulla questione, la Corte reitera, che, a causa alla stessa natura dell'atto dell’annullamento, i conseguenti procedimenti riaperti, anche se danno luogo alla reiterazione della decisione annullata, non possono offrire una via di ricorso attinente ai fini sia dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (confronta, per esempio The Mrevli Foundation c. Georgia (dec.), n. 25491/04, 5 maggio 2009, e Popov c. Moldavia (n. 2), n. 19960/04, § 35 6 dicembre 2005). Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo deve essere respinta.
46. La Corte conclude così che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non sono né manifestamente mal-fondato all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione né inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Loro devono essere dichiarate perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
47. Il Governo presentò che l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 era stata una misura legale e giustificabile. La legalità seguiva dal fatto che l’annullamento era basato sull'Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del CCP che affermava direttamente che l'insuccesso nel chiamare in modo appropriato in causa una delle parti ai procedimenti all'esame della causa renderebbe la decisione definitiva priva di valore legale. Inoltre, il fine legittimo di questo meccanismo legislativo era proteggere il principio dell'uguaglianza dei mezzi. Nella presente causa, il Governo affermò, l’annullamento mirava alla protezione del diritto del notaio di far sostenere questo principio.
48. Il Governo presentò inoltre che non si poteva dire che la decisione dell’annullamento del 27 ottobre 2005 era stata basata su un ragionamento arbitrario. Così, la Corte della Città di Batumi aveva esaminato debitamente sia il criterio procedurale della richiesta del notaio per l’annullamento-ottemperanza col periodo legale di un mese-che la sua effettiva fondatezza. Esaminando quest’ultimo elemento, la Corte Urbana aveva trovato che il notaio aveva avuto un interesse legittimo nel giudizio civile. Poiché era stato direttamente responsabile della validità dell'operazione in oggetto, la sentenza della nullità del contratto di vendita avrebbe potuto inficiare la reputazione professionale del notaio suggerendo che aveva partecipato agli atti illegali del Sig. G. . Il Governo dibatté anche che, se la Corte della Città di Batumi avesse respinto la richiesta di annullamento del notaio , avrebbe limitato ingiustificabilmente il suo diritto di accesso ad una corte. Inoltre, la partecipazione del notaio avrebbe potuto offrire informazioni supplementari che avrebbero permesso una migliore aggiudicazione del giudizio civile.
49. Il Governo chiese anche alla Corte di dare retta al fatto che l’annullamento nella presente causa non si era verificato né su richiesta di un ufficiale Statale (vedere, a contrario, Ryabykh c. Russia, n. 52854/99, § 52 ECHR 2003-IX) né sulla base di fatti emersi successivamente, di circostanze nuove. L’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 era piuttosto tesa sinceramente, alla
correzione di un errore giudiziale e non poteva corrispondere così ad una violazione sia dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
50. Il richiedente rispose che l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 (b) chiaramente era stato illegale ed arbitrario, nella misura in cui il notaio non era mai stato una parte al giudizio civile in oggetto. Le sole parti alla controversia sul contratto di vendita erano lui, come rivendicatore ed il Sig. G., come convenuto. Il richiedente aggiunse che lui non aveva avuto qualsiasi contesa contro il notaio, siccome quest’ultimo non avrebbe potuto essere proprio consapevole della pressione esercitata dal Sig. G. su lui al tempo del contratto contestato. Comunque, se il notaio si fosse sentito offeso dalle azioni del richiedente, avrebbe potuto sempre depositare un'azione civile separata contro lui.
51. Se il notaio fosse stato così preoccupato del destino del contratto di vendita dell’ 8 aprile 1994, sulla base del quale il Sig. G. era divenuto il proprietario della proprietà Mazniashvili, allora, il richiedente continuava, non era chiaro perché non mai aveva tentato di essere coinvolto anche nei procedimenti di sequestro. Il richiedente affermò anche che l'accusatore dell’ Ajarian aveva incitato il notaio pubblico a richiedere l’annullamento della decisione definitivo del 18 novembre 2004 e che anche la pubblicazione sul giornale locale era stata una messa in scena (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). Lui dibatté inoltre che, facendo seguito alle disposizioni attinenti dell'Atto dei Notai Pubblici del 3 maggio 1996 (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra), un notaio avrebbe dovuto essere trattato come un ufficiale Statale.
52. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che Giudice V. aveva annullato la definitivo decisione del 18 novembre 2004 solamente sulla base delle osservazioni del notaio, senza dargli un'opportunità di presentare commenti scritti od orali in replica. Lui disse inoltre che, in realtà, nessuna udienza era mai stata sostenuta il 27 ottobre 2005 presso la Corte della Città di Batumi e che la decisione attinente era stata retrodatata dal giudice nel febbraio o marzo 2006. Il richiedente fece riferimento in questo collegamento al fatto sospetto che lo stesso giudice aveva continuato a chiamarlo in causa ai procedimenti attinenti anche dopo la data summenzionata ed aveva inviato la decisione del 27 ottobre 2005 all’’inizio del marzo 2006 (vedere paragrafi 27 e 28 sopra).
2. La valutazione della Corte
53. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad un'udienza corretta di fronte ad un tribunale come garantito dall’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere interpretato alla luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, dichiara la preminenza del diritto essere parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali della preminenza del diritto è il principio di certezza legale che richiede fra le altre cose che dove le corti infine hanno deciso un problema, la loro direttiva non dovrebbe essere richiamata in questione (vedere Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999-VII). Questo principio sottolinea che a nessuna parte viene concesso di chiedere una revisione di una sentenza definitiva e vincolante soltanto al fine di ottenere un riesame ed una nuova determinazione della causa. La revisione da parte di corti superiori non dovrebbe essere trattato come un ricorso mascherato, e la mera possibilità che ci siano due prospettive sulla questione non è una base per un riesame. Lasciare questo principio è giustificato solamente quando reso necessario da circostanze di carattere sostanziale e impellente (vedere Ryabykh, citata sopra, § 52). Inoltre, l'esistenza di un interesse di proprietà confermato da una sentenza esecutiva vincolante costituisce la proprietà del beneficiario del giudizio all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. L’annullamento di tale sentenza corrisponde ad un'interferenza con il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 40 ECHR 2002-III).
54. La Corte prima nota che la decisione definitiva e esecutiva del 18 novembre 2004 ha stabilito il titolo del richiedente sulla proprietà Mazniashvili. Di conseguenza, annullando questa decisione il 27 ottobre 2005, la Corte della Città di Batumi interferì col diritto del richiedente alla certezza legale ed al godimento tranquillo dell'appezzamento del terreno. Rimane da vedere se questa duplice interferenza era giustificabile all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
55. La Corte considera che la procedura per la riapertura dei procedimenti civili definitivamente stabiliti sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 del CCP non può, come tale, essere ritenuta incompatibile con la Convenzione, nella misura in cui mira alla correzione di due errori giudiziali fondamentali (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Popov (n. 2), citata sopra, §§ 46 e 47). Il primo di questi errori che danneggia nella prospettiva della Corte, il principio di un processo “da parte di un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge”, è il fatto di un giudice illegale o altra partecipazione indebita nella causa (Articolo 422 § 1 (a) del CCP). Il secondo errore giudiziale nega, come notò il Governo, il principio dell'uguaglianza dei mezzi, poiché riguardava la situazione in cui una decisione definitiva è stata consegnata in assenza ingiustificata di una delle parti ai procedimenti (Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del CCP). Il compito della Corte deve determinare così se, sui fatti della presente, causa la procedura fu esercitata in un modo appropriato cioè di assicurare che l’annullamento non fu applicato per un fine diverso da quelli per cui era stato prescritto sotto le disposizioni attinenti del CCP.
56. La Corte trova inappropriato che la Corte della Città di la Batumi trattò, nella sua decisione del 27 ottobre 2005 solo gli argomenti del pubblico notaio, senza chiedere le osservazioni del richiedente in replica, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 430 del CCP, ad un'udienza orale o, almeno, tramite una procedura scritta. La Corte Civica non si preoccupò neanche di dare ragioni per questa grave irregolarità procedurale che, come palesato dalle circostanze attinenti, era attribuibile alla sua propria condotta (vedere paragrafi 23 e 25-27 sopra). Di conseguenza, il richiedente fu messo in una posizione ingiustificabilmente svantaggiosa vis-à-vis al suo oppositore nei procedimenti il che danneggiò direttamente i suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, Dombo Beheer B.V. c. Paesi Bassi, 27 ottobre 1993, § 33 Serie A n. 274; Hentrich c. Francia, 22 settembre 1994, § 56 Serie A n. 296-A). Inoltre, mentre l'archivio della causa non contiene prova sufficiente per ammettere la conclusione che la decisione del 27 ottobre 2005 era, come asserito dal richiedente, costruita, la Corte non può trascurare il fatto fastidioso che la Corte della Città di Batumi chiamò in causa il richiedente a simili procedimenti attinenti solo dopo la data summenzionata (vedere paragrafi 27 e 28 sopra).
57. La Corte osserva inoltre che Corte della Città di Batumi non si rivolse criticamente all'asserzione del pubblico notaio per cui aveva appreso per la prima volta della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 dal giornale locale il 28 settembre 2005. Per analogia alla sua giurisprudenza simile in merito all’annullamento di decisioni definitive e alla riapertura di procedimenti, e notando che tale norma era contenuta anche esplicitamente nell’ Articolo 422 § 2 del CCP, la Corte considera che l'asserzione del notaio avrebbe dovuto essere esaminata alla luce dell'attinente norma della “diligenza dovuta”. In particolare, il notaio avrebbe dovuto mostrare che, nonostante avesse agito con dovuta diligenza, non aveva potuto ottenere conoscenza o non avrebbe potuto far riferimento ai fatti che costituiscono presumibilmente una limitazione del suo diritto sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del CCP prima (vedere, per esempio, Pravednaya c. Russia, n. 69529/01, §§ 17 e 27, 18 novembre 2004, e Popov (n. 2), citata sopra, §§ 26-28 e 49-51). In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che, facendo seguito all'Atto dei Notai Pubblici del 3 maggio 1996, i notai individuali, riuniti nella Camera dei Notai, erano supervisionati direttamente dal Ministero della Giustizia (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra). Comunque, i fatti della causa chiaramente mostrano che il Ministero, agendo tramite le sue due agenzie subalterne - la Camera stessa dei Notai e la Cancelleria Fodiaria -era debitamente consapevole dell'esistenza del giudizio civile del richiedente, sia mentre era ancora pendente di fronte alla Corte della Città di Batumi così come subito dopo che la decisione di 18 novembre 2004 divenne vincolante ed il richiedente ottenne un titolo esecutivo sulla proprietà Mazniashvili (vedere paragrafi 10, 13 e 17-18 sopra). In simili circostanze, la Corte trova difficile accettare che il notaio abbia assolto, nella sua richiesta per l’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004, l'onere della prova richiesto sotto l’Articolo 422 § 2 del CCP, mostrando che sarebbe stato obiettivamente impossibile per questo ottenere conoscenza del giudizio civile prima. È particolarmente deplorevole che, nella sua decisione del 27 ottobre 2005, la Corte della Città di Batumi omise di esaminare questo importante problema prima di arrivare alla conclusione che la richiesta per l’annullameto era opportuna e fondata (vedere Eugenia e Doina Duca c. Moldavia, n. 75/07, § 35-37 3 marzo 2009; Popov (n. 2), citata sopra, § 50; Kumkin ed Altri c. Russia, n. 73294/01, § 33 del 5 luglio 2007).
58. Il punto che disturba la Corte è il fatto che il pubblico notaio che non era mai stato parte al giudizio civile iniziale ottenne l'annullamento della decisione definitivo del 18 novembre 2004 sulla base dell’ Articolo 422 § 1 (b) del CCP. In realtà questa disposizione è stata fatta strettamente per le parti effettive ai procedimenti, per garantire, come notò il Governo, che il loro diritto procedurale all'uguaglianza dei mezzi e a procedimenti contraddittori venisse protetto. Una persona che non era una parte ai procedimenti non poteva logicamente pretendere successivamente, di essere stata una vittima di una violazione di diritti procedurali nel corso di quei procedimenti. Presumendo anche che l'azione civile del richiedente avesse offeso la reputazione professionale del notaio, allora invece di aspra tale misura come l’annullamento della decisione definitiva ed esecutiva, un corso più proporzionato di azione sarebbe stato per la Corte della Città di Batumi consigliare al notaio di citare in giudizio il richiedente in un set separato di procedimenti. La Corte reitera a questo riguardo che il potere per annullare una decisione definitiva dovrebbe essere esercitata dalle autorità con cautela estrema, così che un equilibrio equo fra i vari interessi in gioco venga previsto sempre nella misura massima possibile (vedere, per esempio, Mitrea c. Romania, n. 26105/03, § 25, 29 luglio 2008 e, mutatis mutandis, Nikitin c. Russia, n. 50178/99, § 57 ECHR 2004-VIII).
59. Avendo riguardo alle considerazioni sopra, la Corte conclude, che annullando la decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004 che infranse il principio della certezza legale ed interferì col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo della proprietà Mazniashvili, è stato fatto un cattivo uso della procedura di riapertura sotto l’Articolo 422 § 1 del CCP, non essendo giustificata da circostanze di carattere sostanziale ed impellente e che impose un carico eccessivo e sproporzionato sul richiedente (vedere, Smirnitskaya ed Altri c. Russia, n. 852/02, §§ 45 e 53, 5 luglio 2007; Gavrilenko c. Russia, n. 30674/03, §§ 37 e 41, 15 febbraio 2007; Rahmanova c. Azerbaijan, n. 34640/02, §§ 65 e 73, 10 luglio 2008).
60. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
61. Appellandosi agli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione, il richiedente impugnò la lunghezza dei procedimenti riaperti e si lamentò che lui non aveva avuto una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva contro la decisione di annullamento del 27 ottobre 2005.
62. La Corte prima nota che, data la costatazione di violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa dell’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004, la lunghezza dei procedimenti riaperti conseguentemente diventa solo un elemento dell'incapacità prolungata del richiedente di godere del possesso della proprietà accordatagli dalla decisione annullata. Non c'è di conseguenza, nessuna chiamata per prendere una decisione separatamente su questo problema sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Vrioni ed Altri c. Albania, n. 2141/03, § 64 del 24 marzo 2009).
63. Né è necessario decidere sull'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione, nella misura in cui questa questione è stata assorbita dall'azione di reclamo del principio della certezza legale (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Popov (n. 2), citata sopra, § 55, e Nikolay Zaytsev c. Russia, n. 3447/06, § 24 18 febbraio 2010).
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DEL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
64. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
65. Il richiedente chiese il risarcimento a riguardo della proprietà Mazniashvili. Lui si appellò alle opinioni competenti emesse da Economics-Audit Ltd, una ditta Georgiana privata specializzata nelle revisioni. La prima opinione, del 29 novembre 2007 valutava l' intero alloggio al 54 di Via Mazniashvili, con un'area della superficie totale di 212.7 metri quadrati ad USD 180,000 (EUR 132,752). La seconda opinione, datata 15 aprile 2008, affermava che il valore dell' intero alloggio che misurava circa 207.94 metri quadrati era EUR 320,000. Il richiedente spiegò che la differenza nel prezzo era causata dal fatto che la prima opinione dell’ esperto aveva omesso di includere nella sua valutazione il valore della terra sul quale l'alloggio era situato. Inoltre, il richiedente sostenne che c'era stata una rapida espansione dei prezzi dei beni immobili a Batumi nel periodo fra la prima e la seconda valutazione competente. Appellandosi alle informazioni degli annunci pubblicitari di un'agenzia di beni immobili, il richiedente asserì inoltre che il prezzo degli appartamenti nel distretto attinente a Batumi partivano da USD 2,200 (EUR 1,622) il metro quadrato.
66. Inoltre, il richiedente chiese EUR 50,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
67. Il Governo affermò che le opinioni competenti presentate non erano affidabili e che le rivendicazioni del richiedente per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale erano non comprovate ed estremamente eccessive. Dibatté che, ai fini dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, il valore della proprietà Mazniashvili al tempo della violazione addotta avrebbe dovuta essere presa in considerazione. Il Governo chiese anche alla Corte che, se una violazione dei diritti del richiedente sotto la Convenzione fosse stata trovata, la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione avrebbe dovuto essere riservata. Spigò a questo riguardo che, dopo l’annullamento della decisione definitiva dell’ 8 novembre 2004 e la riapertura dei procedimenti, la causa del richiedente contro il Sig. G. era stata lasciata senza esame a causa dell’ incapacità continua delle parti a comparire di fronte alla Corte della Città di Batumi. Il richiedente potrebbe sempre introdurre comunque, una nuova azione per il ricupero della proprietà della proprietà Mazniashvili nel qual caso lo Stato rispondente darebbe pronto a giungere ad un regolamento amichevole con lui.
68. La Corte prima nota che non ci si può aspettare che il richiedente esaurisca di nuovo una via di ricorso nazionale riguardo alle sue rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione (vedere De Wilde, Ooms e Versyp c. Belgio (Articolo 50), 10 marzo 1972, § 16 Serie A n. 14, e Mancheva c. Bulgaria, n. 39609/98, § 72 del 30 settembre 2004). RIguardo alle opinioni competenti presentate, la Corte nota, che riguardano il valore dell' intero alloggio che misurava 207.94 o 212.7 metri quadrati. Comunque ciò che è in gioco nella presente causa non è l' intero alloggio al 54 di via Mazniashvili a Batumi ma solamente parte di questo, rappresentante un'area che, secondo il materiale di fronte alla Corte, è limitata a circa 68 metri quadrati (vedere paragrafi 7, 11 e 15-16 sopra). Inoltre, presumendo che è probabile che ci sia stato davvero un aumento dei prezzi sul mercato degli immobili di Batumi, il fatto che due valutazioni dello stesso bene immobile entro un periodo di solamente cinque mesi abbiano dato una differenza nel prezzo di EUR 188,000 (vedere paragrafo 65 sopra) getta un dubbio legittimo sulla qualifica e la buona fede degli esperti che hanno valutato. Avendo esaminato debitamente le due opinioni, la Corte nota inoltre che loro non indicano con chiarezza sufficiente come le valutazioni furono determinate. Di conseguenza, la Corte non può accettare queste opinioni competenti come prova affidabile. Né poteva il riferimento del richiedente agli annunci pubblicitari di un'agenzia di beni immobili privata essere confermato come una fonte legittima di informazioni del prezzo reale dei beni immobili a Batumi.
69. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte reitera che, normalmente, la priorità sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione è la restitutio in integrum, siccome ci si aspetta che lo Stato rispondente faccia ogni riparazione fattibile delle conseguenze della violazione in modo tale da ripristinare il più possibile la situazione esistente prima della violazione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Apostol c. Georgia, n. 40765/02, § 71 ECHR 2006-XIV; FC Mretebi c. Georgia, n. 38736/04, § 61 del 31 luglio 2007; Assanidze c. Georgia [GC], n. 71503/01, § 198). Di conseguenza, avendo dovuto riguardo alle sue costatazioni nella presente causa, la Corte considera, che la forma più appropriata di compensazione sarebbe ripristinare al richiedente il suo titolo sulla proprietà Mazniashvili, come stabilito dalla decisione della Corte della Città di Batumi del 18 novembre 2004. Alternativamente, se questo dovesse dimostrarsi impossibile, la Corte è della prospettiva che la rivendicazione del richiedente potrebbe essere soddisfatta anche pagandogli il risarcimento ragionevole per la perdita del titolo di proprietà sulla proprietà Mazniashvili, l'importo di cui dovrebbe essere concordato tra le parti entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Comunque, se le parti non dovessero riuscire a giungere ad un accordo entro questo periodo, la Corte si riserva il diritto di fissare l'ulteriore procedura sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione per determinare l'importo di simile risarcimento (Articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
70. Inoltre, la Corte senza dubbio ha che il richiedente soffrì di angoscia e di frustrazione a causa dell'annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004. Il danno non-patrimoniale risultante non sarebbe compensato adeguatamente dalla costatazione mera di una violazione. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 5,000 al richiedente sotto questo capo.
B. Costi e spese
71. Il richiedente ha anche chiesto RUB 120,000 (EUR 2,956) per i costi e le spese incorse di fronte alle corti nazionali e questa Corte a causa della sua rappresentanza da parte di un certo Sig. S. K., un avvocato russo che pratica a Belgorod.
72. Il Governo presentò che la rivendicazione non era comprovata.
73. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solo sé è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum (vedere, fra altri, Donadze c. Georgia, n. 74644/01, § 48 del 7 marzo 2006; Gurgenidze c. Georgia, n. 71678/01, § 83 del 17 ottobre 2006). Come rivelato dai materiali nella causa presente, il richiedente redasse personalmente tutte le sue note, sia nei procedimenti nazionali che di fronte alla Corte . Inoltre, essendo stato accordato il permesso di presentare la sua propria causa di fronte alla Corte (vedere paragrafo 2 sopra), il richiedente non spiegò il modo in cui il Sig. K. l'aveva assistito volontariamente; l’archivio della causa non contiene nessun documento che mostra il volume e la natura del lavoro davvero completato da questa persona. Di conseguenza, la Corte non trova stabilito che il Sig. K.a abbia mai ha lavorato sulla causa e che il richiedente è sotto un obbligo di rimunerarlo a questo riguardo (vedere, a contrario, Ghavtadze c. Georgia, n. 23204/07, § 120 3 marzo 2009). Riguardo agli altri vari costi procedurali, il richiedente non fece, qualsiasi richiesta sotto questo capo.
74. In queste circostanze, la Corte conclude, che non c’è nessuna base su cui assegnare il rimborso dei costi e delle spese al richiedente
C. Interesse di mora
75. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbe essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara ammissibile le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo all'annullamento della decisione del 18 novembre 2004;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa dell’annullamento della decisione definitiva del 18 novembre 2004;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare le rimanenti azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene
(a) che se la restituzione della proprietà Mazniashvili dovesse dimostrarsi impossibile, lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, sotto un accordo reciproco (vedere paragrafo 69 sopra), il risarcimento ragionevole nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione;
(b) se le parti non dovessero riuscire a giungere ad un accordo sull'importo del risarcimento valutario, la Corte determinerà la somma da pagare da parte del Governo (vedere paragrafo 69 sopra);
di conseguenza,
(i) riserve in parte la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione;
(ii) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(iii) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale da convertire nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 27 maggio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere President
1 qui ed altrove, conversioni approssimate sono date in conformità col cambio del dollaro degli Stati Uniti (USD), il lari Georgiano (Gel) ed il rublo russo (RUB) all'euro l’ 8 marzo 2010.


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 01/07/2020.