Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF LELAS v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 55555/08/2010
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 20/05/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF LELAS v. CROATIA
(Application no. 55555/08)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
20 May 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Lelas v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 29 April 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 55555/08) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, Mr Č. L. (“the applicant”), on 6 November 2008.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr I. Š., an advocate practising in Split. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs Š. Stažnik.
3. On 11 December 2008 the President of the First Section decided to communicate the complaint concerning the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant lives in Vrlika.
5. He is a serviceman employed by the Ministry of Defence (Ministarstvo obrane Republike Hrvatske). In 1996, 1997 and 1998, as a member of the 40th Engineering Brigade of the Croatian Army, the applicant occasionally participated in demining operations in the newly liberated territories in Croatia.
6. On the basis of the Decision of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995 (see paragraph 36 below), he was entitled to a special daily allowance for such work.
7. Since the allowances had not been paid to him, on 21 May 2002 the applicant brought a civil action against the State in the Knin Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Kninu), seeking payment of the unpaid allowances. He sought in total the sum of 16,142.83 Croatian kunas (HRK) together with accrued statutory default interest.
8. The State responded that his action was time-barred because the three-year limitation period for employment-related claims had expired.
9. In reply, the applicant argued that on several occasions he had asked his commanding officer why the allowances had not been paid. His commanding officer had made enquiries of his superior, who had then contacted the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces (Glavni stožer Oružanih snaga Republike Hrvatske). Eventually, the applicant had been informed through his commanding officer that his claims were not being disputed and that they would be paid once the funds for that purpose had been allocated in the State budget. Relying on that information, the applicant argued that the State had acknowledged the debt within the meaning of section 387 of the Obligations Act and that the running of the statutory limitation period had thus been interrupted.
10. The court heard the applicant's commanding officer B.B. and the head of the Split Regional Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence, Brigadier I.P.
11. B.B., who had been the commander of the 40th Engineering Brigade between January 1996 and April 1999, testified that lists of servicemen who carried out demining work, together with the number of days worked and the corresponding amount of allowances, had been submitted to him by platoon commanders within the brigade. As the commander of the unit, he had signed them after checking them for accuracy and had then submitted them for certification to the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone. After the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone had signed the lists, they had been submitted for payment to the Regional Finance Department in Split. He had informed the applicant that the lists had been submitted for payment. When the allowances were not paid, the applicant and other members of the unit had approached him, as their commanding officer and the only person they were authorised to approach under internal regulations, asking him when the payment would be made. In their name he had then contacted the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone. Each time he had been informed that the right to receive payment and its amount were not being disputed and that payment would follow after the funds had been allocated for that purpose. Each time he had transmitted that information to the members of his unit, including the applicant.
12. I.P. had since 1996 been the head of the Split Regional Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence, which was in charge of financial matters for the 3rd Operational Zone. He testified that he had been aware that members of the 40th Engineering Brigade had been carrying out demining work up to April 1998 and that the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone had been submitting lists of servicemen who carried out demining work for payment. Since payment was not forthcoming when the allowances fell due, the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces had informed the relevant financial departments that the allowances had not been paid because no funds had been allocated in the budget for that purpose, whereas no instructions had been given to dispute the right to receive allowances or their amount.
13. On 3 March 2003 the Knin Municipal Court ruled in favour of the applicant and ordered the State to pay him the allowances he sought. The relevant part of that judgment read as follows:
“[It] is undisputed that ... when each instalment became due, up to 21 February 2002, the plaintiff asked his commanding officer when the payment would be made, because according to the internal organisation of [the Ministry of Defence] that was the only person he was authorised to approach, and that [his] commanding officer took this up on behalf of the plaintiff with the Headquarters of the 3rd Operational Zone and that the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone informed [the plaintiff's] commanding officer that the right to receive payment and its amount were not in dispute, and that payment would follow after the funds had been allocated in the budget, because currently there were none; the commanding officer passed this information on to the plaintiff.
The foregoing, in the view of this court, represents acknowledgement of the debt within the meaning of section 387 of the Obligations Act, because ... the plaintiff was informed by the person authorised to act on behalf of the respondent that the right to receive payment and its amount were not in dispute and that payment would follow once funds had been allocated in the budget.”
14. Following an appeal by the State, on 22 April 2003 the Šibenik County Court (Županijski sud u Šibeniku) quashed the first-instance judgment and remitted the case. It held that the first-instance court had failed to establish: (a) who in this case was the person authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry of Defence, and (b) whether the signed and certified lists of the members of the applicant's unit who had carried out demining work, indicating the number of days on which they had done such work and the corresponding amount of daily allowances, processed by the Ministry's Finance Department, in fact constituted requests for payment and therefore an indirect acknowledgment of the debt.
15. In the resumed proceedings, the Knin Municipal Court again heard the head of the Split Regional Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence, Brigadier I.P., who testified that the certified lists of servicemen who had carried out demining work constituted requests for payment of the allowances. He further stated that after receiving the lists the Split Regional Finance Department had checked them for accuracy and submitted them together with the requisite form, which in fact constituted a request for payment, to the Central Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence in Zagreb. According to I.P., the Central Finance Department had been authorised to check the lists and could have returned them to the Regional Finance Department if the request for payment of allowances or their amount had been invalid, which they had not done. After the Split Regional Finance Department had submitted the lists and request for payment, the head of the Central Finance Department had informed him that payment would follow once funds had been allocated in the budget for that purpose. Had there been funds, no further action would have been required for the amount requested to be transferred to the applicant's bank account.
16. In these resumed proceedings, the respondent argued for the first time that, in accordance with the internal regulations of the Ministry of Defence, the person authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry was the head of its Finance Department before a court action had been brought, and afterwards the head of the Legal Department.
17. On 18 June 2003 the Municipal Court again ruled in favour of the plaintiff. The relevant part of that judgment read as follows:
“The Split Regional Finance Department certified the above-mentioned payment lists ... by first checking that the payment and its amount were justified, and then sent it, together with the [requisite] form, namely the payment request form, to the Central Finance Department ... in Zagreb. [That Department], by not returning the lists and the request for payment to the Split Regional Finance Department, accepted them as justified and well-founded. [The Central Finance Department] had to pay the amounts [sought] because the Split Regional Finance Department did not have ready money. After receiving those [lists and] the request for payment, the Central Finance Department had informed the Split Department that payment would follow once funds had been allocated in the State budget, of which the plaintiff was notified and which was explained to him by his commanding officer between the [time the instalments] became due and 21 February 2002.
The foregoing, in view of this court, represents acknowledgement of the debt because, by certifying the payment lists with the payment request form and informing the plaintiff thereof as well as of the fact that payment would follow once funds had been allocated in the State budget, the plaintiff, as the creditor, was informed by the respondent, as the debtor, in a clear and unequivocal manner, that the claim at issue, that is, the respondent's debt, was being acknowledged.”
18. Following an appeal by the State, on 8 March 2004 the Å ibenik County Court again quashed the first-instance judgment and remitted the case. It held that from the case file it followed that in accordance with the internal regulations of the Ministry of Defence the person authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry had been the head of its Finance Department before the action was brought, and afterwards the head of the Legal Department. Therefore, the applicant's commanding officer could not have acknowledged the debt on behalf of the Ministry.
19. In the resumed proceedings, the Knin Municipal Court, in order to establish who was the person authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry of Defence, heard the head of the Central Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence, and examined the internal regulations of the Ministry.
20. The head of the Ministry's Central Finance Department, I.H., testified that the person authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry had indeed been the head of its Central Finance Department before the action was brought and the head of its Legal Department afterwards. He also testified that the Split Regional Finance Department's request for payment of daily allowances for demining work had been deemed invalid by a letter of 29 October 1998 because the Decision of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995 applied only to the Danube region of Croatia.
21. On 19 April 2005 the Municipal Court ruled for the third time in favour of the plaintiff. The relevant part of that judgment read as follows:
“In line with the internal organisation of [the Ministry], the plaintiff, after [the daily allowances had become due but] payment had not been forthcoming, had been addressing his requests for payment to his immediate superior, that is to the commander of his unit, whereupon he [the commander] had on behalf of the plaintiff been contacting the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone of the Croatian Armed Forces. The commander of the 3rd Operational Zone had been forwarding such requests to the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces, which had been replying that the right to receive payment and its amount were being acknowledged, and that payment would follow once funds had been allocated for that purpose. The commander of the 3rd Operational Zone had been sending that information to the commander of the [plaintiff's] unit, who had been notifying the plaintiff of this between June 1998 and May 2002, when the commander of the unit received the last information from the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone.
In this way authorised and responsible persons and the department [within the Ministry], in particular the commander of the 40th Engineering Brigade, the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone ... and the competent Regional Finance Department, which certified and acknowledged the amounts of daily allowances as costs of [the Ministry], and in the form of a request for transfer of funds corresponding to the amounts sought ..., submitted them to [the Ministry's Central Finance Department], acknowledged the debt to the plaintiff in a clear and unequivocal manner.
Accordingly, the respondent's argument raised in the course of the proceedings that only the head of [the Central Finance Service] or the head of the Legal Department were authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry, is unfounded because this does not follow from the evidence taken, especially from the documents provided by the respondent, in particular from [the internal regulations of the Ministry of Defence], and [because] the time-limits fixed by the court at the request of the respondent's representative for furnishing evidence [in support of that argument] had expired.
...
... from the letter of 29 October 1998 it does not follow that the request of the [Split] Regional Finance Department had been regarded as invalid. [Rather], it was only returned to the [Split Regional Finance] Department for additional examination and checking, and it was suggested that afterwards the Regional Finance Department should decide on the right to receive payment of the allowances at issue.
Consequently, in the light of the foregoing, this court indisputably established that authorised persons of the respondent had continued, throughout the entire period in dispute, that is, from the time the claims had become due until May 2002, to inform the plaintiff in a clear and unequivocal manner that the respondent did not dispute [his] right to receive daily allowances in the amount sought. [T]hereby, the respondent acknowledged the debt to the plaintiff within the meaning of section 387 of the Obligations Act, so it is clear that the statutory limitation period did not expire, because its running was interrupted by the acknowledgment of the debt.”
22. Following an appeal by the State, on 24 October 2005 the Å ibenik County Court reversed the first-instance judgment by dismissing the applicant's action. The relevant part of that judgment read as follows:
“On the basis of the evidence taken, the first-instance court established the following relevant facts:
- that the plaintiff, as a member of the 40th Engineering Brigade of the Croatian Army at the material time, under the command of the 3rd Operational Zone of the Croatian Armed Forces, had occasionally carried out demining work during 1996, 1997 and 1998;
- that the Decision [of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995] had established the right of the ... members of the Croatian Armed Forces to a special daily allowance for demining work;
- that, in accordance with the [above] Decision, the commander of the 40th Engineering Brigade had been compiling monthly lists of members of the unit who in a particular month had carried out demining work, and had specified the number of days spent on demining work and the corresponding amounts of daily allowances due, and that [those lists] had been certified and co-signed by the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone of the Croatian Armed Forces and submitted to the Split Regional Finance Department of the [Ministry of Defence];
- that the plaintiff, when the special daily allowances were not paid, on numerous occasions approached the commander of his unit, in accordance with the hierarchical organisation of the [Ministry] ... with a query as to when the payment would be made, and that [his commander], after making enquiries of the command of the 3rd Operational Zone, informed him that his claims were not in dispute... and that payment would follow after funds had been allocated for that purpose.
Relying on these facts, the first-instance court found that that the authorised persons of the respondent (the commander of the 40th Engineering Brigade, the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone of the Croatian Armed Forces, as well as the Split Regional Finance Department – which had certified and acknowledged the amount of the plaintiff's special daily allowances as costs of the respondent and had submitted it in the form of a request to the [Central] Finance Department of the [Ministry for transfer of the amount sought]) – had, throughout the entire period in dispute, until May 2002, unequivocally informed the plaintiff that the respondent did not dispute [his] right to receive daily allowances in the amount sought, and that the respondent had thereby acknowledged the debt to the plaintiff within the meaning of section 387 of the Obligations Act, so the statutory limitation period had not expired.
However, having regard to the evidence taken before the first-instance court, this court considers the above finding of the first-instance court erroneous. [This is so] because, contrary to the view of the first-instance court, and in accordance with the hierarchical organisation of the [Ministry], the persons authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the [Ministry] were the head of [its Central] Finance Department – which Department, in accordance with the [Ministry's] internal regulations, was authorised to ultimately process and check the requests for payment of the plaintiff's claims submitted by the Split Regional Finance Department (until the action was brought in this case) – and the head of the [Ministry's] Legal Department (during the present proceedings), as the respondent correctly argued ... as well as the other authorised persons who were, in accordance with the hierarchical organisation of the [Ministry], superior to [them].
That being so, and having regard to the facts established in the proceedings before the first-instance court, it does not follow that it was precisely those authorised persons mentioned above who acknowledged the debt by making a declaration to the plaintiff as the creditor, nor that the debt was acknowledged in some indirect manner within the meaning of paragraph 2 of section 387 of the Obligations Act. [O]n the contrary, the request of the Split Regional Finance Department to transfer funds [corresponding to the amounts of daily allowances sought] (which request, together with signed and certified lists compiled by the 40th Engineering Brigade, cannot be considered an acknowledgement of the debt within the meaning of section 387 of the Obligations Act) ... was regarded as invalid by the Central Finance Department and returned to the Split Regional Finance Department for further checking and additional examination (...). [T]herefore, in the instant case the respondent did not acknowledge the plaintiff's claims in any manner prescribed by law that would lead to an interruption of the statutory limitation period. [S]ince the last monthly instalment of special daily allowances had become due in April 1998, and the action in this case had been brought on 21 May 2001, the [respondent's] plea that the claims at issue were statute-barred, ... is well-founded because the three-year statutory limitation period set forth in section 131 of the Labour Act in respect of the plaintiff's claims, which arose from his employment relationship with the respondent, had expired in the instant case.”
23. The applicant then lodged a constitutional complaint against the second-instance judgment, alleging violations of his constitutional rights to equality before the courts and to a fair hearing. He argued that his claim for special daily allowances for demining work was not statute-barred, because the Ministry of Defence had on several occasions acknowledged the debt, thereby interrupting the running of the statutory limitation period, and that the Å ibenik County Court had not relied on any provision of substantive law which would justify dismissal of his action.
24. On 10 April 2008 the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) dismissed the applicant's constitutional complaint and served its decision on his representative on 8 May 2008.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitution
1. Relevant provisions
25. The relevant part of the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette nos. 56/1990, 135/1997, 8/1998 (consolidated text), 113/2000, 124/2000 (consolidated text), 28/2001 and 41/2001 (consolidated text), 55/2001 (corrigendum)) provides as follows:
Article 26
“All citizens of the Republic of Croatia and foreigners shall be equal before the courts and other state or public authorities.”
Article 29 (1)
“In the determination of his rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial court established by law.”
Article 48
“1. The right of ownership shall be guaranteed.
2. Ownership implies duties. Owners and users of property shall contribute to the general welfare.”
Article 50
“1. Ownership may be restricted or taken in accordance with the law and in the interest of the Republic of Croatia subject to payment of compensation equal to the market value.
2. The exercise ... of the right of ownership may, on an exceptional basis, be restricted by law for the protection of the interests and security of the Republic of Croatia, nature, the environment or public health.”
Article 140
“International agreements in force, which were concluded and ratified in accordance with the Constitution and made public, shall be part of the internal legal order of the Republic of Croatia and shall have precedence over the [domestic] statutes. ...”
2. The Constitutional Court's jurisprudence
26. In its decisions nos. U-I-892/1994 of 14 November 1994 (Official Gazette no. 83/1994) and U-I-130/1995 of 20 February 1995 (Official Gazette no. 112/1995) the Constitutional Court held that all rights guaranteed in the Convention and its Protocols were also to be considered constitutional rights having legal force equal to the provisions of the Constitution.
B. The Constitutional Court Act
1. Relevant provisions
27. The relevant part of the 1999 Constitutional Act on the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Croatia (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 99/1999 of 29 September 1999 – “the Constitutional Court Act”), as amended by the 2002 Amendments (Ustavni zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Ustavnog zakona o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 29/2002 of 22 March 2002), which entered into force on 15 March 2002, reads as follows:
Section 62
“1. Anyone may lodge a constitutional complaint with the Constitutional Court if he or she deems that the decision of a state authority, local or regional self-government, or a legal person invested with public authority, on his or her rights or obligations, or as regards suspicion or accusation of a criminal offence, has violated his or her human rights or fundamental freedoms, or right to local or regional self-government, guaranteed by the Constitution (“constitutional right”)...
2. If another legal remedy is available in respect of the violation of the constitutional rights [complained of], the constitutional complaint may be lodged only after this remedy has been exhausted.
3. In matters in which an administrative action or, in civil and non-contentious proceedings, an appeal on points of law [revizija] are available, remedies shall be considered exhausted only after the decision on these legal remedies has been given.”
Section 65 (1)
“A constitutional complaint shall contain ... an indication of the constitutional right alleged to have been violated [together] with an indication of the relevant provision of the Constitution guaranteeing that right...”
Section 71 (1)
“ ... [t]he Constitutional Court shall examine only the violations of constitutional rights alleged in the constitutional complaint.”
2. The Constitutional Court's jurisprudence
28. On 9 July 2001 the Constitutional Court delivered a decision, no. U-III-368/1999 (Official Gazette no. 65/2001) in a case where the complainant relied in her constitutional complaint on Articles 3 and 19(1) of the Constitution, neither of which, under that court's jurisprudence, contained constitutional rights. The Constitutional Court nevertheless allowed the constitutional complaint, finding violations of Articles 14, 19(2) and 26 of the Constitution, on which the complainant had not relied, and quashed the contested decisions. In so deciding it held as follows:
“Therefore, a constitutional complaint cannot be based on either of the constitutional provisions stated [by the complainant in her constitutional complaint].
However, the present case concerns, as will be explained further, a specific legal situation as a result of which this court, despite [its] finding that there are not, and cannot be, violations of the constitutional rights explicitly relied on by the complainant, considers that there are circumstances which warrant quashing [the contested] decisions.
...
Namely, it is evident from the constitutional complaint and the case file that there have been violations of [constitutional] rights, in particular those guaranteed by Article 14 (equality, equality before the law), Article 19 paragraph 2 (the guarantee of judicial review of decisions of state and other public authorities) and Article 26 (equality before the courts and other state or public authorities) of the Constitution ...”
C. The Obligations Act
1. Relevant provisions
29. Section 387 of the Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 29/1978, 39/1985 and 57/1989, and the Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/1991 with subsequent amendments) provided as follows:
STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS
GENERAL PROVISIONS
General rule
Section 360
“(1) The right to request performance of an obligation shall be extinguished on the expiration of a statutory limitation period.
(2) ...
(3) A court shall not take a statutory limitation period into account of its own motion if the debtor did not plead it.”
INTERRUPTION OF A STATUTORY LIMITATION PERIOD
Acknowledgement of a debt
Section 387
“(1) The running of a statutory limitation period shall be interrupted when the debtor acknowledges his or her debt.
(2) A debt may be acknowledged not only by a statement [that is, a declaration] to the creditor but also in an indirect manner, such as by making a payment, paying interest or providing security...”
2. The Supreme Court's practice
30. In interpreting section 387 of the Obligations Act the Supreme Court has consistently held that acknowledgement of a debt capable of interrupting a statutory limitation period, regardless of whether it has been made in a direct or indirect manner, has to be done unequivocally and by the persons authorised to act on behalf of the debtor (see, for example, decisions nos. Rev 3053/1999-2 of 23 January 2002, Rev 271/03-2 of 12 April 2005, Rev 347/04-2 of 21 June 2005, Revt 97/03-2 of 22 December 2005, and Revt 156/2006-2 of 29 November 2006).
31. On 25 May 2000 the Supreme Court delivered a judgment, no. Rev 1401/1999-2, in a case in which the plaintiffs sued the State seeking payment of unpaid salaries for the period during which they had been receiving medical treatment and held captive by the enemy, respectively. The question arose whether the letter of the Ministry of Defence, in particular, the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces, of 9 February 1998, confirming that the plaintiffs had been members of their military unit and had appeared on its payroll but had not collected their salaries in the above-mentioned period, constituted acknowledgment of the debt. The lower courts dismissed the plaintiffs' action, finding that the letter had not constituted acknowledgement of a debt capable of interrupting the statutory limitation period. In dismissing an appeal on points of law (revizija) by the plaintiffs and upholding the lower courts' judgments, the Supreme Court held as follows:
“From [the letter of 9 February 1998] it only follows that the plaintiffs were members of a certain unit at a certain time and that they did not receive a salary for that period. Such [a letter] cannot per se constitute an acknowledgment of the debt within the meaning of section 366 of the Obligations Act and interruption of the statutory limitation period. That is a general statement which cannot be considered as an acknowledgment of the debt. The ... letter indicates that the debt may exist but it does not constitute an acknowledgement by the debtor that the debt [indeed] exists, that is, acknowledgment that the debtor has [an obligation] to settle the debt or that the debtor will settle it. The statement of facts by the debtor, on the basis of which it could be concluded that the debt exists, does not constitute acknowledgment of the debt [capable of] interrupting the statutory limitation period. For the acknowledgement of the debt to result in the interruption of the statutory limitation period, it has to be explicit and specific so that the debtor's will to settle the existing debt is unequivocally expressed.”
32. On 27 September 2007 the Supreme Court delivered a decision, no. Rev-427/2006-2, in a case where the plaintiff company sued the State seeking payment of a certain amount of money. The question arose whether a letter of 15 May 1996 signed on behalf of the Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence by the head of its Bookkeeping Division informing the plaintiff that its claim had been recorded with the Ministry's Finance Department but that funds had not been allocated to satisfy that claim, as well as a letter of 6 November 1997 signed on behalf of the Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence by the head of its Payment Operations Division notifying the plaintiff that the Ministry would settle its debt by transferring the money to the plaintiff company's giro account upon transfer of the funds to the Ministry from the State budget, amounted to acknowledgment of the debt. The lower courts ruled in favour of the plaintiff, finding that the above-mentioned letters had constituted acknowledgement of a debt capable of interrupting the statutory limitation period. The Supreme Court allowed an appeal on points of law by the State, quashed the lower courts' judgments and remitted the case. In so deciding the Supreme Court held as follows:
“In the contested judgments no reasons were given for the finding that the head of the Bookkeeping Division, who had signed the letter of 15 May 1996, would be authorised to acknowledge the debt (even assuming that the mere recording of the claim and its amount with the Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence could be considered an acknowledgment of the debt).
... the letter of 6 November 1997 [containing] the statement that its [the Ministry's] debt would be settled by transferring the money to the [plaintiff company's] giro account, but without establishing the amount of the debt that the respondent considered well-founded, and without establishing whether ... the head of the Payment Operations Division (who signed the letter) was authorised to give such a statement, cannot, at least for the time being, be considered an acknowledgment of the debt.
In this court's view, an acknowledgement of a debt within the meaning of section 387 paragraph 2 of the Obligations Act can be made by the debtor personally or through an authorised person (if the debtor is a legal entity). It follows from the foregoing that declarations of unauthorised persons acknowledging a debt on behalf of a debtor cannot produce for the debtor any legal effects of a valid acknowledgement of a debt. It also has to be noted that an acknowledgement of a debt must not be contrary to peremptory norms [jus cogens].
For these reasons, until it is established whether, and on the basis of which legal document, the head of the Bookkeeping Division and the head of the Payment Operations Division were persons authorised to acknowledge the debt, there can be no conclusions as to the legal significance of the letters of 15 May 1996 and 6 November 1997.”
3. The doctrine
33. According to the views expressed in Croatian legal doctrine, a right is not extinguished by the expiration of a statutory limitation period. Rather, the creditor only loses the right to seek its enforcement through the courts. Therefore, a debtor remains a debtor even after a statutory limitation period has expired. For that reason, if a debtor pays a creditor after the expiry of a statutory limitation period, he or she cannot claim the amount paid back (on account of unjust enrichment) because he or she paid an existing debt
D. The Labour Act
34. Section 131 of the Labour Act (Zakon o radu, Official Gazette nos. 38/95, 54/95 (corrigendum), 65/95 (corrigendum), 17/01, 82/01, 114/03, 123/03, 142/03 (corrigendum) and 30/04) provides as follows:
Statutory limitation period for an employment-related claim
Section 131
“Unless otherwise provided in this or another statute, an employment-related claim expires after three years.”
E. The Civil Procedure Act
35. The relevant part of the Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parničnom postupku, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 and 35/1991, and the Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia nos. 53/1991, 91/1992, 58/1993, 112/1999, 88/2001, 117/2003, 88/2005, 2/2007, 84/2008 and 123/2008) provides as follows:
Section 186 (3)
“The court shall proceed on an action even if the plaintiff has not indicated the legal basis for his or her claim; and if the plaintiff has indicated the legal basis the court shall not be bound by it.”
Reopening of proceedings following a final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom
Section 428a
“(1) When the European Court of Human Rights has found a violation of a human right or fundamental freedom guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms or additional protocols thereto ratified by the Republic of Croatia, a party may, within thirty days of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights becoming final, file a petition with the court in the Republic of Croatia which adjudicated in the first instance in the proceedings in which the decision violating the human right or fundamental freedom was rendered, to set aside the decision by which the human right or fundamental freedom was violated.
(2) The proceedings referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall be conducted by applying, mutatis mutandis, the provisions on the reopening of proceedings.
(3) In the reopened proceedings the courts are required to respect the legal opinions expressed in the final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom.”
F. The Decision of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995
36. Decision of the Minister of Defence on Payment of Special Daily Allowances for Carrying Out Mining and Demining Works (Odluka o isplatama posebnih dnevnica za vrijeme izvođenja radova na miniranju i deminiranju, unpublished) of 18 September 1995 reads as follows:
“1. Permanent and reserve members of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Croatia carrying out mining and demining works shall have the right to special daily allowances.
2. Special allowances shall be calculated in the amounts prescribed by the Decision on the Amount of Daily Allowance for Official Journeys and the Amount of Compensation for Users Financed from the State Budget [that is, 123 Croatian kunas (HRK) at the time], and so from the time of departure to [carry out] mining and demining works, according to the following criteria:
(a) the entire daily allowance for every twenty-four hours spent on mining and demining works, including periods of twelve to twenty-four hours [that is, between twelve and twenty-four hours];
(b) half the daily allowance for periods of eight to twelve hours.
3. The lists of persons entitled to special daily allowances, with details, shall be compiled by the commander at independent battalion level or higher, and shall be certified by the commander of the operational zone ... The certified list shall be submitted for payment to the regional finance department on whose territory mining and demining works have been carried out, at the latest on the third day of the month in respect of the preceding month.
4. This Decision shall enter into force on the day of its adoption, and shall be applicable from 1 June 1995.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
37. The applicant complained that the refusal of the domestic courts to grant his claims for special daily allowances for demining work infringed his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
38. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
39. The Government disputed the admissibility of this complaint on two grounds, namely, that it was incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention and that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies.
1. Compatibility ratione materiae
(a) The arguments of the parties
40. The Government first emphasised that the applicant's complaint related to his claims for special daily allowance for demining work the applicant had carried out as a military serviceman. They further noted that in the Baneković case (see Baneković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 41730/02, 23 September 2004), the Court had established that employment disputes between the authorities and public servants whose duties typify the specific activities of the public service, in so far as the latter is acting as the depository of public authority responsible for protecting the general interests of the State, were excluded from the scope of the Convention. The Court had further noted that a manifest example of such activities was provided by the armed forces and the police. Bearing in mind the fact that the applicant's complaint in the present case related to his work in active military service, the Government deemed that the provisions of the Convention were not applicable to it.
41. The applicant replied that the Government's reference to the Baneković case in support of their argument that the present complaint was incompatible ratione materiae was rather superficial. In that case the Court had not held, as the Government suggested, that employment disputes between the authorities and public servants were excluded “from the scope of the (entire) Convention” but only from the scope of Article 6 § 1 thereof. For that reason, in the Baneković case the Court had declared inadmissible, as incompatible ratione materiae, the applicant's complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The present complaint however concerned the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(b) The Court's assessment
42. The Court notes that in the Baneković case to which the Government referred, the applicant, a police officer, complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention of the unfairness and the excessive length of civil proceedings in which he had sought payment of a salary increase. It was precisely the complaint under that Article (together with related complaints under Articles 13 and 14) that the Court, applying the principles enunciated in the Pellegrin case (see Pellegrin v. France [GC], no. 28541/95, ECHR 1999-VIII), declared inadmissible ratione materiae in the Baneković case. Given that the applicant in the present case, in complaining about the refusal of the domestic courts to award him special daily allowances for demining work, relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the Government's argument appears misconceived.
43. What is more, the Court reiterates that in the case of Vilho Eskelinen and Others (see Vilho Eskelinen and Others v. Finland [GC], no. 63235/00, ECHR 2007-IV) it revisited and abandoned the Pellegrin jurisprudence. Therefore, the Government's reliance on the Baneković case is not relevant even to the applicant's complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see paragraphs 80-82 below).
44. It follows that the Government's objection as to incompatibility ratione materiae must be dismissed.
2. Non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
(a) The arguments of the parties
45. The Government further argued that the applicant had not complained of a violation of his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions in the proceedings before the domestic courts. In particular, in his constitutional complaint the applicant had only complained of violations of his constitutional rights to equality before the courts and a fair hearing, which corresponded in substance to Article 6 of the Convention.
46. The applicant replied that his complaint before the domestic courts had in essence always been the same, as he had always sought payment of special daily allowances for demining work. Referring to the principle of iura novit curia embodied in section 186(3) of the Civil Procedure Act (see paragraph 35 above), he argued that it had been for the domestic courts, including the Constitutional Court, to legally qualify his claim.
(b) The Court's assessment
47. The Court notes that under Croatian law, in particular section 186(3) of the Civil Procedure Act (see paragraph 35 above), civil courts are under an obligation to consider all relevant rules of law which could support a plaintiff's claim. This includes the Convention and its Protocols, which in Croatia not only takes precedence over domestic statutes but the rights enshrined therein are considered constitutional rights (see paragraphs 25 and 26 above).
48. However, it would appear that the principle of iura novit curia does not apply in the proceedings before the Constitutional Court because, under section 71(1) of the Constitutional Court Act, the Constitutional Court examines only the violations of the constitutional rights alleged in the constitutional complaint (see paragraph 27 above). From the applicant's constitutional complaint (see paragraph 23 above), it appears that he did not rely on Article 48 and/or 50 of the Constitution (see paragraph 25 above), which are the provisions that arguably correspond to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Nor did he rely on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 directly. Instead, he referred principally to Articles 26 and 29(1) 33 (2) of the Constitution (see paragraph 25 above), which are the provisions that correspond to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
49. Admittedly, section 65(1) of the Constitutional Court Act requires complainants to indicate in their constitutional complaints the constitutional right which has allegedly been violated as well as the relevant provision of the Constitution guaranteeing that right (see paragraph 27 above). Likewise, section 71(1) of the same Act provides that the Constitutional Court examines only the violations of the constitutional rights alleged in the constitutional complaint (see paragraph 27 above). This rule, however, is not as absolute as the Government suggested. From the Constitutional Court's decision no. U-III-363/1999 of 9 July 2001 (see paragraph 28 above) it follows that in certain cases it is not necessary to plead the relevant Article of the Constitution, as it may be sufficient that a violation of a constitutional right is apparent from the complainant's submissions and the case file (see, mutatis mutandis, Glasenapp v. Germany, 28 August 1986, § 45, Series A no. 104).
50. Therefore, while it is true that in his constitutional complaint the applicant did not explicitly rely on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention or the corresponding provisions of the Constitution, he did complain about the refusal of the Å ibenik County Court to grant his claim for daily allowances for demining work (see paragraph 23 above) .
51. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the applicant, having raised the issue in substance in his constitutional complaint, did ventilate before the domestic courts the grievance which he has submitted to the Court. He thereby provided the national authorities with the opportunity which is in principle intended to be afforded to Contracting States by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, namely of putting right the violations alleged against them (see Glasenapp, cited above, § 44, and X v. Germany, no. 9228/80, Commission decision of 16 December 1982, Decisions and Reports (DR) 11, pp. 142-43).
52. It follows that the Government's objection concerning non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must also be dismissed.
53. The Court further notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It also notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. As to whether the applicant's claims constituted 'possessions'
(a) The arguments of the parties
54. The Government first submitted that the applicant's claims did not amount to “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Relying on the case of Vilho Eskelinen and Others (cited above, § 94), they argued that the Convention did not guarantee the right to a salary of a particular amount and noted that the applicant's claim related in substance to the level of his salary, a right not covered by the Convention. Moreover, at the time he had brought his action his claims had already been statute-barred, so he could not have had a legitimate expectation that they would be granted. As a result, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not applicable to the case.
55. The applicant replied that the existence of his claims for special daily allowances for demining work and their amounts had never been disputed by the domestic authorities. What had been disputed was why they had not been paid. He therefore argued that his claims did constitute “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and the Court's case-law. The applicant also added that his claims had been based on the Decision of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995 and that therefore his case was distinguishable from the case of Vilho Eskelinen and Others, relied on by the Government.
(b) The Court's assessment
56. The Court reiterates that an applicant may allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or claims that are sufficiently established to be regarded as “assets”. Where, as in the present case, a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, it may be regarded as an “asset” only if there is a sufficient basis for that interest in national law (for example, where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it), that is, when the claim is sufficiently established to be enforceable (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, §§ 49 and 52, ECHR 2004-IX, and Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301-B).
57. Turning to the present case, the Court first notes that the Decision of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995 provided for a special daily allowance for the members of the Croatian Army carrying out mining and demining work. It follows from the findings of the domestic courts (see paragraphs 21-22 above) that it was uncontested: (a) that during 1996, 1997 and 1998 the applicant, as a serviceman, occasionally carried out demining work; (b) that his name figured on the monthly lists of members of the 40th Engineering Brigade who carried out demining work, which lists were compiled by the commander of that unit indicating the number of days spent on demining works and related amounts of daily allowances; (c) that those lists were signed by the applicant's commanding officer, then co-signed and certified by the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone of the Croatian Armed Forces, and eventually submitted for payment to the Split Regional Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence. It would therefore appear that all the conditions for acquiring the right to special daily allowances for demining work set forth in the Decision of the Minister of Defence of 18 September 1995 (see paragraph 36 above) were met in the applicant's case. The Court thus considers that the applicant's claims had a sufficient basis in national law to qualify as “assets” protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, for example, Cazacu v. Moldova, no. 40117/02, § 43, 23 October 2007).
58. As to the Government's arguments to the contrary, the Court first notes that in its judgment in the case of Vilho Eskelinen and Others it held that there is no right under the Convention to continue to be paid a salary of a particular amount (see Vilho Eskelinen and Others, cited above, § 94), and not, as the Government suggested, the right to a salary of a particular amount. On the contrary, the Convention organs have consistently held that income that has been earned does constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, for example, Bahçeyaka v. Turkey, no. 74463/01, § 34, 13 July 2006; Erkan v. Turkey (dec.), no. 29840/03, 24 March 2005; Schettini and others v. Italy (dec.), no. 29529/95, 9 November 2000; and Størksen v. Norway, no. 19819/92, Commission decision of 5 July 1994). The Court further notes that under Croatian law, in particular section 360(1) of the Obligations Act, a pecuniary right can no longer be enforced through the courts upon the expiration of a statutory limitation period but the right itself is not extinguished (see paragraphs 29 and 33 above). It follows that, even assuming that the statutory limitation period had indeed expired in the applicant's case, it could not be argued that his claims for special daily allowances for demining work did not qualify as “assets” and thus did not constitute “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
2. Whether there was an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of “possessions”
(a) The arguments of the parties
59. The Government submitted that the case did not disclose any interference with the applicant's right to peacefully enjoy his possessions and that therefore there had been no deprivation or control of possessions by the state authorities.
60. The applicant submitted that non-payment of his daily allowances for demining work constituted deprivation of possessions.
(b) The Court's assessment
61. In the light of the above finding that the applicant's claims for daily allowances for demining work were sufficiently established to qualify as an “asset” attracting the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that the refusal of the domestic courts to grant those claims undoubtedly constituted interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Cazacu, cited above, § 43).
62. The Court must further examine whether that interference was justified.
3. Whether the interference was “provided for by law”
(a) The arguments of the parties
(i) The Government
63. The Government argued that the interference had been provided for by law as it had been based on section 131 of the Labour Act, which provided for a three-year statutory limitation period for employment-related claims.
64. The Government noted that the key issue in the proceedings before the domestic courts had been whether the Ministry of Defence had acknowledged the debt, and thereby interrupted the running of the statutory limitation period. In this connection the Government first reiterated that under the Court's case-law its power to review compliance with domestic law was limited and that it was in the first place for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply the domestic law. They further submitted that under the case-law of the Supreme Court acknowledgment of a debt was an express and specific declaration which, in the case of a legal entity, must be given by an authorised person. In the proceedings before the domestic courts the applicant had maintained that on several occasions his superiors had informed him that his claims were not in dispute and that the payment would follow once the funds had been allocated in the budget. The domestic courts had taken into account all the arguments of the applicant, examined numerous items of evidence, including the internal regulations of the Ministry of Defence, and heard key witnesses, in particular the head of the Ministry's Central Finance Department, I.H. The domestic courts had clearly explained that from the internal organisation of the Ministry of Defence it followed that the head of the Central Finance Department was superior to the Split Regional Finance Department. Since the applicant's claims had only been acknowledged by the Split Regional Finance Department, while the Central Finance Department had considered them invalid, the domestic courts had held that the Ministry of Defence had not acknowledged the debt to the applicant.
65. The Government considered that the above finding of the domestic courts was not arbitrary or unreasonable, but based on the evidence examined in the proceedings. In deciding as they did the domestic courts had acted within their margin of appreciation.
(ii) The applicant
66. The applicant argued that there had been unlawful interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, as the interference had either been arbitrary or failed to meet the criteria of accessibility and foreseeability.
67. The applicant first pointed out that in its judgment of 24 October 2005 the Å ibenik County Court had not referred to any provision of substantive law in support of its finding that the only persons authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry of Defence had been the head of its Central Finance Department, the head of its Legal Department and their superiors. Instead, that court had only vaguely referred to internal regulations of the Ministry without specifying from which provision or provisions of those regulations it had inferred its above finding. That being so, the Å ibenik County Court, in the applicant's view, had indirectly admitted that no such provision had in fact existed, so its judgment could only be considered arbitrary.
68. Even assuming that the Å ibenik County Court's finding had not been arbitrary and that it was supported by the Ministry's internal regulations, the applicant claimed that those regulations had been submitted to the first-instance court for the first time at the hearing held on 14 December 2004 and had been classified as a military secret. In the applicant's view, that meant that the County Court had relied on regulations that had not been accessible to him.
69. What is more, even assuming that the Ministry's internal regulations had been accessible to him, it had been impossible to infer from these that only the head of the Ministry's Central Finance Department had been authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry. Accordingly, the interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions had not been foreseeable.
70. Lastly, regardless of the above considerations, the applicant submitted that in accordance with military hierarchy, he had been authorised to address his request for payment of his daily allowances for demining work only to his immediate superior, who, after making enquiries of his own superiors, had informed him that his claim had not been disputed and that the payment would follow after funds had been allocated in the budget. For the applicant, in these circumstances it was difficult to argue that those persons had not been authorised to acknowledge the debt to him on behalf of the Ministry.
(b) The Court's assessment
71. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
72. The Court takes note of the Government's argument that the decisions of the domestic courts in the present case had a legal basis in domestic law, as their refusal to grant the applicant's claims was based on section 131 of the Labour Act (see paragraph 34 above). However, the Court also notes that the application of that provision by the domestic courts followed from their prior finding that the Ministry of Defence did not acknowledge the debt to the applicant within the meaning of section 387 of the Obligations Act – an action that would have otherwise interrupted the running of the statutory limitation period – as the debt was not acknowledged by authorised persons within the Ministry. In particular, the Šibenik County Court held in its judgment of 24 October 2005 that the only person authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry before the applicant had brought his action was the head of its Central Finance Department and his superiors. Therefore, the repeated declarations of the applicant's commanding officer to the applicant, after making enquiries of his superiors up to the level of the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces, that his claims were not in dispute and that the allowances would be paid once funds had been allocated in the budget for that purpose, had not had the effect of acknowledging the debt (see paragraph 22 above).
73. In this connection the Court notes, as correctly pointed out by the applicant, that the Å ibenik County Court in its judgment of 24 October 2005, did not rely on any specific legal provision that would support its finding that the debt could have been acknowledged on behalf of the Ministry exclusively by the head of its Central Finance Department.
74. The Court considers that an individual acting in good faith is, in principle, entitled to rely on statements made by state or public officials who appear to have the requisite authority to do so, and that internal rules and procedures were complied with, unless it clearly follows from publicly accessible documents (including primary or subordinate legislation), or an individual was otherwise aware, or should have been aware, that a certain official lacked the authority to legally bind the State. It should not be incumbent on an individual to ensure that the state authorities are adhering to their own internal rules and procedures inaccessible to the public and which are primarily designed to ensure accountability and efficiency within a state authority. A State whose authorities failed to observe their own internal rules and procedures should not be allowed to profit from their wrongdoing and escape their obligations. In other words, the risk of any mistake made by state authorities must be borne by the State and the errors must not be remedied at the expense of the individual concerned, especially where no other conflicting private interest is at stake (see Trgo v. Croatia, no. 35298/04, § 67, 11 June 2009; Gashi v. Croatia, no. 32457/05, § 40, 13 December 2007; and Radchikov v. Russia, no. 65582/01, § 50, 24 May 2007).
75. The Court accepts that sometimes the authority of a particular official to legally bind the State may be inferred from the nature of his or her office and requires no explicit rule or provision. In view of that possibility, in their observations on the admissibility and merits of the application of 3 April 2009 the Government, instead of relying, explicitly or by reference, on some domestic legal provision on which the above-mentioned finding of the Šibenik County Court could be based, simply argued that the court's finding had been inferred from the internal organisation of the Ministry of Defence (see paragraph 64 above). The Court will accordingly examine whether that finding was foreseeable for the applicant in the circumstances of the case (see, mutatis mutandis, Sun v. Russia, no. 31004/02, § 29).
76. In this connection the Court first reiterates that the principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application. An individual must be able – if need be with appropriate advice – to foresee, to a degree that is reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences which a given action may entail (see, for example, Sun, cited above, § 27, and Adzhigovich v. Russia, no. 23202/05, § 29, 8 October 2009). The principle of lawfulness also requires the Court to verify whether the way in which the domestic law is interpreted and applied by the domestic courts produces consequences that are consistent with the principles of the Convention (see, for example, Apostolidi and Others v. Turkey, no. 45628/99, § 70, 27 March 2007, and Nacaryan and Deryan v. Turkey, nos. 19558/02 and 27904/02, § 58, 8 January 2008).
77. In this connection the Court notes that the domestic courts established beyond doubt that the applicant had been repeatedly informed by his commanding officer that his claims for daily allowances for demining work were not in dispute and that they would be paid once funds had been allocated in the budget for that purpose (see paragraphs 21-22 above). For the Court the question to be answered is not whether it was plausible, as the Šibenik County Court found, that only the head of the Central Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence was authorised to acknowledge the debt. Rather, the question is whether, in the absence of a clear legal provision or a publicly available document that would support that finding, it was equally plausible for the applicant – who, under the rules of the military hierarchy, could have addressed his request only to his immediate superior – to assume that the information repeatedly communicated to him by his commanding officer came from a person or persons within the Ministry who had the authority to acknowledge the debt. In this respect the Court notes that the applicant was aware that his commanding officer had made enquiries of his own superiors and that the information eventually conveyed to him came, through the commander of the 3rd Operational Zone, from the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces. In the Court's view, in the absence of a clear legal provision or publicly accessible documents as to who was authorised to acknowledge the debt on behalf of the Ministry of Defence, it was quite natural for the applicant to believe that the General Staff of the Croatian Armed Forces was an authority of sufficient rank whose statements could be binding on the Ministry.
78. Therefore, having regard to the Šibenik County Court's failure to indicate a legal provision that could be construed as the basis for its finding that the debt could have been acknowledged only by the head of the Central Finance Department of the Ministry of Defence, the Court finds the impugned interference was incompatible with the principle of lawfulness and therefore contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Frizen v. Russia, no. 58254/00, § 35, 24 March 2005; Adzhigovich, cited above, § 34; and Cazacu, cited above, §§ 46-47), because the manner in which that court interpreted and applied the relevant domestic law, in particular section 387 of the Obligations Act, was not foreseeable for the applicant, who could reasonably have expected that his commanding officer's statements to the effect that his claims were not in dispute and that payment was to follow once funds had been allocated, constituted acknowledgement of the debt capable of interrupting the running of the statutory limitation period (see, for example and mutatis mutandis, Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, §§ 51-60, and Fokas v. Turkey, no. 31206/02, §§ 42-44, 29 September 2009). Accordingly, the applicant could reasonably have expected that the statutory limitation period had not expired. This finding that the interference was not in accordance with the law makes it unnecessary to examine whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights.
79. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
80. The applicant also complained that the aforementioned civil proceedings had been unfair, alleging that the domestic courts had erred in the application of the relevant provisions of substantive law and that the judgment of the second-instance court had not been duly reasoned. He relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, the relevant part of which reads:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ...”
81. The Court notes that the applicant complained about the outcome of the proceedings, which, unless it was arbitrary, the Court is unable to examine under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The applicant did not complain, and there is no evidence to suggest, that the domestic courts lacked impartiality or that the proceedings were otherwise unfair. In the light of all the material in its possession, the Court considers that in the present case the applicant was able to submit his arguments before courts which offered the guarantees set forth in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and which addressed those arguments in decisions that were duly reasoned and not arbitrary.
82. It follows that this complaint is inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
83. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
84. The applicant claimed 2,250 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage.
85. The Government contested this claim.
86. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences. If the national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI). In this connection the Court notes that under section 428a of the Civil Procedure Act (see paragraph 35 above), an applicant may file a petition for reopening of the civil proceedings in respect of which the Court has found a violation of the Convention. Given the nature of the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and the reasons for which it has found a violation of that Article, the Court considers that in the present case the most appropriate way of repairing the consequences of that violation is to reopen the proceedings complained of. As it follows that the domestic law allows such reparation to be made, the Court considers that there is no call to award the applicant any sum in respect of pecuniary damage (see Trgo, cited above, § 75).
87. On the other hand, the Court finds that the applicant must have sustained non-pecuniary damage. It therefore awards the applicant under that head EUR 2,250, that is, the amount sought by the applicant, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
B. Costs and expenses
88. The applicant further claimed EUR 3,500 for costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts. He also claimed costs and expenses incurred before the Court but in doing so he only specified the amount of postal expenses and sought HRK 100 on that account.
89. The Government contested these claims.
90. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to reimbursement of his costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
91. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 833 for costs and expenses in the domestic proceedings, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on that amount.
92. As regards the applicant's claim for costs and expenses incurred before it, the Court notes that pursuant to Rule 60 § 1 of the Rules of Court an applicant who wishes to obtain an award of just satisfaction under Article 41 of the Convention in the event of the Court finding a violation of his or her Convention rights must make a specific claim to that effect. Since in the present case, apart from postal expenses, the applicant did not make a specific claim for costs and expenses before the Court, he failed to comply with the above requirement set out in Rule 60 § 1 of the Rules of Court. The Court therefore makes no award in respect of that part of his claim (Rule 60 § 3). On the other hand, it awards the applicant EUR 14 for postal expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on that amount.
C. Default interest
93. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final according to Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Croatian kunas at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 2,250 (two thousand two hundred and fifty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 847 (eight hundred and forty-seven euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 20 May 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Malinverni is annexed to this judgment.
C.L.R.
S.N.


CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE MALINVERNI
In paragraph 86, the Court reiterates that “... a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences. If the national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI).”
In this connection the Court notes that “... under section 428a of the Civil Procedure Act ... an applicant may file a petition for reopening of the civil proceedings in respect of which the Court has found a violation of the Convention.” Given the nature of the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and the reasons for which it has found a violation of that Article, the Court considers that “... in the present case the most appropriate way of repairing the consequences of that violation is to reopen the proceedings complained of.”
For reasons I have explained on many occasions, either alone or together with other judges, in particular Judge Spielmann,1 I would very much have liked this principle, on account of its importance, to have been reflected in the operative part of the judgment.
That requirement appears to me to be all the more necessary in the present case in view of the Court's finding that “as it follows that the domestic law allows such reparation to be made, the Court considers that there is no call to award the applicant any sum in respect of pecuniary damage ...”
1 See my joint concurring opinions with Judge Spielmann appended to the following judgments: Vladimir Romanov v. Russia (no. 41461/02, 24 July 2008); Ilatovskiy v. Russia (no. 6945/04, 9 July 2009); Fakiridou and Schina v. Greece (no. 6789/06, 14 November 2008); Lesjak v. Croatia (no. 25904/06, 18 February 2010); and Prežec v. Croatia (no. 48185/07, 15 October 2009). See also my concurring opinion joined by Judges Casadevall, Cabral Barreto, Zagrebelsky and Popović in the case of Cudak v. Lithuania ([GC], no. 15869/02, 23 March 2010), as well as the concurring opinon of Judges Rozakis, Spielmann, Ziemele and Lazarova Trajkovska in Salduz v. Turkey ([GC], no. 36391/02, ECHR 2008-...). See also my concurring opinion in Pavlenko v. Russia (no. 42371/02, 1 April 2010).


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1; danno Patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta; danno Non- patrimoniale - assegnazione
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA LELAS C. CROATIA
(Richiesta n. 55555/08)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
20 maggio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Lelas c. Croatia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e da Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 29 aprile 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 55555/08) contro la Repubblica di Croazia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino croato, il Sig. Č. L.(“il richiedente”), il 6 novembre 2008.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. I. Š., un difensore che pratica a Spalato. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. L’ 11 dicembre 2008 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di comunicare al Governo l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente vive a Vrlika.
5. Lui è un membro delle Forze Armate assunto dal Ministero della Difesa (Ministarstvo obrane Republike Hrvatske). Nel 1996, 1997 e 1998, come membro della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria dell'Esercito croato il richiedente ha partecipato di quando in quando ad operazioni di disattivazione di mine nei territori di recente liberati in Croazia.
6. Sulla base della Decisione del Ministro della Difesa del 18 settembre 1995 (vedere paragrafo 36 sotto), gli fu concesso un assegno quotidiano speciale per simile lavoro.
7. Poiché gli assegni non gli erano stati pagati, il 21 maggio 2002 il richiedente introdusse un'azione civile contro lo Stato presso la Corte Municipale di Knin (Općinski sud u Kninu), chiedendo il pagamento degli assegni non retribuiti. Lui chiese in totale la somma di 16,142.83 kuna croati (HRK) insieme all’ interesse di mora legale accumulato.
8. Lo Stato rispose che la sua azione era caduta in prescrizione perché il termine di prescrizione dei tre - anni per le rivendicazioni relative al lavoro era scaduto.
9. In replica, il richiedente dibatté, che in molte occasioni aveva chiesto al suo ufficiale in comando perché gli assegni non erano stati pagati. Il suo ufficiale in comando aveva fatto delle ricerche presso il suo superiore che aveva contattato poi il Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate Glavni stožer Oružanih snaga Republike Hrvatske). Infine, il richiedente era stato informato tramite il suo ufficiale in comando che le sue rivendicazioni non erano contestate e che loro sarebbero state pagate una volta i assegnati i finanziamenti a quel fine nel bilancio Statale. Appellandosi a queste informazioni, il richiedente dibatté che lo Stato aveva riconosciuto il debito all'interno del significato della sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi e che la gestione del termine di prescrizione legale era stata così interrotta.
10. La corte ascoltò l’ufficiale in comandando del richiedente B.B. ed il capo del Dipartimento delle Finanza Regionale del Ministero della Difesa, Generale di brigata I.P.
11. B.B. che era stato il comandante della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria fra il gennaio 1996 e l’ aprile 1999 testimoniò che la lista dei membri delle Forze Armate che eseguirono il lavoro di disinnesto delle mine, insieme col numero dei giorni lavorati e l'importo corrispondente degli assegni, gli era stata presentata dai comandanti di plotone all'interno della brigata. Come comandante dell'unità, lui l’ aveva firmata dopo averla controllata per accuratezza e l’ aveva presentata poi per la certificazione al comandante della 3 Zona Operativa. Dopo che il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa aveva firmato la lista, era stata presentata per il pagamento al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze a Spalato. Lui aveva informato il richiedente che le liste erano state presente per il pagamento. Quando gli assegni non furono pagati, il richiedente e gli altri membri dell'unità gli si erano avvicinati, come loro ufficiale in comando e la sola persona a cui loro erano autorizzati ad avvicinarsi sotto le regolamentazioni interne, chiedendogli quando il pagamento sarebbe stato fatto. A loro nome aveva contattato poi il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa. Ad un certo punto era stato informato che il diritto a ricevere il pagamento ed il suo importo non erano stati contestati e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito dopo che i finanziamenti sarebbero stati assegnati a quel il fine. Ad un certo punto aveva trasmesso queste informazioni ai membri della sua unità, incluso il richiedente.
12. I.P. era stato fin dal 1996 il capo del Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato del Ministero della Difesa che era responsabile delle questioni finanziarie per la 3 Zona Operativa. Lui testimoniò che lui era stato consapevole che i membri della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria stavano eseguendo dei lavori di sminamento dall’ aprile 1998 e che il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa stava presentando delle liste di membri delle Forze Armate che eseguivano i lavori di sminamento per il pagamento. Poiché il pagamento non era imminente quando gli assegni giunsero al termine di pagamento, il Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate aveva informato i reparti finanziari attinenti che gli assegni non erano stati pagati perché nessun finanziamento era stato assegnato al bilancio a quel fine, mentre nessuna istruzione era stata data per contestare il diritto a ricevere assegni o il loro importo.
13. Il 3 marzo 2003 la Corte Municipale di Knin decise a favore del richiedente ed ordinò lo Stato di pagargli gli assegni che rivendicava. La parte attinente di questa sentenza recita come segue:
“[E’] incontrastato che... quando ogni rata giunge a scadenza, fino al 21 febbraio 2002, il querelante chiese al suo ufficiale in comando quando il pagamento sarebbe stato fatto, perché secondo l'organizzazione interna del [Ministero della Difesa] quella era la sola persona a cui era autorizzato avvicinarsi, e che [il suo] ufficiale in comando prese questo a favore del querelante presso la Sede centrale della 3 Zona Operativa e che il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa informò l’ufficiale in comando [del querelante] che il diritto a ricevere il pagamento ed il suo importo non erano in controversia, e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito dopo che i finanziamenti sarebbero stati assegnati nel bilancio, perché non ce n’era attualmente nessuno; l'ufficiale in comando passò queste informazioni al querelante.
Ciò che precedente, nella prospettiva di questa corte, rappresenta il riconoscimento del debito all'interno del significato della sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi, perché... il querelante fu informato dalla persona autorizzata ad agire a favore del convenuto che il diritto a ricevere il pagamento ed il suo importo non erano in controversia e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito dopo l’assegnazione dei finanziamenti nel bilancio.”
14. In seguito ad un ricorso da parte dello Stato, il 22 aprile 2003 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik (Županijski sud u Šibeniku) annullò la sentenza di prima - istanza e rinviò la causa. Sostenne che la corte di prima - istanza era andata a vuoto nel stabilire: (a) chi in questa causa era la persona autorizzata a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero della Difesa, e (b) se le liste firmate e munito certificate dei membri dell'unità del richiedente che aveva eseguito il lavoro di disinnesco di mine, che inidcavano il numero di giorni in cui avevano fatto simile lavoro e l'importo corrispondente degli assegni quotidiani, trattato dal Dipartimento del Ministero delle Finanza difatti costituivano delle richieste di pagamento e perciò un riconoscimento indiretto del debito.
15. Nei procedimenti di annullamento, la Corte Municipale di Knin ascoltò di nuovo il capo del Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze del Ministero di Difesa di Spalato, Generale di brigata I.P. che testimoniò che le liste munite di certificato dei membri delle Forze Armate che avevano eseguito il lavoro di disinnesco di mine costituivano delle richieste di pagamento degli assegni. Lui affermò inoltre che dopo avere ricevuto le liste il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanza di Spalato le aveva controllate per l’accuratezza e le aveva presentate insieme con il formulario di richiesta che difatti costituì una richiesta di pagamento, al Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero della Difesa a Zagabria. Secondo I.P., il Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze era autorizzato a controllare le liste e le avrebbe potute restituire al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze se la richiesta del pagamento degli assegni o il loro importo fossero stati nulla ciò che loro non avevano fatto. Dopo che il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze aveva presentato le liste ed aveva richiesto il pagamento, il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze l'aveva informato che il pagamento sarebbe seguito dopo l’assegnazione dei finanziamenti nel bilancio a quel fine. Se ci fossero stati i finanziamenti, nessuna ulteriore azione sarebbe stata richiesta affinché l'importo richiesto venisse trasferito sul conto bancario del richiedente.
16. In questi procedimenti di annullamento, il convenuto dibatté per la prima volta, che, in conformità con le regolamentazioni interne del Ministero della Difesa, la persona autorizzata a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero era il capo del suo Dipartimento delle Finanze prima che venisse introdotta un'azione di corte, e dopo il capo del Dipartimento Legale.
17. Il 18 giugno 2003 la Corte Municipale decise di nuovo a favore del querelante. La parte attinente di questa sentenza recita come segue:
“Il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato ha certificato le summenzionato liste di pagamento... prima verificando che il pagamento ed il suo importo erano giustificati, e poi spedendole, insieme al formulario [di richiesta], vale a dire il formulario di richiesta di pagamento alla Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze... a Zagabria. [Questo Dipartimento ], non restituendo le liste e la richiesta per il pagamento al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanza, le accettò come giustificate e fondate. [Il Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanza] doveva pagare gli importi [chiesti] perché il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanza di Spalato non aveva soldi pronti. Dopo avere ricevuto quelle [liste e] la richiesta del pagamento, il Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze aveva informato il Dipartimento di Spalato che il pagamento avrebbe seguito l’assegnazione dei finanziamenti nel bilancio Statale di cui il querelante fu notificato e che ricevette spiegazioni dal suo ufficiale in comando fra il [il tempo in cui le rate] giunse a scadenza e il 21 febbraio 2002.
Ciò che precede, nella prospettiva di questa corte rappresenta un riconoscimento del debito perché, certificando le liste di pagamento col formulario di richiesta di pagamento ed informando il querelante a riguardo del fatto che il pagamento sarebbe seguito una volta assegnati i finanziamenti nel bilancio Statale, il querelante, come creditore, fu informato dal convenuto, come debitore, in modo chiaro ed inequivocabile che la rivendicazione in questione, cioè, il debito del convenuto, era stato ammesso.”
18. In seguito ad un ricorso da parte dello Stato, l’8 marzo 2004 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik annullò di nuovo la sentenza di prima - istanza e rinviò la causa. Sostenne che dall'archivio della causa ne seguì che in conformità con le regolamentazioni interne del Ministero della Difesa la persona autorizzata a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero era il capo del suo Dipartimento delle Finanze prima che l'azione fosse stata introdotta, e dopo il capo del Dipartimento Legale. Perciò, l'ufficiale in comando del richiedente non poteva riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero.
19. Nei procedimenti di annullamento, la Corte Municipale di Knin per stabilire la persona autorizzata a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero della Difesa, ascoltò il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero della Difesa, e furono esaminate le regolamentazioni interne del Ministero.
20. Il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanza del Ministero, I.H., testimoniò che la persona autorizzata a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero era stato davvero il capo del suo Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze prima che l'azione era stata introdotta ed il capo del suo Dipartimento Legale dopo. Lui testimoniò anche che la richiesta del Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato di pagamento degli assegni quotidiani per il lavoro di disinnesco delle mine era stata ritenuta nulla con una lettera del 29 ottobre 1998 perché la Decisione del Ministro della Difesa del 18 settembre 1995 si applicava solamente alla regione Danube della Croazia.
21. Il 19 aprile 2005 la Corte Municipale decise per la terza volta favore del querelante. La parte attinente di questa sentenza recita come segue:
“In linea con l'organizzazione interna [del Ministero], il querelante, dopo che il pagamento [degli assegni quotidiani erano giunti a scadenza] non si rivelava imminente, rivolse le sue richieste di pagamento al suo immediato superiore, cioè al comandante della sua unità, ed allora lui [il comandante] contattò a favore del querelante il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa delle Forze armate croate. Il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa spedì simile richiesta al Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate che rispose che al diritto a ricevere il pagamento ed il suo importo era stato riconosciuto e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito una volta finanziamenti assegnati a quel fine. Il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa spedì queste informazioni al comandante dell’unità [del querelante] notificando al querelante tutto ciò fra il giugno 1998 e il maggio 2002 quando il comandante dell'unità ricevette le ultime informazioni dal comandante della 3 Zona Operativa.
In questo modo le persone autorizzate e responsabili ed il reparto [all'interno del Ministero], in particolare il comandante della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria, il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa... ed il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanza competente che certificò e riconobbe gli importi degli assegni quotidiani come costi [del Ministero], e nella forma di una richiesta di trasferimento di finanziamenti che corrispondono agli importi chiesti..., li presentò al [Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero], riconobbero il debito al querelante in modo chiaro ed inequivocabile.
Di conseguenza, l'argomento del convenuto sollevato nel corso dei procedimenti per cui solamente il capo del [Servizio Centrale delle Finanze] o il capo del Dipartimento Legale erano autorizzate a riconoscere debito a carico del Ministero, è infondato perché questo non consegue dalle prove prese, specialmente dai documenti forniti dal convenuto in particolare dalle [regolamentazioni interne del Ministero della Difesa], e [perché] il tempo-limite fissato dalla corte su richiesta del rappresentante del convenuto per fornire le prove [in appoggio di questo argomento] era scaduto.
...
... dalla lettera del 29 ottobre 1998 non segue che la richiesta del [Dipartimento] Regionale delle Finanze era stato considerata come nulla. [Piuttosto], fu ritornata solamente al [Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze] di Spalato per esame supplementare e controllo, e si suggerì che dopo il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze avrebbe dovuto decidere sul diritto di ricevere il pagamento degli assegni in questione.
Alla luce del precedente, questa corte ha stabilito indiscutibilmente di conseguenza, che delle persone autorizzate del convenuto avevano continuato, per tutto l’intero periodo in controversia cioè dal tempo in cui le rivendicazioni erano giunte a scadenza sino al maggio 2002, ad informare il querelante in modo chiaro ed inequivocabile che il convenuto non ha contestato il [suo] diritto a ricevere degli assegni quotidiani nell'importo chiesto. [Perciò ], il convenuto ha riconosciuto il debito al querelante all'interno del significato della sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi, così è chiaro che il termine di prescrizione legale non scadde, perché la sua gestione fu interrotta col riconoscimento del debito.”
22. In seguito ad un ricorso da parte dello Stato, il 24 ottobre 2005 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik invertì la sentenza di prima - istanza respingendo l'azione del richiedente. La parte attinente di questa sentenza recita come segue:
“Sulla base delle prove prese, la corte di prima - istanza stabilì i seguenti fatti attinenti:
- che il querelante, come un membro della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria dell'Esercito croato al tempo attinente, sotto il comando della 3 Zona Operativa delle Forze armate croate aveva eseguito dei lavori di sminamento di quando in quando durante il 1996, 1997 e 1998;
- che la Decisione [del Ministro della Difesa del 18 settembre 1995] aveva stabilito il diritto del... membro delle Forze armate croate ad un assegno quotidiano speciale per lavoro di sminamento;
- che, in conformità con la Decisione [sopra], il comandante della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria stava compilando delle liste mensili dei membri dell'unità che in un particolare mese avevano eseguito dei lavori di sminamento, ed aveva specificato il numero di giorni trascorsi su questo lavoro e gli importi corrispondenti di quota di assegni quotidiani, e che [quelle liste] erano state certificate e co-firmate dal comandante della 3 Zona Operativa delle Forze armate croate e presentate al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze del [Ministero della Difesa] di Spalato;
- che il querelante, quando gli assegni quotidiani speciali non furono pagati, in numerose occasioni avvicinò il comandante della sua unità, in conformità con l'organizzazione gerarchica del [Ministero]... per una consultazione in merito a quando il pagamento sarebbe stato fatto, e che [il suo comandante], dopo avere fatto delle indagini presso il comando della 3 Zona Operativa, l'informò che le sue rivendicazioni non erano in controversia... e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito dopo che finanziamenti erano stati assegnati a quel fine.
Appellandosi a questi fatti, la corte di prima - istanza trovò che queste persone autorizzate del convenuto (il comandante della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria, il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa delle Forze armate croate così come il Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato - che aveva certificato ed aveva riconosciuti l'importo degli assegni quotidiani speciali del querelante in merito ai costi del convenuto e l'aveva presentato nella forma di una richiesta al Dipartimento [Centrale] delle Finanze del [Ministero per il trasferimento dell'importo chiesto])-aveva, per tutto l’intero periodo in controversia, sino al maggio 2002, informato inequivocabilmente il querelante che il convenuto non aveva contestato [il suo] diritto a ricevere degli assegni quotidiani nell'importo chiesto, e che il convenuto aveva riconosciuto con ciò il debito al querelante all'interno del significato della sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi, così il termine di prescrizione legale non era scaduto.
Comunque, avendo riguardo alle prove prese di fronte alla corte di prima - istanza, questa corte considera la sentenza sopra della corte di prima - istanza erronea. [Questo è così] perché, contrariamente alla prospettiva della corte di prima - istanza, e in conformità con l'organizzazione gerarchica del [Ministero], le persone autorizzate a riconoscere il debito a carico del [Ministero] era il capo del [suo Dipartimento Centrale] delle Finanza –il cui Dipartimento, in conformità con le regolamentazioni interne [del Ministero], era autorizzato a trattare ultimamente e a controllare le richieste di pagamento delle rivendicazioni del querelante presentate dal Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato (finché l'azione legale era ancora introdotta in questa causa)-ed il capo del Dipartimento Legale [del Ministero] (durante i presenti procedimenti), come il convenuto ha dibattuto correttamente... così come le altre persone autorizzate che erano, in conformità con l'organizzazione gerarchica del [Ministero], superiore a [loro].
Che essendo così, ed avendo riguardo ai fatti stabiliti nei procedimenti di fronte alla corte di prima - istanza, non segue, che non sono state precisamente quelle persone autorizzate menzionate sopra che riconobbero il debito facendo una dichiarazione al querelante come creditore, né che il debito fu riconosciuto in modo indiretto all'interno del significato del paragrafo 2 della sezione 387 dell'Atto degli Obblighi. [Al] contrario, la richiesta del Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanza di Spalato di trasferire finanziamenti [corrispondenti agli importi degli assegni quotidiani chiesti] (questa richiesta, insieme con le liste firmate e certificate compilate dalla 40 Brigata di Ingegneria, non possono essere considerate un riconoscimento del debito all'interno del significato della sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi)... fu considerata come nulla dal Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze e ritornata al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato per ulteriore verifica ed esame supplementare (...). [Quindi], nella presente causa il convenuto non riconobbe le rivendicazioni del querelante in qualsiasi modo prescritto dalla legge che condurrebbe ad un'interruzione del termine di prescrizione legale. [Poiché ] l’ultima rata mensile degli assegni quotidiani speciali era giunta a scadenza nell’ aprile 1998, e l'azione in questa causa era stata introdotta il 21 maggio 2001, la dichiarazione [del convenuto] per cui le rivendicazioni in questione erano cadute in prescrizione ,... è fondata perché il termine dei tre anni di prescrizione legale esposto nella sezione 131 dell’Atto del Lavoro a riguardo delle rivendicazioni del querelante che scaturirono dalla sua relazione di lavoro col convenuto era scaduto nella presente causa.”
23. Il richiedente presentò poi un reclamo costituzionale contro la sentenza di seconda - istanza, adducendo violazioni dei suoi diritti costituzionali all'uguaglianza di fronte alle corti ed ad un'udienza corretta. Lui dibatté che la sua rivendicazione per gli assegni quotidiani speciali per il lavoro di sminamento non era caduta in prescrizione , perché il Ministero della Difesa aveva in molte occasioni ammesso il debito, interrompendo con ciò la gestione del termine di prescrizione legale, e che l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik non si era appellato a qualsiasi norma di diritto sostanziale tale da giustificare la cancellazione della sua azione.
24. Il 10 aprile 2008 la Corte Costituzionale (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) respinse l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente e notificò la sua decisione al suo rappresentante l’ 8 maggio 2008.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Costituzione
1. Disposizioni attinenti
25. La parte attinente della Costituzione della Repubblica della Croazia (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 56/1990, 135/1997 8/1998 (testo consolidato), 113/2000, 124/2000 (testo consolidato), 28/2001 e 41/2001 (testo consolidato), 55/2001 ( corrigendum)) prevede come segue:
Articolo 26
“Tutti i cittadini della Repubblica di Croazia e stranieri saranno uguali di fronte alle corti e altro stato o autorità pubbliche.”
Articolo 29 (1)
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti ed obblighi o di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro lui, ad ognuno viene concessa un'udienza corretta all'interno di un termine ragionevole da parte di una corte indipendente ed imparziale stabilita dalla legge.”
Articolo 48
“1. Il diritto di proprietà sarà garantito.
2. La proprietà implica i doveri. I proprietari e gli utenti delle proprietà contribuiranno al welfare generale.”
Articolo 50
“1. La proprietà può essere ristretta o può essere presa in conformità con la legge e nell'interesse della Repubblica della Croazia soggetta a pagamento del risarcimento uguale al valore di mercato.
2. L'esercizio... del diritto di proprietà, su una base eccezionale, è ristretto dalla legge per la protezione degli interessi e la sicurezza della Repubblica della Croazia, della natura, dell'ambiente o della salute pubblica.”
Articolo 140
“Gli accordi internazionali in vigore che furono conclusi e ratificati in conformità con la Costituzione e resi pubblici, saranno parte dell'ordine legale interno della Repubblica della Croazia ed avranno precedenza sugli statuti [nazionali]. ...”
2. La giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale
26. Nelle sue decisioni N. U-I-892/1994 del 14 novembre 1994 (Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 83/1994) ed U-I130/1995 del 20 febbraio 1995 (Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 112/1995) la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che tutti i diritti garantiti nella Convenzione e nei suoi Protocolli sarebbero stati considerati anche diritti costituzionali aventi forza legale uguale alle disposizioni della Costituzione.
B. L’Atto della Corte Costituzionale
1. Disposizioni attinenti
27. La parte attinente dell’Atto Costituzionale del 1999 sulla Corte Costituzionale della Repubblica della Croazia (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 99/1999 del 29 settembre 1999-“L’Atto della Corte Costituzionale”), corretto dagli Emendamenti del2002 (Ustavni zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Ustavnog zakona o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 29/2002 del 22 marzo 2002) che entrò in vigore il 15 marzo 2002 recita come segue:
Sezione 62
“1. Chiunque può presentare un reclamo costituzionale presso la Corte Costituzionale se ritiene che la decisione di un'autorità statale, autogoverno locale o regionale, o un soggetto giuridico investito di autorità pubblica, sui suoi diritti od obblighi, o come sospetto o accusato di un reato penale, ha violato il suo o i suoi diritti umani o le libertà fondamentali, o diritto ad autogoverno locale o regionale, garantiti dalla Costituzione (“il diritto costituzionale”)...
2. Se un'altra via di ricorso legale è disponibile a riguardo della violazione dei diritti costituzionali [di cui ci si lamenta], il reclamo costituzionale si può presentare solamente dopo che questa via di ricorso è stata esaurita.
3. In questioni in cui un'azione amministrativa o, in procedimenti civili e di non-contenzioso, è disponibile un ricorso su questioni di diritto [revizija], le via di ricorso saranno considerate esaurite solamente dopo che è stato data la decisione su queste vie di ricorso legali.”
Sezione 65 (1)
“Un'azione di reclamo costituzionale conterrà... un'indicazione del diritto costituzionale che si adduce essere stato violatoa [insieme] con un'indicazione della disposizione attinente della Costituzione che garantisce questo diritto...”
Sezione 71 (1)
“... [La ] Corte Costituzionale esaminerà solamente le violazioni di diritti costituzionali addotte nell'azione di reclamo costituzionale.”
2. La giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale
28. Il 9 luglio 2001 la Corte Costituzionale consegnò una decisione, n. U-III-368/1999 (Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 65/2001) in una causa in cui il reclamante si appellò nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale agli Articoli 3 e 19(1) della Costituzione nessuno dei quali, sotto questa giurisprudenza di corte, conteneva diritti costituzionali. La Corte Costituzionale accolse ciononostante l'azione di reclamo costituzionale, trovando violazioni degli Articoli 14, 19(2) e 26 della Costituzione sui quali il reclamante non si era appellato, ed annullò le decisioni contestate. Nel decidere così sostenne come segue:
“Perciò, un'azione di reclamo costituzionale non può essere basata su entrambe le disposizioni costituzionali enunciate [dal reclamante nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale].
Comunque, la presente causa riguarda, come sarà spiegato più avanti, una specifica situazione legale come risultato della quale questa corte, nonostante [la sua] costatazione che non ci sono, e non possono esserci, violazioni dei diritti costituzionali a cui si è appellato esplicitamente il reclamante, considera che ci sono circostanze che garantiscono l’annullamento delle decisioni [contestate ].
...
Vale a dire, è evidente dall'azione di reclamo costituzionale e dall'archivio della causa che ci sono state violazioni [costituzionali] di diritti, in particolare quelli garantiti dall’ Articolo 14 (uguaglianza, l'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge), Articolo 19 paragrafo 2 (la garanzia di controllo giurisdizionale di decisioni di stato e delle altre autorità pubbliche) ed Articolo 26 (l'uguaglianza di fronte alle corti e altro stato o autorità pubbliche) della Costituzione...”
C. L' Atto degli Obblighi
1. Disposizioni attinenti
29. La Sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista dell'Iugoslavia N. 29/1978, 39/1985 e 57/1989, e Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Croazia n. 53/1991 con susseguenti emendamenti) prevede come segue:
PRESCRIZIONE
DISPOSIZIONI GENERALI
Articolo Generale
Sezione 360
“(1) il diritto di richiedere l'adempimento di un obbligo sarà estinto alla scadenza di un termine di prescrizione legale.
(2)...
(3) una corte non prenderà in considerazione un termine di prescrizione legale di sua propria istanza se il debitore non farà ricorso.”
INTERRUZIONE DI UN TERMINE DI PRESCRIZIONE LEGALE
Il riconoscimento di un debito
Sezione 387
“(1) la gestione di un termine di prescrizione legale si interromperà quando il debitore ammette il suo debito.
(2) un debito non solo può essere riconosciuto con una dichiarazione [cioè una dichiarazione] al creditore ma anche in modo indiretto, come facendo un pagamento, pagando interessi od offrendo security...”
2. La pratica della Corte Suprema
30. Nell'interpretare la sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi la Corte Suprema ha sostenuto costantemente che il riconoscimento di un debito capace di interrompere un termine di prescrizione legale, nonostante sia che stato fatto in modo diretto che indiretto, doveva essere fatto inequivocabilmente e dalle persone autorizzate ad agire a favore del debitore (vedere per esempio, decisioni N. Rev. 3053/1999-2 del 23 gennaio 2002, Rev. 271/03-2 del 12 aprile 2005, Rev. 347/04-2 21 giugno 2005, Revt 97/03-2 del 22 dicembre 2005 e Revt156/2006-2 del 29 novembre 2006).
31. Il 25 maggio 2000 la Corte Suprema consegnò una sentenza, n. Rev. 1401/1999-2, in una causa nella quale i querelanti citarono in giudizioso Stato chiedendo il pagamento di salari non retribuiti per il periodo durante il quale loro rispettivamente stavano ricevendo cure mediche ed erano detenuti prigionieri dal nemico. La questione era se la lettera del Ministero della Difesa, in particolare, il Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate, del 9 febbraio 1998 che confermava che i querelanti erano stati membri della loro unità militare ed erano comparsi sul suo libro paga ma non avevano percepito i loro salari nel periodo summenzionato, costituiva un riconoscimento del debito. Le corti inferiori respinsero l'azione dei querelanti, trovando che la lettera non costituiva riconoscimento di un debito capace di interrompere il termine di prescrizione legale. Nel respingere un ricorso su questioni di diritto (revizija) da parte dei querelanti e sostenendo le sentenze delle corti inferiori, la Corte Suprema sostenne come segue:
“Dalla [lettera del 9 febbraio 1998] segue solamente che i querelanti erano membri di una certa unità ad un certo tempo e che loro non ricevettero un salario per quel periodo. Simile [lettera] non costituisce per se un riconoscimento del debito all'interno del significato della sezione 366 dell’Atto degli Obblighi ed un’ interruzione del termine di prescrizione legale. Cioè una dichiarazione generale non può essere considerata come un riconoscimento del debito. La... lettera indica che il debito può esistere ma non costituisce un riconoscimento da parte del debitore che il debito [davvero] esiste, cioè il riconoscimento che il debitore ha [un obbligo] di saldare il debito o che il debitore lo salderà. La dichiarazione dei fatti da parte del debitore, sulla base dei quali si potrebbe concludere che il debito esiste, non costituisce un riconoscimento del debito [capace di] interrompere il termine di prescrizione legale. Per dare luogo all'interruzione del termine di prescrizione legale, deve essere esplicito e specifico il riconoscimento del debito così come la volontà del debitore di saldare il debito esistente deve essere espressa inequivocabilmente.”
32. Il 27 settembre 2007 la Corte Suprema consegnò una decisione, n. Rev.-427/2006-2, in una causa dove la società querelante citò in giudizio lo Stato chiedendo il pagamento di un certo importo di soldi. La questione era se una lettera del 15 maggio 1996 firmato a favore del Dipartimento delle Finanze del Ministero delle Difesa dal capo della sua Divisione di Contabilità che informava il querelante che la sua rivendicazione era stata registrata dal Dipartimento delle Finanze del Ministero ma che i finanziamenti non erano stati assegnati per soddisfare questa rivendicazione, così come una lettera del 6 novembre 1997 firmata a favore del Dipartimento delle Finanze del Ministero della Difesa dal capo della sua Divisione delle Operazioni del Pagamento che notificava al querelante che il Ministero avrebbe saldato il suo debito trasferendo i soldi al giroconto della società querelante al trasferimento dei finanziamenti al Ministero dal bilancio Statale, corrispose a riconoscimento del debito. Le corti inferiori stabilirono a favore del querelante, trovando che le lettere summenzionate avevano costituivano riconoscimento di un debito capace di interrompere il termine di prescrizione legale. La Corte Suprema accolse un ricorso su questioni di diritto da parte dello Stato, annullò le sentenze delle corti inferiori e rinviò la causa. Nel decidere così la Corte Suprema sostenne come segue:
“Nelle sentenze contestate nessuna ragione fu data per la costatazione che il capo della Divisione di Contabilità che aveva firmato la lettera del 15 maggio 1996 sarebbe stato autorizzato a riconoscere il debito (presumendo anche che la mera registrazione della rivendicazione ed il suo importo presso il Dipartimento delle Finanze del Ministero della Difesa potrebbe essere considerata un riconoscimento del debito).
... la lettera del 6 novembre 1997 [contenente] la dichiarazione che il suo debito [del Ministero] sarebbe stato saldato tramite trasferimento dei soldi al giroconto [della società querelante], ma senza stabilire l'importo del debito che il convenuto ha considerato fondato, e senza stabilire se... il capo della Divisione delle Operazioni del Pagamento (che firmò la lettera) era autorizzato a fare tale dichiarazione, non può essere, almeno per il tempo, considerato un riconoscimento del debito.
Nella prospettiva di questa corte, un riconoscimento di un debito all'interno del significato della sezione 387 paragrafo 2 dell' Atto degli Obblighi può essere fatto personalmente dal debitore o tramite una persona autorizzata (se il debitore è una persona giuridica). Ne segue da ciò che precede che le dichiarazioni di persone non autorizzate che riconoscono un debito a favore di un debitore non possono produrre per il debitore qualsiasi effetto legalo di un riconoscimento valido di un debito. Si deve anche notare che un riconoscimento di un debito non deve essere contrario a norme perentorie [jus cogens].
Per queste ragioni, finché non viene stabilito se, e sulla base di questo documento legale, il capo della Divisione di Contabilità ed il capo della Divisione delle Operazioni del Pagamento erano persone autorizzate a riconoscere il debito, non ci possono essere conclusioni in merto al significato legale delle lettere del 15 maggio 1996 e del 6 novembre 1997.”
3. La dottrina
33. Secondo le prospettive espresse nella dottrina legale croata, un diritto non viene estinto con la scadenza di un termine di prescrizione legale. Il creditore piuttosto perde solamente, il diritto di chiedere la sua esecuzione tramite le corti. Un debitore rimane perciò, un debitore anche dopo che un termine di prescrizione legale è scaduto. Per questa ragione, se un debitore paga un creditore dopo la scadenza di un termine di prescrizione legale, non può chiedere di nuovo l'importo pagato (a causa dell'arricchimento ingiusto) perché ha pagato un debito esistente
D. L' Atto del Lavoro
34. La Sezione 131 dell'Atto del Lavoro (Zakon o radu, Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 38/95, 54/95 (corrigendum), 65/95 (corrigendum), 17/01, 82/01 114/03, 123/03 142/03 (corrigendum) e 30/04) prevede come segue:
Termine di prescrizione legale per una rivendicazione relativa al lavoro
Sezione 131
“A meno che altrimenti previsto in questo o in un altro statuto, una rivendicazione relativa al lavoro scade dopo tre anni.”
E. Atto di Procedura Civile
35. La parte attinente dell’ Atto di Procedura Civile (Zakon o parničnom postupku, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista dell'Iugoslavia N. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 e 35/1991, e Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica della Croazia N. 53/1991, 91/1992 58/1993, 112/1999 88/2001, 117/2003 88/2005, 2/2007 84/2008 e 123/2008) prevede come segue:
Sezione 186 (3)
“La corte procederà su un'azione anche se il querelante non ha indicato la base legale per la sua rivendicazione; e se il querelante ha indicato la base legale la corte non sarà vincolata a questa.”
riapertura di procedimenti in seguito ad una sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani a Strasburgo che ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o di una libertà
Sezione 428a
“(1) quando la Corte europea dei Diritti umani ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano o di una libertà fondamentale garantiti dalla Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali o dai protocolli supplementari ratificati dalla Repubblica della Croazia, una parte può, entro trenta giorni da quando la sentenza della Corte europea dei Diritti umani diviene definitiva, introdurre un ricorso presso la corte nella Repubblica della Croazia che giudicò in prima istanza nei procedimenti in cui fu resa la decisione che violava il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale, per annullare la decisione con cui il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale furono violati.
(2) i procedimenti a cui si fa riferimento nel paragrafo 1 di questa sezione saranno condotti applicando, mutatis mutandis, le disposizioni sulla riapertura dei procedimenti.
(3) nei procedimenti di annullamento le corti sono costrette a rispettare le opinioni giuridiche espresse nella sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani che ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o di una libertà.”
F. La Decisione del Ministro della Difesa del 18 settembre 1995
36. La Decisione del Ministro del Difesa sul Pagamento degli Assegni Quotidiani Speciali per l’Eseguire di Lavori di scoperta e disinnesco mine (Odluka o isplatama posebnih dnevnica za vrijeme izvođenja radova na miniranju i deminiranju, inedita) del 18 settembre 1995 recita come segue:
“1. I membri permanenti e di riserva delle Forze armate della Repubblica di Croazia che eseguono lavori di ritrovamento e disinnesco mine avranno il diritto ad assegni quotidiani speciali.
2. Gratifiche extra saranno calcolate negli importi prescritti dalla Decisione sull'Importo degli Assegni Quotidiani per Viaggi Ufficiali e l'Importo del Risarcimento per Utenti Finanziati dal Bilancio Statale [cioè, 123 kuna croati (HRK) al tempo], e così dal tempo della partenza [per eseguire ] lavori di disinnesco di mine , secondo i seguenti criteri:
(a) l’intero assegno quotidiano per ogni ventiquattro ore spese nei lavori di sminamento, incluso periodi di dodici a ventiquattro ore [cioè, fra dodici e ventiquattro ore];
(b) metà dell'assegno quotidiano per periodi da otto a dodici ore.
3. Le liste delle persone alle quali vengono concessi assegni quotidiani speciali, con dettagli saranno compilate dal comandante a livello di battaglione indipendente o più alto, e saranno certificati dal comandante della zona operativa... La lista certificata sarà presentata per il pagamento al reparto regionale delle finanza sul cui territorio sono stati eseguiti lavori di sminamento, all'ultimo nel terzo giorno del mese a riguardo del mese precedente.
4. Questa Decisione entrerà in vigore nel giorno della sua adozione, e sarà applicabile dal 1 giugno 1995.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
37. Il richiedente si lamentò che il rifiuto delle corti nazionali di ammettere i suoi ricorsi per gli assegni quotidiani speciali per il lavoro di sminamento infranse il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
38. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
39. Il Governo contestò l'ammissibilità di questa azione di reclamo per due motivi, vale a dire che era incompatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione e che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali.
1. Compatibilità ratione materiae
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
40. Il Governo prima enfatizzò che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente si riferiva alle sue rivendicazioni per un assegno quotidiano speciale per i lavori di sminamento che il richiedente aveva eseguito come membro delle Forze Armate militari. Notò inoltre che nella causa Baneković (vedere Baneković c. Croatia (dec.), n. 41730/02, 23 settembre 2004), la Corte aveva stabilito che le dispute fra le autorità e i funzionari pubblici i cui doveri tipizzano le specifiche attività del servizio pubblico, nella misura in cui questi ultimi operano come deposito dell’ autorità pubblica responsabile di proteggere gli interessi generali dello Stato, sono state escluse dalla sfera della Convenzione. La Corte aveva notato inoltre che un esempio manifesto di simile attività veniva offerto dalle forze armate e dalla polizia. Tenendo presente il fatto che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente nella presente causa si riferisce al suo lavoro in servizio militare attivo, il Governo ritenne che le disposizioni della Convenzione non erano applicabili a questa.
41. Il richiedente rispose che il riferimento del Governo alla causa Baneković in appoggio del suo argomento che la presente azione di reclamo era incompatibile ratione materiae era piuttosto superficiale. In quella causa che la Corte non aveva sostenuto, come suggerì il Governo, che la disputa fra le autorità e i funzionari pubblici era escluso “dalla sfera della (completa) Convenzione” ma solamente dalla sfera dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 a riguardo. Per questa ragione, nella causa Baneković la Corte aveva dichiarato inammissibile, come incompatibile ratione materiae, l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. La presente azione di reclamo riguardava comunque il diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà garantito dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
42. La Corte nota che nella causa Baneković alla quale ha fatto riferimento il Governo, il richiedente, un agente di polizia si lamentava sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione dell'iniquità e della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti civili in cui lui aveva chiesto pagamento di un aumento salariale. Era precisamente l'azione di reclamo sotto questo Articolo (insieme con le relative azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 13 e 14) che la Corte, applicando i principi enunciati nella causa Pellegrin (vedere Pellegrin c. Francia [GC], n. 28541/95, ECHR 1999-VIII), dichiarò inammissibile ratione materiae la causa Baneković. Dato che il richiedente nella presente causa, nel lamentarsi del rifiuto delle corti nazionali di assegnargli assegni quotidiani speciali per il lavoro di sminamento si è appellato all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, l'argomento del Governo sembra giudicato male.
43. Inoltre, la Corte reitera che nella causa Vilho Eskelinen ed Altri (vedere Vilho Eskelinen ed Altri c. Finlandia [GC], n. 63235/00, ECHR 2007-IV) rivisitò ed abbandonò la giurisprudenza di Pellegrin. L'affidamento del Governo sulla causa Baneković non è neanche perciò, attinente all'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafi 80-82 sotto).
44. Ne segue che l'eccezione del Governo in merito all’ incompatibilità ratione materiae deve essere respinta.
2. Il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
45. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che il richiedente non si era lamentato di una violazione del suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà nei procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali. In particolare, nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale il richiedente si era lamentato solamente di violazioni dei suoi diritti costituzionali all'uguaglianza di fronte alle corti ed un'udienza corretta che corrispondevano in sostanza all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
46. Il richiedente rispose che la sua azione di reclamo di fronte alle le corti nazionali era sempre stata essenzialmente la stesso, siccome lui aveva sempre chiesto il pagamento di assegni quotidiani speciali per il lavoro di sminamento. Riferendosi al principio di iura novit curia incarnato nella sezione 186(3) dell’Atto di Procedura Civile (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra), lui dibatté che spettava alle le corti nazionali, incluso la Corte Costituzionale di qualificare giuridicamente la sua rivendicazione.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
47. La Corte nota che sotto la legge croata, in particolare sezione 186(3) dell’ Atto di Procedura Civile (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra), le corti civili sono sotto l’ obbligo di considerare tutte le attinenti norme giurisprudenziali che potrebbero sostenere la rivendicazione di un querelante. Questo include la Convenzione ed i suoi Protocolli che in Croazia non solo hanno la precedenza sugli statuti nazionali ma i diritti custoditi in questi sono considerati diritti costituzionali (vedere paragrafi 25 e 26 sopra).
48. Comunque, sembrerebbe che il principio di iura novit curia non si applica ai procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale perché, sotto la sezione 71(1) dell’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale, la Corte Costituzionale esamina solamente le violazioni dei diritti costituzionali addotte nell'azione di reclamo costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). Dall'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra), sembra che lui non si appellò sull’ Articolo 48 e/o 50 della Costituzione (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra) che sono le disposizioni che discutibilmente corrispondono all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Né lui si appellò sull’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 direttamente. Lui si riferì principalmente invece, agli Articoli 26 e 29(1) 33 (2) della Costituzione (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra) che sono le disposizioni che corrispondono all’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
49. Per ammissione, la sezione 65(1) dell’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale costringe i reclamanti ad indicare nelle loro azioni di reclamo costituzionali il diritto costituzionale che è presumibilmente stato violato così come la disposizione attinente della Costituzione che garantisce che diritto (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). Similmente, la sezione 71(1) dello stesso Atto prevede che la Corte Costituzionale esamini solamente le violazioni dei diritti costituzionali addotte nell'azione di reclamo costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra). Comunque, questa norma non è così assoluta come il Governo ha suggerito. Dalla decisione della Corte Costituzionale n. U-III-363/1999 del 9 luglio 2001 (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra) ne segue che in certi casi non è necessario fa appello all’Articolo attinente della Costituzione, siccome può essere sufficiente che una violazione di un diritto costituzionale sia evidente dalle osservazioni del reclamante e dal file della causa (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Glasenapp c. Germania, 28 agosto 1986, § 45 Serie A n. 104).
50. Perciò, mentre è vero che nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale il richiedente non si appellò esplicitamente all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione o alle disposizioni corrispondenti della Costituzione, lui si lamentò del rifiuto dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik di ammettere il suo ricorso per gli assegni quotidiani per il lavoro di sminamento (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra).
51. In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che il richiedente, avendo sollevato il problema in sostanza nella sua azione di reclamo costituzionale, ha ventilato di fronte alle corti nazionali il danno che lui ha presentato alla Corte. Lui fornì con ciò alle autorità nazionali l'opportunità che è in principio intesa essere riconosciuta agli Stati Contraenti dall’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, vale a dire di correggere le violazioni addotte contro loro (vedere Glasenapp, citata sopra, § 44, e X c. Germania, n. 9228/80, decisione della Commissione del 16 dicembre 1982, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 11, pp. 142-43).
52. Ne segue che anche l'eccezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
53. La Corte nota inoltre che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota anche che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. In merito a se le rivendicazioni del richiedente costituivano una “proprietà”
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
54. Il Governo prima presentò che le rivendicazioni del richiedente non corrispondevano a“proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Appellandosi alla causa Vilho Eskelinen ed Altri (citata sopra, § 94), dibatté che la Convenzione non garantiva il diritto ad un salario di un particolare importo e notò che la rivendicazione del richiedente si riferiva in sostanza al livello del suo salario, un diritto non coperto dalla Convenzione. Al tempo inoltre in cui aveva introdotto la sua azione le sue rivendicazioni erano già cadute in prescrizione, così non poteva avere un'aspettativa legittima che loro gli sarebbero stati accordati. Di conseguenza, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non era applicabile alla causa.
55. Il richiedente rispose che l'esistenza delle sue rivendicazioni per gli assegni quotidiani speciali per il lavoro di sminamento ed i loro importi non erano mai stati contestati dalle autorità nazionali. Quello che era stato contestato era perché loro non erano stati pagato. Lui dibatté perciò che le sue rivendicazioni costituivano una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e della giurisprudenza della Corte. Il richiedente aggiunse anche che le sue rivendicazioni erano basate sulla Decisione del Ministro della Difesa del 18 settembre 1995 e che perciò la sua causa era distinguibile dalla causa Vilho Eskelinen ed Altri, a cui ha fatto appello il Governo.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
56. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nella misura in cui le decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato di quella disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistente” o rivendicazioni che sono sufficientemente stabilite da essere considerate come “beni.” Dove, come nella presente causa, un interesse di proprietà riservato è nella natura di una rivendicazione, può essere riguardato come un “bene” solamente se c'è una base sufficiente per quell’ interesse nella legge nazionale (per esempio, dove è stabilito dalla giurisprudenza delle corti nazionali che lo confermano), cioè, quando la rivendicazione è sufficientemente stabilita da essere esecutiva (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, §§ 49 e 52, ECHR 2004-IX, e Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 Serie A n. 301-B).
57. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte prima nota che la Decisione del Ministro della Difesa del 18 settembre 1995 prevedeva un assegno quotidiano speciale per i membri dell'Esercito croato che eseguivano lavori di sminamento. Ne segue dalle sentenze delle corti nazionali (vedere paragrafi 21-22 sopra) che era incontestato: (a) che durante il 1996, 1997 e 1998 il richiedente, come membro delle Forze Armate di quando in quando aveva eseguito lavori di sminamento; (b) che il suo nome figurava sulla lista mensile dei membri della 40 Brigata di Ingegneria che eseguiva i lavori di sminamento liste che furono compilate dal comandante di quell’unità indicando il numero dei giorni spesi nei lavori di sminamento e i relativi importi degli assegni quotidiani; (c) che quelle liste furono firmate dall’ufficiale in comando del richiedente, poi co-firmate e certificate dal comandante della 3 Zona Operativa delle Forze armate croate, e presentate infine per il pagamento al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze del Ministero di Difesa di Spalato. Sembrerebbe perciò che ci si fosse attenuti a tutte le condizioni per acquisire il diritto agli assegni quotidiani speciali per i lavori di sminamento esposti nella Decisione del Ministro della Difesa di 18 settembre 1995 (vedere paragrafo 36 sopra) nella causa del richiedente. La Corte considera così che le rivendicazioni del richiedente avevano una base sufficiente in legge nazionale per qualificarsi come “beni” protetti dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Cazacu c. Moldavia, n. 40117/02, § 43 del 23 ottobre 2007).
58. In merito agli argomenti del Governo al contrario, la Corte prima nota, che nella sua sentenza nella causa Vilho Eskelinen ed Altri sostenne che non c'era nessun diritto sotto la Convenzione per continuare a pagare un salario di un particolare importo (vedere Vilho Eskelinen ed Altri, citata sopra, § 94), e non, come suggerì il Governo, il diritto ad un salario di un particolare importo. Al contrario, gli organi della Convenzione hanno sostenuto costantemente, che il reddito che è stato guadagnato costituisce una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Bahçeyaka c. Turchia, n. 74463/01, § 34 13 luglio 2006; Erkan c. Turchia (dec.), n. 29840/03, 24 marzo 2005; Schettini ed altri c. Italia (dec.), n. 29529/95, 9 novembre 2000; e Størksen c. Norvegia, n. 19819/92, decisione della Commissione del 5 luglio 1994). La Corte nota inoltre che sotto la legge croata, in particolare la sezione 360(1) dell'Atto degli Obblighi, un diritto patrimoniale non può essere più eseguito tramite le corti alla scadenza di un termine di prescrizione legale ma il diritto stesso non è estinto (vedere paragrafi 29 e 33 sopra). Ne segue che, presumendo anche che il termine di prescrizione legale fosse davvero scaduto nella causa del richiedente, non si poteva dibattere che le sue rivendicazioni per gli assegni quotidiani speciali per lavoro di sminamento non si qualificavano come “beni” e così non costituivano “la proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
2. Se c'era un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della “proprietà”
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
59. Il Governo presentò che la causa non rivelava qualsiasi interferenza col diritto del richiedente per godere tranquillamente la sua proprietà e che non c'era stata perciò nessuna privazione o controllo di proprietà da parte delle autorità statali.
60. Il richiedente presentò che il non-pagamento dei suoi assegni quotidiani per lavoro di sminamento costituì una privazione di proprietà.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
61. Alla luce della costatazione sopra per cui le rivendicazioni del richiedente per gli assegni quotidiani per il lavoro di sminamento erano sufficientemente stabilite da qualificarsi come un “bene” che coinvolgeva la protezione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera indubbiamente che il rifiuto delle corti nazionali di ammettere quei ricorsi ha costituito un’ interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà (vedere Cazacu, citata sopra, § 43).
62. La Corte deve esaminare inoltre se questa interferenza era giustificata.
3. Se l'interferenza era “prevista dalla legge”
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
(i) Il Governo
63. Il Governo dibatté che l'interferenza era prevista dalla legge siccome era basata sulla sezione 131 dell' Atto del Lavoro che prevedeva un termine legale di prescrizione di tre anni per le rivendicazioni relative al lavoro.
64. Il Governo notò che il problema chiave nei procedimenti prima che le corti nazionali erano state se il Ministero di Difesa aveva dato credito al debito, e con ciò interruppe la gestione del termine di prescrizione legale. In questo collegamento il Governo prima reiterò che sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte il suo potere per fare una revisione dell’ ottemperanza con diritto nazionale era limitato e che spettava al primo posto alle autorità nazionali, in particolare le corti, interpretare e applicare il diritto nazionale. Presentò inoltre che sotto la giurisprudenza del riconoscimento della Corte Suprema di un debito una dichiarazione espressa e specifica era che, nel caso di una persona giuridica, doveva essere dato da una persona autorizzata. Nei procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali il richiedente aveva sostenuto che in molte occasioni i suoi superiori l'avevano informato che le sue rivendicazioni non erano in controversia e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito una volta che i finanziamenti fossero stati assegnati nel bilancio. Le corti nazionali avevano preso in considerazione tutti gli argomenti del richiedente, esaminato numerosi elementi di prova, incluso le regolamentazioni interne del Ministero della Difesa ed ascoltato testimoni chiave, in particolare il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero, I.H. Le corti nazionali chiaramente avevano spiegato che dall'organizzazione interna del Ministero della Difesa ne seguiva che il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze era superiore al Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato. Poiché le rivendicazioni del richiedente erano state riconosciute solamente dal Dipartimento Regionale delle Finanze di Spalato, mentre il Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze le aveva considerati nulle, le corti nazionali avevano sostenuto che il Ministero della Difesa non aveva riconosciuto il debito al richiedente.
65. Il Governo considerò che la costatazione sopra delle corti nazionali non era arbitraria o irragionevole, ma basata sulle prove esaminate nei procedimenti. Nel decidere come avevano fatto le corti nazionali avevano agito all'interno del loro margine di valutazione.
(ii) Il richiedente
66. Il richiedente dibatté che c'era stata interferenza illegale col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, siccome l'interferenza era stata arbitraria o non era riuscita a soddisfare il criterio dell'accessibilità e della prevedibilità.
67. Il richiedente prima indicò che nella sua sentenza del 24 ottobre 2005 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik non aveva fatti riferimento a qualsiasi norma di diritto sostanziale in appoggio della sua sentenza per cui le sole persone autorizzate a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero della Difesa erano il capo del suo Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze, il capo del suo Dipartimento Legale ed i loro superiori. Invece, questa corte si era riferita solamente vagamente a regolamentazioni interne del Ministero senza specificare da quale norma o provvedimento di quelle regolamentazioni aveva dedotto la sua costatazione sopra. Essendo così, l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik, nella prospettiva del richiedente aveva ammesso indirettamente che nessuna simile disposizione difatti esisteva, così la sua sentenza avrebbe potuto essere considerata solamente arbitraria.
68. Presumendo anche che la sentenza dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik non fosse stata arbitraria e che fosse stata sostenuta le regolamentazioni interne del Ministero, il richiedente affermò che quelle regolamentazioni erano state presentate per la prima volta alla corte di prima - istanza all'udienza sostenuta il 14 dicembre 2004 ed erano state classificate come segreto militare. Nella prospettiva del richiedente ciò significava che l'Organo giudiziario locale si era appellato a regolamentazioni che non erano state accessibili a lui.
69. Inoltre, presumendo anche che le regolamentazioni interne del Ministero fossero state accessibili a lui, era stato impossibile dedurre da queste che solamente il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero era stato autorizzato a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero. Di conseguenza, l'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà non era stata prevedibile.
70. Nonostante le considerazioni sopra, il richiedente presentò infine, che in conformità con la gerarchia militare, lui era stato autorizzato a rivolgere la sua richiesta per pagamento dei suoi assegni quotidiani per i lavori di sminamento, solamente al suo immediato superiore che, dopo avere fatto delle indagini presso i suoi propri superiori, l'aveva informato che la sua rivendicazione non era stata contestata e che il pagamento sarebbe seguito dopo che finanziamenti fossero stati assegnati nel bilancio. In queste circostanze era difficile dibattere per il richiedente, che quelle persone non erano state autorizzate a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
71. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
72. Le prese di Corte prende nota dell'argomento del Governo per cui le decisioni delle corti nazionali nella presente causa avevano una base legale in diritto nazionale, siccome il loro rifiuto di ammettere i ricorsi del richiedente era basato sulla sezione 131 dell' Atto del Lavoro (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). La Corte nota anche comunque, che l’applicazione di questa norma da parte delle corti nazionali seguì la loro antecedente sentenza che il Ministero della Difesa non riconobbe il debito al richiedente all'interno del significato della sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi - un'azione che avrebbe interrotto altrimenti la gestione del termine legale di prescrizione siccome il debito non fu riconosciuto da persone autorizzate all'interno del Ministero. In particolare, l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik sostenne nella sua sentenza del 24 ottobre 2005 che la sola persona autorizzata a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero prima che il richiedente introducesse la sua azione era il capo del suo Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze ed il suo superiore. Perciò, le dichiarazioni ripetute dell’ufficiale in comando del richiedente al richiedente, dopo avere fatto indagini presso i suoi superiori a livello del Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate che le sue rivendicazioni non erano in controversia e che gli assegni sarebbero stati pagati una volta assegnati i finanziamenti nel bilancio a quel fine, non avevano avuto l'effetto di riconoscere il debito (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra).
73. In questo collegamento la Corte nota, come indicato correttamente dal richiedente che l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik nella sua sentenza del 24 ottobre 2005, non si appellò a nessuna specifica disposizione legale che avrebbe sostenuto la sua costatazione per cui il debito a carico del Ministero avrebbe potuto essere riconosciuto esclusivamente dal capo del suo Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanza.
74. La Corte considera che ad un individuo che agisce in buon fede è, in principio, concesso di appellarsi a dichiarazioni fatte dallo stato o da ufficiali pubblici che sembravano avere l'autorità richiesta per fare così, e che si sono attenuti con le norme interne e le procedure, ammesso che segua chiaramente da documenti pubblicamente accessibili (incluso la legislazione primaria o subordinata), o un individuo era altrimenti consapevole, o avrebbe dovuto essere consapevole, che ad un certo ufficiale mancava l'autorità di vincolare giuridicamente lo Stato. Non dovrebbe essere pesare su un individuo garantire che le autorità statali stiano rispettando i le loro proprie norme interne e le procedure inaccessibili al pubblico e che siano progettate primariamente per assicurare la responsabilità e l’ efficienza all'interno di un'autorità statale. Ad un Stato le cui autorità andarono a vuoto nell’ osservare le loro proprie norme interne e procedure non dovrebbe essere permesso di trarre profitto dal loro male e sfuggire i suoi obblighi. In altre parole, il rischio di qualsiasi errore fatto dalle autorità statali deve essere sopportato dallo Stato e gli errori non devono essere rimediati a spese dell'individuo riguardato, specialmente dove non è in pericolo nessun altro interesse privato (vedere Trgo c. Croatia, n. 35298/04, § 67 dell’11 giugno 2009; Gashi c. Croatia, n. 32457/05, § 40 del 13 dicembre 2007; e Radchikov c. Russia, n. 65582/01, § 50 del 24 maggio 2007).
75. La Corte accetta che qualche volta l'autorità di un particolare ufficiale per legare giuridicamente lo Stato può essere dedotta dalla natura di suo o il suo ufficio e non richiede nessun articolo esplicito o disposizione. In prospettiva di che possibilità, nelle loro osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e meriti della richiesta di 3 aprile 2009 il Governo, invece di appellarsi esplicitamente o con riferimento, su della disposizione legale e nazionale sulla quale potrebbe essere basata la sentenza summenzionata dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik semplicemente dibattuto che la sentenza della corte era stata dedotta dall'organizzazione interna del Ministero di Difesa (veda paragrafo 64 sopra). La Corte esaminerà di conseguenza se che trovare era prevedibile per il richiedente nelle circostanze della causa (veda, mutatis mutandis, Sole c. la Russia, n. 31004/02, § 29).
76. In questo collegamento la Corte prima reitera che il principio della legalità presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione. Un individuo deve essere in grado- all’occorrenza tramite un consigliere appropriato-di prevedere, ad un grado che sia ragionevole nelle circostanze, le conseguenze che può comportare una determinata azione (vedere, per esempio, Soleggi, citata sopra, § 27, ed Adzhigovich c. Russia, n. 23202/05, § 29 del 8 ottobre 2009). Il principio della legalità costringe anche la Corte a verificare se il modo in cui il diritto nazionale è interpretato e applicato dalle corti nazionali produce conseguenze che sono coerenti coi principi della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Apostolidi ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 45628/99, § 70, 27 marzo 2007, e Nacaryan e Deryan c. Turchia, N. 19558/02 e 27904/02, § 58 dell’8 gennaio 2008).
77. In questo collegamento la Corte nota che le corti nazionali stabilirono senza possibilità di dubbio che il richiedente era stato informato ripetutamente dal suo ufficiale in comando che le sue rivendicazioni per gli assegni quotidiani per il lavoro di sminamento non erano in controversia e che loro sarebbero stati pagati una volta assegnati i finanziamenti nel bilancio a quel fine (vedere paragrafi 21-22 sopra). Per la Corte la domanda a cui bisogna rispondere non è se era plausibile, come trovò l'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik, che solamente il capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero di Difesa fosse autorizzato a riconoscere il debito. Piuttosto, la questione è se, in assenza di una disposizione legale chiara o un documento pubblicamente disponibile che avrebbe sostenuto una costatazione, era ugualmente plausibile per il richiedente-che, sotto le norme della gerarchia militare avrebbe potuto rivolgere la sua richiesta solamente al suo immediato superiore-presumere che le informazioni comunicategli ripetutamente dal suo ufficiale in comando provenissero da una persona o da persone all'interno del Ministero che avevano l'autorità per riconoscere il debito. A questo riguardo la Corte nota che il richiedente era consapevole che il suo ufficiale in comando aveva fatto delle indagini presso i suoi propri superiori e che le informazioni infine portategli venivano, tramite il comandante della 3 Zona Operativa, dal Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate. Nella prospettiva della Corte, in assenza di una disposizione legale chiara o di documenti pubblicamente accessibili in merito a chi era autorizzato a riconoscere il debito a carico del Ministero della Difesa, era piuttosto naturale per il richiedente credere che il Personale Generale delle Forze armate croate fosse un'autorità di rango sufficiente le cui dichiarazioni avrebbero potuto essere vincolanti per il Ministero.
78. Perciò, avendo riguardo all'insuccesso dell'Organo giudiziario locale di Šibenik nell’ indicare una disposizione legale che avrebbe potuto essere costruita come base per la sua sentenza per cui il debito avrebbe potuto essere riconosciuto solamente dal capo del Dipartimento Centrale delle Finanze del Ministero della Difesa, la Corte trova che l'interferenza contestata era incompatibile col principio della legalità e perciò contravveniva l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Frizen c. Russia, n. 58254/00, § 35 del 24 marzo 2005; Adzhigovich, citata sopra, § 34; e Cazacu, citata sopra, §§ 46-47), perché il modo in cui questa corte interpretò e applicò il diritto nazionale attinente, in particolare la sezione 387 dell’Atto degli Obblighi, non era prevedibile per il richiedente che si sarebbe potuto aspettare ragionevolmente che le dichiarazioni del suo ufficiale in comando all'effetto che le sue rivendicazioni non erano in controversia e che il pagamento avrebbe dovuto seguire una volta assegnati i finanziamenti, costituivano il riconoscimento del debito capace di interrompere la gestione del termine legale di prescrizione (vedere per esempio e mutatis mutandis, Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, §§ 51-60, e Fokas c. Turchia, n. 31206/02, §§ 42-44 del 29 settembre 2009). Il richiedente si sarebbe potuto aspettare ragionevolmente di conseguenza, che il termine di prescrizione legale non fosse scaduto. Questa costatazione che l'interferenza non era in conformità con la legge non rende necessario esaminare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
79. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
80. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che i procedimenti civili summenzionati erano stati ingiusti, adducendo che le corti nazionali avevano errato nell’applicazione delle disposizioni attinenti di diritto sostanziale e che la sentenza della corte di seconda - istanza non era stata debitamente ragionata. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, la parte attinente di che le letture:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta…”
81. La Corte nota che il richiedente si lamentò della conseguenza dei procedimenti che, a meno che fossero stati arbitrario, la Corte non è capace di esaminare sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Il richiedente non si lamentò, e non c'è nessuna prova che suggerisca questo, che alle corti nazionali mancò l'imparzialità o che i procedimenti erano altrimenti ingiusti. Alla luce di tutto il materiale in suo possesso, la Corte considera, che nella presente causa il richiedente era in grado di presentare i suoi argomenti di fronte alle corti che offrivano le garanzie esposte nell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e che si rivolsero a quegli argomenti in decisioni che sono state debitamente ragionate e non arbitrare.
82. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente inammissibile sotto l’Articolo 35 § 3 come mal-fondata e deve essere respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
83. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
84. Il richiedente chiese 2,250 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale.
85. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
86. La Corte reitera che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di porre fine alla violazione e fare riparazione delle sue conseguenze. Se la legge nazionale non permette -o permette solamente una riparazione parziale , l’Articolo 41 conferisce potere alla Corte di riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come le sembra più appropriato (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 32-33 ECHR 2000-XI). In questo collegamento la Corte nota che sotto la sezione 428a dell’Atto di Procedura Civile (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra), un richiedente può introdurre un ricorso per riaprire dei procedimenti civili a riguardo dei quali la Corte ha trovato una violazione della Convenzione. Data la natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e le ragioni per cui ha trovato una violazione di quell’ Articolo, la Corte considera che nella presente causa il modo più appropriato di riparare le conseguenze di questa violazione è riaprire i procedimenti di cui ci si lamentava . Siccome ne segue che il diritto nazionale permette di fare simile riparazione, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnare al richiedente qualsiasi somma a riguardo del danno patrimoniale (vedere Trgo, citata sopra, § 75).
87. D'altra parte la Corte costata che il richiedente ha dovuto subire un danno non-patrimoniale. Assegna perciò al richiedente sotto che capo EUR 2,250, cioè, l'importo chiesto dal richiedente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quell'importo.
B. Costi e spese
88. Il richiedente chiese inoltre EUR 3,500 per costi e spese incorse di fronte alle corti nazionali. Lui chiese anche costi e spese incorse di fronte alla Corte ma nel fare così specificò solamente l'importo delle spese postali e HRK 100 chiesti su quel conto.
89. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni.
90. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei suoi costi e spese solamente se viene mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum.
91. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 833 per costi e spese nei procedimenti nazionali, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente su quell'importo.
92. Riguardo alla rivendicazione del richiedente per costi e spese incorse di fronte a sé, la Corte nota che facendo seguito all’Articolo 60 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte un richiedente che desidera ottenere un'assegnazione della soddisfazione equa sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione in caso della sentenza di Corte di una violazione del suo o dei suoi diritti della Convenzione deve fare una specifica rivendicazione a quell'effetto. Siccome nella presente causa, a parte le spese postali, da allora nella causa presente, il richiedente non fece una specifica rivendicazione dei costi e spese di fronte alla Corte, lui non riuscì ad attenersi col requisito esposto sopra dell’ Articolo 60 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte. La Corte non fa perciò assegnazione a riguardo di questa parte della sua rivendicazione (Articolo 60 § 3). D'altra parte assegna EUR 14 al richiedente per spese postali, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente su quell'importo.
C. Interesse di mora
93. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva secondo l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire in kuna croati al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 2,250 (due mila duecento e cinquanta euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo di danno non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 847 (ottocento e quaranta-sette euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, a riguardo dei costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
4. Respinge all’unanimità il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 20 maggio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione separata del Giudice Malinverni è annessa a questa sentenza.
C.L.R.
S.N.


OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE MALINVERNI
Nel paragrafo 86, la Corte reitera, che “... una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di porre fine alla violazione e fare riparazione delle sue conseguenze. Se la legge nazionale non permette -o permette solamente una riparazione parziale, l’Articolo 41 conferisce potere alla Corte di riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come le sembra più appropriato (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 32-33 ECHR 2000-XI).”
In questo collegamento la Corte nota che “... sotto la sezione 428a dell’Atto di Procedura Civile... un richiedente può introdurre un ricorso per riaprire dei procedimenti civili a riguardo del quale la Corte ha trovato una violazione della Convenzione.” Data la natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e le ragioni per cui ha trovato una violazione di quell’ Articolo, la Corte considera che “... nella presente causa il modo più appropriato di riparare le conseguenze di questa violazione è riaprire i procedimenti di cui ci si lamentava.”
Per le ragioni ho spiegato in molte occasioni, da solo o insieme con altri giudici in particolare il Giudice Spielmann,1 avrei gradito moltissimo che questo principio, a causa della sua importanza , venisse riflesso nella parte operativa della sentenza.
Questo requisito mi sembra essere più necessario nella presente causa nella prospettiva della costatazione della Corte che “siccome ne segue che il diritto nazionale permette simile riparazione, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnare al richiedente qualsiasi somma a riguardo del danno patrimoniale...”
1 vedere le mie opinioni concordanti unite con il Giudice Spielmann allegate alle seguenti sentenze: Vladimir Romanov c. Russia (n. 41461/02, 24 luglio 2008); Ilatovskiy c. Russia (n. 6945/04, 9 luglio 2009); Fakiridou e Schina c. Grecia (n. 6789/06, 14 novembre 2008); Lesjak c. Croatia (n. 25904/06, 18 febbraio 2010); e Prežec c. Croatia (n. 48185/07, 15 ottobre 2009). Vedere anche la mia opinione concordante congiunta con i Giudici Casadevall, Cabral Barreto, Zagrebelsky e Popović nella causa Cudak c. Lituania ([GC], n. 15869/02, 23 marzo 2010), così come l'opinone concordante dei Giudici Rozakis, Spielmann, Ziemele e Lazarova Trajkovska in Salduz c. Turchia ([GC], n. 36391/02, ECHR 2008 -...). Vedere anche la mia opinione concordante in Pavlenko c. Russia (n. 42371/02, 1 aprile 2010).




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.