Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF REZVANOV AND REZVANOVA v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 12457/05/2009
STATO: Russia
DATA: 24/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION
CASE OF REZVANOV AND REZVANOVA v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 12457/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
24 September 2009
Request for referral to the Grand Chamber pending
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Rezvanov and Rezvanova v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 12457/05) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Russian nationals, Mr S. R. and Ms S. R. (“the applicants”), on 25 March 2005.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by Ms L. K., a lawyer practising in Moscow. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Ms V. Milinchuk, former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. On 1 September 2005 the Court decided to apply Rule 41 of the Rules of Court and to grant priority treatment to the application.
4. On 28 September 2007 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
5. The Government objected to the joint examination of the admissibility and merits of the application. Having considered the Government’s objection, the Court dismissed it.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1941 and 1947 respectively and live in the town of Urus-Martan, in the Chechen Republic.
7. The applicants are husband and wife. They are the parents of Mr A. R., born in 1984.
A. Disappearance of A. R.
1. The applicants’ account
8. At about 7.15 a.m. on 10 December 2002 six armoured personnel carriers (“APCs”) and two UAZ vehicles arrived at the applicants’ house at 6 Mayakovskiy Street, Urus-Martan. A group of armed men in camouflage uniforms got off the vehicles and burst into the house. The applicants assumed that they were federal servicemen.
9. Some of the servicemen levelled machine guns at the second applicant and asked her in unaccented Russian where the men of the house were. The others searched the house and its annexes without producing any warrant. Later the applicants discovered that the men had messed everything up, broken some crockery, ripped bed-linen and scattered flour all over the floor.
10. In the meantime A. R. was hiding in a wash-house annexed to the house. At some point the servicemen threatened to blow up the house. The first applicant asked them to wait, went to the wash-house and convinced his son to come out of it. A.R. went to the courtyard; the armed men apprehended him and placed him in a light-blue UAZ all-terrain vehicle («таблетка») with registration number 276-95-RUS. Then they seized some of the applicants’ belongings, including a leather jacket, a video appliance, a pair of running shoes and a few more items. It appears that at some point the men told the applicants that they were servicemen of the department of the interior of the Zavodskoy District. Then they got into the vehicles and drove away.
11. On the same day the armed men apprehended two of the first applicant’s nephews, A. and Artur; they were released a few hours later and returned home. A. and A. told the applicants that following their arrest they had been brought to the premises of the military commander’s office of the Urus-Martan District.
2. Information submitted by the Government
12. On the morning of 10 December 2002 unidentified persons wearing camouflage uniforms and armed with machine guns took A.R. away from the first applicant’s house at 6 Mayakovskiy Street, Urus-Martan. The same persons robbed the first applicant and took a video appliance, a leather jacket, running shoes and some other items.
B. Investigation into A. R.’s disappearance
1. The applicants’ account
13. On 10 December 2002 the first applicant complained about his son’s abduction to the Urus-Martan Town Court and to the prosecutor’s office of the Urus-Martan District (“the district prosecutor’s office”). In his complaint the first applicant mentioned that the armed men had told him that they belonged to the department of the interior of the Zavodskoy District. He also requested information on his son’s whereabouts from the local administration and the military commander’s office of the Urus-Martan District (“the military commander’s office”), but to no avail.
14. On 27 December 2002 the prosecutor’s office of the Chechen Republic forwarded the first applicant’s complaint to the district prosecutor’s office.
15. On 16 January 2003 the Ministry of Justice of Ingushetia informed the prosecutor’s office of the Chechen Republic that they had received a complaint from the first applicant and his brother. The letter read as follows:
“According to the complainants, those who apprehended A. Rezvanov identified themselves as the FSB [Federal Security Service] officers and were [travelling] in two or three APCs and an Ural vehicle. The convoy with the arrestee went to Grozny. The detainee’s relatives’ complaints [lodged with] many authorities have brought no positive results.”
16. By decision of 16 January 2003 the district prosecutor’s office admitted the first applicant as a victim to the criminal proceedings in case no. 34003 instituted on 31 January 2003 in relation to A. R.’s kidnapping.
17. On 31 January 2003 the district prosecutor’s office instituted an investigation into A. R.’s kidnapping under Article 126 § 2 (“aggravated kidnapping”) and the theft of the R.’s belongings under Article 162 § 2 (“aggravated robbery”) of the Russian Criminal Code. The case was assigned the number 34003.
18. On 31 March 2003 the district prosecutor’s office suspended the investigation in case no. 34003 for failure to identify those responsible. On 1 April 2003 they notified the first applicant of the decision and commented that, despite the suspension of the proceedings, they had instructed the police to search for A.R. more vigorously.
19. On 7 April 2003 the first applicant requested the district prosecutor’s office to vigorously pursue the search for his son and reported that one hour after the abduction an FSB officer had told him that A.R.had been taken to the Khankala military base by servicemen of the Main Intelligence Department of the Ministry of Defence («ГРУ»).
20. On 28 April 2003 the first applicant requested the prosecutor’s office of the Chechen Republic to help him to establish his son’s whereabouts.
21. On 26 May 2003 the military prosecutor’s office of military unit no. 20102 (“the unit prosecutor’s office”) informed the first applicant that they had carried out an inquiry, which had not established any traces of military personnel implication in his son’s kidnapping.
22. On 10 July 2003 the military prosecutor’s office of the United Group Alignment (“the UGA prosecutor’s office”) forwarded the first applicant’s complaint to the unit prosecutor’s office and ordered that an inquiry be conducted into the possible implication of military servicemen in A. R.’s kidnapping.
23. On 24 November 2003 the first applicant requested assistance in the search for his son from the Administration of the Chechen Republic.
24. On 22 April 2004 the district prosecutor’s office resumed the investigation into A. R.’s kidnapping and notified the first applicant accordingly.
25. On 11 May 2004 the Ministry of the Interior of the Chechen Republic informed the second applicant that the search for her son was under way.
2. Information submitted by the Government
26. On 31 January 2003 the district prosecutor’s office instituted an investigation in case no. 34003 under Articles 126 § 2 and 161 § 2 of the Russian Criminal Code.
27. On unspecified dates the applicants were granted victim status in case no. 34003.
28. On an unspecified date the first applicant was questioned and stated that at about 7 a.m. on 10 December 2002 he had been awakened by knocking at his door. He had opened the door and seen around eighty or ninety men in camouflage uniforms armed with machine guns; some of them had worn masks. He had also noticed six APCs and two UAZ vehicles. One of the armed men had demanded the first applicant’s identity papers, checked them out and returned them. Another man had said that someone had been hiding in a wash-house in the courtyard. The armed men had surrounded the house and told the first applicant that they would shoot unless the person in the wash-house surrendered. The first applicant had replied that it was his son. Having obtained permission, the first applicant had entered the wash-house and seen his son armed with a Makarov pistol and a grenade. A.R. had said that he had been planning to blow himself up. The first applicant had convinced his son to give him the pistol and the grenade and had stepped outside. He had given the arms to the men. Then they had searched A. R., put a plastic bag on his head and taken him away. The first applicant had not seen his son since then. On the same day two of the first applicant’s nephews had been arrested and then released two hours later. During the arrest of A.R. the armed men had searched the house, ruined some furniture, crockery and clothing and stolen a video appliance, a leather jacket, running shoes and other items. The first applicant also stated that he did not wish to study the case-file upon its completion.
29. The second applicant was questioned on an unspecified date and made a deposition identical to that of her husband.
30. On unspecified dates the first applicant’s nephews, A. and A., were questioned as witnesses. They stated that at about 7 a.m. on 10 December 2002 around twenty masked men in camouflage uniforms and armed with machine guns had entered A. and A.’s house, demanded their identity papers and taken them to the courtyard. The armed men had tied A. and A.’s arms, blindfolded them and put them in a car. The witnesses did not know the make of the car. After a journey of some twenty minutes the armed men had taken A. and A. out of the car and led them downstairs. The detained men had been questioned about A. R.. Then they had again been placed in the car and driven for forty minutes. The armed men had taken A. and A. out of the car, untied their arms and ordered them to sit still for twenty minutes. When the car drove off, the two men took the blindfolds off their eyes and realised that they were in a farm near Urus-Martan. Then they returned home and learned of A. R.’s abduction.
31. On an unspecified date Mr G., the applicants’ neighbour, was questioned as a witness and stated that at 7.20 a.m. on 10 December 2002, while at home, he had heard voices coming from the outside. He had looked out of the window and seen armed men in masks and camouflage uniforms. Mr G. had tried to step outside but the armed men had told him not to do so. Later Mr G. had found out that those men had taken A.R. away.
32. On an unspecified date Mr Sh. was questioned as a witness and stated that on 29 January 2003 he had been arrested for storage of explosive materials and weapons that he had obtained from A. R..
33. The investigators questioned fifteen residents of Mayakovskiy Street in Urus-Martan who stated that they had no information on A. R.’s abduction.
34. Law-enforcement agencies of the Chechen Republic reported to the district prosecutor’s office that A.R.had not been arrested or kept in detention facilities in the Chechen Republic and that no charges had been brought against him. They also pointed out that federal forces had not carried out any special operations in the Urus-Martan District on 10 December 2002.
35. An UAZ vehicle with registration number 276-95 was not listed in the register of the State Traffic Inspection of the Ministry of the Interior of the Chechen Republic.
36. On 31 March 2003 the investigation in case no. 34003 was suspended for failure to identify those responsible. The second applicant was served with the decision on 3 June 2003.
37. On 22 April 2004 the district prosecutor’s office quashed the decision of 31 March 2003 and resumed the investigation.
38. On an unspecified date the investigation was suspended and then resumed on 10 June 2004. On 10 July 2004 it was again suspended.
39. The investigation in case no. 34003 was repeatedly suspended and then resumed following the quashing of decisions on suspension by higher prosecutors.
40. On 25 October 2007 the Investigating Committee of the Russian Prosecutor’s Office in the Chechen Republic resumed the investigation in case no. 34003.
41. The Government submitted that the investigation had failed to establish the perpetrators and was still in progress. Involvement of the federal military in the crime had not been proven.
42. Despite specific requests by the Court, the Government did not disclose most of the documents from the investigation file in case no. 34003, providing only a few copies of the district prosecutor’s office’s decisions and notifications to the applicants. They stated that the investigation was in progress and that disclosure of the documents would be in violation of Article 161 of the Code of Criminal Procedure since the files contained information of a military nature and personal data concerning witnesses or other participants in criminal proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
43. For a summary of relevant domestic law see Akhmadova and Sadulayeva v. Russia (no. 40464/02, §§ 67-69, 10 May 2007).
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENT’S OBJECTION REGARDING NON-EXHAUSTION OF DOMESTIC REMEDIES
A. The parties’ submissions
44. The Government contended that the complaint should be declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. They submitted that the investigation into the disappearance of A.R.had not yet been completed. It was also open to the applicants to complain of the inactivity of the investigators to courts or higher prosecutors’ offices or to lodge civil claims for damages, which they had failed to do.
45. The applicants contested that objection. They stated that the criminal investigation had proved to be ineffective.
B. The Court’s assessment
46. The Court reiterates that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention obliges applicants to use first the remedies which are available and sufficient in the domestic legal system to enable them to obtain redress for the breaches alleged. The existence of the remedies must be sufficiently certain both in theory and in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness. Article 35 § 1 also requires that complaints intended to be brought subsequently before the Court should have been made to the appropriate domestic body, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law and further that any procedural means that might prevent a breach of the Convention should have been used. However, there is no obligation to have recourse to remedies which are inadequate or ineffective (see Aksoy v. Turkey, 18 December 1996, §§ 51-52, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI, and Cennet Ayhan and Mehmet Salih Ayhan v. Turkey, no. 41964/98, § 64, 27 June 2006).
47. It is incumbent on the respondent Government claiming non-exhaustion to indicate to the Court with sufficient clarity the remedies to which the applicants have not had recourse and to satisfy the Court that the remedies were effective and available in theory and in practice at the relevant time, that is to say that they were accessible, were capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant’s complaints and offered reasonable prospects of success (see Cennet Ayhan and Mehmet Salih Ayhan, cited above, § 65).
48. The Court notes that the Russian legal system provides in principle two avenues of recourse for victims of illegal and criminal acts attributable to the State or its agents, namely civil and criminal remedies.
49. As regards a civil action to obtain redress for damage sustained through alleged illegal acts or unlawful conduct on the part of State agents, the Court has already found in a number of similar cases that this procedure alone cannot be regarded as an effective remedy in the context of claims brought under Article 2 of the Convention. A civil court is unable to pursue any independent investigation and is incapable, without the benefit of the conclusions of a criminal investigation, of making any meaningful findings regarding the identity of the perpetrators of fatal assaults or disappearances, still less of establishing their responsibility (see Khashiyev and Akayeva v. Russia, nos. 57942/00 and 57945/00, §§ 119-21, 24 February 2005). In the light of the above, the Court confirms that the applicants were not obliged to pursue civil remedies.
50. As regards criminal law remedies provided for by the Russian legal system, the Court observes that the applicants complained to the law enforcement agencies immediately after the disappearance of A. R.. The investigation into his kidnapping has been under way since 31 January 2003. The applicants and the Government dispute the effectiveness of this investigation.
51. The Court considers that this part of the Government’s objection raises issues concerning the effectiveness of the investigation which are closely linked to the merits of the applicants’ complaints. Thus, it decides to join this objection to the merits of the case and considers that the issue falls to be examined below under Article 2 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 2 OF THE CONVENTION
52. The applicants complained that A.R.had disappeared following his arrest by Russian servicemen and that the domestic authorities had failed to carry out an effective investigation into the kidnapping. They relied on Article 2 of the Convention, which reads:
“1. Everyone’s right to life shall be protected by law. No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law.
2. Deprivation of life shall not be regarded as inflicted in contravention of this article when it results from the use of force which is no more than absolutely necessary:
(a) in defence of any person from unlawful violence;
(b) in order to effect a lawful arrest or to prevent the escape of a person lawfully detained;
(c) in action lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot or insurrection.”
A. Arguments of the parties
53. The Government argued that there was no convincing evidence that A.R. was dead. Neither was it proven that he had been arrested by State servicemen. None of the witnesses had claimed to have noticed any insignia on the camouflage uniforms of the armed men, which proved that they could not be members of the military.
54. The letters by the Deputy Prosecutor of the Chechen Republic and the Ministry of Justice of Ingushetia submitted by the applicants did not prove military implication in the crime but merely restated the wording of the applicants’ complaints without reaching any conclusions as to the perpetrators’ identities.
55. The applicants’ allegations that A.R. had been arrested by FSB servicemen and brought to the military commander’s office were speculative. The Government also pointed out that A. and A. had not claimed before the domestic authorities that they had been kept in the military commander’s office. Furthermore, the first applicant had initially claimed that the armed men had identified themselves as servicemen of the department of the interior of the Zavodskoy District but later alleged that they had been FSB servicemen, which proved the unreliability of his statements.
56. The Government further pointed out that various groups of Ukrainian mercenaries had committed crimes in the territory of the Chechen Republic and emphasised that the fact that the perpetrators had Slavic features and spoke Russian did not prove their attachment to the Russian military. They also observed that a considerable quantity of weaponry and military vehicles, including APCs, had been stolen by illegal armed groups from Russian depots in the 1990s and that anyone could purchase camouflage uniforms.
57. The Government emphasised that A.R. had been armed and inferred from his intention to blow himself up that he had been afraid of members of illegal armed groups to whom he had been supplying firearms. They referred to Mr Sh.’s deposition that he had obtained weapons from the applicants’ son. The Government also asserted that State agents had had no reasons to abduct A.R.as they would rather use him as a prosecution witness to convict insurgents.
58. In sum, the Government insisted that the involvement of State agents in A. R.’s kidnapping had not been proven beyond reasonable doubt.
59. The Government further argued that the investigation into the kidnapping had been effective and was pending before an independent State agency. The applicants had been informed of progress in the investigation in due course. Repeated suspensions and resumptions of the investigation only showed that the proceedings were ongoing and the requisite investigative measures had been taken.
60. The applicants maintained that it was beyond reasonable doubt that the men who had arrested A.R.had been State agents because the perpetrators had been travelling in APCs, which could only be used by State agencies. They further complained that the investigation into the kidnapping of their son had been protracted and ineffective.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
61. The Court considers, in the light of the parties’ submissions, that the complaint raises serious issues of fact and law under the Convention, the determination of which requires an examination of the merits. The Court has already found that the Government’s objection concerning the alleged non-exhaustion of criminal domestic remedies should be joined to the merits of the complaint (see paragraph 51 above). The complaint under Article 2 of the Convention must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) The alleged violation of the right to life of A. R.
i. Establishment of the facts
62. The Court reiterates that, in the light of the importance of the protection afforded by Article 2, it must subject deprivations of life to the most careful scrutiny, taking into consideration not only the actions of State agents but also all the surrounding circumstances. Detained persons are in a vulnerable position and the obligation on the authorities to account for the treatment of a detained individual is particularly stringent where that individual dies or disappears thereafter (see Orhan v. Turkey, no. 25656/94, § 326, 18 June 2002). Where the events in question lie wholly or in large part within the exclusive knowledge of the authorities, as in the case of persons under their control in detention, strong presumptions of fact will arise in respect of injuries and death occurring during that detention. Indeed, the burden of proof may be regarded as resting on the authorities to provide a satisfactory and convincing explanation (see Salman v. Turkey [GC], no. 21986/93, § 100, ECHR 2000-VII, and Çakıcı v. Turkey [GC], no. 23657/94, § 85, ECHR 1999-IV).
63. The Court observes that it has developed a number of general principles relating to the establishment of disputed facts, in particular when faced with allegations of disappearance under Article 2 of the Convention (for a summary of these, see Bazorkina v. Russia, no. 69481/01, §§ 103-09, 27 July 2006). The Court also notes that the conduct of the parties when evidence is being obtained has to be taken into account (see Ireland v. the United Kingdom, 18 January 1978, § 161, Series A no. 25).
64. The Court notes that, despite its requests for a copy of the entire investigation file into the kidnapping of A. R., the Government refused to produce the majority of the case materials on the grounds that they were precluded from providing them by Article 161 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. The Court observes that in previous cases it has found this explanation insufficient to justify the withholding of key information requested by the Court (see Imakayeva v. Russia, no. 7615/02, § 123, ECHR 2006-... (extracts)).
65. In view of the foregoing and bearing in mind the principles referred to above, the Court finds that it can draw inferences from the Government’s conduct in this respect.
66. The applicants alleged that the persons who had taken A.R.away on 10 December 2002 were State agents.
67. Their hypothesis is confirmed by witness statements of the first applicant’s nephews who had been taken away by a group of armed men and questioned about A.R.(see paragraph 30 above), as well as by the statement of Mr G., who had seen the armed men in front of the applicants’ house on 10 December 2002 (see paragraph 31 above).
68. The Government suggested that A. R.’s kidnappers could be insurgents or mercenaries. However, this allegation was not specific and they did not submit any material to support it. The Court would stress in this regard that the evaluation of the evidence and the establishment of the facts is a matter for the Court, and it is incumbent on it to decide on the evidentiary value of the documents submitted to it (see Çelikbilek v. Turkey, no. 27693/95, § 71, 31 May 2005). The Court considers that the fact that A.R.had been armed at the time of his arrest does not in itself prove that he had supplied weapons to illegal armed groups. Furthermore, according to the Government, no criminal proceedings had been instituted against A.R.by the time of his abduction (see paragraph 34 above).
69. In the Court’s view the fact that immediately after the abduction the first applicant asserted that the armed men had identified themselves as servicemen of the department of the interior of the Zavodskoy District and later reportedly stated that those men had said they belonged to the FSB does not render his account of events less plausible.
70. The Court also emphasises that APCs, unlike regular civilian vehicles, could not normally be owned by private individuals. It takes note of the Government’s allegation that the APCs, as well as weaponry and camouflage uniforms, were probably stolen by insurgents from Russian arsenals in the 1990s. Nonetheless it considers it very unlikely that several stolen armoured military vehicles carrying a considerable number of armed men in camouflage uniforms could have passed through Russian military checkpoints to enter Urus-Martan and then moved freely about the town without being noticed.
71. It is noteworthy that the domestic investigators accepted factual assumptions as presented by the applicants and looked at the possibility of military implication in the crime (see paragraphs 21 and 22 above).
72. The Court further takes note of the Government’s assertion that A. and A. , the first applicant’s nephews, did not inform the investigators that they had been kept in premises used by the military commander’s office. However, it is unable to verify whether the two men indeed omitted to inform the domestic authorities of it because the Government failed to provide a transcript of their interviews with the investigators. In any event, the Court does not deem it necessary to establish whether A.R. was brought to the military commander’s office upon his abduction, since it considers that the fact that a large group of armed men in uniform equipped with military vehicles was able to move freely through Urus-Martan and to arrest A.R.at his home strongly supports the applicants’ version of State servicemen’s involvement in their son’s kidnapping.
73. The Court observes that where the applicants make out a prima facie case and the Court is prevented from reaching factual conclusions owing to a lack of documents, it is for the Government to show conclusively why the documents in question cannot serve to corroborate the allegations made by the applicants, or to provide a satisfactory and convincing explanation of how the events in question occurred. The burden of proof is thus shifted to the Government and if they fail in their arguments, issues will arise under Article 2 and/or Article 3 (see Toğcu v. Turkey, no. 27601/95, § 95, 31 May 2005, and Akkum and Others v. Turkey, no. 21894/93, § 211, ECHR 2005-II).
74. Taking into account the above elements, the Court is satisfied that the applicants have made a prima facie case that A.R. was taken away by State servicemen. The Government’s statement that the investigation did not find any evidence pointing to the involvement of the special forces in the kidnapping is insufficient to discharge them from the above-mentioned burden of proof. Drawing inferences from the Government’s failure to submit the documents which were in their exclusive possession or to provide another plausible explanation of the events in question, the Court considers that A.R. was abducted from his family home by State servicemen during an unacknowledged security operation.
75. There has been no reliable news of A.R. since 10 December 2002. His name has not been found in any official detention facilities’ records. The Government did not submit any explanation as to what had happened to him after that day.
76. Having regard to the previous cases concerning disappearances of people in the Chechen Republic which have come before the Court (see, for example, Luluyev and Others v. Russia, no. 69480/01, ECHR 2006-... ), it considers that, in the context of the conflict in the Chechen Republic, when a person is detained by unidentified servicemen without any subsequent acknowledgement of the detention, this can be regarded as life-threatening. The absence of A.R.or any news of him for more than six years corroborates this assumption.
77. Accordingly, the Court finds it established that on 10 December 2002 A.R.was abducted by State servicemen and that he must be presumed dead following his abduction.
ii. The State’s compliance with Article 2
78. The Court reiterates that Article 2, which safeguards the right to life and sets out the circumstances when deprivation of life may be justified, ranks as one of the most fundamental provisions in the Convention, from which no derogation is permitted (see McCann and Others v. the United Kingdom, 27 September 1995, § 147, Series A no. 324).
79. The Court has already found it established that A.R. must be dead (see paragraph 77 above). Noting that the authorities do not rely on any ground of justification in respect of use of lethal force by State servicemen, it considers that responsibility for his death lies with the respondent Government.
80. Accordingly, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention in respect of A. R..
(b) The alleged inadequacy of the investigation
81. The Court reiterates that the obligation to protect the right to life under Article 2 of the Convention, read in conjunction with the State’s general duty under Article 1 of the Convention to “secure to everyone within [its] jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in [the] Convention”, also requires by implication that there should be some form of effective official investigation when individuals have been killed as a result of the use of force (see Kaya v. Turkey, 19 February 1998, § 86, Reports 1998-I). The essential purpose of such an investigation is to secure the effective implementation of the domestic laws which protect the right to life and, in those cases involving State agents or bodies, to ensure their accountability for deaths occurring under their responsibility. This investigation should be independent, be accessible to the victim’s family, be carried out with reasonable promptness and expedition, be effective in the sense that it is capable of leading to a determination of whether or not the force used in such cases was lawful and justified in the circumstances, and afford a sufficient element of public scrutiny of the investigation or its results (see Hugh Jordan v. the United Kingdom, no. 24746/94, §§ 105-09, ECHR 2001-III (extracts), and Douglas-Williams v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 56413/00, 8 January 2002).
82. In the present case, the kidnapping of A.R.was investigated. The Court must assess whether that investigation met the requirements of Article 2 of the Convention.
83. The Court notes at the outset that the majority of the documents from the investigation remain undisclosed by the Government. It therefore has to assess the effectiveness of the investigation on the basis of the few documents submitted by the parties and the sparse information on its progress presented by the Government.
84. The Court first notes that the authorities were immediately made aware of the kidnapping of A.R. through the applicants’ submissions (see paragraph 13 above). However, the investigation into the murder was instituted on 31 January 2003, that is, more than six weeks after the abduction. Such a lengthy delay was in itself liable to affect the investigation of the kidnapping in life-threatening circumstances, where crucial action has to be taken in the first days after the event.
85. The Court further points out that the information on the course of the investigation into the kidnapping of A.R.at its disposal is highly inadequate. It observes that the applicants, who themselves were not updated on progress in the case, could not provide it with a list of investigative measures taken by the domestic authorities.
86. The Government, in their turn, vaguely referred to investigative steps taken to solve the kidnapping of A. R.. In particular, they stated that a number of witnesses were questioned (see paragraphs 28 – 33 above). However, they did not mention when those interviews had taken place and did not provide any further details enabling the Court to assess their effectiveness.
87. Furthermore, a number of important investigative steps were never conducted. For instance, it does not appear that such a basic measure as the inspection of the crime scene has ever been taken. Moreover, nothing in the materials at the Court’s disposal warrants the conclusion that the investigators tried to question servicemen of the military commander’s office, the FSB or the department of the interior of the Zavodskoy District. They made no attempts to find the APCs described by the applicants or to identify their owners.
88. Accordingly, the Court considers that the domestic investigative authorities demonstrably failed to act of their own motion and breached their obligation to act with exemplary diligence and promptness in dealing with such a serious crime as kidnapping (see Öneryıldız v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 94, ECHR 2004-XII).
89. The Court also notes that the applicants were not promptly informed of significant developments in the investigation and considers therefore that the investigators failed to ensure that the investigation received the required level of public scrutiny, or to safeguard the interests of the next of kin in the proceedings (see Oğur v. Turkey [GC], no. 21594/93, § 92, ECHR 1999-III).
90. Lastly, the Court notes that the investigation into the kidnapping of A.R.was repeatedly suspended and then resumed, which led to lengthy periods of inactivity on the part of the investigators when no proceedings were pending. Owing to the Government’s failure to submit the entire case-file, the Court is unable to establish the exact time-line of the investigation. However, it is clear that no proceedings were pending between 31 March 2003 and 22 April 2004, that is, for more than a year. Such handling of the investigation could only have had a negative impact on the prospects of identifying the perpetrators and establishing the fate of the applicants’ son.
91. Having regard to the limb of the Government’s objection that was joined to the merits of the application, in so far as it concerns the fact that the domestic investigation is still pending, the Court notes that the investigation, having been repeatedly suspended and resumed and plagued by inexplicable delays, has been ongoing for more than six years and has produced no tangible results. Accordingly, the Court finds that the remedy relied on by the Government was ineffective in the circumstances and rejects their objection in this part.
92. The Government also mentioned that the applicants had the opportunity to apply for judicial review of the decisions of the investigating authorities in the context of exhaustion of domestic remedies and to complain to higher prosecutors. The Court observes that, owing to the time that had elapsed since the events complained of, certain investigative steps that ought to have been carried out much earlier could no longer be usefully conducted. The Court finds therefore that it is highly doubtful that the remedies relied on by the Government would have had any prospects of success and considers that they were ineffective in the circumstances of the case. It thus rejects the Government’s objection in this part as well.
93. In the light of the foregoing, the Court finds that the authorities failed to carry out an effective criminal investigation into the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of A. R., in breach of Article 2 of the Convention in its procedural aspect.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 3 OF THE CONVENTION
94. The applicants complained that the armed men who searched their house on 10 December 2002 had treated them rudely and inconsiderately. They further submitted that, as a result of their son’s disappearance and the State’s failure to investigate it properly, they had endured severe mental suffering. The applicants relied on Article 3 of the Convention, which reads:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
A. The parties’ submissions
95. The Government disagreed with these allegations and argued that the applicants had not been subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment prohibited by Article 3 of the Convention.
96. The applicants maintained their complaints.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
(a) The complaint concerning the armed men’s behaviour during the search
97. The Court reiterates at the outset that in order to fall under Article 3 of the Convention ill-treatment must be at least marginally severe (see Ireland v. the United Kingdom, cited above § 162). It considers that the way the applicants were treated by the State servicemen who came to their home on 10 December 2002 could indeed have been disagreeable and inconsiderate. However, the Court is not persuaded that it amounted to treatment exceeding the minimum level of severity to be in breach of Article 3 of the Convention.
98. It follows that this part of the complaint under Article 3 of the Convention is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
(b) The complaint concerning the applicants’ mental suffering
99. The Court notes that this part of the complaint under Article 3 of the Convention is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
100. The Court observes that the question whether a member of the family of a “disappeared person” is a victim of treatment contrary to Article 3 will depend on the existence of special factors which give the suffering of the applicants a dimension and character distinct from the emotional distress which may be regarded as inevitably caused to relatives of a victim of a serious human rights violation. Relevant elements will include the proximity of the family tie, the particular circumstances of the relationship, the extent to which the family member witnessed the events in question, the involvement of the family member in the attempts to obtain information about the disappeared person and the way in which the authorities responded to those enquiries. The Court would further emphasise that the essence of such a violation does not mainly lie in the fact of the “disappearance” of the family member but rather concerns the authorities’ reactions and attitudes to the situation when it is brought to their attention. It is especially in respect of the latter that a relative may claim directly to be a victim of the authorities’ conduct (see Orhan v. Turkey, no. 25656/94, § 358, 18 June 2002).
101. The Court notes that the applicants have not had any reliable information on the fate of their son for more than six years. During this period the applicants have applied to various official bodies with enquiries about A. R., both in writing and in person. Despite these attempts, they have never received any plausible explanation or information as to what became of him. The Court’s findings under the procedural aspect of Article 2 of the Convention are also of direct relevance here.
102. In view of the above, the Court finds that the applicants suffered distress and anguish as a result of the disappearance of their son and their inability to find out what happened to him. The manner in which their complaints have been dealt with by the authorities must be considered to constitute inhuman treatment contrary to Article 3.
103. The Court therefore concludes that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention in respect of the applicants.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 5 OF THE CONVENTION
104. The applicants complained that A.R.had been detained in violation of the guarantees of Article 5 of the Convention, which reads, in so far as relevant:
“1. Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be deprived of his liberty save in the following cases and in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law:...
(c) the lawful arrest or detention of a person effected for the purpose of bringing him before the competent legal authority on reasonable suspicion of having committed an offence or when it is reasonably considered necessary to prevent his committing an offence or fleeing after having done so;
...
2. Everyone who is arrested shall be informed promptly, in a language which he understands, of the reasons for his arrest and of any charge against him.
3. Everyone arrested or detained in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 1 (c) of this Article shall be brought promptly before a judge or other officer authorised by law to exercise judicial power and shall be entitled to trial within a reasonable time or to release pending trial. Release may be conditioned by guarantees to appear for trial.
4. Everyone who is deprived of his liberty by arrest or detention shall be entitled to take proceedings by which the lawfulness of his detention shall be decided speedily by a court and his release ordered if the detention is not lawful.
5. Everyone who has been the victim of arrest or detention in contravention of the provisions of this Article shall have an enforceable right to compensation.”
A. The parties’ submissions
105. The Government submitted that no evidence had been obtained by the investigators to confirm that A.R.was deprived of liberty in breach of the guarantees set out in Article 5 of the Convention.
106. The applicants reiterated the complaint.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
107. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that the complaint is not inadmissible on any other grounds and must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
108. The Court has previously noted the fundamental importance of the guarantees contained in Article 5 to secure the right of individuals in a democracy to be free from arbitrary detention. It has also stated that unacknowledged detention is a complete negation of these guarantees and discloses a very grave violation of Article 5 (see Çiçek v. Turkey, no. 25704/94, § 164, 27 February 2001, and Luluyev, cited above, § 122).
109. The Court has found it established that A.R.was abducted by State servicemen on 10 December 2002. His detention was not acknowledged, was not logged in any custody records and there exists no official trace of his subsequent whereabouts or fate. In accordance with the Court’s practice, this fact in itself must be considered a most serious failing, since it enables those responsible for an act of deprivation of liberty to conceal their involvement in a crime, to cover their tracks and to escape accountability for the fate of a detainee. Furthermore, the absence of records noting such matters as the name of the detainee, the date, time and location of detention, reasons for it and the name of the person effecting it must be seen as incompatible with the very purpose of Article 5 of the Convention (see Orhan, cited above, § 371).
110. In view of the foregoing, the Court finds that A.R.was held in unacknowledged detention without any of the safeguards contained in Article 5. This constitutes a particularly grave violation of the right to liberty and security enshrined in Article 5 of the Convention.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
111. The applicants complained that following his disappearance A.R. would not have had a fair trial should any criminal charges have been brought against him. They invoked Article 6 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of ... any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
112. The Court finds that A.R.can not be considered a “victim” of the alleged violation of the right to fair trial since there is no evidence to suggest that any criminal charges have been brought against him.
113. It follows that this complaint is incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4 thereof.
VI. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
114. The applicants claimed that the intrusion by the Russian military into their house on 10 December 2002 and the ensuing search had been unlawful and had infringed their right to respect for their home, private and family life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention. The applicants further complained that the seizure of their belongings during the search on 10 December 2002 had not been justified under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Those Articles, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 8
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home...
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ submissions
115. The Government denied that the State was responsible for the alleged breaches of Article 8 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and insisted that the unidentified armed men who had broken into the applicants’ house were not State agents. They further claimed that the actions of those men had been qualified as robbery under national laws and that criminal proceedings had been brought in this connection.
116. The applicants maintained their complaints under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
117. The Court notes that these complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that the complaints are not inadmissible on any other grounds and must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
118. The Court has found above that the men who took A.R.away on 10 December 2002 were State agents (see paragraph 74 above). It observes that although the Government denied their responsibility for the alleged violations of the applicants’ rights under Article 8 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, they conceded that the men who had abducted A.R.had entered the applicants’ house and taken away the video appliance, the leather jacket, the running shoes and other items.
119. The Government did not call into question the applicants’ ownership of the property in issue, nor dispute the argument that the persons referred to had entered the house against the applicants’ will. The Court is therefore satisfied that the actions of the aforementioned men constituted an interference with the applicants’ right to respect for their home secured by Article 8 of the Convention and their property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court further notes the absence of any justification on the part of the State for its agents’ actions in that regard. It accordingly finds that there has been a violation of the applicants’ right to respect for their home under Article 8 of the Convention and their property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
VIII. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
120. The applicants complained that they had been deprived of effective remedies in respect of the alleged violations above, contrary to Article 13 of the Convention, which provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties’ submissions
121. The Government contended that the applicants had had effective remedies at their disposal as required by Article 13 of the Convention and that the authorities had not prevented them from using them. The applicants could also have complained to courts or higher prosecutors or claimed civil damages, but had failed to do so. In sum, the Government submitted that there had been no violation of Article 13.
122. The applicants reiterated the complaint.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
123. In so far as the complaint under Article 13 concerns the existence of a domestic remedy in respect of the complaints under Article 3 concerning the inconsiderate behaviour of the State servicemen towards the applicants and under Article 6, the Court notes that they have been declared inadmissible in paragraphs 98 and 113 above, respectively. Accordingly, the applicants did not have “arguable claims” of a violation of substantive Convention provisions in this respect and, therefore, Article 13 of the Convention is inapplicable.
124. It follows that these parts of the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention are incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4 thereof.
125. The Court notes that the remaining complaints under Article 13 are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds and must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
126. The Court reiterates that Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at the national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights and freedoms in whatever form they might happen to be secured in the domestic legal order. According to the Court’s settled case-law, the effect of Article 13 of the Convention is to require the provision of a remedy allowing the competent domestic authority both to deal with the substance of a relevant Convention complaint and to grant appropriate relief, although Contracting States are afforded some discretion as to the manner in which they comply with their obligations under this provision. However, such a remedy is only required in respect of grievances which can be regarded as “arguable” in terms of the Convention (see Halford v. the United Kingdom, 25 June 1997, § 64, Reports 1997-III).
127. As regards the complaint of the lack of effective remedies in respect of the complaint under Article 2, the Court emphasises that, given the fundamental importance of the right to protection of life, Article 13 requires, in addition to the payment of compensation where appropriate, a thorough and effective investigation capable of leading to the identification and punishment of those responsible for the deprivation of life, including effective access for the complainant to the investigation procedure leading to the identification and punishment of those responsible (see Anguelova v. Bulgaria, no. 38361/97, §§ 161-62, ECHR 2002-IV). The Court further reiterates that the requirements of Article 13 are broader than a Contracting State’s obligation under Article 2 to conduct an effective investigation (see Khashiyev and Akayeva, cited above, § 183).
128. In view of the Court’s above findings with regard to Article 2, this complaint is clearly “arguable” for the purposes of Article 13 (see Boyle and Rice v. the United Kingdom, 27 April 1988, § 52, Series A no. 131). The applicants should accordingly have been able to avail themselves of effective and practical remedies capable of leading to the identification and punishment of those responsible and to an award of compensation for the purposes of Article 13.
129. It follows that in circumstances where, as here, the criminal investigation into the disappearance of the applicants’ son has been ineffective and the effectiveness of any other remedy that may have existed, including civil remedies suggested by the Government, has consequently been undermined, the State has failed in its obligation under Article 13 of the Convention.
130. Consequently, there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention.
131. In so far as the complaint under Article 13 concerns the existence of a domestic remedy in respect of the complaint concerning the applicants’ mental suffering, the Court notes that it has found a violation of Article 3 on this account. However, the Court has already found a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention on account of the authorities’ conduct that led to the suffering endured by the applicants. The Court considers that, in the circumstances, no separate issue arises in respect of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 3 of the Convention.
132. As regards the applicants’ reference to Article 5 of the Convention, the Court reiterates that according to its established case-law the more specific guarantees of Article 5 §§ 4 and 5, being a lex specialis in relation to Article 13, absorb its requirements and in view of the above findings of a violation of Article 5 of the Convention resulting in unacknowledged detention, the Court considers that no separate issue arises in respect of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 5 of the Convention.
133. Lastly, as to the applicants’ complaint under Article 13 in conjunction with Article 8 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that in a situation where the authorities denied their involvement in the alleged intrusion into the applicants’ house and the taking of their belongings and where the domestic investigation does not appear to have made any meaningful findings on this matter, the applicants did not have any effective domestic remedies in respect of the alleged violations of their rights secured by Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Accordingly, there has been a violation on that account.
IX. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
134. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
135. The applicants claimed damages in respect of the lost wages of their son. Although he had been unemployed, the applicants assumed that eventually he would have earned at least the minimum monthly wage. The first applicant claimed in total 69,000 Russian roubles (RUB) (1,865 euros (EUR)) and the second applicant claimed RUB 103,500 (EUR 2,797). Moreover, the applicants claimed EUR 10,000 as compensation for the damage caused by the search of 10 December 2002. They did not provide any documents or calculations to substantiate their claims in this regard.
136. The Government regarded these claims as unfounded and unsubstantiated.
137. The Court reiterates that there must be a clear causal connection between the damage claimed by the applicants and the violation of the Convention. Furthermore, under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court any claim for just satisfaction must be itemised and submitted in writing together with the relevant supporting documents or vouchers, “failing which the Chamber may reject the claim in whole or in part”.
138. The Court first notes that compensation for pecuniary damage may be awarded in respect of loss of earnings. The Court considers that there is a direct causal link between the violation of Article 2 in respect of the applicants’ son and the loss by the applicants of the financial support which he could have provided. The Court finds it reasonable to assume that A.R.would eventually have had some earnings. Having regard to the applicants’ submissions and the fact that A.R.was not employed at the time of his disappearance, the Court finds it appropriate to award EUR 1,500 to the applicants jointly in respect of pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable thereon.
139. The Court further notes that the applicants failed to substantiate their claims as regards the damage caused by the search of their house and thus makes no award in this respect.
B. Non-pecuniary damage
140. The applicants claimed compensation in respect of non-pecuniary damage for the suffering they endured as a result of the loss of their son and the indifference shown by the authorities towards them. The applicants claimed EUR 100,000 each under this head.
141. The Government found the amounts claimed exaggerated.
142. The Court has found a violation of Articles 2, 5 and 13 of the Convention on account of the disappearance of the applicants’ son. The applicants themselves have been found to have been victims of violations of Articles 3 and 8 of the Convention, as well as of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court thus accepts that they have suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the findings of violations. It thus awards the applicants EUR 40,000 jointly in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable thereon.
C. Costs and expenses
143. The applicants also claimed a total of EUR 4,800 to be paid to their lawyer who had prepared their application form and observations on the admissibility and merits of the case. They failed to produce any documents or invoices to confirm that the amounts claimed had been paid to the representative.
144. The Government indicated that the applicants had not shown that the expenses claimed for legal representation had actually been incurred.
145. The Court may make an award in respect of costs and expenses in so far as they were actually and necessarily incurred (see Bottazzi v. Italy [GC], no. 34884/97, § 30, ECHR 1999-V). Given that the applicants failed to submit any evidence to justify their costs and expenses related to the legal representation, it makes no award under this head.
D. Default interest
146. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join to the merits the Government’s objection as to non-exhaustion of criminal domestic remedies and rejects it;
2. Declares admissible the complaints under Articles 2, 5 and 8 of the Convention, the complaint under Article 3 concerning the applicants’ mental suffering, the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the complaints under Article 13 in conjunction with Articles 2, 5 and 8, as well as the complaint under Article 13 in conjunction with the complaint concerning the applicants’ mental suffering and in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention in respect of A. R.;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention in respect of the failure to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances in which A.R.had disappeared;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 3 in respect of the applicants on account of their mental suffering;
6. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 5 of the Convention in respect of A. R.;
7. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the applicants;
8. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention;
9. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the applicants;
10. Holds that no separate issues arise under Article 13 of the Convention in respect of the alleged violation of Article 3 on account of the applicants’ mental suffering and in respect of the alleged violation of Article 5 of the Convention;
11. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 1,500 (one thousand five hundred euros) to the applicants jointly in respect of pecuniary damage, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable thereon;
(ii) EUR 40,000 (forty thousand euros) to the applicants jointly in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable thereon;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
12. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 24 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA REZVANOV E REZVANOVA C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 12457/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
24 settembre 2009
Richiesta per raccomandazione alla Grande Camera pendente
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Rezvanov e Rezvanova c. la Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 12457/05) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini russi, il Sig. S. R. ed la Sig.ra S. R. (“i richiedenti”), il 25 marzo 2005.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stato accordato il gratuito patrocinio furono rappresentati dalla Sig.ra L. K., un avvocato che pratica a Mosca. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani.
3. Il 1 settembre 2005 la Corte decise di applicare l’ Articolo 41 dell’Ordinamento di Corte ed accordare il trattamento prioritario alla richiesta.
4. Il 28 settembre 2007 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
5. Il Governo obiettò all'esame unito dell'ammissibilità e dei meriti della richiesta. Avendo considerato l'eccezione del Governo, la Corte la respinse.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1941 e 1947 e vivono nella città di Urus-Martan, nella Repubblica di Cecenia.
7. I richiedenti sono marito e moglie. Loro sono i genitori di A. R., nato nel 1984.
A. Scomparsa di A. R.
1. Il racconto dei richiedenti
8. Alle 7.15 circa di mattina il10 dicembre 2002 sei carri armati (“APCs”) e due veicoli UAZ arrivarono all’alloggio dei richiedenti al 6 di via Mayakovskiy, Urus-Martan. Un gruppo di uomini armati in uniforme mimetica scese dai veicoli e irrupper nell'alloggio. I richiedenti presunsero fossero membri delle Forze Armate federali.
9. Alcuni dei membri delle Forze Armate puntarono delle mitragliatrici alla seconda richiedente e le chiesero in russo senza accentato dove fossero gli uomini dell'alloggio. Gli altri ispezionarono l'alloggio e i sui annessi senza mostrare nessun permesso di perquisizione. Più tardi i richiedenti scoprirono che gli uomini avevano sporcato tutto, rotto del vasellame, lacerato la biancheria da letto e sparso la farina sul pavimento.
10. Nel frattempo A. R. si stava nascondendo nella lavanderia annessa all'alloggio. Ad un certo punto i membri delle Forze Armate minacciarono di far esplodere l'alloggio. Il primo richiedente chiese a loro di aspettare, andò nella lavanderia e convinse suo figlio ad uscire da solo. A. R. andò nel cortile; gli uomini armati lo arrestarono e lo misero su un veicolo UAZ da terra azzurro («l'òàáëåòêà») con numero di registrazione 276-95-RUS. Poi presero alcuni oggetti personali appartenenti ai richiedenti, incluso una giacca di cuoio, un apparecchio video, un paio di scarpe da ginnastica ed alcuni altri articoli. Sembra che ad un certo punto gli uomini dissero ai richiedenti che loro erano membri delle Forze Armate del reparto dell'interno del Distretto di Zavodskoy. Poi loro salirono sui veicoli e se ne andarono.
11. Lo stesso giorno gli uomini armati arrestarono due dei nipoti del primo richiedente, A. ed A.; furono rilasciati alcuni ore più tardi e ritornarono a casa. A. ed A. dissero ai richiedenti che in seguito al loro arresto erano stati portati nei locali dell'ufficio del comandante militare del Distretto di Urus-Martan.
2. Informazioni presentate dal Governo
12. Di prima mattina del10 dicembre 2002 delle persone non identificate che portavano uniformi mimetiche ed armate di mitragliatrici prelevarono A. R. dall'alloggio del primo richiedente al 6 di viadi Mayakovskiy, Urus-Martan. Le stesse persone derubarono il primo richiedente e presero un apparecchio video, una giacca di cuoio, scarpe da ginnastica e altri articoli.
B. Indagine sulla scomparsa di A. R.
1. Il racconto dei richiedenti
13. Il 10 dicembre 2002 il primo richiedente si lamentò del rapimento di suo figlio alla Corte della Città di Urus-Martan ed all'ufficio dell'accusatore del Distretto di Urus-Martan (“l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto”). Nella sua azione di reclamo il primo richiedente menzionò che gli uomini armati gli avevano detto di appartenere al reparto dell'interno del Distretto di Zavodskoy. Lui richiese anche informazioni sulla posizione di suo figlio all'amministrazione locale e all'ufficio del comandante militare del Distretto di Urus-Martan (“l'ufficio del comandante militare”), ma inutilmente.
14. Il 27 dicembre 2002 l'ufficio dell'accusatore della Repubblica di Cecenia spedì l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente all'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto.
15. Il 16 gennaio 2003 il Ministero della Giustizia di Ingushetia informò l'ufficio dell'accusatore della Repubblica di Cecenia che loro avevano ricevuto un'azione di reclamo dal primo richiedente e di suo fratello. La lettera recitava come segue:
“Secondo i reclamanti, coloro che arrestarono A. R. si identificarono come ufficiali del FSB [Servizio di Sicurezza Federale] e [viaggiavano] in due o tre APCs e in un veicolo Ural. Il convoglio con l’arrestato andò a Grozny. Le azioni di reclamo dei genitori del detenuto [depositate presso] molte autorità non hanno portato risultati positivi.”
16. Con decisione del 16 gennaio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto riconobbe la qualità di vittima al primo richiedente nei procedimenti penali nella causa n. 34003 avviati il 31 gennaio 2003 in relazione al rapimento di A. R..
17. Il 31 gennaio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto avviò un'indagine sul rapimento di A. R. sotto l’Articolo 126 § 2 (“rapimento aggravato”) ed il furto degli oggetti personali di R. sotto l’Articolo 162 § 2 (“furto aggravato”) del Codice Penale russo. Alla causa fu assegnato il numero 34003.
18. Il 31 marzo 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto sospese l'indagine nella causa n. 34003 per insuccesso nell’ identificare i responsabili. Il 1 aprile 2003 notificarono al primo richiedente la decisione e fecero commenti che, nonostante la sospensione dei procedimenti, avevano istruito la polizia di cercare più assiduamente A. R..
19. Il 7 aprile 2003 il primo richiedente richiese all'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto di intraprendere assiduamente la ricerca di suo figlio e riportò che un'ora dopo il rapimento un ufficiale del FSB gli aveva detto che A. R. era stato portato alla base militare di Khankala da dei membri delle Forze Armate del Dipartimento Principale di Intelligence del Ministero della Difesa («ГРУ»).
20. Il 28 aprile 2003 il primo richiedente richiese all'ufficio dell'accusatore della Repubblica della Cecenia di aiutarlo a stabilire dov’era suo figlio.
21. Il 26 maggio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell’ unità militare n. 20102 (“l'ufficio dell'accusatore dell’ unità”) informò il primo richiedente di aver eseguito un'indagine che non aveva stabilito nessuna traccia di implicazione del personale militare nel rapimento di suo figlio .
22. Il 10 luglio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore militare dell'Allineamento Del gruppo Unito (“l'ufficio dell'accusatore dell’ UGA”) spedì l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente all'ufficio dell'accusatore dell’ unità ed ordinò che venisse condotta un'indagine sulla possibile implicazione di membri delle Forze Armate militari nel rapimento di A. R..
23. Il 24 novembre 2003 il primo richiedente richiese assistenza per la ricerca di suo figlio dall'Amministrazione della Repubblica di Cecenia.
24. Il 22 aprile 2004 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto riprese l'indagine sul rapimento di A. R. e lo notificò di conseguenza al primo richiedente.
25. L’ 11 maggio 2004 il Ministero dell'Interno della Repubblica di Cecenia informò la seconda richiedente che la ricerca di suo figlio era in corso.
2. Informazioni presentate dal Governo
26. Il 31 gennaio 2003 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto avviò un'indagine nella causa n. 34003 sotto gli Articoli 126 § 2 e 161 § 2 del Codice Penale russo.
27. In date non specificate ai richiedenti fu accordato lo status di vittima nella causa n. 34003.
28. In una data non specificata il primo richiedente fu interrogato e affermò che alle 7 circa di mattina del 10 dicembre 2002 era stato svegliato da qualcuno che bussava alla sua porta. Lui aveva aperto la porta ed aveva visto circa ottanta o novanta uomini in uniformi mimetiche armate con mitragliatrici; alcuni di loro portavano maschere. Lui aveva osservato anche sei APCs e due veicoli UAZ. Uno degli uomini armati aveva richiesto il documento d'identità del primo richiedente, lo verificò e lo restituì. Aveva detto ad un altro uomo che qualcuno si stava nascondendo in una lavanderia nel cortile. Gli uomini armati avevano circondato l'alloggio ed avevano detto al primo richiedente che avrebbero sparato se la persona nella lavanderia non si fosse arresa. Il primo richiedente aveva risposto che era suo figlio. Avendo ottenuto il permesso, il primo richiedente era entrato nella lavanderia ed aveva visto suo figlio armato con una pistola Makarov ed una granata. Aveva detto che A. R. che stava progettando di farsi esplodere. Il primo richiedente aveva convinto suo figlio a dargli la pistola e la granata ed erano usciti. Lui aveva dato le armi agli uomini. Poi loro percuisirono A. R., gli misero in una borsa di plastica sul suo capo e lo portarono via. Il primo richiedente non vide più suo figlio da quel momento . Lo stesso giorno due dei nipoti del primo richiedente erano stati arrestati e poi erano stati rilasciati due ore più tardi. Durante l'arresto di A. R. gli uomini armati avevano perquisito l'alloggio, rovinato della mobilia, del vasellame e dell’abbigliamento e rubato un apparecchio video, una giacca di cuoio, scarpe da ginnastica e altri articoli. Il primo richiedente affermò anche che lui non desiderava studiare il file della causa al suo completamento.
29. La seconda richiedente fu interrogata in una data non specificata e fece una deposizione identica a quella di suo marito.
30. In date non specificate i nipoti del primo richiedente, A. ed A. furono interrogati come testimoni. Loro affermarono che alle 7 circa di mattina del 10 dicembre 2002 circa venti uomini mascherati in uniformi mimetiche ed armati con mitragliatrici erano entrati nell’alloggio di A. e di A., avevano chiesto i loro documenti d’ identità e li avevano portati nel cortile. Gli uomini armati avevano legato le braccia di A. e di A., li avevano bendati e li avevano messi in una macchina. I testimoni non conoscevano il tipo macchina. Dopo un viaggio di circa venti minuti gli uomini armati avevano preso A. ed A. dalla macchina e li avevano condotti giù per delle scale. Gli uomini detenuti erano stati interrogati circa A. R.. Poi loro erano stati messi di nuovo sulla macchina e trasportati per quaranta minuti. Gli uomini armati avevano preso A. ed A. dalla macchina, avevano slegato le loro braccia ed avevano ordinato loro di rimanere seduti tranquilli ancora per venti minuti. Quando la macchina se ne andò via, i due uomini tolsero la benda dai loro occhi e compresero di essere in una fattoria vicino ad Urus-Martan. Poi loro ritornarono a casa ed appresero del rapimento di A. R..
31. In una data non specificata il Sig. G., il vicino di casa dei richiedenti, fu interrogato come testimone e dichiarò che alle 7.20 di mattina del 10 dicembre 2002, mentre era a casa, lui aveva sentito delle voci provenienti da fuori. Lui aveva guardato fuori dalla finestra ed aveva visto uomini armati con maschere ed uniformi mimetiche. Il Sig. G. aveva tentato di uscire ma gli uomini armati gli avevano detto di non farlo. Più tardi il Sig. G. aveva scoperto che quegli uomini avevano portato via A. R..
32. In una data non specificata il Sig. Sh. fu interrogato come testimone e dichiarò che il 29 gennaio 2003 lui era stato arrestato per deposito di materiali esplosivi ed armi che lui aveva ottenuto da A. R..
33. Gli investigatori interrogarono quindici residenti di via Mayakovskiy a Urus-Martan che affermarono di non avere informazioni sul rapimento di A. R..
34. Delle Agenzie di esecuzione della legge della Repubblica di Cecenia riportarono all'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto che A. R. non era stato arrestato o era detenuto in strutture di detenzione nella Repubblica di Cecenia e che era stata sporta querela contro di lui. Loro indicarono anche che le forze federali non avevano condotto nessuna operazione speciale nel Distretto di Urus-Martan il 10 dicembre 2002.
35. Un veicolo UAZ con numero di registrazione 276-95 non era registrato nel registro dell’Ispezione del Traffico Statale del Ministero dell'Interno della Repubblica di Cecenia.
36. Il 31 marzo 2003 l'indagine nella causa n. 34003 fu sospesa per insuccesso nell’ identificare quei responsabili. Alla seconda richiedente fu notificata la decisione del 3 giugno 2003.
37. Il 22 aprile 2004 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto annullò la decisione del 31 marzo 2003 e riprese l'indagine.
38. In una data non specificata l'indagine fu sospesa e poi fu ripresa il 10 giugno 2004. Il 10 luglio 2004 fu sospesa di nuovo.
39. L'indagine nella causa n. 34003 fu ripetutamente sospesa e poi ripresa in seguito all’annullamento delle decisioni sulla sospensione da parte degli accusatori più alti.
40. Il 25 ottobre 2007 il Comitato Inquirente dell'Ufficio dell'Accusatore russo nella Repubblica di Cecenia riprese l'indagine nella causa n. 34003.
41. Il Governo presentò che l'indagine era andata a vuoto nel stabilire i perpetratori ed era ancora in corso. Il coinvolgimento dei militari federali nel crimine non era stato provato.
42. Nonostante le specifiche richieste della Corte, il Governo non rivelò la maggior parte dei documenti dei file dell'indagine nella causa n. 34003, offrendo solamente alcune copie delle decisioni dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto e delle notifiche ai richiedenti. Affermò che l'indagine era in corso e che la rivelazione dei documenti sarebbe stata in violazione dell’ Articolo 161 del Codice di Procedura penale poiché gli archivi contenevano informazioni di natura militare e dei dati personali riguardo ai testimoni ad altri partecipanti nei procedimenti penali.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
43. Per un riassunto del diritto nazionale attinente vedere Akhmadova e Sadulayeva c. Russia (n. 40464/02, §§ 67-69 del 10 maggio 2007).
LA LEGGE
I. L'ECCEZIONE DEL GOVERNO RIGUARDO AL NON-ESAURIMENTO DELLE VIE DI RICORSO NAZIONALI
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
44. Il Governo contese che l'azione di reclamo avrebbe dovuta essere dichiarata inammissibile per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. Presentò che l'indagine sulla scomparsa di A. R .non era stata ancora completata. Era anche aperto ai richiedenti lamentarsi dell'inattività degli investigatori presso le corti o presso gli uffici di accusatori più alti o depositare delle rivendicazioni civili per danni ciò che loro non erano riusciti a fare.
45. I richiedenti contestarono quell'eccezione. Loro affermarono che l'indagine penale si era rivelata inefficace.
B. La valutazione della Corte
46. La Corte reitera che la regola dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione obbliga i richiedenti ad usare vie di ricorso che sono disponibili e sufficienti nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale da permettere loro di ottenere compensazione per le violazioni addotte prima. L'esistenza delle vie di ricorso deve essere sufficientemente sicura sia in teoria che in pratica, in mancanza di ciò mancherà loro l'accessibilità richiesta e l'efficacia. L’Articolo che 35 § 1 richiede anche che le azioni di reclamo che si intende portare successivamente di fronte alla Corte dovrebbero essere fatte presso il l’ente nazionale appropriato, almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e i tempo-limiti stabiliti dal diritto nazionale ed inoltre che dovrebbe essere usato qualsiasi mezzo procedurale che potrebbe prevenire una violazione della Convenzione. Non c'è comunque, nessun obbligo di ricorrere a vie di ricorso che sono inadeguate o inefficaci (vedere Aksoy c. Turchia, 18 dicembre 1996 §§ 51-52, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI e Cennet Ayhan e Mehmet Salih Ayhan c. Turchia, n. 41964/98, § 64 del 27 giugno 2006).
47. Spetta al Governo rispondente che rivendica il non-esaurimento indicare alla Corte con chiarezza sufficiente le vie di ricorso a cui i richiedenti non hanno ricorso e soddisfare la Corte che le vie di ricorso erano effettive e disponibili in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente cioè che loro erano accessibili, era in grado di offrire compensazione a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e di offrire delle prospettive ragionevoli di successo (vedere Cennet Ayhan e Mehmet Salih Ayhan, citata sopra, § 65).
48. La Corte nota che l'ordinamento giuridico russo prevede in principio due vie di ricorso per le vittime di atti illegali e penali attribuibili allo Stato o ai suoi agenti, vale a dire la via di ricorso civile e penale.
49. Riguardo ad un'azione civile per ottenere compensazione per danno subito per addotti atti illegali o condotta illegale da parte di agenti Statali, la Corte ha già trovato in un numero di cause simili che questa procedura da sola non può essere considerata una via di ricorso effettiva nel contesto di rivendicazioni introdotte sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione. Una corte civile è incapace di perseguire qualsiasi indagine indipendente ed è incapace, senza il beneficio delle conclusioni di un'indagine penale, ottenere qualsiasi informazione significativa riguardo all'identità dei perpetratori di aggressioni mortali o di scomparse, tanto meno di stabilire la loro responsabilità (vedere Khashiyev ed Akayeva c. Russia, N. 57942/00 e 57945/00, §§ 119-21 del 24 febbraio 2005). Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte conferma, che i richiedenti non erano obbligati ad intraprendere la via di ricorso civile.
50. Riguardo alla via di penale di riguardi prevista dall'ordinamento giuridico russo, la Corte osserva che i richiedenti si lamentarono immediatamente presso le agenzie di esecuzione delle legge dopo la scomparsa di A. R.. L'indagine sul suo rapimento è in corso dal 31 gennaio 2003. I richiedenti e lo Stato contestano l'efficacia di questa indagine.
51. La Corte considera che questa parte dell'eccezione del Governo solleva problemi riguardo all'efficacia dell'indagine che è collegata da vicino ai meriti delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti. Così, decide di congiungere questa eccezione ai meriti della causa e considera che il problema deve essere esaminato sotto l’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 2 DELLA CONVENZIONE
52. I richiedenti si lamentarono che A. R. era scomparso in seguito al suo arresto da parte dei membri delle Forze Armate russe e che le autorità nazionali erano andate a vuoto nel portare avanti un'indagine effettiva sul rapimento. Loro si appellarono all’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione che recita:
"1. Il diritto di ogni persona alla vita è protetto dalla legge. La morte non può essere inflitta a nessuno intenzionalmente, salvo nel corso dell’ esecuzione di una sentenza capitale pronunziata da un tribunale nel caso in cui il reato sia punito da questa pena per legge.
2. La morte non è considerata come inflitta in violazione di questo articolo nei casi in cui risultasse da un ricorso alla forza resa assolutamente necessaria:
a) per garantire la difesa di ogni persona contro la violenza illegale;
b) per effettuare un arresto regolare o per impedire l'evasione di una persona regolarmente detenuta;
c) per reprimere, conformemente alla legge, una sommossa o un'insurrezione. "
A. Argomenti delle parti
53. Il Governo dibatté che non c'erano prove convincenti che A. R. fosse morto. Neanche era provato che lui fosse stato arrestato dai membri delle Forze Armate Statali. Nessuno dei testimoni aveva affermato di avere notato qualsiasi stemma sulle uniformi mimetiche degli uomini armati che provava che loro non potessero essere dei membri militari.
54. Le lettere dell'Accusatore Aggiunto della Repubblica di Cecenia e del Ministero della Giustizia di Ingushetia presentate dai richiedenti non provavano implicazione militare nel crimine ma soltanto riaffermavano la dichiarazione delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti senza raggiungere qualsiasi conclusione in merito all’identità dei perpetratori.
55. Le dichiarazione dei richiedenti che A. R .era stato arrestato da membri delle Forze Armate del FSB ed era stato portato all'ufficio del comandante militare erano speculative. Il Governo indicò anche che A. ed A. non avevano sostenuto di fronte alle autorità nazionali di essere stati tenuti nell'ufficio del comandante militare. Il primo richiedente aveva affermato inizialmente inoltre, che gli uomini armati si erano identificati come membri delle Forze Armate del reparto dell'interno del Distretto di Zavodskoy ma più tardi addusse che loro erano membri delle Forze Armate del FSB il che prova l'inattendibilità delle sue dichiarazioni.
56. Il Governo indicò inoltre che vari gruppi di mercenari ucraini avevano commesso dei crimini nel territorio della Repubblica di Cecenia ed avevano enfatizzato che il fatto che i perpetratori avevano caratteristiche slave e parlavano russo non prova la loro appartenenza all’esercito russo. Osservò anche che una quantità considerevole di armamenti e di veicoli militari, incluso APCs era stata rubata da gruppi armati illegali da depositi russi negli anni novanta e che chiunque avrebbe potuto acquistare uniformi mimetiche.
57. Il Governo enfatizzò che A. R. era armato ed era stato dedotto dalla sua intenzione di farsi esplodere che lui aveva avuto paura dei membri di gruppi armati illegali a chi lui stava fornendo delle armi da fuoco. Si riferì alla deposizione del Sig. Sh. che lui aveva ottenuto delle armi dal figlio dei richiedenti . Il Governo asserì anche che gli agenti Statali non avevano avuto nessuna ragione di rapire A. R. siccome loro l'avrebbero usato piuttosto come testimone di accusa per dichiarare colpevole gli insorti.
58. Insomma, il Governo insisté, che il coinvolgimento degli agenti Statali nel rapimento di A. R. non fosse stato provato oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio.
59. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che l'indagine sul rapimento era stata efficace ed era pendente di fronte ad un'agenzia Statale indipendente. I richiedenti erano stati informati dei progressi nell'indagine in tempo debito. Le ripetute sospensioni e riaperture dell'indagine mostravano solamente che i procedimenti erano in corso e che le misure investigative richieste erano state prese.
60. I richiedenti sostennero che era oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio che gli uomini che avevano arrestato A. R. fossero stati degli agenti Statali perché i perpetratori viaggiavano in APCs che avrebbero potuto essere usati solamente dalle agenzie Statali. Loro si lamentarono inoltre che l'indagine sul rapimento di loro figlio era stata protratta e era stata inefficace.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
61. La Corte considera, alla luce delle osservazioni delle parti , che l'azione di reclamo solleva problemi seri di fatto e di diritto sotto la Convenzione, la determinazione di cui richiede un esame dei meriti. La Corte ha già trovato che l'eccezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento addotto delle vie di ricorso nazionali e penali dovrebbe essere congiunta ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo (vedere paragrafo 51 sopra). L'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
(a) La violazione addotta del diritto alla vita di A. R.
i. Ricostruzione dei fatti
62. La Corte reitera che, alla luce dell'importanza della protezione riconosciuta dall’ Articolo 2, deve sottoporre le privazioni della vita allo scrutinio più accurato, non solo prendendo in esame le azioni degli agenti Statali ma anche tutte le circostanze circostanti. Le persone detenute sono in una posizione vulnerabile e l'obbligo sulle autorità di rendere conto del trattamento di un individuo detenuto è particolarmente severo dove un individuo muore o scompare da allora in poi (vedere Orhan c. Turchia, n. 25656/94, § 326 del 18 giugno 2002). Dove gli eventi in oggetto risiedono completamente o in grande parte all'interno della conoscenza esclusiva delle autorità, come nel caso di persone sotto il loro controllo in detenzione, presunzioni forti di fatto sorgeranno a riguardo di danni e di morte accaduti durante quella detenzione. Effettivamente, si può ritenere che rimanga sulle autorità l'onere della prova di fornire un chiarimento soddisfacente e convincente (vedere Salman c. Turchia [GC], n. 21986/93, § 100, ECHR 2000-VII, e Çakıcı c. Turchia [GC], n. 23657/94, § 85 ECHR 1999-IV).
63. La Corte osserva che ha sviluppato un numero di principi generali relativi alla costituzione di fatti contestati, in particolare di fronte a dichiarazioni di scomparsa sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione (per un riassunto di questi, vedere Bazorkina c. Russia, n. 69481/01, §§ 103-09 27 luglio 2006). La Corte nota anche che doveva essere presa in considerazione la condotta delle parti nell’ottenimento delle prove (vedere Irlanda c. Regno Unito, 18 gennaio 1978, § 161 Serie A n. 25).
64. La Corte nota che, nonostante le sue richieste di una copia dell’intero file dell’ indagine sul rapimento di A. R., il Governo rifiutò di produrre la maggior parte dei materiali della causa al motivo che l’ Articolo 161 del Codice di Procedura penale gli precludeva di fornirli. La Corte osserva che in cause precedenti ha trovato questo chiarimento insufficiente per giustificare la trattenuta di informazioni chiave richieste dalla Corte (vedere Imakayeva c. Russia, n. 7615/02, § 123 ECHR 2006 -... (estratti)).
65. Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede e tenendo presente i principi a cui è stato fatto riferimento sopra, la Corte costata che può dedurre delle inferenze dalla condotta del Governo a questo riguardo.
66. I richiedenti addussero che le persone che avevano portato via A. R. il10 dicembre 2002 erano agenti Statali.
67. La loro ipotesi è confermata da dichiarazioni da testimoni dei nipoti del primo richiedente che erano stati portati via da un gruppo di uomini armati ed erano stati interrogati circa A. R.(vedere paragrafo 30 sopra), così come dalla dichiarazione del Sig. G. che aveva visto gli uomini armati di fronte all’alloggio dei richiedenti il 10 dicembre 2002 (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra).
68. Il Governo suggerì che i rapitori di A. R. avrebbero potuto essere degli insorti o dei mercenari. Comunque, questa dichiarazione non era specifica e non presentò qualsiasi materiale per sostenerla. La Corte sottolineerebbe a questo riguardo che la valutazione delle prove e la ricostruzione dei fatti è una questione che spetta alla Corte, e spetta sempre a lei decidere sul valore probatorio dei documenti presentati a sé (vedere Çelikbilek c. la Turchia, n. 27693/95, § 71 31 maggio 2005). La Corte considera che il fatto che A. R. fosse armato al tempo del suo arresto non prova di per sé che lui aveva fornito armi a gruppi armati illegali. Secondo il Governo, inoltre, nessun procedimento penali era stato avviato contro A. R. al tempo del suo rapimento (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra).
69. Nella prospettiva della Corte il fatto che immediatamente dopo questo rapimento il primo richiedente ha asserito che gli uomini armati si erano identificati come membri delle Forze Armate del reparto dell'interno del Distretto di Zavodskoy e più tardi a quanto riferito aveva affermato che quegli uomini avevano detto di appartenere al FSB non rende il suo resoconto degli eventi meno plausibile.
70. La Corte enfatizza anche che gli APCs, diversamente dai veicoli civili regolari non potevano essere posseduti normalmente da individui privati. Prende nota della dichiarazione del Governo secondo cui APCs, così come armamenti ed uniformi mimetiche, probabilmente furono rubati da insorti dagli arsenali russi negli anni novanta. Nondimeno considera molto improbabile che molti carri armati militari rubati che portavano un numero considerevole di uomini armati in uniformi mimetiche avrebbero potuto passare attraverso i posto di controllo militari russi per entrare l’ Urus-Martan e poi si sarebbero potuti muovere liberamente per la città senza essere notati.
71. È degno di nota il fatto che gli investigatori nazionali hanno accettato le affermazioni riguardanti i fatti come presentate dai richiedenti e considerato la possibilità di implicazione militare nel crimine (vedere paragrafi 21 e 22 sopra).
72. La Corte prende ulteriormente nota della dichiarazione del Governo per cui A. ed A., i nipoti del primo richiedente non hanno informato gli investigatori di essere stati tenuti nei locali usati dall'ufficio del comandante militare. Comunque, è incapace di verificare se i due uomini omisero davvero di informare le autorità nazionali di questo perché il Governo andò a vuoto nel fornire una trascrizione dei loro colloqui con gli investigatori. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte non ritiene necessario stabilire se A. R. fu portato all'ufficio del comandante militare nel suo rapimento, poiché considera che il fatto che un grande gruppo di uomini armati in uniforme dotati di veicoli militari fosse in grado muoversi liberamente per l’ Urus-Martan ed arrestare a casa sua A. R. fortemente sostiene la versione dei richiedenti del coinvolgimento dei membri delle Forze Armate Statali nel rapimento di loro figlio.
73. La Corte osserva che dove i richiedenti redigono una causa di prima facie ed alla Corte viene impedito di giungere a conclusioni riguardanti i fatti a causa di una mancanza di documenti, spetta la Governo mostrare conclusivamente perché i documenti in oggetto non possono servire a corroborare le dichiarazioni fatte dai richiedenti, od offrire un chiarimento soddisfacente e convincente di come gli eventi in oggetto accaddero. L'onere della prova è spostato così al Governo e se fallisce nei suoi argomenti, dei problemi deriveranno dotto l’Articolo 2 e/o Articolo 3 (vedere Toğcu c. Turchia, n. 27601/95, § 95, 31 maggio 2005, ed Akkum ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 21894/93, § 211 ECHR 2005-II).
74. Prendendo in considerazione gli elementi sopra, la Corte si soddisfa che i richiedenti hanno fatto una causa di prima facie che A. R. fu portato via dai membri delle Forze Armate Statali. La dichiarazione del Governo che l'indagine non ha trovato qualsiasi prova che sottolineasse il coinvolgimento delle forze speciali nel rapimento è insufficiente per assolverlo dall'onere della prova summenzionato. Traendo inferenze dall'insuccesso del Governo nel presentare i documenti che erano in loro possesso esclusivo o di fornite un altro chiarimento plausibile degli eventi in oggetto, la Corte considera che A. R. fu rapito dalla sua casa di famiglia da membri delle Forze Armate Statali durante un'operazione di sicurezza non riconosciuta.
75. Non c’è nessuna notizia affidabile di A. R. dal 10 dicembre 2002. Il suo nome non è stato trovato in nessun documento di una qualsiasi struttura di detenzione ufficiale . Il Governo non presentò qualsiasi chiarimento in merito a ciò che era accaduto a lui dopo quel giorno.
76. Avendo riguardo alle cause precedenti riguardo alle scomparse di persone nella Repubblica della Cecenia che sono pervenute di fronte alla Corte (vedere, per esempio, Luluyev ed Altri c. Russia, n. 69480/01, ECHR 2006 -... ), considera che, nel contesto del conflitto nella Repubblica di Cecenia, quando una persona è detenuta da membri delle Forze Armate non identificati senza qualsiasi susseguente riconoscimento della detenzione, questo può essere riguardato come una minaccia alla vita. L'assenza di qualsiasi notizia su A. R. da più di sei anni corroborano questa presunzione.
77. Di conseguenza, la Corte trova stabilito che il10 dicembre 2002 A. R. fu rapito da membri delle Forze Armate Statali e che lui deve essere considerato morto in seguito al suo rapimento.
ii. L'ottemperanza dello Stato con l’Articolo 2
78. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 2 che salvaguarda il diritto alla vita e stabilisce le circostanze in cui la privazione della vita può essere giustificata, si classifica come una delle disposizioni più fondamentali nella Convenzione da cui non è permessa nessuna deroga (vedere McCann ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 27 settembre 1995, § 147 Serie A n. 324).
79. La Corte già ha trovato stabilito che A. R. deve essere morto (vedere paragrafo 77 sopra). Notando che le autorità non si appellano a nessuna base di giustificazione a riguardo dell’ uso della forza letale da parte dei membri delle Forze Armate Statali, considera che la responsabilità per la sua morte risiede nel Governo rispondente.
80. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione a riguardo di A. R..
(b) L'inadeguatezza addotta dell'indagine
81. La Corte reitera che l'obbligo per proteggere il diritto alla vita sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione, letto in concomitanza col dovere generale dello Stato sotto l’Articolo 1 della Convenzione di “garantire ad ognuno entro [la] sua giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definite [nella] Convenzione”, richiede anche per implicazione che ci dovrebbe essere una forma di indagine ufficiale ed effettiva quando degli individui sono stati uccisi come risultato dell'uso della forza (vedere Kaya c. Turchia, 19 febbraio 1998, § 86, Relazioni 1998-I). Il fine essenziale di tale indagine è di garantire l'attuazione effettiva dei diritti nazionali che proteggono il diritto alla vita e, nei casi che coinvolgono agenti o entità Statali, di garantire la loro responsabilità per le morti che accadono sotto la loro responsabilità. Questa indagine dovrebbe essere indipendente, accessibile alla famiglia della vittima, eseguita con prontezza ragionevole e rapidità, effettivo nel senso di essere in grado di condurre alla determinazione di se o meno la forza usata in simile casi è stata legale e giustificata nelle circostanze, e permette un elemento sufficiente di scrutinio pubblico dell'indagine o dei suoi risultati (vedere Hugh Giordania c. Regno Unito, n. 24746/94, §§ 105-09 ECHR 2001-III (estratti), e Douglas-Williams c.
Regno Unito (dec.), n. 56413/00, 8 gennaio 2002).
82. Nella presente causa, il rapimento di A. R. fu investigato. La Corte deve valutare se questa indagine ha soddisfatto i requisiti dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
83. La Corte nota all'inizio che la maggioranza dei documenti dall'indagine rimangono non rivelati dal Governo. Deve perciò valutare l'efficacia dell'indagine sulla base dei pochi documenti presentati dalle parti e le informazioni sparse sui suoi progressi presentati dal Governo.
84. La Corte prima nota che le autorità furono immediatamente rese consapevoli del rapimento di A. R. tramite le osservazioni dei richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Comunque, l'indagine sull'assassinio fu avviata il 31 gennaio 2003, cioè , più di sei settimane dopo il rapimento. Tale lungo ritardo è stato di per sé responsabile di influenzare l'indagine del rapimento in circostanze minacciose per la vita, dove invece un’ azione cruciale doveva essere presa nei primi giorni dopo l'evento.
85. La Corte evidenzia ulteriormente che le informazioni sul corso dell'indagine sul rapimento di A. R. a sua disposizione sono estremamente inadeguate. Osserva che i richiedenti, i quali non furono aggiornati sui progressi sulla causa, non potevano fornire una lista delle misure investigative prese dalle autorità nazionali.
86. Il Governo, a sua volta si riferì vagamente a dei passi investigativi presi per risolvere il rapimento di A. R.. In particolare, affermò che fu interrogato un certo numero di testimoni (vedere paragrafi 28-33 sopra). Comunque, non hanno menzionato quando quei colloqui avevano avuto luogo e non hanno fornito alcun ulteriore dettaglio tale da permettere alla Corte di valutare la loro efficacia.
87. Inoltre non fu mai condotto un certo numero di importanti passi investigativi. Per esempio, non sembra, mai è stata presa una misura di base come l'ispezione della scena del delitto. Inoltre, nulla nei materiali a disposizione della Corte garantisce la conclusione che gli investigatori hanno tentato di interrogare i membri delle Forze Armate dell'ufficio del comandante militare, il FSB o il reparto dell'interno del Distretto di Zavodskoy. Loro non fecero nessun tentativo di trovare gli APCs descritti dai richiedenti o di identificare i loro proprietari.
88. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che le autorità investigative nazionali andarono a vuoto in modo dimostrabile nell’agire di loro propria volontà e violarono il loro obbligo di agire con diligenza esemplare e prontezza nel trattare con un crimine grave come il rapimento (vedere Öneryıldız c. Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 94 ECHR 2004-XII).
89. La Corte nota anche che i richiedenti non furono informati prontamente degli sviluppi significativi sull'indagine e considera perciò che gli investigatori non riuscirono ad assicurare che l'indagine ricevesse il livello richiesto di scrutinio pubblico, o a salvaguardare gli interessi dei parenti prossimi nei procedimenti (vedere Oğur c. Turchia [GC], n. 21594/93, § 92 ECHR 1999-III).
90. Infine, la Corte nota che l'indagine sul rapimento di A. R. fu ripetutamente sospesa e poi ripresa il che condusse a lunghi periodi d'inattività da parte degli investigatori quando nessun procedimento era pendente. A causa dell'insuccesso del Governo nel presentare l’intero file della causa, la Corte non è capace di stabilire le tempistiche esatte dell'indagine. Comunque, è chiaro che nessun procedimento era pendente fra il 31 marzo 2003 e il 22 aprile 2004 , cioè per più di un anno. Simile trattamento dell'indagine avrebbe potuto avere solamente un impatto negativo sulle prospettive di identificazione dei perpetratori e sull’accertamento del destino del figlio dei richiedenti.
91. Avendo riguardo al risvolto dell'eccezione del Governo che è stata congiunta ai meriti della richiesta, nella misura in cui riguarda il fatto che l'indagine nazionale è ancora pendente, la Corte nota che l'indagine, essendo stata ripetutamente sospesa e ripresa , e colpita da ritardi inesplicabili, è in corso da più di sei anni e non ha prodotto risultati tangibili. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che le vie di ricorso a cui si è appellato il Governo erano inefficaci nelle circostanze e rifiuta la sua eccezione in questa parte.
92. Il Governo menzionò anche che i richiedenti avevano l'opportunità di richiedere un controllo giurisdizionale delle decisioni delle autorità inquirenti nel contesto dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali e di lamentarsi presso accusatori più alti. La Corte osserva che, a causa del tempo che era trascorso dagli gli eventi di cui ci si lamenta , certi passi investigativi che avrebbero dovuto essere stati presi molto prima non potrebbero più essere utili. La Corte trova perciò che è estremamente dubbio che le vie di ricorso a cui si appella il Governo avrebbero avuto una qualsiasi prospettiva di successo e considera che loro erano inefficaci nelle circostanze della causa. Respinge così anche l'eccezione del Governo in questa parte.
93. Alla luce del precedente, la Corte trova, che le autorità andarono a vuoto nell’ eseguire un'indagine penale effettiva nelle circostanze che circondano la scomparsa di A. R., in violazione dell’Articolo 2 della Convenzione nel suo aspetto procedurale.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 3 DELLA CONVENZIONE
94. I richiedenti si lamentarono che gli uomini armati che perquisirono il loro alloggio il 10 dicembre 2002 li avevano trattati rudemente e senza alcuna considerazione. Loro presentarono inoltre che, come risultato della scomparsa di loro figlio e l'insuccesso dello Stato nell’investigarla in modo appropriato, loro avevano sopportato una grave sofferenza mentale. I richiedenti si appellarono all’Articolo 3 della Convenzione che recita:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamenti o punizioni inumani o degradanti.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti le osservazioni
95. Il Governo non era d'accordo con queste dichiarazioni e dibatté che i richiedenti non erano stati sottoposti a trattamenti inumani o degradanti proibiti dall’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
96. I richiedenti mantennero le loro azioni di reclamo.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
(a) L'azione di reclamo riguardo al comportamento degli uomini armati durante la ricerca
97. La Corte reitera all'inizio che per rientrare sotto l’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione il mal-trattamento deve essere almeno marginalmente grave (vedere Irlanda c. Regno Unito, § 162 e citata sopra). Considera che il modo in cui i richiedenti sono stati trattati dai membri delle Forze Armate Statali che giunsero alla loro casa il 10 dicembre 2002 non avrebbero potuto essere davvero sgradevoli ed inconsiderate. Comunque, la Corte non si persuade che ha corrisposto ad trattamento che eccede il livello minimo di gravità tale da essere in violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
98. Ne segue che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 3 della Convenzione è mal-fondata manifestamente e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
(b) L'azione di reclamo riguardo alla sofferenza mentale dei richiedenti
99. La Corte nota che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
100. La Corte osserva che la questione se un membro della famiglia di una “persona scomparsa” è una vittima di trattamenti contrari all’ Articolo 3 dipenderà dall'esistenza di fattori speciali che danno alla sofferenza dei richiedenti una dimensione e un carattere distinti dall'angoscia emotiva che può essere considerata causata inevitabilmente a parenti di una vittima di una grave violazione dei diritti umani. Gli elementi attinenti includeranno la prossimità del legame famigliare, le particolari circostanze della relazione, la misura in cui il membro della famiglia fu testimone degli eventi in oggetto, il coinvolgimento del membro della famiglia nei tentativi di ottenere informazioni della persona scomparsa ed il modo in cui le autorità hanno risposto a quelle richieste. La Corte enfatizzerebbe inoltre che l'essenza di tale violazione non giace principalmente nel fatto della “scomparsa” del membro della famiglia ma piuttosto concerne le reazioni e gli atteggiamenti delle autorità alla situazione quando è stata portata alla loro attenzione. È a riguardo specialmente di quest’ultimo aspetto che un parente può rivendicare direttamente di essere una vittima della condotta delle autorità (vedere Orhan c. Turchia, n. 25656/94, § 358 del 18 giugno 2002).
101. La Corte nota che i richiedenti non hanno avuto qualsiasi informazioni affidabile sulla sorte del loro figlio per più di sei anni. Durante questo periodo i richiedenti hanno fatto domanda ai vari corpi ufficiali chiedendo di A. R., sia per iscritto che di persona. Nonostante questi tentativi, loro non hanno ricevuto mai nessun chiarimento plausibile o nessuna informazione in merito a ciò che gli era accaduto. Anche le costatazioni della Corte sotto l'aspetto procedurale dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione sono di attinenza diretta in questo caso.
102. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte trova, che i richiedenti soffrirono di stress e di angoscia come un risultato della scomparsa di loro figlio e della loro incapacità di scoprire ciò che gli era accaduto Si deve considerare che il modo in cui le loro azioni di reclamo sono state trattate dalle autorità costituisce un trattamento inumano contrario all’ Articolo 3.
103. La Corte conclude perciò che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione a riguardo dei richiedenti.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 5 DELLA CONVENZIONE
104. I richiedenti si lamentarono che A. R. era stato detenuto finora in violazione delle garanzie dell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione che si legge così nelle parti attinenti:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà ed alla sicurezza della persona. Nessuno sarà privato della sua libertà salvo nei seguenti casi e in conformità con una procedura prescritta dalla legge:...
(c) l'arresto legale o la detenzione di una persona effettuati al fine di portarlo di fronte all'autorità legale competente su ragionevole sospetto di avere commesso un reato o quando è considerato ragionevolmente necessario per prevenire la perpetrazione di un reato o la fuga dopo avere agito così;
...
2. Tutti coloro che vengono arrestati saranno informati prontamente, in una lingua che comprendono, delle ragioni del loro arresto e di qualsiasi accusa contro loro.
3. Ognuno arrestato o detenuto in conformità con le disposizioni del paragrafo 1 (c) di questo Articolo sarà portato prontamente di fronte ad un giudice o ad un altro ufficiale autorizzato dalla legge ad esercitare il potere giudiziale e gli verrà concesso un processo all'interno di un termine ragionevole o al rilascio essendo pendente il processo. La liberazione può essere condizionata da garanzie di comparire al processo.
4. Ad ognuno che viene privato della sua libertà tramite arresto o detenzione verrà concesso di intraprendere procedimenti con cui la legalità della sua detenzione sarà decisa velocemente da una corte ed ordinata la sua liberazione se la detenzione non è legale.
5. Ognuno che è stato la vittima di arresto o di detenzione in violazione delle disposizioni di questo Articolo avrà un diritto esecutivo al risarcimento.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
105. Il Governo presentò che nessuna prova era stata ottenuta dagli investigatori per confermare che A. R. fu privato della libertà in violazione delle garanzie stabilite nell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione.
106. I richiedenti reiterarono l'azione di reclamo.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
107. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che l'azione di reclamo non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo e deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
108. La Corte ha in precedenza notato l'importanza fondamentale delle garanzie contenute nell’ Articolo 5 per garantire il diritto degli individui in una democrazia di essere liberi dalla detenzione arbitraria. Ha affermato anche che la detenzione non riconosciuta è una negazione completa di queste garanzie e rivela una violazione molto grave dell’ Articolo 5 (vedere Çiçek c. Turchia, n. 25704/94, § 164, 27 febbraio 2001, e Luluyev citata sopra, § 122).
109. La Corte ha trovato stabilito che A. R. fu rapito dai membri delle Forze Armate Statali il 10 dicembre 2002. La sua detenzione non fu riconosciuta, non fu iscritto in nessun registro di custodia e non esiste alcuna traccia ufficiale della sua susseguente sorte . In conformità con la pratica della Corte, questo fatto deve essere considerato di per sé una debolezza più grave, poiché permette ai responsabili per un atto di privazione di libertà di nascondere il loro coinvolgimento in un crimine, coprire le loro tracce ed eludere la responsabilità per la sorte di un detenuto. Inoltre, l'assenza di documenti che annotano questioni come il nome del detenuto, la data, il tempo e l’ ubicazione della detenzione, le ragioni per questa ed il nome della persona che l’ha effettuata devono essere vista come incompatibile con lo stesso fine dell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione (vedere Orhan, citata sopra, § 371).
110. Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede, la Corte trova, che A. R. fu tenuto in detenzione non riconosciuta senza una qualsiasi delle salvaguardie contenute nell’ Articolo 5. Questo costituisce una violazione particolarmente grave del diritto alla libertà e alla sicurezza custodito nell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione.
C. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
111. I richiedenti si lamentarono che in seguito alla sua scomparsa A. R. non avrebbe avuto un processo equo nel caso in cui delle accuse criminali fossero state messe a suo carico. Loro invocarono l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione che, nella parte attinente, recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ….”
112. La Corte trova che A. R. non può essere considerato una “vittima” della violazione addotta del diritto ad un processo equo poiché non c'è nessuna prova tale da suggerire che una qualsiasi accusa criminale sia state messa a suo carico.
113. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 e deve essere respinta a riguardo in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 4.
VI. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
114. I richiedenti rivendicarono che l'intrusione dei militari russi nel loro alloggio il 10 dicembre 2002 e la ricerca che ne conseguì erano state illegali ed avevano infranto il loro diritto al rispetto della loro casa, della loro vita privata e famigliare, come garantito dall’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre che la confisca del loro oggetti personali durante la ricerca del 10 dicembre 2002 non era stata giustificata sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Quegli Articoli, nelle parti attinenti, recitano come segue:
Articolo 8
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
115. Il Governo negò che lo Stato fosse responsabile per le violazioni addotte dell’ Articolo 8 e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ed insistette sul fatto che gli uomini armati e non identificati che avevano fatto irruzione nell’alloggio dei richiedenti non fossero agenti Statali. Rivendicò inoltre che le azioni di quegli uomini erano state qualificate come furto sotto le leggi nazionali e che dei procedimenti penali erano stati introdotti a questo collegamento.
116. I richiedenti mantennero le loro azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
117. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che le azioni di reclamo non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo e devono essere dichiarate perciò ammissibili.
2. Meriti
118. La Corte ha trovato sopra che gli uomini che portarono via A. R. il 10 dicembre 2002 erano agenti Statali (vedere paragrafo 74 sopra). Osserva che benché il Governo negasse la loro responsabilità per le violazioni addotte dei diritti dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 8 e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, ha ammesso che gli uomini che avevano rapito A. R. erano entrati nell’alloggio dei richiedenti ed avevano portato via l'apparecchio video, la giacca di cuoio, le scarpe da ginnastica e altri articoli.
119. Il Governo non ha messo in questione la proprietà dei richiedenti, né contesta l'argomento per cui le persone a cui è stato fatto riferimento erano entrate nell'alloggio contro la volontà dei richiedenti. La Corte è soddisfatta perciò che le azioni degli uomini summenzionati costituirono un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al rispetto della loro casa garantito dall’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed i loro diritto di proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte nota inoltre l'assenza di qualsiasi giustificazione da parte dello Stato per le azioni dei suoi agenti a quel riguardo. Trova di conseguenza che c'è stata una violazione del diritto dei richiedenti al rispetto della loro casa sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dei loro diritti di proprietà sotto l’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
VIII. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
120. I richiedenti si lamentarono di essere stati privati delle vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo delle violazioni addotte sopra, contrariamente all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
121. Il Governo contese che i richiedenti avevano avuto delle vie di ricorso effettive a loro disposizione come richiesto dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione e che le autorità non avevano impedito loro di usarle . I richiedenti avrebbero potuto lamentarsi di fronte a corti o anche accusatori più alti o richiedere danni civili, ma non erano riuscito ad agire così. Insomma, il Governo presentò, che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13.
122. I richiedenti reiterarono l'azione di reclamo.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
123. Nella misura in cui l'azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 13 riguarda l'esistenza di una via di ricorso nazionale a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 3 riguardo al comportamento sconsiderato dei membri delle Forze Armate Statali verso i richiedenti e sotto l’Articolo 6, la Corte nota, che loro sono stati dichiarati inammissibili rispettivamente nei paragrafi 98 e 113 sopra. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti non avevano “rivendicazioni difendibili” di una violazione della norme della Convenzione a questo riguardo e, perciò, l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione è inapplicabile.
124. Ne segue che queste parti dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione sono incompatibili ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 e devono essere respinte a riguardo in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 4.
125. La Corte nota che le rimanenti azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo e devono essere dichiarate perciò ammissibili.
2. Meriti
126. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello nazionale di una via di ricorso per eseguire la sostanza dei diritti della Convenzione e delle libertà in qualsiasi forma avrebbero potuto accadere per essere garantiti garantire nell'ordine legale nazionale. Secondo la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte, l'effetto dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione è quello di richiedere la disposizione di una via di ricorso che concede all'autorità nazionale competente sia di trattare la sostanza di un'azione di reclamo della Convenzione attinente che di accordare il rimedio appropriato, benché agli Stati Contraenti sia riconosciuto un margine di discrezione riguardo al modo in cui attenersi coi loro obblighi sotto questa disposizione. Tale via di ricorso è richiesta solamente comunque, a riguardo di danni che possono essere considerati “difendibili” nei termini della Convenzione (vedere Halford c. Regno Unito, 25 giugno 1997, § 64 Relazioni 1997-III).
127. Riguardo all’ azione di reclamo della mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 2, la Corte enfatizza che, data l'importanza fondamentale del diritto alla protezione della vita, l’Articolo 13 richiede, oltre il pagamento del risarcimento dove appropriato, un'indagine completa ed effettiva in grado di condurre all'identificazione ed alla punizione dei responsabili della privazione della vita, incluso l’accesso effettivo per il reclamante alla procedura di indagine che conduce all'identificazione d alla punizione dei responsabili (vedere Anguelova c. Bulgaria, n. 38361/97, §§ 161-62 ECHR 2002-IV). La Corte reitera inoltre che i requisiti dell’ Articolo 13 sono più ampi dell'obbligo di un Stato Contraente sotto l’Articolo 2 per condurre un'indagine effettiva (vedere Khashiyev ed Akayeva, citata sopra, § 183).
128. Nella prospettiva delle costatazioni sopra della Corte a riguardo dell’ Articolo 2, questa azione di reclamo chiaramente è, “difendibile” ai fini dell’ Articolo 13 (vedere Boyle e Riso c. Regno Unito, 27 aprile 1988, § 52 Serie A n. 131). I richiedenti avrebbero dovuto essere di conseguenza in grado di giovarsi di una via di ricorso effettiva e pratica in grado di condurre all'identificazione ed alla punizione dei responsabili ed ad un'assegnazione del risarcimento ai fini dell’ Articolo 13.
129. Ne segue che in circostanze in cui, come qui, l'indagine penale sulla scomparsa del figlio dei richiedenti è stato inefficace e l'efficacia di qualsiasi altra via di ricorso esistente, incluso una via di ricorso civile suggerita dal Governo è stata minata di conseguenza, lo Stato è andato a vuoto nel suo obbligo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
130. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione.
131. Nella misura in cui l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 riguarda l'esistenza di una via di ricorso nazionale a riguardo dell'azione di reclamo riguardo alla sofferenza mentale dei richiedenti , la Corte nota che ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 a questo proposito . La Corte ha già trovato comunque, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione a causa della condotta delle autorità che ha portato alla sofferenza sopportata dai richiedenti. La Corte considera che, nelle circostanze, non sorge nessun problema separato a riguardo dell’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
132. Riguardo al riferimento dei richiedenti all’Articolo 5 della Convenzione, la Corte reitera che secondo la sua giurisprudenza consolidata le garanzie più specifiche dell’ Articolo 5 §§ 4 e 5, essendo una lex specialis in relazione all’ Articolo 13, assorbono i suoi requisiti e nella prospettiva delle costatazioni sopra di una violazione dell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione che dà luogo a detenzione non riconosciuta, la Corte considera, che nessun problema separato sorge a riguardo dell’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione.
133. Infine, riguardo all’azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che in una situazione in cui le autorità hanno negato il loro coinvolgimento nell'intrusione addotta nell’alloggio dei richiedenti e la presa dei loro oggetti personali e in cui l'indagine nazionale non sembra avere fatto qualsiasi costatazione significativa su questa questione, i richiedenti non avevano qualsiasi via di ricorso nazionale effettiva a riguardo delle violazioni addotte dei loro diritti garantiti dall’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dall’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione a questo riguardo.
IX. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
134. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”

A. Danno patrimoniale
135. I richiedenti chiesero danni a riguardo dei salari perduti di loro figlio. Benché lui fosse stato disoccupato, i richiedenti presunsero che infine avrebbe guadagnato almeno un salario minimo mensile. Il primo richiedente chiese in totale 69,000 rubli russi (RUB) (1,865 euro (EUR)) ed la seconda richiedente chiese RUB 103,500 (EUR 2,797). Inoltre, i richiedenti chiesero EUR 10,000 come risarcimento per il danno causato dalla ricerca del 10 dicembre 2002. Loro non fornirono nessun documento o i calcolo per provare le loro rivendicazioni a questo riguardo .
136. Il Governo considerò queste rivendicazioni come infondate e non comprovate.
137. La Corte reitera che ci deve essere un collegamento causale e chiaro fra il danno rivendicato dai richiedenti e la violazione della Convenzione. Inoltre, sotto l’Articolo 60 dell’ordinamento di Corte qualsiasi rivendicazione per soddisfazione equa deve essere particolareggiata e deve essere presentata per iscritto insieme con gli attinenti documenti o ricevute di sostegno, “in mancanza di ciò la Camera può respingere questa rivendicazione per intero o in parte.”
138. La Corte nota prima che il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale può essere assegnato a riguardo di perdita di guadagni. La Corte considera che c'è un collegamento causale e diretto fra la violazione dell’ Articolo 2 a riguardo del figlio dei richiedenti e la perdita da parte dei richiedenti dell'appoggio finanziario che lui avrebbe potuto offrire. La Corte trova ragionevole presumere che A. R. avrebbe avuto infine dei guadagni. Avendo riguardo alle osservazioni dei richiedenti ed al fatto che A. R. non aveva un lavoro al tempo della sua scomparsa, la Corte trova appropriato assegnare congiuntamente EUR 1,500 ai richiedenti a riguardo del danno patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabili su questi.
139. La Corte nota inoltre che i richiedenti non riuscirono a provare le loro rivendicazioni riguardo al danno causato dalla ricerca del loro alloggio e così non fa assegnazione in questo riguardo.
B. Danno non-patrimoniale
140. I richiedenti chiesero il risarcimento a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale per la sofferenza che hanno sopportato come risultato della perdita di loro figlio e l'indifferenza mostrata dalle autorità verso loro. I richiedenti chiesero EUR 100,000 ognuno sotto questo capo.
141. Il Governo trovò gli importi chiesti esagerati.
142. La Corte ha trovato una violazione degli Articoli 2, 5 e 13 della Convenzione a causa della scomparsa del figlio dei richiedenti. I richiedenti stessi sono stati trovati vittime di violazioni degli Articoli 3 e 8 della Convenzione, così come dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte accetta così che loro hanno sofferto di un danno non-patrimoniale che non può essere compensato solamente dalle costatazioni di violazioni. Assegna così congiuntamente ai richiedenti EUR 40,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabili su questi.
C. Costi e spese
143. I richiedenti chiesero anche un totale di EUR 4,800 da pagare al loro avvocato che aveva preparato il loro modulo di richiesta e le osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della causa. Loro non riuscirono a produrre nessun documento o fattura per confermare che gli importi chiesti erano stati pagati al rappresentante.
144. Il Governo indicò che i richiedenti non avevano mostrato che le spese chieste per rappresentanza legale erano state davvero sostenute.
145. La Corte può fare un'assegnazione a riguardo dei costi e delle spese nella misura in cui davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti (vedere Bottazzi c. Italia [GC], n. 34884/97, § 30 1999- ECHR V). Dato che i richiedenti non riuscirono a presentare nessuna prova per giustificare i loro costi e spese riferiti alla rappresentanza legale, non fa assegnazione sotto questo capo.
D. Interesse di mora
146. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere ai meriti l'eccezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali penali e la respinge;
2. Dichiara ammissibile le azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 2, 5 e 8 della Convenzione l'azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 3 riguardo alla sofferenza mentale dei richiedenti, l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 in concomitanza con gli Articoli 2, 5 e 8, così come l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla sofferenza mentale dei richiedenti ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione a riguardo di A. R.;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione a riguardo dell'insuccesso per condurre un'indagine effettiva nelle circostanze in cui era scomparso A. R.;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 a riguardo dei richiedenti a causa della loro sofferenza mentale;
6. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione a riguardo di A. R.;
7. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in riguardo dei richiedenti;
8. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione;
9. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione a riguardo dei richiedenti;
10. Sostiene che non sorge c’è nessuna questione separata sotto l’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione a riguardo della violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 3 a causa della la sofferenza mentale dei richiedenti ed a riguardo della violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione;
11. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 1,500 (mille cinquecento euro) ai richiedenti congiuntamente a riguardo del danno patrimoniale, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questi;
(ii) EUR 40,000 (quaranta mila euro) ai richiedenti congiuntamente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questi;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
12. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 24 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.