Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KOHLHOFER AND MINARIK v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 06

NUMERO: 32921/03/2009
STATO:
DATA: 15/10/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - finding a violation sufficient ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF KOHLHOFER AND MINARIK v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC
(Applications nos. 32921/03, 28464/04 and 5344/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
15 October 2009
Request for referral to the Grand Chamber pending
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Kohlhofer and Minarik v. the Czech Republic,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 15 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in applications (nos. 32921/03, 28464/04 and 5344/05) against the Czech Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Austrian national, Mr B. K. (“the first applicant”) and German nationals, Mr R. M. (“the second applicant”) and S. M. (“the third applicant”), on 8 October 2003, 21 July 2004 and 29 April 2005, respectively.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr P. Z., a lawyer practising in Prague. The Czech Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V.A. Schorm, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. On 4 September 2006 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the applications and to communicate complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention to the Government. On 11 September 2006 he decided to give notice of the applications to the Government of Austria and the Government of Germany respectively in order to enable them to exercise their right to intervene in the proceedings (Article 36 § 1 and Rule 44). Neither the Government of Austria nor the Government of Germany exercised their right to intervene (Rule 44 § 1(b)).
4. The applicants and the Czech Government each filed written observations (Rule 59 § 1). The Chamber decided that no hearing on the admissibility and merits was required (Rule 59 § 3 in fine). It was further decided to join the aforementioned applications for examination and to examine the merits of the applications at the same time as their admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
Application no. 32921/03
6. Through the acquisition of shares before January 2001, the first two applicants became minority shareholders of Českomoravský cement, a.s., a joint stock company incorporated under Czech law.
7. On 1 January 2001 the Commercial Code (hereinafter “the CC”) was amended. In accordance with its newly introduced Article 220p, a general meeting of a joint stock company was empowered to decide to wind up the company and transfer all its assets to a shareholder who owned shares representing more than 90% of the company's share capital (“the main shareholder”). An asset transfer contract between the main shareholder and the company was to be concluded to that end and compensation paid to the minority shareholders.
8. On 31 May 2001 the general meeting of the company adopted, by votes of the main shareholder, a resolution on the winding-up of the company and on the transfer of all its assets to the main shareholder (together also referred to as “the transfer”).
9. On the same day the applicants filed an action to have that resolution and the asset transfer contract set aside with the Prague Municipal Court (městský soud). They asserted that the resolution had been adopted contrary to law, treaties concerning the encouragement and reciprocal protection of investments and their property rights. They informed the court administering the commercial register (obchodní rejstřík) about this step.
10. On 31 October 2001 the court administering the commercial register (rejstříkový soud) approved the transfer. No hearing was held prior to that decision.
11. On 14 December 2001 the applicants contested the decision to register the transfer before the Constitutional Court (Ústavní soud), alleging an infringement of the right to a fair trial and their property rights. They claimed not to have been able to raise their objections to the general meeting resolution in a hearing during the non-contentious proceedings preceding the delivery of the decision. They invited the court to strike down inter alia Articles 220h(3) and (4) and 220p of the CC.
12. On 25 March 2003 the Constitutional Court in its decision no. IV. ÚS 720/01 rejected the applicants' appeal without holding a hearing. It found that the applicants were not entitled to participate in the proceedings as the task of the court in charge of the commercial register had been to decide on the rights of the company, not on theirs. It noted that that court had the applicants' arguments in their action to set aside at its disposal and had taken them into consideration before delivering the impugned decision, whilst reviewing the lawfulness of the resolution as a preliminary question. It held that the power to stay the proceedings was still available to that court under the law as it stood at the relevant time. The Constitutional Court dismissed the applicants' second claim according to which that decision amounted to other interference by public authority into their right to access to a court. Referring to Article 220h of the CC, it found the application of Article 131 of the CC in conformity with constitutional law. In this regard, the court pointed to procedural safeguards enshrined in Articles 131, 220h, 220k, 2201 and 220p of the CC which were available to the applicants, and emphasised the aim of the regulation providing for legal certainty and expeditious transformation of companies. As for the applicants' challenge to the law providing for the winding-up and the transfer on the ground of insufficient protection of the rights of minority shareholders, the court did not examine it since it went beyond the scope of that court's review defined by the applicants' constitutional appeal contesting the decision in which the court in charge of the commercial register had approved the registration of the winding-up and the transfer at the commercial register, but not any decisions adopted in other proceedings available to the complaining minority shareholders.
13. On 27 July 2006 the Municipal Court dismissed the applicants' action lodged on 31 May 2001. Having noted that the court in charge of the commercial register had approved the registration of the transfer, the Municipal Court, referring to Article 131(3)(c) of the CC, refused to deal with the applicants' assertions of unlawfulness of the impugned general meeting resolution, their principal allegation being that the resolution had been adopted by the main shareholder whose voting rights had been suspended. As for the applicants' plea of invalidity of the asset transfer contract, namely the insufficient number of experts commissioned for the expert report on the compensation and the determination of the decisive day (rozhodný den), the court expressed the view that the validity of the asset transfer contract must have been examined as a preliminary question by the court approving the registration of the transfer into the commercial register. At the same time, having reviewed the contract, the Municipal Court found that the determination of decisive day complied with the CC. Having interpreted relevant provisions of the CC, the court further found that the law did not require that more experts be commissioned for the purposes of assessing the compensation to be paid by the main shareholders to the applicants. Finally, the court examined and dismissed the applicants' claims that the compensation had not been properly determined as unfounded or reviewable only by a court reviewing the compensation in separate proceedings.
14. On 6 September 2007 the Prague High Court (vrchní soud), sharing the legal view of the court of first instance, upheld the Municipal Court's judgment of 27 July 2006.
15. The proceedings are now pending before the Supreme Court (Nejvyšší soud). According to the applicants, they have no prospect of success before that jurisdiction due to its settled case law.
16. According to the Government, the applicants filed with a court actions under Article 220k of the CC whereby they asserted that the compensation paid for the transfer pursuant to Article 220p(2) of the CC was not adequate and claimed the remainder thereof. According to the Government, these proceedings and the set-aside proceedings are still pending.
Application no. 28464/04
17. The third applicant owned 3% of the share capital of YTONG, a.s., a joint stock company incorporated under Czech law.
18. On 24 June 2003 the general meeting of that company adopted, by votes of the main shareholder, a resolution on the winding up of the company and the transfer of all its assets to the main shareholder.
19. On 25 June 2003 the third applicant filed with the Brno Regional Court (krajský soud) an action to have the resolution set aside, asserting that it had been adopted contrary to the applicable law, treaties concerning the encouragement and reciprocal protection of investments and their property rights. Asserting the unlawfulness of the asset transfer contract on account of its clause reserving for arbitration jurisdiction over disputes concerning the value of the compensation, she further emphasised a number of irregularities of the resolution. She informed the court administering the commercial register about the action.
20. On 1 September 2003 the court in charge of the commercial register approved the registration of the transfer. No hearing was held before that decision, which was not served on the third applicant as she did not have standing to participate in the proceedings.
21. On 11 December 2003 the Olomouc High Court rejected the third applicant's appeal contesting that decision. It ruled that since the applicant did not have standing to take part in the impugned proceedings, she was not entitled to appeal their outcome.
22. On 28 November 2005 the High Court, relying on Article 220h(4) of the CC, discontinued the set-aside proceedings without examining the merits.
23. According to the Government, the third applicant filed with a court an action under Article 220k of the CC whereby she asserted that the compensation for the transfer paid pursuant to Article 220p(2) of the CC was not adequate and claimed the remainder thereof.
24. According to the parties, these proceedings are after dismissive rulings of courts of first two instances pending before the Supreme Court.
25. On 24 June 2008 the Supreme Court rejected the applicant's appeal on points of law and upheld the High Court's ruling of 28 November 2005.
26. On 11 December 2008 the Constitutional Court rejected the applicant's constitutional appeal, in which the applicant claimed an impairment of her right to a fair trial in the set-aside proceedings by reason of the limitation on access to court brought about by Article 220h(4) of the CC. The Constitutional Court found that the Supreme Court had not erred in its impugned decision of 24 June 2008 and that neither the applicant's right to a fair trial nor any other constitutional right had been breached.
27. The third applicant also raised the claim for compensation, together with two other petitioners, before an arbitration tribunal to which she was referred in the decisions of the ordinary courts. The arbitration proceedings were discontinued and the petition rejected on 11 October 2006 for lack of jurisdiction.
Application no. 5344/05
28. The first applicant was a minority shareholder of Biocel, a.s., a joint stock company incorporated under Czech law.
29. On 21 November 2001 the company's general meeting decided to wind up the company and transfer its assets to the main shareholder.
30. On the same day the applicant brought an action in the Ostrava Regional Court (krajský soud) to have the general meeting resolution and the asset transfer contract set aside. He argued that the general meeting resolution was void on the grounds of unlawfulness as the main shareholder had taken part in the vote although not entitled to do so, the resolution had been adopted despite the fact that the shares had been lodged as securities, and the compensation payable to minority shareholders had been determined improperly. He further asserted a violation of treaties concerning the encouragement and reciprocal protection of investments and his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
31. On 12 November 2002 the Regional Court, acting as a court in charge of the commercial register, approved the registration of the transfer at the commercial register without holding a public hearing.
32. On 21 November 2002 an appeal by the first applicant against this decision was rejected by the Olomouc High Court, which found that the minority shareholders were not parties to the proceedings concerning the approval of the registration at the commercial register.
33. On 14 January 2003 the Regional Court stayed the set-aside proceedings and asked the Constitutional Court to strike down Article 220p and other provisions of the Commercial Code.
34. On an unspecified date the first applicant filed a constitutional appeal alleging a violation of his right to judicial protection under Article 36 § 1 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms (Listina základních práv a svobod). He claimed that he had not been allowed to act as a party in the proceedings conducted by the court in charge of the commercial register and had been prevented de facto, by Articles 131(3)(c), 220h(4), 220p of the CC and 109(2)(c) of the Code of Civil Procedure (hereinafter “the CCP”), from acting before the court in the proceedings to set aside the general meeting resolution. He further contended that the relevant law was contrary to the Third Council Directive 78/855/EEC. The first applicant requested that the aforementioned provisions be struck down as being contrary to Article 36 § 1 of the Charter.
35. On 31 August 2004 the Constitutional Court by its decision no. II. ÚS 21/03 rejected the applicant's constitutional appeal against the decision approving the registration of the transfer at the commercial register. It found that, under Article 131 of the CC a court in charge of the commercial register is entitled to review as a preliminary question the lawfulness and validity of a general meeting resolution on the basis of which a registration in the commercial register is to be made. It held that the right to judicial protection was not denied to the first applicant having regard to the remedies enshrined in Article 131 taken in conjunction with Articles 220h, 220k, 2201 and 220p of the CC. Therefore, shareholders of a joint stock company could seek protection of their rights before an independent and impartial court by another way than by taking part in the proceedings held before the court in charge of the commercial register.
36. On 22 February 2005 the Plenary of the Constitutional Court rejected by its decision no. Pl. ÚS 51/03 the request of the Regional Court that it should strike down, inter alia, Article 220p of the CC. It found that the Regional Court's request was ill-founded as Article 220p of the CC could no longer be applied by the Regional Court on account of Article 131(3)(c) of the CC, which barred that court from deciding the case before it on the merits once the general meeting resolution on the winding-up of the company and the transfer had been inserted into the commercial register. Four constitutional judges joined their dissenting opinions to the Plenary's decision.
37. On 14 March 2008 the Ostrava Regional Court, relying on Article 220h(4) of the CC discontinued the set-aside proceeding without examining the merits as the transfer was registered in the commercial register.
38. On 1 July 2008 the Olomouc High Court upheld that decision of the Regional Court. Referring to the Constitutional Court's decision no. IV. ÚS 720/01, the High Court found Articles 131(3)(b) and (c) and 220h(3) and (4), and Article 220k(1) of the CC conform with Czech law including the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms. The first applicant did not pursue the case before higher instances. He alleged to have no prospect of success due to the settled case law of the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court.
39. According to the Government, the applicant filed with a court an action under Article 220k of the CC whereby he asserted that the compensation for the transfer paid pursuant to Article 220p(2) of the CC was not adequate and claimed the remainder thereof According to the Government, these proceedings are still pending.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
1. The Constitution
40. Article 83 provides that the Constitutional Court is the judicial body responsible for the protection of constitutionality.
41. Article 89(2) provides that all national authorities and individuals are bound by enforceable rulings of the Constitutional Court.
2. The Commercial Code (as in force at the relevant time)
42. Article 27(3) provided inter alia that facts inserted in the commercial register became effective as of the date on which they were made public.
43. In accordance with Article 33 a court administering the commercial register made a registration into the commercial register public.
44. Article 131(1) gave shareholders the right to contest a general meeting resolution by means of an application to set aside if it was deemed to contravene the law, a deed of incorporation or by-laws. An application to set aside could be lodged within three months or, in certain circumstances, one year of the adoption of the resolution. The provision was applicable to general meeting resolutions of joint stock companies by virtue of Article 183(1).
45. Under Article 131(3)(c) the court could not set aside a general meeting resolution if a court in charge of the commercial register had recorded a transfer of the company's assets in the commercial register.
46. Article 131(4) provided, inter alia, that persons who had suffered damage by a resolution of the general meeting adopted contrary to law, the deed of incorporation or by-laws, were entitled to claim damages and/or just satisfaction for an impairment of fundamental shareholders' rights. This right could be asserted even if a court did not declare the general meeting resolution void for one of the reasons set out in Article 131(3) of the Code. Such a claim had to be made before a court within the same time-limit as applied for introducing an application to set aside of a general meeting resolution, or within three months of the day on which a court decided on such an action.
47. Under Article 131(7) everyone is bound by an enunciation of decision delivered pursuant to Article 131(1), (2) or (3).
48. Article 131(7) provides that if a resolution of general meeting was not contested under Article 131(1),(2) or such a claim was not upheld, the resolution may be reviewed only in proceedings on the registration of the resolution in the commercial register, unless the resolution involves amendments of by-laws or a deed of incorporation contrary to law.
49. Pursuant to Article 220a(11) proceedings to set aside a contract providing for a merger may be brought only if an application to set aside the relevant general meeting resolution has been filed.
50. Under Article 220h(3) an action to set aside a general meeting resolution, or a contract, on merger could not be filed if a registration of the merger into the commercial register had been allowed by a court in charge thereof.
51. By Article 220h(4), proceedings to set aside a general meeting resolution, or a contract, on merger brought prior to an registration of the merger in the commercial register could be continued after the registration had been made only if the plaintiff changed his or her action so as to seek damages or an adequate payment for surrendered shares pursuant to Article 220k, provided that those claims had not previously been raised.
52. Under paragraph (1) of Article 220k, if the exchange ratio for shares together with financial compensation was not adequate, shareholders of a merging company were entitled to seek compensation from an acquiring company. The ratio decidendi of a judicial decision granting compensation to a shareholder was by virtue of paragraph (5) thereof binding, in respect of remaining shareholders, upon an acquiring company.
53. Pursuant to Article 220l members of boards of directors and supervisory boards of companies involved in a merger, and experts who drew up an expert report for these companies were liable jointly and severally for damages caused by a breach of their duties during the merger.
54. Article 220p(l) empowered a general meeting of a joint stock company to decide to wind up the company and transfer all its assets to a shareholder owning shares which represented more than 90% of the company's share capital (the main shareholder).
55. Under Article 220p(2) the main shareholder was obliged to provide other shareholders with adequate compensation paid in cash in order to settle such a transfer.
56. Article 220p(3) provided, inter alia, that Articles 220a(l)-(4),(7)-(11), 220h and 2201 were to be applied appropriately to the winding-up of a company and the transfer of its assets to its main shareholder.
57. According to Article 220p(4), among other obligations, a company must have concluded a contract for the transfer of its assets with its main shareholder. Shareholders must have been thereby informed of their right to apply for review by a court of the value of the compensation. Article 220k(l),(5) and (7) governing an exchange of shares pending mergers were to be applied appropriately.
3. The Act on Transformation of Companies and Cooperatives (no. 125/2008)
58. The Act which entered into force on 1 July 2008 replaced inter alia the provisions of the CC governing the winding up of a company and the transfer of its assets to its main shareholder, Articles 220h (3) and (4) and 220p (3) of the CC being among them.
59. Under Article 55(2) a court may declare a general meeting resolution on the transfer null and void only until the time when the transfer is inserted into the commercial register. Article 56(a) provides that such a registration may not be rescinded.
4. The Code of Civil Procedure (as in force in the relevant time)
60. Under Article 109(2)(c) a court is empowered to stay proceedings should a legal issue which might be relevant for its decision be examined in other pending proceedings. Courts deciding in proceedings on a registration into the commercial register ceased to have that power upon the amendment of that provision, which came into force on 31 December 2001.
61. Article 200c(1) defines the persons having standing to participate in proceedings on a request for a registration into the commercial register. Only the requesting entrepreneur and the persons whose names are required to be inserted into the commercial register have such standing.
62. Under Article 200c(3) a court in charge of the commercial register is obliged to proceed so as to take steps to prepare for delivery of decision within fifteen days from the day when the request was lodged.
63. According to Article 200d(2) a court in charge of the commercial register may decide the matter before it without holding a hearing if, inter alia, it can do so on the basis of deeds before it which have been written pursuant to a particular statute (deeds by notary public etc.).
64. By virtue of Article 243d a court to which a case was remitted following a quashing judgment of the Supreme Court is bound by a legal view enshrined therein.
5. The Constitutional Court Act (Act no. 182/1993)
65. Section 72(1)(a) stipulates that a constitutional appeal may be submitted: a) pursuant to Article 87(l)(d) of the Constitution, by a natural or legal person, if he or she alleges that his or her fundamental rights and basic freedoms guaranteed in the constitutional order have been infringed as a result of the final decision in proceedings to which he or she was a party, of a measure, or of some other encroachment by a public authority.
66. By virtue of Section 82(3) if the Constitutional Court grants the constitutional appeal of a natural or legal person under Article 87(l)(d) of the Constitution, it shall: a) quash the contested decision of the public authority, or b) if a constitutionally guaranteed fundamental right or basic freedom was infringed as the result of an encroachment by a public authority other than a decision, enjoin the authority from continuing to infringe this right or freedom and order it, to the extent possible, to restore the situation that existed prior to the infringement.
6. Act on Courts and Judges (acts nos. 335/1991 and 182/1993 respectively)
67. The Supreme Court is by virtue of that legislation the highest Czech court of ordinary jurisdiction with the task inter alia to settle case law of ordinary courts.
III. RELEVANT DOMESTIC PRACTICE
1. Judgment of the Constitutional Court no. I. ÚS 70/96
68. In its judgment of 18 March 1997 the Constitutional Court, interpreting Article 89(2) of the Constitution, rejected the assumption according to which its views enshrined in reasoning of its judgments are legally irrelevant. The court held inter alia that an a priori disrespect by ordinary courts towards such views raises doubts whether ordinary courts decide in conformity with Article 90 of the Constitution, according to which their principal task is to ensure the protection of rights pursuant to law. Ordinary courts declining to follow such views must be aware that their rulings will be most probably brought by the Constitutional Court in line with its existent case law. The Constitutional Court added in this regard that an a priori disrespect towards existent case law, resulting in different decisions on a same matter, contravenes the principle of legal certainty, which is an indispensable component of constitutional law and the rule of law.
2. Decision of the Constitutional Court no. III. ÚS 527/04
69. In this decision of 25 May 2005 in which it rejected an appeal against a court's decision approving the registration of a transfer of company's assets to the main shareholder at the commercial register and a request to strike down Articles 131(3)(c), 220h(3) and 220p of the CC, the Constitutional Court held as follows:
“The law providing for the winding up of a company and the transfer of its assets to its main shareholder is at the very limit of constitutional conformity owing to the imperfect coordination of proceedings for a registration into the commercial register with proceedings to set aside an asset transfer contract (filed together with an application to set aside a general meeting resolution) which makes possible the irreversible registration of [the winding up of a company and the transfer of its assets to its main shareholder] into the commercial register without examination of an action to set it aside. It cannot be said, however, that minority shareholders have no remedy at their disposal.. ..[A]ccording to Article 131(4) of the [CC], they can seek damages and just satisfaction.
The law governing proceedings before a court in charge of the commercial register is proportionate to the aim and objective of the legislation providing for transformations of companies, whose purpose is to accommodate expeditious registration of those transformations, made on the basis of the agreement among the companies' shareholders, into the commercial register, with regard to the fact that such a transformation is from a certain moment irreversible owing to legal, economic and technical aspects of that process.
...[T]he impugned decision of the court in charge of the commercial register did not amount to unconstitutional interference with the appellant's property rights as he retained access to legal remedies for the protection of his ownership rights to the shares in a proportionate manner.. ..[L]egitimate expectations of shareholders do not have the same intensity as those of owners of other property. ..[as] the nature of a joint stock company implies risks of a change in the shareholders' status...
The gist of the appeal consists in the applicant's disagreement with the law providing for [the winding-up of a company and the transfer of its assets to its main shareholder] as such, in particular with the insufficient guarantees for minority shareholders. The Constitutional Court, however, by Section 74 of the Constitutional Court Act is not empowered to examine these complaints as the appeal at hand contested only the decision adopted by the court in charge of the commercial register in the proceedings on the registration of the winding up and the transfer into the commercial register. [Examination] of these complaints would go beyond the scope of that court's review defined by the applicants' constitutional appeal contesting the decision of the court in charge of the commercial register which decided on the registration in the commercial register, not on decisions adopted in other proceedings available to the complaining minority shareholders.”
3. Decision of the Supreme Court no. 29 Odo 1128/2005 of 23 May 2007
70. In this decision the Supreme Court upheld lower court's views according to which a legal impediment, enshrined in Article 131(3)(c) of the CC taken in conjunction with Article 183(1) thereof, and Article 220h(4) of the CC taken in conjunction with Article 220p(3) thereof, barred courts from setting aside general meeting resolutions and asset transfer contracts after such an asset transfer had been recorded into the commercial register.
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
71. The Court considers that, in accordance with Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court, the applications should be joined, given their common factual and legal background.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
72. The applicants, minority shareholders, complained that Czech law permitted them to challenge neither a company resolution to wind up the company and transfer its assets to the main shareholder nor an asset transfer contract, once the resolution had been registered in the commercial register.
They relied on Article 6 § I of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal...”
73. The Government disagreed.
A. Admissibility
74. The Government maintained that the applications were inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies or, alternatively, premature. They argued that only the proceedings before the courts administering the commercial register had ended, whilst the others - actions to set aside the general meeting resolutions, actions to determine the value of the compensation, and actions in damages and/or seeking just satisfaction - were still pending or were never brought. They maintained that the law hindering the applicants from seeking a review of lawfulness, i.e. Article 131(3)(c) and Article 220h(3) and (4) of the CC, had not yet been directly examined by the Czech higher courts. The existing case law of the Constitutional Court (decisions nos. IV. ÚS 720/01, PI. ÚS 51/03, III. ÚS 527/04 and III. ÚS 84/05) consisted of unpublished resolutions whose normative force was “much less intensive” than that of that court's judgments. It could not therefore be argued that the relevant domestic case law was so settled as to prevent the applicants from defending their cause in proceedings before domestic courts.
75. The applicants disputed that objection, asserting that they had no prospect of success in the pending proceedings.
76. The Court reiterates that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies referred to in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is based on the assumption that the domestic system provides an effective remedy in respect of the alleged breach. It is for the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that an effective remedy was available in theory and in practice at the relevant time; that is to say, that the remedy was accessible, capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant's complaints and offered reasonable prospects of success (V. v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 24888/94, § 57, ECHR 1999-IX). The Court has recognised that the rule of exhaustion is neither absolute nor capable of being applied automatically; for the purposes of reviewing whether it has been observed, it is essential to have regard to the circumstances of the individual case. This means, in particular, that the Court must take realistic account not only of the existence of formal remedies in the legal system of the Contracting State concerned but also of the general context in which they operate, as well as the personal circumstances of the applicant. It must then examine whether, in all the circumstances of the case, the applicant did everything that could reasonably be expected of him or her to exhaust domestic remedies (D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 116, ECHR 2007-XII). The Court further reiterates that where a suggested remedy did not offer reasonable prospects of success, for example in the light of settled domestic case law, the fact that the applicant did not use it is not a bar to admissibility (Radio France and Others v. France, no. 53984/00, decision of 23 September 2003, § 34).
77. In the instant case, the Court notes that it appears from the Government's submissions that not all of the set-aside proceedings have ended. The Court understands their contention to be that, absent a determination by the Constitutional Court of the issues in the individual set-aside proceedings, the Court is not able to consider those proceedings.
78. The Court first notes that as regards application no. 28464/04, on 11 December 2008 the Constitutional Court - that is, after the Government's admissibility submissions - dealt with the third applicant's constitutional complaint by confirming the approach of the Supreme Court of 24 June 2008. As the third applicant had raised the compatibility of Article 220h(4) of the Commercial Code with provisions of constitutional law guaranteeing the right to a fair trial in those proceedings, the Government's contention as regards this particular application is no longer accurate and must be rejected.
79. As regards applications nos. 3291/03 and 5344/05, it is true that the applicants did not bring about a decision of the Constitutional Court: in application no. 5344/05 the proceedings ended with a ruling of 1 July 2008 by the Olomouc High Court, and in application no. 32921/03 the set-aside proceedings are still pending before the Supreme Court. In its decisions IV. ÚS 720/01 of 25 March 2003 (that is, the appeal of the applicants in application no. 3291/03 concerning, as such, the challenge to the registration of the asset transfer, see paragraph 12 above) and II. ÚS 21/03 of 31 August 2004 (in the context of the challenge by the applicant in application no. 5344/05 to the registration of the transfer (see paragraph 35 above) the Constitutional Court examined the constitutional issues raised in applications no. 32921/03 and 5344/05. In particular, although the Constitutional Court was formally dealing with challenges to decisions to register asset transfers, in each case it made comprehensive findings that the legislation on regulation of actions to set aside was compatible with the Constitution, as extensive procedural safeguards were contained in the CC. Those safeguards included, in its view, the possibility of an action for compensation under Articles 131, 220h, 220(k), 2201 and 220p of the CC. Moreover, the Constitutional Court subsequently took the same approach in its decision III. ÚS 527/04 of 25 May 2005, and on 23 May 2007 the Supreme Court applied those principles in a decision dealing directly with applications to set aside general meeting resolutions once the transfer had been registered. Furthermore, as to application no. 5344/05, the Plenary Constitutional Court did deal in the set-aside proceedings with the first applicant's complaint of denial of access to a court, when it refused the Ostrava Regional Court's request to strike down as unconstitutional the provisions of the Commercial Code preventing the first applicant from having his case decided on the merits (see paragraphs 33 and 36 above). The outcome of that review by the Constitutional Court embodied in its decision no. Pl. ÚS 51/03 did not differ from its earlier case law.
In these circumstances, the Court considers that the domestic courts' case law on the question was settled such that the applicants could not reasonably be expected to have pursued (or, in the case of application no. 32921/03, to await the outcome of) separate constitutional complaints in the individual set-aside proceedings. It is true, as the Government point out, that that case law consists of decisions rather than judgments. However, in the absence of any such judgments, or any indication that the Constitutional Court would regard those decisions as irrelevant, the Court does not consider that the decisions should be afforded lesser weight for the purposes of the review under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
Accordingly, the Government's objection is in this respect dismissed for all three applications.
80. As for the other proceedings which, according to the Government, the applicants could have brought or whose outcome they should have awaited, that is, actions in damages or for just satisfaction, or actions for compensation, the Court considers that the question of alternative remedies is inseparably linked to the Government's plea on merits that those remedies justified the limitation on the applicants' access to a court in the set-aside proceedings. The Court therefore joins those legal questions to its examination on the merits of the applications.
81. The Court notes that non-compliance with other admissibility criteria was not asserted by the Government. Recalling that the right to seek a review of the lawfulness of a general meeting resolution and related measures affecting applicants' shares falls within the ambit of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (Pafitis and Others v. Greece, judgment of 26 February 1998, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-1, § 87), it therefore declares the applicants' complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicants
82. The applicants alleged that the main shareholders voted in the respective general meetings for resolutions approving the transfers against the applicants' will. Their right to have the lawfulness of those resolutions reviewed by means of an action to set aside was infringed by the outcome of separate proceedings initiated by the respective companies requesting the courts in charge of the commercial register to insert the impugned resolution therein and wind them up. Having granted these requests, the courts made it impossible for the applicants to pursue their actions to set aside as the CC prevented them from doing so once the requests for registration had been granted. Since the applicants were not allowed to participate in the proceedings before the courts granting those requests, and as the courts were obliged to decide on the requests within fifteen days of their introduction, the applicants lost any chance of a fair trial on their actions for review of the lawfulness of the transfer. They maintained that on account of these shortcomings and the inevitably perfunctory examination of the lawfulness of the transfers caused by the fifteen-day time-limit, these proceedings should be deemed contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and bilateral treaties concerning encouragement and reciprocal protection of investments binding upon the Czech Republic and Germany and Austria, respectively.
83. The applicants further asserted that the legal protection of their impaired rights consisting of actions in damages referred to in the decisions of the domestic courts was infeasible or, at very best, quasi-feasible. The right to bring proceedings against the main shareholder in order to be paid the value of the compensation was excessively difficult to assert before the courts. The third applicant stressed in that regard that, according to the asset transfer contract, entered into by the company and the main shareholder, whereby all the company's assets had been transferred from the former to the latter, she could assert that right only before an arbitration tribunal.
84. The applicants moreover contended that the legislation providing for the transfer was allegedly inspired by Austrian and German law, yet its conformity with the purpose of the Third Council Directive 78/855/EEC was not ensured.
(b) The Government
85. The Government conceded that an action to set aside a general meeting resolution whereby a company's assets had been transferred to the main shareholder when the company was wound up could be brought only if a court administering the commercial register had not yet authorised the registration of the transfer into the commercial register. Nevertheless, they maintained that such a court was indeed obliged to review the lawfulness of that resolution as a preliminary question. The impossibility for shareholders to take part in proceedings before that court pursued a legitimate aim to eliminate protraction of the issue and abusive challenges which would weaken the protection of shareholders' rights, including those of minority shareholders. They added that the court deciding in the case of the first applicant was empowered to stay the proceedings if it thought that to be necessary.
86. As regards the alleged breach of bilateral treaties concerning protection of investments, that issue was, in the Government's view, outside the scope of review under the Convention.
87. Moreover, where the majority shareholder possessed more than 90 percent of a company's shares, minority shareholders could not influence the company's conduct. Therefore, benefits arising from their shares were de facto reduced to the asset value of the shares which they possessed, the other rights attached thereto being rather theoretical. The influence of minority shareholders could not be durable and those shareholders were to be considered rather as brakes delaying the plans of the main shareholder. In these circumstances, the legislature allowed a main shareholder to squeeze out minority shareholders by winding up a company without liquidation whilst all its assets were transferred to the main shareholder. This form of squeeze out had been found to be in conformity with the Convention in the case of Bramelid and Malmström v. Sweden (nos. 8588/79 and 8589/79, Commission decision of 12 October 1982, Decisions and Reports (DR) 29, p. 64).
88. The Government further maintained that alternative legal remedies were available to the applicants. In the event of disagreement regarding the compensation, it was possible for the applicants to request that the value of that compensation be determined by a court. In such proceedings a court was obliged to seek and take into account even evidence which was not presented by the parties but which was necessary for it to establish relevant facts. Moreover, if the decision depended on an expert opinion, a party could be discharged of its obligation to pay the costs of proceedings even if it was only partly successful. Therefore, such proceedings, in the Government's view, did not put the applicants at a disadvantage in comparison with their standing as the plaintiffs in set-aside proceedings. Furthermore, an action for compensation for the damage inflicted by the resolution and an action for just satisfaction for a breach of fundamental shareholders' rights were at the applicants' disposal.
89. They concluded that even though the applicants had been hindered from seeking a review of the transfer through actions to set aside, this limitation of their rights under Article 6 of the Convention had to be regarded as justified, since it pursued the legitimate aim of promoting legal certainty in legal relations, protecting the interests of third parties and the main shareholder and, alternatively, of guaranteeing the efficient operation of business companies. The judicial protection afforded to minority shareholders must therefore be considered adequate.
2. The Court's assessment
90. The Court recalls that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is, the right to institute proceedings before a court in civil matters, constitutes one aspect (Osman v. the United Kingdom, 28 October 1998, § 147, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-VIII).
However, being able to put a case to a court does not in itself satisfy all the requirements of that provision. It must also be established that the degree of access afforded under the national legislation was sufficient to secure the individual's “right to a court”, having regard to the rule of law in a democratic society (Petkoski and Others v. "the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia", no. 27736/03, § 40, 8 January 2009 which itself refers to Ashingdane v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 28 May 1985, Series A no. 93, § 57). Moreover, Article 6 § 1 of the Convention guarantees the right of access to a court which does not only include the right to institute proceedings, but also the right to obtain a “determination” of the dispute by a court. As stated in the Court's case-law, “it would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed an individual to bring a civil action before a court without securing that the case would be determined by a final decision in the judicial proceedings. It would be inconceivable that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention should describe in detail procedural guarantees afforded to litigants - proceedings that are fair, public and expeditious - without guaranteeing the parties to have their civil disputes finally determined” (Petkoski, cited above, and Multiplex v. Croatia, no. 58112/00, §§ 44 and 45, 10 July 2003).
At the same time, the “right to a court” is not absolute; it is subject to limitations permitted by implication, since by its very nature it calls for regulation by the State, which enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in this regard. However, these limitations must not restrict or reduce a person's access in such a way or to such an extent that the very essence of the right is impaired (Edificaciones March Gallego S.A. v. Spain, 19 February 1998, § 34, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-I). In addition, the principle of the rule of law and the notion of fair trial enshrined in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention preclude any interference by the legislature with the administration of justice designed to influence the judicial determination of the dispute (Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, judgment of 9 December 1994, Series A no. 301-B, § 49).
i. Application no. 32921/03
91. In the instant case, the Court observes that the applicants' action lodged on 31 May 2001 was twofold, consisting of the claim of unlawfulness of the general meeting resolution of Českomoravský cement, a. s. and that of unlawfulness of the asset transfer contract (see paragraph 9 above).
92. Dealing first with the applicants' claim before the Municipal Court that the asset transfer contract had been unlawful, the Court notes that the Municipal Court dealt with all heads of the claim (see paragraph 13 above). In particular, it dealt on the merits with the claims concerning the determination of the decisive day and the number of experts commissioned. There was therefore no limitation on access to court in this respect. As regards the head of unlawfulness purportedly deriving from the manner of determining compensation for minority shareholders, the Municipal Court referred the applicants to the other fora which were available. Given that such fora were set up and used by the applicants, this part of the decision did not limit the applicants' access to court, either.
It follows that there was no limitation on access to court concerning the applicants' claim that the asset transfer contract was unlawful.
93. However, as regards the claim that the courts failed to deal with the applicants' contention that the resolution of the general meeting of Českomoravský cement, a. s. was unlawful, on 27 July 2006 the Municipal Court declined to examine the applicants' challenge of unlawfulness to the general meeting resolution of 31 May 2001 on the ground that the resolution had been registered in the commercial register, and that Article 131(3)(c) of the CC, taken in conjunction with Article 183(1) thereof, therefore deprived the Municipal Court of jurisdiction (see ibidem). The Court finds that the application of Article 131(3)(c) of the CC in the case constituted a limitation on the applicants' access to court as it prevented them from having a court determination on merits of the legal issue at stake, namely whether the resolution had been adopted contrary to law.
94. The Court must examine whether that limitation is compatible with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
95. The Court first notes that the limitation on access to court came about as a result of the operation of Article 131(3)(c) of the CC, and it is clear that that provision covered the present case. The limitation was therefore lawful in the sense that it was provided for by domestic law. As to the applicants' contention that the domestic law was, itself, incompatible with Community law, and apart from the fact that it is in the first place for the domestic authorities to interpret domestic law and for the Community judicial organs to interpret Community law, the applicants, referring to the Third Council Directive 78/855/EEC, have not specified what provisions thereof they invoked. The Court therefore finds this applicant's plea unsubstantiated. The same applies mutatis mutandis to the contention whereby the applicants relied on the aforesaid bilateral treaties.
96. Consequently, it is to be examined whether the interference was justified, i.e. whether it pursued a legitimate aim in the public interest and was proportionate (Osman v. the United Kingdom, referred to above, § 147).
97. The Government maintained that the limitation aimed to preserve legal certainty and facilitate the operation of business. The applicants disagreed, contesting the existence of any public interest in the case.
98. The Court recognises that giving companies flexibility in determining their share-holdership, and a concomitant limitation on challenges to asset transfers once they have been registered, can be seen as enhancing trade and economic development. The Court further recognises that Article 131(3)(c) of the CC can have the effect of preventing delays by abusive challenges to company resolutions, which in turn promotes stability in commercial markets and also contributes to trade and economic development. This is so, even though in the present cases the immediate beneficiary of the transfer was the main shareholder: the mere fact that legislation benefits a private person does not mean that the impugned legislation cannot have pursued a public interest (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 21 February 1986, Series A no. 98, §§ 39-40). The Court finds that the denial of access to a court through the contested legal provision, which is part of the legislation on asset transfers, pursued a legitimate aim in the public interest.
99. As for the proportionality of the contested limitation, the Court reiterates that a limitation will not be compatible with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be achieved (Ashingdane v. the United Kingdom, cited above, § 57).
100. The Court first observes that the application by the Municipal Court on 27 July 2006 of Article 131(3)(c) of the CC in the case at hand prevented any further examination of the merits of the applicants' claim that the resolution of 31 May 2001 was unlawful. As to the Government's suggestion that the applicants' interests were adequately considered in the proceedings connected with the registration of the resolution, the Court notes that the applicants had no standing in the registration proceedings as is shown in rulings of domestic courts upheld by the decision of the Constitutional Court of 25 March 2003. Thus, the applicants' interests under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention could not be protected in those proceedings. Further, the registration was not adjourned pending the outcome of the challenge to the resolution, even though the applicants informed the court of their views, and even though the law at the relevant time would have permitted such an adjournment.
101. As to the Government's contention that it was open to the applicants to seek to vindicate their interests in other ways, such as by requesting a separate judicial review of the compensation paid by the main shareholder, or by claiming damages or just satisfaction for a breach of fundamental rights of shareholders, the Court would note that those proceedings had different objectives and dealt with the separate issue of the monetary satisfaction. Moreover, just satisfaction could be claimed for breach of not all but only fundamental rights of shareholders. The Government have not shown that these legal avenues were capable of giving rise to a discussion of the lawfulness of the resolution in circumstances comparable to a review in the set-aside proceedings. They cannot be therefore regarded as a means of mitigating the effects of Article 131(3)(c) of the CC in connection with the core issue in the proceedings. Nor could they be considered as effective remedies to be exhausted by the applicant (see paragraph 74 above), an issue which the Court joined to merits (see paragraph 80 above).
102. Thus, the Court concludes that as a result of the operation of Article 131(l)(c) of the CC, the applicants were deprived of a determination on the merits of the claim that the resolution of the general meeting was unlawful. Their access to a court was therefore limited, and no reasons have been established which could render that limitation proportionate to the legitimate aims of furthering stability in the business community by preventing abusive challenges to resolutions.
Accordingly, the Court dismisses the Government's objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in this respect and finds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
ii. Application no. 28464/04
103. The Court notes that on 25 June 2003 the third applicant contested by her action to set aside both the general meeting resolution of YTONG, a. s. and the asset transfer contract to which she was not a party (see paragraph 19 above) and pursuant to which the compensation she received from the main shareholder for the transfer was reviewable not by courts but only an arbitral tribunal. The Court further notes that she claimed, in particular, that the transfer was unlawful because of a compulsory arbitration clause in the contract. The Court further notes that the Olomouc High Court discontinued the set-aside proceedings initiated by the third applicant without reviewing the merits with reference to Article 220h(4) of the CC. The Court observes that she had no standing in the proceedings on the registration of the transfer into the commercial register, and that those proceedings were not adjourned pending the outcome of the challenge to the resolution and the contract.
104. After the transfer had been registered with the commercial register, it was no longer possible for the applicant to seek that the general meeting resolution and the asset transfer contract be set aside, as the proceedings could have continued only if she had changed the object of her action so as to claim damages or to request a review of compensation. Article 220h(4) of the CC thus constituted a limitation on the third applicant's access to a court as it prevented her from having a court determination on merits of the legal issue at stake, in particular whether the resolution and the contract had been adopted contrary to law. Its effects on the third applicant were thus similar to those of Article 131(3)(c) of the CC on the applicants in application no. 32921/03 examined above.
105. Reviewing whether that limitation was justified, the Court notes that Article 220h(4) of the CC pursued according to the Government the same aim as Article 131(3)(c) thereof. Having regard to its considerations expressed in paragraph 98 above, the Court finds Article 220h(4) of the CC to have pursued a legitimate aim in the public interest within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
As for the proportionality of that limitation, the Court notes that the Government relied, as in application no. 32921/03 above, on the existence of alternative legal avenues which rendered the limitation compatible with the Convention. The Court further notes that in its view expressed above those legal avenues did not constitute remedies to be exhausted within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, nor could they adequately mitigate the impairments of minority shareholders' rights caused by that limitation (see paragraph 101 above). Given that the third applicant's right to access to a court was limited as a result of the operation of Article 220h(4) of the CC in a manner similar to that in application no. 32921/03, the Court finds that the availability of alternative remedies could not satisfy the requirements of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in the present application.
106. It ensues that the third applicant's right of access to a court was limited as a result of the operation of Article 220h(4) of the CC which deprived her of a determination on merits of the claim of unlawfulness of the general meeting resolution and the asset transfer contract, and no reasons that would render that limitation justified were established. Therefore, the Court dismisses the Government's objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in this respect and finds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
iii. Application no. 5344/05
107. The applicant in application no. 5344/05 complained about a lack of access to court in the set-aside proceedings in two respects. He complained, first, that the courts had not dealt with his claim that the asset transfer contract was invalid because of the way it provided for the calculation of compensation, and he complained that the courts had not dealt with his claim that the asset transfer contract and the general meeting resolution were invalid on the ground of serious irregularities at the general meeting of Biocel, a. s.
108. As to the claim that the courts did not deal with the claim concerning compensation provisions, the Court notes, as the Government contended, that it was open to him to raise precisely this issue in proceedings under Article 220k of the CC. The applicant did bring such proceedings, and they are still pending. It follows that the refusal to deal with the claim in the set-aside proceedings did not deprive the applicant of access to court in this respect.
As to the claim that the courts did not deal with the merits of the proceedings to have the transfer set aside, the Court notes that those proceedings were discontinued by the decisions of the Ostrava Regional Court and Olomouc High Court of 14 March 2008 and 1 July 2008 respectively, without having been examined on merits. Both courts, referring to the registration of the transfer in the commercial register, relied on Article 220h(4) of the CC which prevented them from further reviewing the action to set aside. The Court observes that the first applicant had no standing in the proceedings on the registration of the transfer into the commercial register, and that those proceedings were not adjourned pending the outcome of the challenge to the resolution and the contract.
109. The Court notes that the situation of the first applicant in the set-aside proceedings became after the decision of the Regional Court and High Court respectively, analogous to the position of the third applicant in application no. 28464/04 (see paragraph 103 above), as he was prevented from having a court determination on merits of his action to have the general meeting resolution set aside. His access to a court was therefore limited in a manner similar to that in application no. 28464/04. Having found that the alternative legal avenues referred to by the Government did not constitute an effective legal remedy within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention and did not adequately mitigate such a limitation (see paragraphs 101 and 105 above), the Court finds that no reasons that would render that limitation proportionate to the legitimate aims of furthering stability in the business community by preventing abusive challenges to general meeting resolutions were established.
In the light of the foregoing, the Court dismisses the Government's non-exhaustion arguments in this respect and finds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
110. The applicants further complained that the transfer of the companies' assets amounted to the expropriation of their property, which was not safeguarded by sufficient procedural safeguards. They contested the relevant legislation as such, in particular the way it governed determination of the compensation. Furthermore, they argued that the relevant law did not provide for a sufficient level of precision, foreseeability and certainty regarding the rights of minority shareholders. It lacked such features as duty for companies to provide information, joint representation of minority shareholders and other safeguards. They considered the relevant law unbalanced as it failed to strike a fair balance between the interests of a main shareholder and those of minority shareholders. Finally, they alleged an interference with their legitimate expectation, as Czech law had not provided for that form of transformation of a company when they acquired their shares. Moreover, it had to be considered legitimate to expect observation of the legal standards of west European countries and international treaties on protection of investments by the Czech legislature when it introduced the impugned provisions contravening Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the relevant part of which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
111. The Government maintained that the complaints under this provision of the Convention were inadmissible.
112. The Court observes that the complaint before it aims at the entire process of the company's transformation and the position of minority shareholders therein. However, this process has not yet been fully completed, as the compensation proceedings, crucial in the light of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, are still pending.
It follows that this part of the applications is premature within the meaning of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention and must be declared inadmissible pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
113. The applicants complained that they did not have at their disposal any remedy against the interference with the property rights asserted in their applications. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
114. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the claims made by applicants under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which were declared inadmissible as premature.
It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded pursuant to Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and must de declared inadmissible in accordance with Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
115. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
116. The applicants asserted that they had not yet been able to assess pecuniary damage inflicted by the “expropriation” of their shares as the relevant domestic proceedings were still pending. They reserved the right to specify the damages once those proceedings are terminated. The third applicant claimed in addition CZK 622,160 (EUR 22,200) for fees she had been obliged to pay in the arbitration proceedings.
The Government maintained that the applicants failed to establish any damage. They saw no casual link between the alleged damage and the violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. They noted in respect of the third applicant that the asserted arbitration fee was incurred by all three petitioners together, not just by the third applicant.
The Court considers that the damage alleged by the applicants is connected to the loss of their shares upon the liquidation of the companies and the attempts to recover it in proceedings before domestic courts. These claims, however, are linked to the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which has been declared inadmissible. It follows that no casual link has been established between the alleged damage and the violation found. As for the damage allegedly incurred by the payment of the arbitration fee, the third applicant did not allege in her submissions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that her property rights had been impaired by the payment of that fee. Even if she had done so, no casual link between the alleged damage and the violation found could be established as only a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention was found.
No award under this head is therefore granted.
117. As for non-pecuniary damage the applicants claimed EUR 1,000,000 for having suffered on account of uncertainty and frustration caused by their inability to enjoy rights under the Convention. They considered that sum to be proportionate to the size of their investment and of the class of shareholders affected by the impugned legislation and case law. In the applicants' view a smaller amount would not compel the responding Party to bring that legislation in line with European standards.
The Government pointed out that the Convention system does not recognize actio popularis and therefore only the situation of the applicants may be taken into consideration. They consider that a mere statement of finding a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is sufficient satisfaction for the applicants.
The Court, ruling on an equitable basis and in accordance with its case law concerning the denial of access to a court, holds that finding a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention represents in itself just satisfaction for the applicants.
B. Costs and expenses
118. Each applicant claimed the costs of legal representation amounting to CZK 120,000 (EUR 4,528). They asserted that the legal representation in each case consisted of fifty billable hours charged CZK 2,400 (EUR 90) per hour.
Invoking Rule 60 paragraph 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court, the Government asserted that it appeared that the applicants had not provided within the time specified therein any documents proving the payment of those costs at the amount sought. They contended that the Court should reject the claim as insufficiently grounded (Aldoshkina v. Russia, no. 66041/01, § 32, 12 October 2006).
119. The Court reiterates that an applicant may recover his costs and expenses only in so far as they have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum (Bottazzi v. Italy [GC], no. 34884/97, § 22, ECHR 1999-V). Having regard to the material before it, particularly the complexity of the case, domestic proceedings pursued in search of remedy of violation found, the aforementioned criteria, and the fact that the applicants were successful only in part of their claim raised in their applications, the Court finds it proportionate to award the applicants, in respect of each application, EUR 2,264 for costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants on this amount, all that to be converted into Czech crowns at the rate set by the Czech National Bank and applicable at the date of settlement.
C. Default interest
120. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Decides unanimously to join the applications;
2. Joins unanimously to the merits the Governments' contention that the applicants did not exhaust domestic remedies in that they did not avail themselves of the available alternative remedies and declares the complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention concerning the denial of access to a court admissible and the remainder of the applications inadmissible;
3. Dismisses by five votes to two the non-exhaustion argument which was joined to the merits and holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in respect of each application;
4. Holds by five votes to two that finding a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention represents in itself just satisfaction for the applicants;
5. Holds by five votes to two
a) that the respondent State is to pay, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 2,264 (two thousand two hundred and sixty four euro) in respect of each application for costs and expenses, to be converted into the national currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, together with any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicants' claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 October 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the dissenting opinion of Judge Jaeger joined by Judge Rait Maruste is annexed to this judgment.
P.L.
C.W.


DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE JAEGER,
JOINED BY JUDGE MARUSTE
I am unable to agree with the majority's finding of a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention – access to court – without any determination of the substantive civil right at stake.
The case is about the rights of shareholders as defined by the Czech law. On the one hand owners of shares may be protected under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in so far as these shares constitute a possession or a property right of a certain variable value according to the stock market. But the Chamber declared these claims inadmissible as being premature (§ 110-112). On the other hand shareholders are empowered to participate in certain decisions concerning the future of the company concerned by means of resolutions taken within a general meeting, which is an added value to the pure monetary value.
These decisions are taken under the majority rule. Shareholders being in the majority have the overwhelming power to transform the company into something different and to transfer its assets. Minority rights are rather limited, according to the restrictions by law: the minority, or a single shareholder, can institute proceedings to set aside such resolutions, but cannot inhibit registration following the majority's vote by virtue of his own right. After registration the minority's rights dwindle to a mere right to compensation. This is all set out in the judgment under § 42-59.
The Czech courts gave some reasoning why they considered those restrictions of shareholder rights to be legitimate – legal certainty and the expeditious transformation of companies. The court administering the commercial register was established to project majority rights and the rights of the company as such (see paragraph 12 of the judgment). In addition, by reviewing the legality of the decision-making process within the company the courts administering the commercial register also protect the public interest in ensuring that the law is complied with.
I am of the opinion that the restrictions of which the applicants complain are partly implemented by substantive provisions, partly by procedural ones. Whether these restrictions are in conformity with Convention rights cannot be answered by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention only focusing on the procedural aspect, even limited to one single factor within the procedural safeguards. In the context of civil rights that are not to be exercised individually but collectively together with other shareholders in the same position and under the obligation to reach a majority vote, access to court cannot be understood as a purely individual right to challenge and suspend every decision. This would at the same time grant every single shareholder a veto right against majority decisions. Thus the scope of shareholders' voting rights is defined within the limits of judicial control attached to them.
Whether the rights enshrined in the Convention demand for an extension of minority rights with the aim to sufficiently protecting a minority of shareholders cannot be answered by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention but only by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It is a substantive and not a procedural question.
Article 6 of the Convention applies under its “civil head” if there was a “dispute” over a “right” which can be said, at least, on arguable grounds, to be recognised under domestic law irrespective of whether it is also protected under the Convention (see Associazone Nazionale Reduci Dalla Prigonia Dall'Internamento E Dalla Guerra Di Liberazione and others v. Germany, no. 45563/04; J.S. and A.S. v. Poland, no. 40732/98, 24 May 2005). The absence of a legitimate expectation of a property right or any other civil right does not presuppose the absence of a right recognised on arguable grounds and the applicability of Article 6 of the Convention. The Court therefore has always to examine whether there was a dispute over a defendable right, which the Chamber did not do in any depth in this case.
The civil right under dispute might be the purely financial property right embodied in the share. This dispute is still pending as conceded by the majority of the Chamber. It might as well be the additional right to influence important resolutions taken in a general meeting. The only existing legal provisions regarding a right to influence the future of a company clearly limit shareholders' bearing to a right to participate and vote in the general meeting, to a right to challenge resolutions as long as the changes are not registered and assets transferred by the commercial court, and – after the registration finalises the transactions – to claim compensation in case of any damages sustained or of inadequate compensation paid for their shares. Domestic law neither provides for any right to set aside majority resolutions nor to suspend their execution after registration. Minority shareholders are clearly excluded from these rights. Thus they cannot claim to have such right on arguable grounds. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is not applicable (see Associazone Nazionale, referred to above).
Finding Article 6 of the Convention not applicable in the case does not necessarily exclude finding a violation under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. This question, especially whether the law strikes a fair balance between the competing interests of the majority's rights and the public interest in the functioning of economy under the safeguards of the rule of law on the one hand and the protection of minority rights on the other hand, cannot be decided before compensation is determined. In the course of their scrutiny the courts will have to examine whether the totality of restrictions, including those on access to court, can be deemed necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest (under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1). I agree with the majority of the Chamber under § 112 that this part of the application is premature.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; eccezione Preliminare congiunta ai meriti e respinta (non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; danno non-patrimoniale – costatazione di violazione sufficiente; danno Patrimoniale - rivendicazione respinta
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA KOHLHOFER E MINARIK C. REPUBBLICA CECA
(Richieste N. 32921/03, 28464/04 e 5344/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
15 ottobre 2009
Richiesta per raccomandazione alla Grande Camera pendente
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Kohlhofer e Minarik c. Repubblica ceca,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger, Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 15 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da richieste (N. 32921/03, 28464/04 e 5344/05) contro la Repubblica ceca depositate presso Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino austriaco, il Sig. B. K. (“il primo richiedente”) e da cittadini tedeschi, il Sig. R. M. (“il secondo richiedente”) e S. M. (“la terza richiedente”), rispettivamente l’8 ottobre 2003, il 21 luglio 2004 e il 29 aprile 2005.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. P. Z., un avvocato che pratica a Praga. Il Governo ceco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. V.A. Schorm, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. Il 4 settembre 2006 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso al Governo delle richieste e comunicare le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. L’11 settembre 2006 decise di dare rispettivamente avviso delle richieste al Governo dell’ Austria ed al Governo della Germania per abilitarli ad esercitare il loro diritto ad intervenire nei procedimenti (Articolo 36 § 1 e Decide 44). Né il Governo dell’ Austria né il Governo della Germania hanno esercitato il loro diritto ad intervenire (Articolo 44 § 1(b)).
4. I richiedenti ed il Governo ceco entrambi hanno registrato osservazioni scritte (Articolo 59 § 1). La Camera decise che non era richiesta nessuna udienza sull'ammissibilità ed i meriti (Articolo 59 § 3 in fine). Fu deciso inoltre di congiungere le richieste summenzionate per l’esame e di esaminare i meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo della loro ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I fatti della causa, come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
Richiesta n. 32921/03
6. Tramite l'acquisizione di quote prima del gennaio 2001, i primi due richiedenti divennero azionisti di minoranza della Českomoravský cemento, a.s., una società per azioni incorporata sotto la legge ceca.
7. Il 1 gennaio 2001 il Codice Commerciale (in seguito “il CC”) fu emendato. In conformità con il suo Articolo 220p di recente introdotto, furono conferiti ad un'assemblea generale di una società per azioni dei poteri per decidere di liquidare società e trasferire tutti i suoi beni ad un azionista che possedeva quote rappresentanti più del 90% del capitale di quota della società, (“l'azionista principale”). Un contratto di trasferimento di beni fra l'azionista principale e la società doveva essere concluso a questo fine e pagata un risarcimento agli azionisti di minoranza.
8. Il 31 maggio 2001 l'assemblea generale della società adottò, tramiti votazione dell'azionista principale, una decisione sulla liquidazione della società e sul trasferimento di tutti i suoi beni all'azionista principale (insieme anche riferiti come “il trasferimento”).
9. Lo stesso giorno i richiedenti introdussero un'azione per far accantonare questa decisione ed il contratto di trasferimento di beni da parte della Corte Municipale di Praga (městský soud). Asserirono che la decisione era stata adottata contrariamente alla legge, trattati riguardanti l'incoraggiamento e la protezione reciproca degli investimenti ed i loro diritti di proprietà. Loro informarono la corte che amministrava il registro delle imprese (obchodní rejstřík) circa questo passo.
10. Il 31 ottobre 2001 la corte che amministrava il registro delle imprese (rejstříkový soud) approvò il trasferimento. Nessuna udienza fu sostenuta prima di quella decisione.
11. Il 14 dicembre 2001 i richiedenti contestarono la decisione di registrare il trasferimento di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale (Ústavní soud), adducendo una violazione del diritto ad un processo equo ed i loro diritti di proprietà. Loro dissero di non essere stati in grado sollevare le loro eccezioni alla decisione dell’ assemblea generale in un'udienza durante i procedimenti di non-contenzioso che precedono la consegna della decisione. Loro invitarono la corte a cancellare inter alia gli Articoli 220h(3) e (4) e 220p del CC.
12. Il 25 marzo 2003 la Corte Costituzionale nella sua decisione n. IV. ÚS 720/01 respinse il ricorso dei richiedenti senza sostenere un'udienza. Trovò che ai richiedenti non era concesso partecipare ai procedimenti siccome il compito della corte incaricata del registro delle imprese era stato decidere sui diritti della società, non sui loro. Notò che questa corte aveva accantonato gli argomenti a sua disposizione dei richiedenti nella loro azione e li aveva presi in esame prima di consegnare la decisione contestata, facendo una revisione la legalità della decisione come questione preliminare. Sostenne che il potere di sospendere i procedimenti era ancora disponibile per questa corte sotto la legge come era al tempo attinente. La Corte Costituzionale respinse la seconda rivendicazione dei richiedenti secondo cui questa decisione corrispondeva ad un’altra interferenza da parte di un’ autorità pubblica nel loro diritto ad accesso ad una corte. Riferendosi all’ Articolo 220h del CC, trovò l’applicazione dell’ Articolo 131 del CC in conformità con la legge costituzionale. A questo riguardo, la corte sottolineò le salvaguardie procedurali custodite negli Articoli 131, 220h 220k, 2201 e 220p del CC che erano disponibili ai richiedenti ed enfatizzò lo scopo della regolamentazione che prevedeva la certezza legale e la sollecita trasformazione di società. Riguardo alla contestazione dei richiedenti della legge che prevedeva la liquidazione ed il trasferimento sulla base della protezione insufficiente dei diritti degli azionisti di minoranza, la corte non l'esaminò poiché andava oltre la sfera di quella revisione della corte definita dal ricorso costituzionale dei richiedenti che contestava la decisione nella quale la corte incaricata del registro delle imprese aveva approvato la registrazione della liquidazione ed il trasferimento al registro delle imprese, ma non altre decisioni adottate in altri procedimenti disponibili agli azionisti di minoranza querelanti.
13. Il 27 luglio 2006 la Corte Municipale respinse l'azione dei richiedenti depositata il 31 maggio 2001. Avendo notato che la corte incaricata del registro delle imprese aveva approvato la registrazione del trasferimento, la Corte Municipale riferendosi all’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC, rifiutò di trattare con le asserzioni dei richiedenti dell'illegalità della decisione dell’ assemblea generale contestata, essendo che la loro dichiarazione principale era stata la decisione adottata dall'azionista principale i cui diritti di voto erano stati sospesi. Riguardo alla dichiarazione dei richiedenti dell'invalidamento del contratto di trasferimento dei bene, vale a dire il numero insufficiente di esperti commissionato per il rapporto competente sul risarcimento e la determinazione del giorno decisivo (rozhodný den), la corte espresse la prospettiva che la validità del contratto di trasferimento dei beni doveva essere esaminata come una questione preliminare dalla corte che approvava la registrazione del trasferimento nel registro delle imprese. Allo stesso tempo, avendo fatto una revisione del contratto, la Corte Municipale trovò che la determinazione del giorno decisivo si attenneva col CC. Avendo interpretato le disposizioni attinenti del CC, la corte trovò inoltre che la legge non richiedeva più che degli esperti venissero commissionati al fine di valutare il risarcimento che doveva essere pagato dagli azionisti principali ai richiedenti. Infine, la corte esaminò e respinse le rivendicazioni dei richiedenti per cui il risarcimento non era stato determinato in modo appropriato come infondate o solamente revisionabili da una corte che faceva una revisione il risarcimento in procedimenti separati.
14. Il 6 settembre 2007 L’Alta Corte di Praga (vrchní soud), condividendo la prospettiva legale del giudice di prima istanza, sostenne la sentenza della Corte Municipale del 27 luglio 2006.
15. I procedimenti ora sono pendenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema (Nejvyšší soud). Secondo i richiedenti, loro non hanno nessuna prospettiva di successo di fronte a questa giurisdizione a causa del suo stabilito diritto giurisprudenziale.
16. Secondo il Governo, i richiedenti presentarono azioni di corte sotto l’Articolo 220k del CC cui asserivano che il risarcimento pagato per il trasferimento facendo seguito all’ Articolo 220p(2) del CC non era adeguato e rivendicavano il rimanente a questo riguardo. Secondo il Governo, questi procedimenti e i procedimenti a parte sono ancora pendenti.
Richiesta n. 28464/04
17. La terza richiedente possedeva il 3% della capitale di quota della YTONG, a.s., una società per azioni incorporata sotto la legge ceca.
18. Il 24 giugno 2003 l'assemblea generale di questa società adottò, con votazione dell'azionista principale, una decisione sulla liquidazione della società ed il trasferimento di tutti i suoi beni all'azionista principale.
19. Il 25 giugno 2003 la terza richiedente introdusse presso la Corte Regionale di Brno (krajský soud) un'azione per far accantonare la decisione, asserendo che era stata adottata contrariamente alla legge applicabile, trattati riguardanti l'incoraggiamento e la reciproca protezione degli investimenti ed i loro diritti di proprietà. Asserendo l'illegalità del contratto di trasferimento dei bene a causa della sua clausola che riservava alla giurisdizione di arbitrato sulle controversie riguardo al valore del risarcimento, lei enfatizzò inoltre un numero di irregolarità della decisione. Lei informò la corte che amministrava il registro delle imprese dell'azione.
20. Il 1 settembre 2003 la corte incaricata del registro delle imprese approvò la registrazione del trasferimento. Nessuna udienza fu sostenuta prima di questa decisione che non fu notificata alla terza richiedente siccome non aveva qualità per partecipare ai procedimenti.
21. L’ 11 dicembre 2003 l'Alta Corte di Olomouc respinse il ricorso della terza richiedente che contestava quella decisione. Decise che poiché la richiedente non aveva qualità per prendere parte ai procedimenti contestati, non le era concesso fare ricorso contro il loro risultato.
22. Il 28 novembre 2005 l’Alta Corte, appellandosi all’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC, cessò i procedimenti predisposti a parte senza esaminare i meriti.
23. Secondo il Governo, la terza richiedente introdusse presso una corte un'azione sotto l’ Articolo 220k del CC con cui lei asserì che il risarcimento pagato per il trasferimento facendo seguito all’Articolo 220p(2) del CC non era adeguato e rivendicò il resto al riguardo.
24. Secondo le parti, questi procedimenti sono pendenti dopo le direttive delle corti di rigetto delle prime due istanze di fronte alla Corte Suprema.
25. Il 24 giugno 2008 la Corte Suprema respinse il ricorso della richiedente per questioni di diritto e sostenne la decisione dell’Alta Corte del 28 novembre 2005.
26. L’ 11 dicembre 2008 la Corte Costituzionale respinse il ricorso costituzionale della richiedente nel quale la richiedente rivendicò un danneggiamento del suo diritto ad un processo equo nei procedimenti predisposti a parte in ragione della limitazione all’ accesso al tribunale provocata dall’Articolo 220h(4) del CC. La Corte Costituzionale trovò che la Corte Suprema non aveva fatto errori nella sua decisione contestata del 24 giugno 2008 e che né il diritto del richiedente ad un processo equo né qualsiasi altro diritto costituzionale era stato violato.
27. La terza richiedente avanzò anche la rivendicazione per il risarcimento, insieme con due altri postulanti, di fronte ad un tribunale di arbitrato al quale fece riferimento nelle decisioni delle corti ordinarie. I procedimenti di arbitrato furono cessati ed il ricorso respinto l’ 11 ottobre 2006 per mancanza di giurisdizione.
Richiesta n. 5344/05
28. Il primo richiedente era un azionista di minoranza della Biocel, a.s., una società per azioni incorporata sotto la legge ceca.
29. Il 21 novembre 2001 l'assemblea generale della società decise di liquidare la società e trasferire i suoi beni all'azionista principale.
30. Lo stesso giorno il richiedente introdusse un'azione presso la Corte Regionale di Ostrava (krajský soud) per fare accantonare la decisione dell’ assemblea generale ed il contratto di trasferimento dei beni. Lui dibatté che la decisione dell’ assemblea generale era nulla per motivi d’illegalità siccome l'azionista principale aveva preso parte alla votazione benché non gli era concesso di fare così, la decisione era stata adottata nonostante il fatto che le quote erano state depositate come security , ed il risarcimento pagabile agli azionisti di minoranza era stato determinato impropriamente. Lui asserì inoltre una violazione dei trattati riguardanti l'incoraggiamento e la protezione reciproca degli investimenti ed il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
31. Il 12 novembre 2002 la Corte Regionale, comportandosi come una corte incaricata del registro delle imprese approvò la registrazione del trasferimento sul registro delle imprese senza sostenere un'udienza pubblica.
32. Il 21 novembre 2002 un ricorso da parte del primo richiedente contro questa decisione fu respinto dall’Alta Corte di Olomouc che trovò che gli azionisti di minoranza non erano parti ai procedimenti riguardo all'approvazione della registrazione sul registro delle imprese.
33. Il 14 gennaio 2003 la Corte Regionale sospese i procedimenti predisposti a parte e chiese alla Corte Costituzionale di cancellare l’ Articolo 220p e le altre disposizioni del Codice Commerciale.
34. In una data non specificata il primo richiedente introdusse un ricorso costituzionale adducendo una violazione del suo diritto alla protezione giudiziale sotto l’Articolo 36 § 1 dello Statuto dei Diritti essenziali e delle Libertà (Listina základních práv a svobod). Lui disse che non gli era stato concesso di comportarsi come una parte ai procedimenti condotti dalla corte incaricata del registro delle imprese ed era stato ostacolato de facto, dagli Articoli 131(3)(c), 220h(4), 220p del CC e 109(2)(c) del Codice di Procedura Civile (in seguito “il CCP”), nell'agire di fronte alla corte nei procedimenti per accantonare la decisione dell’ assemblea generale. Lui sostenne inoltre che la legge attinente era contraria alla terza Direttiva del Consiglio 78/855/EEC. Il primo richiedente richiese che le disposizioni summenzionate venissero giudicate come contrarie all’ Articolo 36 § 1 dello Statuto.
35. Il 31 agosto 2004 la Corte Costituzionale con la sua decisione n. II. ÚS 21/03 respinse il ricorso costituzionale del richiedente contro la decisione che approvava la registrazione del trasferimento sul registro delle imprese. Trovò che, sotto l’Articolo 131 del CC ad una corte incaricata del registro delle imprese viene concesso di revisionare come questione preliminare la legalità e la validità di una decisione dell’ assemblea generale sulla base della quale sarà fatta una registrazione nel registro delle imprese. Sostenne che il diritto alla protezione giudiziale non fu negato al primo richiedente avendo riguardo alle vie di ricorso custodite nell’ Articolo 131 preso in concomitanza con gli Articoli 220h, 220k, 2201 e 220p del CC. Perciò, gli azionisti di una società per azioni potrebbero chiedere protezione dei loro diritti di fronte ad una corte indipendente ed imparziale tramite un altro modo differente dal prendere parte nei procedimenti sostenuti di fronte alla corte incaricata del registro delle imprese.
36. Il 22 febbraio 2005 la Plenaria della Corte Costituzionale respinse con la sua decisione n. Pl. ÚS 51/03 la richiesta della Corte Regionale che avrebbe dovuto cancellare, inter alia,l’ Articolo 220p del CC. Trovò che la richiesta della Corte Regionale era mal-fondata siccome l’Articolo 220p del CC non poteva più essere applicato dalla Corte Regionale a causa dell’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC che impediva a questa corte di decidere la causa di fronte a sé sui meriti una volta che la decisione dell’assemblea generale sulla liquidazione della società ed il trasferimento era stata inserita nel registro delle imprese. Quattro giudici costituzionali unirono le loro opinioni dissidenti alla decisione della Plenaria.
37. Il 14 marzo 2008 la Corte Regionale di Ostrava, appellandosi all’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC cessò i procedimenti di annullamento senza esaminare i meriti siccome il trasferimento fu registrato nel registro delle imprese.
38. Il 1 luglio 2008 l'Alta Corte di Olomouc ha sostenuto questa decisione della Corte Regionale. Riferendosi alla decisione della Corte Costituzionale n. IV. ÚS 720/01, l’Alta Corte trovò gli Articoli 131(3)(b) e (il c) e 220h(3) e (4), e l’ Articolo 220k(1) del CC conformi alla legge ceca incluso lo Statuto dei Diritti essenziali e delle Libertà. Il primo richiedente non portò la causa di fronte alle istanze superiori. Lui addusse di non avere nessuna prospettiva di successo a causa del diritto giurisprudenziale fisso della Corte Suprema e della Corte Costituzionale.
39. Secondo il Governo, il richiedente introdusse presso una corte un'azione sotto l’Articolo 220k del CC con cui lui asserì che il risarcimento per il trasferimento pagato facendo seguito all’ Articolo 220p(2) del CC non era adeguato e chiese il resto al riguardo. Secondo il Governo, questi procedimenti sono ancora pendenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
1. La Costituzione
40. L’Articolo 83 prevede che la Corte Costituzionale sia il corpo giudiziale responsabile per la protezione della costituzionalità.
41. L’ Articolo 89(2) prevede che tutte le autorità nazionali ed individui siano legati alle direttive esecutive della Corte Costituzionale.
2. Il Codice Commerciale (come in vigore al tempo attinente)
42. L’ Articolo 27(3) prevedeva inter alia che fatti inseriti nel registro delle imprese divenissero effettivi dalla data in cui venivano resi pubblici.
43. In conformità con l’Articolo 33 una corte che amministrava il registro delle imprese facesse una registrazione nel registro pubblico delle imprese.
44. L’Articolo 131(1) dava agli azionisti il diritto di contestare una decisione dell’ assemblea generale tramite una richiesta di accantonare, se si fosse ritenuto che contravvenisse alla legge, un atto di incorporazione o di legge locale. Una richiesta di accantonamento potrebbe essere depositata entro tre mesi o, in certe circostanze, un anno dall'adozione della decisione. La disposizione era applicabile a decisioni dell’ assemblea generale delle società per azioni in virtù di Articolo 183(1).
45. Sotto l’Articolo 131(3)(c) la corte non poteva accantonare una decisione dell’ assemblea generale se una corte incaricata del registro delle imprese avesse registrato un trasferimento dei beni della società nel registro delle imprese.
46. L’Articolo 131(4) prevedeva, inter alia, che alle persone che avevano sofferto di un danno a causa di una decisione dell'assemblea generale adottata contrariamente alla legge, l'atto di incorporazione o di legge locale, era concesso chiedere danni e/o soddisfazione equa per una violazione dei diritti fondamentali degli azionisti. Si potrebbe asserire questo diritto si anche se una corte non avesse dichiarato la lacuna della decisione dell’ assemblea generale per una delle ragioni esposte nell’ Articolo 131(3) del Codice. Tale rivendicazione doveva essere fatta di fronte ad una corte all'interno dello stesso tempo-limite come applicato per l’introduzione di una richiesta di accantonamento di una decisione dell’ assemblea generale, o entro tre mesi dal giorno in cui una corte ha deciso su tale azione.
47. Sotto l’Articolo 131(7) ognuno è legato da un'enunciazione della decisione consegnata facendo seguito all’ Articolo 131(1), (2) o (3).
48. L’ Articolo 131(7) prevede che se una decisione dell’ assemblea generale non fosse contestata sotto l’Articolo 131(1),(2) o tale rivendicazione non fosse sostenuta, la decisione può essere revisionata solamente in procedimenti sulla registrazione della decisione nel registro delle imprese, a meno che la decisione comporti emendamenti di legge locale o un atto d’incorporazione contrario alla legge.
49. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 220a(11) i procedimenti per annullamento di un contratto che prevedeva una fusione si possono introdurre solamente se è stata introdotta una richiesta per accantonare la decisione attinente dell’ assemblea generale.
50. Sotto l’Articolo 220h(3) un'azione per annullare una decisione dell’ assemblea generale, o un contratto, su fusione non poteva essere introdotta se fosse stata concesso una registrazione della fusione nel registro delle imprese a riguardo da parte di una corte incaricata.
51. Con l’ Articolo 220h(4), i procedimenti per annullare una decisione dell’ assemblea generale, o un contratto, su fusione introdotti prima di una registrazione della fusione nel registro delle imprese potrebbero essere continuati dopo che la registrazione è stata fatta solamente se il querelante cambiasse la sua azione così da chiedere i danni o un pagamento adeguato per le quote rese facendo seguito all’Articolo 220k, purché quelle rivendicazioni non fossero state avanzate prima.
52. Sotto il paragrafo (1) dell’ Articolo 220k, se il rapporto di cambio per le quote non fosse insieme con il risarcimento finanziario adeguato, agli azionisti di una società di fusione è stato concesso di chiedere il risarcimento da una società acquirente. Il ratio decidendi di una decisione giudiziale che accorda il risarcimento ad un azionista era in virtù del paragrafo (5) vincolante, a riguardo dei rimanenti azionisti, su una società acquirente.
53. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 220l i membri del consiglio di amministrazione e del coniglio direttivo delle società coinvolte in una fusione, e gli esperti che hanno redatto un rapporto competente per queste società erano congiuntamente e separatamente responsabili per i danni causati da una violazione dei loro doveri durante la fusione.
54. L’Articolo 220p(l) conferiva poteri ad un'assemblea generale di una società per azioni per decidere di liquidare la società e trasferire tutti i suoi beni ad un azionista che possedeva quote rappresentanti più del 90% del capitale di quota della società (l'azionista principale).
55. Sotto l’Articolo 220p(2) l'azionista principale era obbligato a fornire agli altri azionisti il risarcimento adeguato pagato in contanti per definire tale trasferimento.
56. L’Articolo 220p(3) prevedeva, inter alia che gli Articoli 220a(l)-(4),(7)-(11), 220h e 2201 sarebbero stati applicati propriamente alla liquidazione di una società ed al trasferimento dei suoi beni al suo azionista principale.
57. Secondo l’Articolo 220p(4), fra gli altri obblighi, una società doveva concludere un contratto per il trasferimento dei suoi beni col suo azionista principale. Gli azionisti dovevano essere informati con ciò del loro diritto di richiedere una revisione da parte di una corte del valore del risarcimento. L’Articolo 220k(l),(5) e (7) che disciplinano uno scambio di quote di fusioni pendenti doveva essere applicato propriamente.
3. L'Atto sulla Trasformazione di Società e Cooperative (n. 125/2008)
58. L'Atto che entrò in vigore il 1 luglio 2008 sostituì inter alia le disposizioni del CC che disciplinavano la liquidazione di una società ed il trasferimento dei suoi beni al suo azionista principale, essendo gli Articoli 220h (3) e (4) e 220p (3) del CC tra questi.
59. Sotto l’Articolo 55(2) una corte può dichiarare una decisione dell’i assemblea generale sul trasferimento priva di valore legale solamente sino al momento in cui il trasferimento non viene inserito nel registro delle imprese. L’Articolo 56(a) prevede che tale registrazione non può essere rescissa.
4. Il Codice di Procedura Civile (come in vigore al tempo attinente)
60. Sotto L’Articolo 109(2)(c) ad una corte vengono conferiti poteri per sospendere i procedimenti se un problema legale che sarebbe attinente per la sua decisione fosse in corso d’esame in altri procedimenti pendenti. Le Corti che decidono nei procedimenti su una registrazione nel registro delle imprese cessarono di avere questo potere su emendamento di questa disposizione che entrò in vigore il 31 dicembre 2001.
61. L’ Articolo 200c(1) definisce le persone che hanno qualità per partecipare a procedimenti su una richiesta per registrazione nel registro delle imprese. Solamente l'imprenditore richiedente e le persone di cui si è costretti inserire i nomi nel registro delle imprese hanno tale qualità.
62. Sotto l’Articolo 200c(3) una corte incaricata del registro delle imprese è obbligata a procedere così in modo da intraprendere i passi per preparare la consegna di una decisione entro quindici giorni dal giorno in cui la richiesta è stata depositata.
63. Secondo l’Articolo 200d(2) una corte incaricata del registro delle imprese può decidere la questione di fronte a sé senza sostenere un'udienza se, inter alia, può fare così sulla base di atti di fronte a sé che sono stati scritti facendo seguito ad un particolare statuto (atti di notaio pubblico ecc.).
64. In virtù dell’ Articolo 243d una corte alla quale una causa è stata rinviata in seguito ad un giudizio di annullamento della Corte Suprema è legata da un punto di vista legale custodito in questo.
5. L’Atto della Corte Costituzionale (l'Atto n. 182/1993)
65. La Sezione 72(1)(a) stipula che un ricorso costituzionale può essere presentato: a) facendo seguito all’ Articolo 87(l)(d) della Costituzione, da parte di una persona fisica o giuridica se adduce che i suoi diritti essenziali e le libertà di base garantite nell'ordine costituzionale sono stati infranti come risultato della decisione definitiva in procedimenti ai quali erano una parte, di una misura o di altro abuso da parte di un'autorità pubblica.
66. In virtù della Sezione 82(3) se la Corte Costituzionale ammette il ricorso costituzionale di una persona fisica o giuridica sotto l’Articolo 87(l)(d) della Costituzione, può,: a) annullare la decisione contestata dell'autorità pubblica, o b) se un diritto essenziale costituzionalmente garantito o una libertà di base fossero infranti come risultato di un abuso da parte di un'autorità pubblica diverso da una decisione, ingiungere all'autorità di smettere di infrangere questo diritto o la libertà ed ordinarle, alla misura possibile, ripristinare la situazione esistente prima della violazione.
6. Atto sulle Corti e sui Giudici (rispettivamente gli atti N. 335/1991 e 182/1993)
67. La Corte Suprema è in virtù di questa legislazione la corte ceca più alta di giurisdizione ordinaria col compito inter alia di stabilire il diritto giurisprudenziale delle corti ordinarie.
III. PRATICA NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
1. Sentenza della Corte Costituzionale n. I. ÚS 70/96
68. Nella sua sentenza del 18 marzo 1997 la Corte Costituzionale, interpretando l’Articolo 89(2) della Costituzione, respinse l'assunzione secondo cui i suoi punti di vista intrinseci nel ragionamento delle sue sentenze sono giuridicamente irrilevanti. La corte contenne inter alia che un'una mancanza di rispetto a priori da parte delle corti ordinarie verso simili punti di vista sollevi dei dubbi riguardo a se le corti ordinarie decidono in conformità all’ Articolo 90 della Costituzione secondo cui il loro compito principale è assicurare la protezione dei diritti facendo seguito alla legge. Le corti ordinarie che si rifiutano di seguire simili punti di vista devono essere consapevoli che le loro direttive con più probabilità saranno introdotte dalla Corte Costituzionale in linea col suo diritto giurisprudenziale esistente. La Corte Costituzionale aggiunse a questo riguardo che una mancanza di rispetto a priori verso il diritto giurisprudenziale esistente, dando luogo a decisioni diverse su una stessa questione, contravviene al principio di certezza legale che è una componente indispensabile della legge costituzionale e della preminenza del diritto.
2. Decisione della Corte Costituzionale n. III. ÚS 527/04
69. In questa decisione del 25 maggio 2005 nella quale respinse un ricorso contro la decisione di una corte che approvava la registrazione di un trasferimento dei beni di società all'azionista principale sul registro delle imprese ed una richiesta di cancellazione degli Articoli 131(3)(c), 220h(3) e 220p del CC, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne come segue:
“La legge che prevede la liquidazione di una società ed il trasferimento dei suoi beni al suo azionista principale è proprio al limite della conformità costituzionale a causa della coordinazione imperfetta dei procedimenti per una registrazione nel registro delle imprese con procedimenti di annullamento di un contratto di trasferimento di beni (registrato insieme con una richiesta per cancellazione di una decisione dell’ assemblea generale) che rende possibile la registrazione irreversibile della [liquidazione di una società ed il trasferimento dei suoi beni al suo azionista principale] nel registro delle imprese senza esame di un'azione per annullarlo. Comunque, non si può dire che gli azionisti di minoranza non abbiano alcuna via di ricorso a loro disposizione.. .. [Secondo ]l’ Articolo 131(4) del [CC], loro possono chiedere danni e soddisfazione equa.
La legge che disciplina i procedimenti di fronte ad una corte incaricata del registro delle imprese è proporzionata allo scopo ed all’obiettivo della legislazione che prevede trasformazioni di società il cui fine è accomodare la sollecita registrazione di quelle trasformazioni, rese sulla base dell'accordo fra gli azionisti delle società, nel registro delle imprese con riguardo al fatto che tale trasformazione è da un certo momento irreversibile a causa degli aspetti legali, economici e tecnici di quel processo.
... [La] decisione contestata della corte incaricata del registro delle imprese non corrispose ad un’ interferenza incostituzionale coi diritti di proprietà dell'appellante siccome mantenne l’ accesso a vie di ricorso legali per la protezione dei suoi diritti di proprietà sulle quote in modo proporzionato.. .. [Le aspettative legittime] degli azionisti non hanno la stessa intensità di quelle dei proprietari di altre proprietà. .. [siccome] la natura di una società per azioni implica rischi di un cambio nello status degli azionisti...
L'essenza del ricorso consiste nel disaccordo del richiedente con la legge che prevede [liquidazione di una società ed il trasferimento dei suoi beni al suo azionista principale] come, in particolare con le garanzie insufficienti per gli azionisti di minoranza. Comunque, alla Corte Costituzionale con la Sezione 74 dell’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale non vengono conferiti poteri per esaminare queste azioni di reclamo siccome il ricorso in oggetto contestava solamente la decisione adottata dalla corte incaricata del registro delle imprese nei procedimenti sulla registrazione della liquidazione ed il trasferimento nel registro delle imprese. [L'esame] di queste azioni di reclamo andrebbe oltre la sfera di questa revisione di corte definita col ricorso costituzionale dei richiedenti che contesta la decisione della corte incaricata del registro delle imprese che decise sulla registrazione nel registro delle imprese, non sulle decisioni adottate negli altri procedimenti disponibili agli azionisti di minoranza querelanti.”
3. Decisione della Corte Suprema n. 29 Odo 1128/2005 di 23 maggio 2007
70. In questa decisione la Corte Suprema sostenne le prospettive della corte inferiore secondo cui un impedimento legale, previsto dall’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 183(1) a riguardo, e dall’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 220p(3) a riguardo, impedisce l’annullamento di decisioni dell’ assemblea generale e di contratti di trasferimento di beni dopo che tale trasferimento di beni era stato registrato nel registro delle imprese.
LA LEGGE
I. UNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
71. La Corte considera che, in conformità con l’Articolo 42 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte, le richieste dovrebbero essere congiunte, dato il loro background legale e dei fatti comune.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
72. I richiedenti, azionisti di minoranza si lamentarono che la legge ceca non permetteva loro di impugnare né una decisione della società di liquidare la società e di trasferire i suoi beni all'azionista principale né un contratti di beni, una volta che la decisione era stata registrata nel registro delle imprese.
Loro si appellarono all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale...”
73. Il Governo non era d'accordo.
A. Ammissibilità
74. Il Governo sostenne che le richieste erano inammissibili per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali o, alternativamente, prematuro. Dibatté che solamente i procedimenti di fronte alle corti che amministravano il registro delle imprese erano terminati, mentre gli altri - azioni per cancellazione delle decisioni dell’ assemblea generale, le azioni per determinare il valore del risarcimento, e le azioni per richiedere danni e/o soddisfazione equa – erano ancora pendenti o non erano mai stati introdotti. Sostenne che la legge che impedisce ai richiedenti di chiedere una revisione della legalità, cioè l’ Articolo 131(3)(c) e l’ Articolo 220h(3) e (4) del CC, non era stata esaminata ancora direttamente dalle corti superiori ceche. Il diritto giurisprudenziale esistente della Corte Costituzionale (le decisioni N. IV. ÚS 720/01, Pi. ÚS 51/03, III. ÚS 527/04 ed III. ÚS 84/05) consisteva in decisioni inedite la cui forza normativa era “molto meno intensa” che quella delle sentenze di corte. Non si poteva dibattere perciò che il diritto giurisprudenziale nazionale attinente fosse stabilito così da impedire ai richiedenti di difendere la loro causa in procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali.
75. I richiedenti contestarono questa eccezione, asserendo che loro non avevano nessuna prospettiva di successo nei procedimenti pendenti.
76. La Corte reitera che la norma dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali a cui si fa riferimento nell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione è basato sull'assunzione che il sistema nazionale offra una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo della violazione addotta. Spetta al Governo dimostrare il non-esaurimento per soddisfare la Corte che una via di ricorso effettiva era disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente; cioè , che la via di ricorso era accessibile, capace di offrire compensazione a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e delle prospettive ragionevoli di successo (V. c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 24888/94, § 57 ECHR 1999-IX). La Corte ha riconosciuto che la norma dell'esaurimento non è né assoluto né capace di essere applicata automaticamente; ai fini verificare se è stata osservata, è essenziale avere riguardo alle circostanze della causa individuale. Questo vuole dire, in particolare, che la Corte non solo deve prendere in conto realisticamente l'esistenza di vie di ricorso formali nell'ordinamento giuridico dello Stato Contraente riguardato ma anche del contesto generale nel quale loro operano, così come le circostanze personali del richiedente. Deve esaminare poi se, in tutte le circostanze della causa, il richiedente ha fatto tutto ciò che ci si sarebbe potuto ragionevolmente aspettare affinché esaurisse le vie di ricorso nazionali (D.H. ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 116 ECHR 2007-XII). La Corte reitera inoltre che dove una via di ricorso suggerita non offriva prospettive ragionevoli di successo, per esempio alla luce del diritto giurisprudenziale nazionale consolidato il fatto che il richiedente non l’avesse utilizzata non pregiudica l'ammissibilità (Radio France ed Altri c. Francia, n. 53984/00, decisione del 23 settembre 2003 § 34).
77. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota, che sembra dalle osservazioni del Governo che non tutti i procedimenti di annullamento sono terminati. La Corte capisce la sua asserzione per cui, in mancanza di una determinazione della Corte Costituzionale sulla questione dei procedimenti individuali di annullamento, la Corte non è in grado di considerare quei procedimenti.
78. La Corte da prima nota riguardo alla richiesta n. 28464/04, dell’11 dicembre 2008 la Corte Costituzionale – cioè , dopo le osservazioni di ammissibilità del Governo – ha trattato l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del terzo richiedente confermando l'approccio della Corte Suprema del 24 giugno 2008. Siccome la terza richiedente aveva sollevato la compatibilità dell’ Articolo 220h(4) del Codice Commerciale con le disposizioni della legge costituzionale che garantivano il diritto ad un processo equo in quei procedimenti, la presunzione del Governo riguardo a questa particolare richiesta non è più accurata e deve essere respinta.
79. Riguardo alle richieste N. 3291/03 e 5344/05, è vero che i richiedenti non chiamarono in causa una decisione della Corte Costituzionale: nella richiesta n. 5344/05 i procedimenti sono terminati con una direttiva del 1 luglio 2008 da parte dell’ Alta Corte dell'Olomouc, e nella richiesta n. 32921/03 i procedimenti di annullamento sono ancora pendenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema. Nelle sue decisioni IV. ÚS 720/01 del 25 marzo 2003 (cioè il ricorso dei richiedenti nella richiesta n. 3291/03 riguardante, come tale, il ricorso contro la registrazione del trasferimento dei beni, vedere paragrafo 12 sopra) ed II. ÚS 21/03 del 31 agosto 2004 (nel contesto del ricorso da parte del richiedente nella richiesta n. 5344/05 contro la registrazione del trasferimento (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra) la Corte Costituzionale esaminò i problemi costituzionali sollevati nelle richieste n. 32921/03 e 5344/05. In particolare, benché la Corte Costituzionale stesse trattando formalmente con ricorsi contro decisioni di registrare il trasferimento dei beni, in ogni causa fece costatazioni comprensive che la legislazione sulla regolamentazione delle azioni di annullamento era compatibile con la Costituzione, siccome ampie salvaguardie procedurali erano contenute nel CC. Quelle salvaguardie includevano, nella sua prospettiva, la possibilità di un'azione per il risarcimento sotto gli Articoli 131, 220h, 220(k), 2201 e 220p del CC. La Corte Costituzionale adottò successivamente inoltre, lo stesso approccio nella sua decisione III. ÚS 527/04 del 25 maggio 2005, ed il 23 maggio 2007 la Corte Suprema applicò quei principi ad una decisione che trattava direttamente richieste di annullamento una volta che le decisioni dell’ assemblea generale del trasferimento erano state registrate. Inoltre, riguardo alla richiesta n. 5344/05, la Corte Costituzionale Assoluta tratto nei procedimenti di annullamento l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente di rifiuto di accesso ad una corte, quando rifiutò la richiesta della Corte Regionale di Ostrava di cancellare come incostituzionali le disposizioni del Codice Commerciale che impedivano al primo richiedente di far decidere la sua causa sui meriti (vedere paragrafi 33 e 36 sopra). Il risultato di questa revisione da parte della Corte Costituzionale incarnata nella sua decisione n. Pl. ÚS 51/03 non differiva dal suo precedente giurisprudenza.
In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che la giurisprudenza delle corti nazionali sulla questione era consolidata a tal punto che i richiedenti non potevano aspettarsi ragionevolmente di avere perseguito (o, nella causa della richiesta n. 32921/03, di aver atteso il risultato) le azioni di reclamo costituzionali separate in procedimenti individuali di annullamento. È vero, come evidenzia lo Stato, che questa giurisprudenza consiste di decisioni piuttosto che di giudizi. Comunque, in mancanza di qualsiasi simili giudizi, o qualsiasi indicazione che la Corte Costituzionale ritenesse quelle decisioni come irrilevanti, la Corte non considera che le decisioni dovrebbero essere riconosciute di minore peso ai fini della revisione sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo è a questo riguardo respinta per tutte le tre richieste.
80. Come per gli altri procedimenti che, secondo il Governo, i richiedenti avrebbero potuto introdurre, o di cui avrebbero dovuto attendere il risultato , cioè , le azioni per danni o per soddisfazione equa, o le azioni per risarcimento, la Corte considera che la questione delle vie di ricorso alternative è collegata inseparabilmente alla dichiarazione del Governo su meriti per cui quelle vie di ricorso hanno giustificato la limitazione all'accesso dei richiedenti ad una corte nei procedimenti di annullamento. La Corte si unisce perciò quelle questioni legali al suo esame sui meriti delle richieste.
81. La Corte nota che l’inadempienza con gli altri criteri di ammissibilità non è stata asserita dal Governo. Richiamando che il diritto di chiedere una revisione della legalità di una decisione dell’assemblea generale e delle relative misure che toccano le quote dei richiedenti rientrano all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (Pafitis ed Altri c. Grecia, sentenza del 26 febbraio 1998, Relazioni delle Sentenze e delle Decisioni 1998-1 § 87), dichiara perciò le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
82. I richiedenti addussero che gli azionisti principali votarono nelle rispettive assemblee generali per le decisioni che approvavano i trasferimenti contro la volontà dei richiedenti. Il loro diritto di ottenere una revisione della legalità di quelle decisioni tramite un'azione di annullamento fu infranto come conseguenza di procedimenti per annullamento iniziati dalle rispettive società che richiedevano alle corti incaricate del registro delle imprese di inserire in questo la decisione contestata e di metterle in liquidazione. Avendo accolto queste richieste, le corti resero impossibile per i richiedenti proseguire le loro azioni di annullamento siccome il CC impediva loro di fare così una volta che le richieste per la registrazione erano state accolte. Poiché ai richiedenti non fu permesso di partecipare ai procedimenti di fronte alle corti che accolsero quelle richieste, e siccome le corti furono obbligate a decidere sulle richieste entro quindici giorni della loro introduzione, i richiedenti persero qualsiasi opportunità di un processo equo sulle loro azioni per revisione della legalità del trasferimento. Loro sostennero che a causa di questi difetti e dell’inevitabile esame frettoloso della legalità dei trasferimenti causato dal tempo-limite dei quindici - giorni, questi procedimenti avrebbero dovuto essere ritenuti contrari all’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed ai trattati bilaterali riguardo all’ incoraggiamento e alla protezione reciproca di investimenti che vincolavano rispettivamente la Repubblica ceca, Germania e l'Austria,.
83. I richiedenti asserirono inoltre che la tutela giuridica dei loro diritti danneggiati che consisteva di azioni per danni a cui si faceva riferimento nelle decisioni delle corti nazionali era ineffettuabile o, a molto meglio, quasi - fattibile. Era smodatamente difficile asserire di fronte alle corti il diritto di introdurre procedimenti contro l'azionista principale in modo da ottenere il pagamento del valore del risarcimento. La terza richiedente sottolineò a questo riguardo che, secondo il contratto di trasferimento di beni, firmato dalla società e l'azionista principale, con cui tutti i beni della società erano stati trasferiti dalla prima al secondo, avrebbe potuto asserire quel diritto solamente di fronte ad un tribunale di arbitrato.
84. I richiedenti contesero inoltre che la legislazione che prevedeva il trasferimento è stata inspirata presumibilmente dalla legge austriaca e tedesca, per cui la sua conformità con lo scopo della terza Direttiva del Consiglio 78/855/EEC non era assicurato.
(b) Il Governo
85. Il Governo concedette che un'azione per annullare una decisione dell’ assemblea generale con cui i beni di una società erano stati trasferiti all'azionista principale quando la società fu messa in liquidazione avrebbe potuto essere introdotta solamente se una corte che amministrava il registro delle imprese non avesse ancora autorizzato la registrazione del trasferimento sul registro delle imprese. Ciononostante, sostenne che tale corte era obbligata davvero a fare una revisione della legalità di quella decisione come questione preliminare. L'impossibilità per gli azionisti di prendere parte nei procedimenti di fronte a quella corte intraprendeva lo scopo legittimo di eliminare la protrazione del problema e delle richieste abusive che avrebbero indebolito la protezione dei diritti degli azionisti, incluso gli azionisti di minoranza. Aggiunse che alla corte che decide nella causa del primo richiedente furono conferito il potere di sospendere i procedimenti nel caso avesse pensato essere necessario.
86. Riguardo alla violazione addotta dei trattati bilaterali riguardo alla protezione degli investimenti questa questione era, nella prospettiva del Governo, fuori della sfera della revisione sotto la Convenzione.
87. Inoltre, dove l'azionista di maggioranza possedeva più del 90 percento delle quote di una società, gli azionisti di minoranza non potevano influenzare la condotta della società. Perciò, i benefici che sorgono dalle loro quote erano de facto ridotti al valore dei beni delle quote che loro possedevano, essendo inoltre gli altri diritti addotti piuttosto teoretici. L'influenza degli azionisti di minoranza non poteva essere durevole e quegli azionisti sarebbero stati considerati piuttosto come dei freni che ritardavano i piani dell'azionista principale. In queste circostanze, la legislatura permise ad un azionista principale di escludere gli azionisti di minoranza mettendo in liquidazione una società senza liquidazione mentre tutti i suoi beni furono trasferiti all'azionista principale. Questa forma di squeeze out era stata trovata essere in conformità con la Convenzione nella causa Bramelid e Malmström c. la Svezia (N. 8588/79 e 8589/79, decisione della Commissione del 12 ottobre 1982, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 29, p. 64).
88. Il Governo sostenne inoltre che le alternative vie di ricorso legali erano disponibili ai richiedenti. Nel caso di disaccordo riguardo al risarcimento, era possibile per i richiedenti richiedere che il valore di questo risarcimento venisse determinato da una corte. In simili procedimenti una corte era obbligata a chiedere e a prendere in considerazione anche delle prove che non erano state presentate dalle parti ma che erano necessarie per stabilire i fatti attinenti. Inoltre, se la decisione dipendesse da un'opinione competente, una parte avrebbe potuto essere assolta dal suo obbligo di pagare i costi dei procedimenti anche se avesse avuto successo solamente in parte . Perciò, simili procedimenti, nella prospettiva del Governo non misero i richiedenti in una posizione di svantaggio rispetto alla loro posizione come querelanti nei procedimenti di annullamento. Inoltre, un'azione per il risarcimento per il danno inflitto dalla decisione ed un'azione per la soddisfazione equa per una violazione dei diritti fondamentali degli azionisti erano a disposizione dei richiedenti.
89. Concluse che anche se ai richiedenti era stato impedito di cercare una revisione del trasferimento attraverso azioni di annullamento, questa limitazione dei loro diritti sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione doveva essere riguardata come giustificata, poiché ha perseguito lo scopo legittimo di promuovere la certezza legale nelle relazioni legali, proteggendo gli interessi di terze parti e l'azionista principale e, alternativamente, di garantire l'operazione efficace di società commerciali. La protezione giudiziale riconosciuta agli azionisti di minoranza deve essere considerata perciò adeguata.
2. La valutazione della Corte
90. La Corte richiama che l'Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione incarna il “diritto ad una corte” il cui diritto di accesso che è il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte ad una corte in questioni civili, ne costituisce un aspetto (Osman c. Regno Unito, 28 ottobre 1998, § 147 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-VIII).
Essere in grado di presentare una causa ad una corte non soddisfa di per sé comunque, tutti i requisiti di quella disposizione. Deve essere stabilito anche che il grado di accesso riconosciuto sotto la legislazione nazionale era sufficiente a garantire il “diritto ad una corte” dell’individuo, avendo riguardo alla preminenza del diritto in una società democratica (Petkoski ed Altri c. "Precedente Repubblica iugoslava e della Macedonia", n. 27736/03, § 40 dell’8 gennaio 2009 che fa riferimento a Ashingdane c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 28 maggio 1985 Serie A n. 93, § 57). Inoltre, l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione garantisce il diritto di accesso ad una corte che non solo include il diritto di avviare procedimenti, ma anche il diritto di ottenere una“determinazione” della controversia da parte di una corte. Come affermato nella giurisprudenza della Corte, “sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di uno Stato Contraente permettesse ad un individuo di introdurre un'azione civile di fronte ad una corte senza garantire che la causa venga determinata da una decisione definitiva nei procedimenti giudiziali. Sarebbe inconcepibile che l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione debba descrivere in dettaglio le garanzie procedurali riconosciute ai contendenti - procedimenti che sono equi, pubblici e rapidi - senza garantire alle parti infine di far determinare le loro controversie civili” (Petkoski, citatao sopra, e Mulptiplex c. Croazia, n. 58112/00, §§ 44 e 45, 10 luglio 2003).
Allo stesso tempo, il “diritto ad una corte” non è assoluto; è soggetto a limitazioni permesse per implicazione, poiché per sua stessa natura richiama una legiferazione da parte dello Stato in cui gode di un certo margine di valutazione questo riguardo. Comunque, queste limitazioni non devono restringere o non devono ridurre l'accesso di una persona in modo tale o a tale misura che la stessa essenza del diritto ne venga danneggiata (Edificaciones March Gallego S.A. c. Spagna, 19 febbraio 1998, § 34 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-io). Inoltre, il principio della preminenza del diritto e la nozione di processo equo custoditi nell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione precludono qualsiasi interferenza da parte della legislatura con l'amministrazione della giustizia progettata per influenzare la determinazione giudiziale della controversia (Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, sentenza di 9 dicembre 1994 Serie A n. 301-B, § 49).
i. Richiesta n. 32921/03
91. Nella presente causa, la Corte osserva, che l'azione dei richiedenti deposita il 31 maggio 2001 era duplice, consistendo nella rivendicazione dell'illegalità della decisione dell’ assemblea generale della Českomoravský cement , a. s. e che dell'illegalità del contratto di trasferimento di beni (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra).
92. Trattando con la rivendicazione dei richiedenti di fronte alla Corte Municipale prima che il contratto di trasferimento di beni fosse stato illegale, la Corte nota che la Corte Municipale trattò tutti i capi della rivendicazione (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). In particolare, trattò i meriti con le rivendicazioni riguardo alla determinazione del giorno decisivo ed il numero di esperti commissionati. Non c'era perciò limitazione all’ accesso ad una corte a questo riguardo. Riguardo al capo dell’illegalità derivante volontariamente dal metodo di determinare il risarcimento per gli azionisti di minoranza, la Corte Municipale riferì ai richiedenti gli altri fori che erano disponibile. Dato che simili fori furono stabiliti ed utilizzati dai richiedenti, neanche questa parte della decisione non ha limitato l'accesso dei richiedenti ad una corte.
Ne segue che non c'era limitazione all’ accesso ad una corte riguardo alla rivendicazione dei richiedenti per cui il contratto di trasferimento di beni era illegale.
93. Comunque, riguardo alla rivendicazione per cui le corti sono andate a vuoto nel trattare con la contesa dei richiedenti per cui la decisione dell'assemblea generale della di Českomoravský cement, a. s. era illegale, il 27 luglio 2006 la Corte Municipale declinò di esaminare la richiesta dei richiedenti dell'illegalità alla decisione dell’ assemblea generale del 31 maggio 2001 sulla base che la decisione era stata registrata sul registro delle imprese, e che l’Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC, preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 183(1) a riguardo, perciò spogliava la Corte Municipale della giurisdizione (vedere ibidem). La Corte costata che l’applicazione dell’Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC alla causa costituiva una limitazione all'accesso dei richiedenti ad una corte siccome impediva loro dall'avere una determinazione di una corte sui meriti della questione legale in gioco, vale a dire se la decisione era stata adottata contrariamente alla legge.
94. La Corte deve esaminare se questa limitazione è compatibile con l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
95. La Corte prima nota che la limitazione all’ accesso ad un tribunale accadde come risultato dell'operazione dell’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC, ed è chiaro che questa norma copriva presente la causa. La limitazione era perciò legale nel senso che era prevista dal diritto nazionale. Riguardo alla rivendicazione dei richiedenti che il diritto nazionale era incompatibile con la legge della Comunità, e separatamente dal fatto che spetta al primo posto alle autorità nazionali interpretare il diritto nazionale e agli organi giudiziali della Comunità interpretare la giurisprudenza della Comunità, i richiedenti
riferendosi alla terza Direttiva del Consiglio 78/855/EEC, non ha specificato quali norme di questa hanno invocato. La Corte trova perciò la dichiarazione di questo richiedente non comprovata. Lo stesso si applica mutatis mutandis alla rivendicazione con cui i richiedenti si appellarono ai suddetti trattati bilaterali.
96. Di conseguenza, sarà esaminato se l'interferenza era giustificata, cioè se intraprendeva uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico ed era proporzionata (Osman c. Regno Unito, a cui si fa riferimento sopra § 147).
97. Il Governo sostenne che la limitazione era tesa a preservare la certezza legale e a facilitare l'operazione delle attività commerciali. I richiedenti non erano d'accordo, contestando l'esistenza di qualsiasi interesse pubblico nella causa.
98. La Corte riconosce che dando alle società una flessibilità nel determinare la loro quota azionaria, ed una limitazione concomitante sulle contestazioni sui trasferimenti di beni una volta che sono stati registrati, può essere visto come un miglioramento del lavoro e dello sviluppo economico. La Corte riconosce inoltre che l’Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC ha per effetto quello di prevenire dei ritardi tramite delle richieste abusive nei confronti di decisioni societarie che in cambio può promuovere la stabilità sui mercati commerciali ed anche contribuire allo sviluppo commerciale ed economico. Questo è così, anche se nelle presenti cause il beneficiario immediato del trasferimento era l'azionista principale: il mero fatto che legislazione dia profitto ad una persona privata non vuole dire che la legislazione contestata non abbia potuto perseguire un interesse pubblico (vedere James ed Altri c. Regno Unito, sentenza di 21 febbraio 1986 Serie A n. 98, §§ 39-40). La Corte costata che il rifiuto di accesso ad una corte tramite la disposizione legale contestata che è parte della legislazione sul trasferimento dei beni , intraprese uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico.
99. Riguardo alla proporzionalità della limitazione contestata, la Corte reitera, che una limitazione non sarà compatibile con l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo che si cerca di realizzare (Ashingdane c. Regno Unito, citata sopra, § 57).
100. La Corte prima osserva che l’applicazione da parte della Corte Municipale del 27 luglio 2006 dell’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC nella presente causa previene qualsiasi ulteriore esame dei meriti della rivendicazione dei richiedenti che la decisione del 31 maggio 2001 era illegale. Riguardo al suggerimento del Governo che gli interessi dei richiedenti sono stati considerati adeguatamente nei procedimenti connessi con la registrazione della decisione, la Corte nota, che i richiedenti non avevano qualità nei procedimenti di registrazione come è mostrato nelle direttive delle corti nazionali sostenute dalla decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 25 marzo 2003. Così, gli interessi dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione non potevano essere protetti in quei procedimenti. Inoltre, la registrazione non fu aggiornata essendo pendente il risultato del ricorso contro la decisione, anche se i richiedenti informarono la corte delle loro prospettive, ed anche se la legge al tempo attinente avrebbe permesso tale aggiornamento.
101. Riguardo alla rivendicazione del Governo per cui era aperto ai richiedenti cercare di rivendicare i loro interessi in altri modi, come richiedendo un controllo giurisdizionale separato del risarcimento pagato dall'azionista principale, o chiedendo danni o soddisfazione equa per una violazione dei diritti essenziali degli azionisti, la Corte noterebbe, che quei procedimenti avevano obiettivi diversi e trattarono col problema separato della soddisfazione valutaria. Inoltre, la soddisfazione equa avrebbe potuto essere chiesta per violazione di non tutti ma solamente dei diritti essenziali degli azionisti. Il Governo non ha mostrato che queste vie legali erano capaci di generare una discussione sulla legalità della decisione in circostanze comparabili ad una revisione in procedimenti per annullamento. Loro non possono essere riguardati perciò come un mezzo per attenuare gli effetti dell’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC in collegamento col problema centrale nei procedimenti. Né loro potrebbero essere considerati come una via di ricorso effettiva da esaurire da parte del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 74 sopra), una questione a cui la Corte unì ai meriti (vedere paragrafo 80 sopra).
102. Così, la Corte conclude che come risultato dell'operazione dell’ Articolo 131(l)(c) del CC, i richiedenti furono privati di una determinazione sui meriti della rivendicazione che la decisione dell'assemblea generale era illegale. Il loro accesso ad una corte fu limitato perciò, e no è stata stabilita nessuna ragione che potesse rendere questa limitazione proporzionata allo scopo legittimo di assicurare la stabilità nella comunità commerciale ostacolando ricorsi abusivi contro le decisioni.
Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali a questo riguardo e costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
ii. Richiesta n. 28464/04
103. La Corte nota che il 25 giugno 2003 la terza richiedente ha contestato tramite la sua azione per accantonare sia la decisione dell’ assemblea generale del YTONG a.s. , sia il contratto di trasferimento dei beni al quale lei non era una parte (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra) e in seguito al quale il risarcimento che lei ha ricevuto dall'azionista principale per il trasferimento non era revisionabile dalle corti ma solamente da un tribunale di arbitrato. La Corte nota inoltre che lei rivendicò, in particolare, che il trasferimento era illegale a causa di una clausola arbitrale obbligatoria nel contratto. La Corte nota inoltre che l’ Alta Corte di Olomouc cessò i procedimenti di annullamento iniziati dal terzo richiedente senza fare una revisione dei meriti con riferimento all’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC. La Corte osserva che lei non aveva qualità nei procedimenti sulla registrazione del trasferimento nel registro delle imprese, e che quei procedimenti non furono aggiornati essendo pendente il risultato del ricorso alla decisione ed al contratto.
104. Dopo che il trasferimento era stato registrato col registro delle imprese, non era più possibile per il richiedente chiedere che la decisione dell’ assemblea generale ed il contratto del trasferimento dei beni venisse accantonato, siccome i procedimenti avrebbero potuto continuare solamente se avesse cambiato l'oggetto della sua azione così da chiedere danni o da richiedere una revisione del risarcimento. L’Articolo 220h(4) del CC costituì così una limitazione all'accesso del terzo richiedente ad una corte siccome le impedì dall'avere una determinazione della corte sui meriti del problema legale in gioco, in particolare se la decisione ed il contratto erano stati adottati contrariamente alla legge. I suoi effetti sulla terza richiedente erano così simili a quelli dell’ Articolo 131(3)(c) del CC sui richiedenti nella richiesta n. 32921/03 esaminata sopra.
105. Facendo una revisione se questa limitazione era giustificata, la Corte nota che l’Articolo 220h(4) del CC perseguiva secondo il Governo lo stesso scopo dell’ Articolo 131(3)(c) a riguardo. Avendo riguardo alle sue considerazioni espresse nel paragrafo 98 sopra, la Corte trova che l’Articolo 220h(4) del CC ha intrapreso uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico all'interno del significato dell’articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Riguardo alla proporzionalità di questa limitazione, la Corte nota che il Governo si appellò, come nella richiesta n. 32921/03 sopra, all'esistenza di vie legali alternative che resero la limitazione compatibile con la Convenzione. La Corte nota inoltre che nella sua prospettiva espressa sopra in merito a quelle vie legali non costituivano delle vie di ricorso da esaurire all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, né loro avrebbero potuto attenuare adeguatamente il pregiudizio arrecato ai diritti degli azionisti di minoranza causato da questa limitazione (vedere paragrafo 101 sopra). Dato che il diritto della terza richiedente all’ accesso ad una corte fu limitato come risultato dell'operazione dell’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC in una modo simile a quello nella richiesta n. 32921/03, la Corte costata che la disponibilità delle vie di ricorso alternative non poteva soddisfare i requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione nella presente richiesta.
106. Ne consegue che il diritto della terza richiedente all’ accesso ad una corte fu limitato come risultato dell'operazione dell’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC che la spogliò di una determinazione sui meriti della rivendicazione dell'illegalità della decisione dell’ assemblea generale e del contratto di trasferimento dei beni, e non fu stabilita nessuna ragione che avrebbe reso questa limitazione giustificata. Perciò, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali a questo riguardo e costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
iii. Richiesta n. 5344/05
107. Il richiedente nella richiesta n. 5344/05 si lamentò di una mancanza di accesso ad una corte nei procedimenti di annullamento sotto due spetti. Prima, lui si lamentò che le corti non avevano trattato la sua rivendicazione per cui il contratto di trasferimento dei beni era nullo a causa del modo in cui ha fornito il metodo di calcolo del risarcimento, e lui si lamentò che le corti non avevano trattato la sua rivendicazione per cui il contratto di trasferimento di beni e la decisione dell’ assemblea generale erano nulli sulla base di irregolarità serie all'assemblea generale di Biocel, a. s.
108. Riguardo alla rivendicazione per cui le corti non hanno trattato la rivendicazione riguardo alle norme di risarcimento, la Corte nota, come sostenne il Governo, che gli consentito sollevare precisamente questo problema in procedimenti sotto l’Articolo 220k del CC. Il richiedente introdusse simili procedimenti, e loro sono ancora pendenti. Ne segue che il rifiuto di trattare la rivendicazione nei procedimenti di annullamento non spogliarono il richiedente dell’ accesso ad una corte a questo riguardo.
Riguardo alla rivendicazione per cui le corti non hanno trattato i meriti dei procedimenti per far accantonare il trasferimento, la Corte nota, che quei procedimenti furono cessati dalle decisioni della Corte Regionale di Ostrava e dall’Alta Corte di Olomouc rispettivamente il 14 marzo 2008 e il 1 luglio 2008, senza essere stati esaminati sui meriti. Entrambe le corti, riferendosi alla registrazione del trasferimento nel registro delle imprese, si appellarono all’ Articolo 220h(4) del CC che impediva loro di fare un’ulteriore revisione dell’ azione da accantonare. La Corte osserva che il primo richiedente non aveva qualità nei procedimenti sulla registrazione del trasferimento nel registro delle imprese, e che quei procedimenti non furono aggiornati essendo pendente il risultato del ricorso contro la decisione ed il contratto.
109. La Corte nota che la situazione del primo richiedente nei procedimenti di annullamento divenne dopo rispettivamente la decisione della Corte Regionale e dell’Altra Corte, analoga alla posizione della terza richiedente nella richiesta n. 28464/04 (vedere paragrafo 103 sopra), siccome gli fu impedito dall'avere una determinazione di corte sui meriti della sua azione per far accantonare la decisione dell’ assemblea generale. Il suo accesso ad una corte fu limitato perciò in una maniera simile a che in richiesta n. 28464/04. Avendo trovato che le vie legali alternative a cui fa riferimento il Governo non costituivano una via di ricorso legale ed effettiva all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione e non attenuavano adeguatamente tale limitazione (vedere paragrafi 101 e 105 sopra), la Corte trova che non fu stabilita nessuna ragione che avrebbe reso questa limitazione proporzionata agli scopi legittimi dell’ulteriore stabilità nella comunità commerciale prevenendo i ricorsi abusivi contro le decisioni dell’ assemblea generale.
Alla luce del precedente, la Corte respinge gli argomenti di non-esaurimento del Governo w questo riguardo e costatata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
110. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre che il trasferimento dei beni delle società corrispose all'espropriazione della loro proprietà che non fu salvaguardata con salvaguardie procedurali sufficienti. Loro contestarono la legislazione attinente come tale, in particolare il modo in cui disciplinò la determinazione del risarcimento. Inoltre, loro dibatterono che la legge attinente non prevedeva un livello sufficiente di precisione, prevedibilità e di certezza riguardo ai diritti degli azionisti di minoranza. Gli mancavano caratteristiche come il dovere per la società di fornire informazioni, una rappresentanza unita degli azionisti di minoranza e altre salvaguardie. Loro considerarono la legge attinente non equilibrata siccome non riusciva a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi di un azionista principale e quelli degli azionisti di minoranza. Infine, loro addussero un'interferenza con la loro aspettativa legittima, siccome la legge ceca non aveva previsto questa forma di trasformazione di una società quando loro acquisirono le loro quote. Doveva inoltre, essere considerato legittimo aspettarsi l’osservazione degli standard legali dei paesi europei dell'ovest e dei trattati internazionali sulla protezione degli investimenti da parte della legislatura ceca quando introdusse le disposizioni contestate che contravvenivano all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la cui parte attinente recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
111. Il Governo sostenne che le azioni di reclamo sotto questa disposizione della Convenzione erano inammissibili.
112. La Corte osserva che l'azione di reclamo di fronte a sé era tesa all’intero processo di trasformazione della società e alla posizione all’interno di questo degli azionisti di minoranza. Questo processo non è stata ancora completata comunque, pienamente, siccome i procedimenti di risarcimento, cruciali alla luce dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, sono ancora pendenti.
Ne segue che questa parte delle richieste è prematura all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione e deve essere dichiarata inammissibile facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
113. I richiedenti si lamentarono di no avere avuto a loro disposizione qualsiasi via di ricorso contro l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà asserita nelle loro richieste. Loro si appellarono all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
114. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata alle rivendicazioni fatte dai richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che furono dichiarate inammissibile come premature.
Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente mal-fondata facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e deve essere dichiarata inammissibile in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
V. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
115. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”

A. Dano
116. I richiedenti asserirono di non essere stati ancora in grado valutare il danno patrimoniale inflitto dall’ “espropriazione” delle loro quote siccome i procedimenti nazionali attinenti erano ancora pendenti. Loro riservarono il diritto di specificare i danni una volta che quei procedimenti fossero terminati. La terza richiedente chiese inoltre CZK 622,160 (EUR 22,200) per le parcelle che era stata obbligata a pagare nei procedimenti di arbitrato.
Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti non riuscirono a stabilire qualsiasi danno. Non vedevano collegamento casuale fra il danno addotto e la violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Notò a riguardo della terza richiedente che la parcella di arbitrato asserita è stata sostenuta insieme a tutti i tre postulanti, non solamente dalla terza richiedente.
La Corte considera che il danno addotto dai richiedenti è connesso alla perdita delle loro quote sulla liquidazione delle società ed i tentativi di recuperarla nei procedimenti di fronte alle corti nazionali. Comunque, queste rivendicazioni sono collegate all'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che è stato dichiarata inammissibile. Ne segue che nessun collegamento casuale è stato stabilito fra il danno addotto e la violazione trovata. Riguardo al danno incorso presumibilmente col pagamento della parcella di arbitrato, la terza richiedente non addusse nelle sue osservazioni sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che i suoi diritti di proprietà erano stati danneggiati col pagamento di quella parcella. Anche se avesse fatto così, nessun collegamento casuale fra il danno addotto e la violazione trovata avrebbe potuto essere stabilito siccome è stata trovata solamente una violazione dell’ Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Nessuna assegnazione sotto questo capo viene perciò accordata.
117. Riguardo al danno non-patrimoniale i richiedenti chiesero EUR 1,000,000 che avevano subito a causa dell'incertezza e della frustrazione causati dalla loro incapacità di godere dei diritti sotto la Convenzione. Loro considerarono questa somma come proporzionata alla taglia del loro investimento e della classe degli azionisti colpita dalla legislazione contestata e dal diritto giurisprudenziale. Nella prospettiva dei richiedenti un importo inferiore non obbligherebbe la Parte rispondente a portare questa legislazione in linea con gli standard europei.
Il Governo indicò che il sistema della Convenzione non riconosce actio popularis e perciò solamente la situazione dei richiedenti può essere presa in esame. Considerò che la mera dichiarazione di costatazione della violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione è la soddisfazione sufficiente per i richiedenti.
La Corte, decidendo su una base equa e in conformità col suo diritto giurisprudenziale riguardo al rifiuto di accesso ad una corte, sostiene la costatazione di violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione rappresenta di per sé la soddisfazione equa per i richiedenti.
B. Costi e spese
118. Ogni richiedente chiese i costi di rappresentanza legale corrispondenti a CZK 120,000 (EUR 4,528). Loro asserirono che la rappresentanza legale in ogni causa consisteva di cinquanta ore fatturabili a CZK 2,400 (EUR 90) l’ ora.
Invocando l’Articolo 60 paragrafo 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, il Governo asserì che sembrava che i richiedenti non avevano fornito all'interno del tempo specificato qui qualsiasi documento tale da provare il pagamento a quei costi dell'importo chiesto. Sostenne che la Corte avrebbe dovuto respingere la rivendicazione come non comprovata (Aldoshkina c. Russia, n. 66041/01, § 32 del 12 ottobre 2006).
119. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può recuperare i suoi costi e le sue spese solamente nella misura in cui sono incorsi davvero e necessariamente e sono stati ragionevoli in merito al quantum (Bottazzi c. Italia [GC], n. 34884/97, § 22 il 1999-V di ECHR). Avendo riguardo al materiale di fronte a sé, in particolare alla la complessità della causa, ai procedimenti nazionali perseguiti alla ricerca di un rimedio della violazione trovata, ai criteri summenzionati ed al fatto che i richiedenti avevano avuto successo solamente in parte in merito alla loro rivendicazione sollevata nelle loro richieste, la Corte trova proporzionato assegnare ai richiedenti, a riguardo di ciascuna richiesta, EUR 2,264 per costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti su questo importo, tutti da convertire nelle corone ceche al tasso stabilito dalla Banca Nazionale ceca ed applicabile in data dell’ accordo.
C. Interesse di mora
120. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Decide all’unanimità di congiungere le richieste;
2. Congiunge all’unanimità ai meriti la rivendicazione del Governo che i richiedenti non esaurirono le vie di ricorso nazionali in quanto non si giovarono delle vie di ricorso alternative disponibili e dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo al rifiuto di accesso ad una corte ammissibile ed il resto delle richieste inammissibile;
3. Respinge per cinque voti a due l'argomento di non-esaurimento che fu congiunto ai meriti e sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a riguardo di ciascuna richiesta;
4. Sostiene per cinque voti a due la costatazione di violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione rappresenta di per sé una soddisfazione equa per i richiedenti;
5. Sostiene per cinque voti a due
a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 2,264 (due mila duecento e sessanta quattro euro) a riguardo di ciascuna richiesta per costi e spese, da convertire nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo, insieme con qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge alll’unanimità il resto della rivendicazione dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 15 ottobre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione dissidente del Giudice Jaeger congiunta con il Giudice Rait Maruste è annessa a questa sentenza.
P.L.
C.W.


OPINIONE DISSIDENTE DEL GIUDICE JAEGER,
CONGIUNTA CON IL GIUDICE MARUSTE
Io non sono in grado di concordare con la costatazione di violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione della maggioranza-accesso ad una corte-senza qualsiasi determinazione del diritto civile effettivo in pericolo.
La causa è circa i diritti degli azionisti come definito dalla legge ceca. Da una parte i proprietari di quote possono essere protetti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nella misura in cui queste quote costituiscono una proprietà o un diritto di proprietà di un certo valore variabile secondo la borsa. Ma la Camera ha dichiarati queste rivendicazioni inammissibili come premature (§ 110-112). Dall’altra parte agli azionisti viene conferito il potere di partecipare a certe decisioni riguardo al futuro della società riguardata tramite decisioni prese all'interno di un'assemblea generale che è un valore aggiunto al valore valutario e puro.
Queste decisioni sono prese sotto la norma della maggioranza. Gli azionisti che sono nella maggioranza hanno il potere opprimente di trasformare la società in qualche cosa di diverso e di trasferire i suoi beni. I diritti della minoranza sono piuttosto limitati, secondo le restrizioni per legge: la minoranza, o un solo azionista, può avviare procedimenti per accantonare simili decisioni, ma non può interdire la registrazione che segue il voto della maggioranza in virtù del suo proprio diritto. Dopo la registrazione i diritti della minoranza si riducono ad un mero diritto al risarcimento. Tutto ciò è stabilito nella sentenza sotto § 42-59.
Le corti ceche diedero del ragionamento perché loro considerarono che quelle restrizioni di diritti di azionista fossero legittime-la certezza legale e la trasformazione spedita di società. La corte che amministra il registro delle imprese fu stabilita per proiettare diritti di maggioranza ed i diritti della società come simile (veda paragrafo 12 della sentenza). In oltre, con facendo una rassegna la legalità dell'elaborazione decisionale all'interno della società le corti che amministrano anche il registro delle imprese protegge l'interesse pubblico nell'assicurare che la legge si è attenuta con.
Io sono dell'opinione che le restrizioni delle quali si lamentano i richiedenti sono implementate in parte con delle disposizioni effettive, in parte con quelle procedurali. Se queste restrizioni sono in conformità con i diritti di Convenzione non si può rispondere ai diritti solamente tramite l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione concentrandosi solamente sull'aspetto procedurale, anche se limitati ad un solo fattore all'interno delle salvaguardie procedurali. Nel contesto di diritti civili che non saranno esercitati individualmente ma collettivamente insieme con gli altri azionisti nella stessa posizione e sotto condizione di giungere ad un voto maggioritario, l’accesso ad una corte non può essere interpretato puramente come un diritto individuale di impugnare e sospendere ogni decisione. Questo può allo stesso tempo garantire ad ogni azionista solo un diritto di veto contro le decisioni di maggioranza. Così la sfera dei diritti di votazione degli azionisti è definita all'interno dei limiti di controllo giudiziale annessi a loro.
Se i diritti custoditi nella Convenzione richiedono un’estensione dei diritti delle minoranze allo scopo di proteggere sufficientemente una minoranza di azionisti non si può rispondere tramite l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ma solamente tramite l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. È una questione effettiva e non procedurale.
L’Articolo 6 della Convenzione si applica sotto suo “capo civile” se c'era una “controversia” su un “diritto” che si può definire, almeno, per dei motivi difendibili, come riconosciuto sotto il diritto nazionale a dispetto del fatto che sia anche protetto sotto la Convenzione (vedere Associazone Nazionale Reduci Dalla Prigonia Dall'Internamento E Dalla Guerra Di Liberazione ed altri c. Germania, n. 45563/04; J.S. ed A.S. c. Polonia, n. 40732/98, 24 maggio 2005). L'assenza di un'aspettativa legittima di un diritto di proprietà o di qualsiasi altro diritto civile non presuppone l'assenza di un diritto riconosciuto su dei motivi difendibili e l'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. La Corte deve esaminare perciò sempre se c'era una controversia su un diritto difendibile il che no è stato fatto dalla Camera in qualsiasi profondità in questa causa.
È probabile che il diritto civile sotto controversia sia puramente il diritto di proprietà finanziaria incarnata nella quota. Questa controversia è ancora pendente come ammesso dalla maggioranza della Camera. Potrebbe essere anche il diritto supplementare ad influenzare le importanti decisioni prese in un'assemblea generale. Le sole disposizioni legali esistenti riguardo ad un diritto di influenzare il futuro di una società chiaramente limita la relazione tra gli azionisti ad un diritto a partecipare e votare nell'assemblea generale, al diritto di impugnare le decisioni fino a che i cambi non vengono registrati ed i beni trasferiti dal tribunale di commercio, e-dopo che la registrazione rende definitive le operazioni-chiedere il risarcimento in caso di qualsiasi danno subito o di risarcimento inadeguato pagato per le loro quote. Il diritto nazionale non prevede né qualsiasi diritto di accantonare le decisioni della maggioranza né di sospendere la loro esecuzione dopo la registrazione. Gli azionisti di minoranza chiaramente sono esclusi da questi diritti. Così loro non possono dire di avere tale diritto su dei motivi difendibili. L’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione non è applicabile (vedere Associazone Nazionale, citata sopra).
Costatare che l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione non si trova applicabile nella causa non esclude necessariamente una violazione sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Questa questione, specialmente se la legge prevedeva un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi che competono dei diritti della maggioranza e l'interesse pubblico nel funzionamento dell’ economia sotto le salvaguardie della preminenza del diritto da una parte e dall’altra la protezione dei diritti delle minoranze non può essere decisa prima che il risarcimento venga determinato. Nel corso del loro scrutinio le corti dovranno esaminare se la totalità delle restrizioni, incluso quelle sull’ accesso ad una corte, può essere ritenuta necessaria a controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale (sotto il secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1). Io concordo con la maggioranza della Camera sotto § 112 che questa parte della richiesta è prematura.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.