Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ABDURASHIDOVA v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 32968/0572010
STATO: Russia
DATA: 08/04/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 2 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 13


FIRST SECTION
CASE OF ABDURASHIDOVA v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 32968/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
8 April 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Abdurashidova v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 18 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 32968/05) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Ms Zulpa Abdurashidova (“the applicant”), on 22 July 2005.
2. The applicant was represented before the Court by lawyers of the International Protection Centre, an NGO registered in Moscow. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mrs V. Milinchuk, the former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights, and subsequently by their new Representative, Mr G. Matyushkin.
3. On 22 April 2008 the Court decided to apply Rule 41 of the Rules of Court and to grant priority treatment to the application and to give notice of the application to the Government. It also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3 of the Convention).
4. The Government objected to the joint examination of the admissibility and merits of the application. Having considered the Government's objection, the Court dismissed it.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1978. She lived in the village of Solnechnoye in the Khasavyurt district of Dagestan, Russian Federation. Currently she lives abroad after seeking asylum. The applicant is the mother of S. (also spelled S.) A., born in 1998.
A. The events of 14 March 2005
1. The applicant's account
6. At about 5.30 a.m. on 14 March 2005 approximately fifty men in two APCs (armoured personnel carriers) and a white VAZ 2121 Niva car with the registration plate 008 26 arrived at the applicant's house in Solnechnoye.
7. The men were armed and equipped with portable radio sets. They neither introduced themselves nor produced any documents. The applicant thought that they were State servicemen. It appears that the servicemen arrived to apprehend the applicant's husband and two men who were staying in the house that night. The men broke into the applicant's house and opened gunfire. The applicant's husband shouted to the servicemen: “Do not shoot! There are children in the house.” In spite of the warning the servicemen continued shooting. They took the applicant's husband outside; the applicant's three children remained in their rooms and the applicant was in the corridor.
8. During the shooting the applicant's two sons B. (born in 1997) and I. (born in 2002) ran out from their bedrooms into the corridor. At some point B. ran out of his sister's bedroom, screaming that S. had been wounded and was bleeding. It appears that S. A. had been hit by a fragment of a rifle grenade.
9. The applicant tried to go into her daughter's room, but the servicemen pushed her outside the house into the yard. When the applicant asked them to let her go inside, the servicemen forbade her under gun point. She was made to lie down on the ground with her hands behind her head.
10. When the shooting was over, their neighbour Mr I.I. went into the house and carried out the body of S. A..
11. As a result of the shooting the two men who were staying in the applicant's house were killed, and the applicant's husband was taken to the Department of the Interior of the Khasavyurt district (“the Khasavyurt ROVD”).
12. After the shooting the applicant saw that her house, as well as her family possessions in it, had been damaged by the gunfire. In addition, the family's identity documents, including passports and birth certificates, had been taken away by the servicemen.
13. The applicant submitted that after the shooting, the servicemen had taken away two plastic bags with the applicant's family documents and valuables, including the applicant's golden bracelet and two rings.
14. The applicant's description of the events of 14 March 2005 is based on several undated accounts provided by her to her representatives and on the letters which the applicant sent to the authorities. The applicant also submitted articles published in the newspaper “Druzhba” (Дружба) on 8 April 2005 and on 15 April 2005 and an article published in the newspaper “Niyso-Dagestan” (Нийсо-Дагестан) on 14 April 2005.
2. Information submitted by the Government
15. The Government submitted, with reference to the documents from the criminal investigation file (see below), that the two men who had been at the applicant's house on the night of 14 March 2005 had been suspected of the armed robbery of a woman and of an attack on a serviceman of the traffic police, Mr M.M., who had later died. The crimes had been committed by three persons on 31 December 2004, and on 1 January 2005 the Khasavyurt district prosecutor's office (the district prosecutor's office) opened a criminal investigation into the incident. The investigation was assigned file number 5111. It has been established that during the attack the criminals took hold of M.M.'s police identity document and his PM service pistol with a known serial number.
16. The police obtained information that two suspects, Mr S.Ya. and Mr R.Yu., had found refuge at the applicant's house and that they had stored weapons and armaments there, including the PM pistol. On 14 March 2005 the investigator of the district prosecutor's office decided to carry out an urgent search at the applicant's house with the aim of finding the two suspects and the weapons. Since the suspects could have been armed, the prosecutor had been assisted by servicemen of the Khasavyurt ROVD and of the special police force of Dagestan.
17. Upon arrival at the applicant's house, police officers Mr P.A. and Mr S.O. informed the applicant and her husband about the aim of their visit and suggested that they evacuate the building for their own safety. The applicant, her husband and their two sons B. and I. came out of the house. Then the applicant informed the policemen that her daughter S. had remained in the house. Mr P.A. and Mr S.O. returned to the house in order to take the child out, but Mr S.Ya. and Mr R.Yu., who had taken refuge in the house, threw hand grenades at them. Both policemen were injured. Their colleagues, in order to cover them, opened gunfire and killed both suspects.
18. After the skirmish was over, the site was inspected by the investigator of the district prosecutor's office and by forensic and medical experts, in the presence of two attesting witnesses. They discovered the bodies of Mr S.Ya. and Mr R.Yu. and of the applicant's daughter, S. A.. In the room where the two fugitives had been hiding, they also found safety pins from hand grenades and a PM hand pistol with the serial number corresponding to the one stolen from M.M.
B. Reaction of the authorities to the events of 14 March 2005
1. The applicant's correspondence with the State authorities concerning the death of S. A.
19. Shortly after the shooting had ended, experts from the Khasavyurt ROVD took pictures of S. A. and wanted to take her body to the morgue for an autopsy. The applicant and her relatives refused to give their permission and wrote down an official statement of refusal.
20. From the beginning of her correspondence with the authorities the applicant was assisted by Mr B., head of the local human rights organisation Romashka (Ромашка). The applicant and Mr B. contacted various official bodies, including the Russian President, the Dagestan Government, the Khasavyurt district administration, the mass media and prosecutors' offices at different levels, describing the circumstances of S. A.'s killing and requesting an investigation into the crime. The applicant retained copies of a number of their letters and submitted them to the Court. The relevant information is summarised below.
21. On 16 March 2005 the applicant wrote to a number of the State authorities, including the district prosecutor's office, the Dagestan prosecutor's office and the Prosecutor General. She described the events of 14 March 2005 and requested an investigation into the death of her daughter and prosecution of the culprits. The applicant also complained that her property had been unlawfully destroyed during the special operation and requested compensation for the pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage caused by the actions of the servicemen.
22. In March or April 2005 the applicant informed the Dagestan prosecutor's office that servicemen of the Khasavyurt ROVD had participated in the special operation on 14 March 2005.
23. On 20 April 2005 the Dagestan prosecutor's office informed the applicant that her complaint about unlawful actions of servicemen of the Khasavyurt ROVD during her husband's apprehension had been forwarded to the district prosecutor's office for examination.
24. On 26 April 2005 the district State registry office (ЗАГС) issued a statement confirming the death of S. A. on 14 March 2005.
25. On 26 April 2005 the Solnechnoye village administration issued a death certificate for S. A..
26. On 28 April 2005 the applicant again wrote to the authorities, including the district prosecutor's office, the Dagestan prosecutor's office and the Prosecutor General. In her letter she pointed out that on 16 March 2005 she had already complained about her daughter's killing, but the authorities had failed to initiate a criminal investigation into the death. She requested explanations concerning the reasons for the failure to initiate the investigation and to prosecute the perpetrators.
27. On 17 May and 30 June 2005 the Dagestan prosecutor's office informed the applicant that her complaint about the death of S. A. had been forwarded to the district prosecutor's office for examination.
28. On 25 May 2005 the Khasavyurt District Court sentenced the applicant's husband to three months' imprisonment for harbouring two criminals. In its judgment the court stated, inter alia, that his “minor daughter Summaya had been killed in the course of a special operation aimed at apprehending the criminals who had been hiding in the house”. The applicant's husband accepted his guilt and did not appeal against the sentence.
29. It appears that Mr B., who had assisted the applicant in the preparation of her complaints to the domestic authorities, was arrested in November 2005 on suspicion of illegal possession of weapons. Following allegations of torture and ensuing public pressure, he was released and acquitted. He left Russia in 2006 and sought asylum in another country.
2. The destruction of the applicant's property
30. On 15 March 2005 a commission of the administration of Solnechnoye, including the head of the administration, the chief accountant and the applicant's two neighbours, visited the applicant's house. They examined the scene and drew up the following report on damage:
“During the special operation on 14 March 2005 the house ... was practically destroyed; as a result of gunfire and explosions the windows and doors were blown out, the roof was damaged by shots, a powerful blast resulted in cracks in the walls and in the ceiling; the furniture in the living room and in the kitchen, the refrigerator and the TV set were rendered unusable.”
According to the report, the applicant's house was uninhabitable and required major repairs. The report further estimated the cost of repairs at between 650,000 and 800,000 Russian roubles (RUB), without specifying additional details.
3. Information submitted by the Government
31. In response to a specific request from the Court, the Government submitted 26 pages of documents from the criminal investigation files mentioned above. Although this was not marked on many documents, it appears that the Government submitted copies of the decisions to open the criminal proceedings in the cases assigned file numbers 5111, 51151 and 51153.
32. The Government submitted that on 14 March 2005 the district prosecutor's office had opened criminal investigation no. 51151 into the attack on the police officers and the unlawful purchase and storage of arms and ammunition. The investigation was opened in view of the wounding of two policemen, Mr P.A. and Mr S.O. The decision did not mention the suspects' and the applicant's daughter's deaths. The investigation obtained information that Mr S.Ya. and Mr R.Yu. had been involved with illegal armed groups and had fought against the authorities in Chechnya. Thus, on 14 March 2005, the district prosecutor's office opened a new investigation file concerning participation in illegal armed groups, which was assigned number 51153.
33. On 14 March 2005 the investigator of the district prosecutor's office, assisted by medical and forensic experts, in the presence of two witnesses, examined the body of S. A.. They noted two large open wounds: one measuring 10 cm by 8 cm to the head and one measuring 10 cm by 6 cm to the upper part of the torso. The Government submitted a copy of the expert report. The experts also took photographs; however, as follows from subsequent documents and the Government's submissions, the photographs could not be developed because the film was defective.
34. On 21 March 2005 criminal investigation files nos. 51151 and 51153 were joined and assigned number 51151. The decision did not refer to the death of the applicant's daughter or to the deaths of the suspects.
35. No separate criminal investigation was opened into the applicant's daughter's death. The Government submitted that in the course of the investigation of file no. 51151 the authorities had established that S. A. had died of splinter wounds caused by hand-grenade explosions. The police officers had not used grenades and had only employed hand guns. The forensic reports on the bodies of Mr S.Ya. and Mr R.Yu. concluded that they had died as a result of bullet wounds. Seeing that no autopsy had been carried out on the body of S. A. owing to her relatives' refusal to submit it for such an examination, the investigation relied on the description of her body, which referred to splinter wounds. It concluded that her death had resulted from the explosion of hand grenades thrown by the suspected criminals.
36. On 2 April 2005 the criminal proceedings against Mr S.Ya. and Mr R.Yu. were terminated on account of their deaths. The investigation of criminal case no. 5111 continued.
37. On 26 April 2005 the district prosecutor's office took statements from two investigators, medical and forensic experts who had examined the child's body and two attesting witnesses. The Government submitted copies of their testimonies, except for the medical expert's statement and one witness's statement. The forensic expert explained that he had taken photographs of the house, of two male bodies in the courtyard and of the girl's body in the neighbouring house. Once the film was developed, some photographs were spoiled because the film was defective. Thus, no photographs of the girl's body came out.
38. According to the Government, the medical expert stated that he had examined the girl's body in the neighbouring house and noted two large open wounds to the head and upper part of the torso. These wounds could have been caused by splinters from an explosive device. The body had then been transferred to the relatives, who had refused to submit it for an autopsy.
39. The investigator submitted that late at night on 14 March 2005 he had been alerted that the suspects in the murder of Inspector M.M. were hiding in the house of the imam of Solnechnoye. Early in the morning he went to the scene, accompanied by servicemen of the Khasavyurt ROVD and of the special police unit of Dagestan. They also invited two witnesses residing in Khasavyurt, Timur E. and Murat. Once at the house, the servicemen surrounded the house. After that the police ordered everyone to leave the house. A woman, a man and two children came out into the entry hall and the police led them outside the house. The woman said that another child remained in the house. Two servicemen of the special police unit entered the house and immediately afterwards there came the sound of explosions. Several policemen ran to the house and started to shoot in order to cover up their colleagues. The persons taking refuge in the house fired back and threw hand grenades, some of which exploded outside the house, and some inside the house. As soon as the two policemen were led out of the building, other servicemen shot at the doors and windows of the house with machine guns and automatic rifles. When the shooting from inside the house subsided, the policemen went in and brought out two male bodies. They said that there was a child's body in the house. A neighbour walked in and carried the body to the nearby house. Then the body was examined by the officials from the prosecutor's office, in the presence of two witnesses. They noted two large open splinter wounds – one to the front of the head and another near the shoulder blade. The investigator added that the police had not used hand grenades; they had fired from machine guns and automatic rifles. The investigator also answered a number of questions concerning the missing property and identity documents and the damage caused to the applicant's house. He stated that they had collected and seized two yellow rings and the applicant's passport. No other documents or valuables had been found or seized. As to the state of the house, the investigator specified that the window glazing, furniture and parts of the roof had been damaged. The walls had not been damaged. Some parts of the house were in any event unfinished and were not inhabitable. The state of the house could be ascertained from the photographs taken immediately after the attack.
40. Another investigator, a member of the team working on M.M.'s murder, stated that he had arrived at the applicant's house at about 9 a.m. on 14 March 2005. There he was instructed to examine the child's body, together with the criminal and forensic experts. They noted two large wounds, caused by splinters from an explosive device. The mother of the child refused to submit the body for an autopsy and signed a document to that effect. After the body was examined, the relatives took it for burial. The criminal expert later informed the investigator that the film had been defective and no photographs could be developed.
41. The witness M. G. stated that he and his friend T. E. had been doing their morning jogging when the police asked them to be witnesses to a search in Solnechnoye. When the two men arrived at the house, it was surrounded by police. They saw a man, a woman and two children come out, accompanied by servicemen. The woman said that another child remained in the house. Two police officers went in and there followed several explosions. Then several more policemen ran to the house and the witnesses were taken away to a safe distance, from where they could not see the house. They could hear shots being fired and explosions. Once the shooting was over, the witnesses were invited by the investigator to be present during the search. In front of the house there were two male bodies. Someone brought out a child's body, which was taken to the neighbouring house. The investigator found and seized two yellow rings and a woman's passport. The investigator also noted and seized a number of safety pins from hand grenades and empty cartridges, as well as a hand pistol. The rooms were first inspected by a bomb expert and then by the investigators and witnesses. The house was partially damaged, but the load-bearing walls and the roof were intact. Some rooms were unfinished. The Government submitted a copy of M. G.'s testimony and stated that T. E. had made similar statements.
42. In their observations the Government extensively cited an undated statement by Mr A.A., the head of the criminal investigation department of the Khasavyurt ROVD, no copy of which has been submitted. According to the Government, Mr A.A. stated that the department had been tipped off about the location of the suspects in M.M.'s murder. Early in the morning on 14 March 2005 he had arrived at the applicant's house, accompanied by servicemen of the special police force. The servicemen surrounded the house. One serviceman of the special police force walked up to the house and knocked on the door. He was let inside. About one minute later he came out of the house, together with a man, a woman and two children. The woman said that a third child remained in the house. She wanted to return to the house, but was not allowed to. Two servicemen of the special police force went to the house in order to retrieve the child. As soon as they had gone in, there came the sounds of explosions. Several more servicemen ran to the house to help their colleagues. They were shot at from inside the house and more grenades were thrown. The two wounded policemen were assisted in leaving the house, and the servicemen shot at the windows and doors of the house. The policemen were not equipped with grenades. When the shooting from inside the house subsided, several policemen went into the house. They found the bodies of two men and a girl. The male bodies were taken into the courtyard. A local resident took out the child's body and took it to the neighbouring house. Mr A.A. was told by his colleagues that the body had two large splinter wounds. An expert in explosives examined the house, following which an investigator conducted a search in the presence of two witnesses. Mr A.A. also stated that he had seen the seized pistol with the serial number corresponding to that taken from M.M. and a number of empty cartridges. The investigators put them in bags and sealed off the courtyard of the house.
43. The Government submitted a note dated 14 March 2005, in which Mrs R. Ya. stated that the family had refused to submit the body of S. A. for an autopsy with the aim of establishing the cause of her death. The note stated that the family knew the cause of the child's death and that they wanted to proceed with the burial in accordance with religious rites.
44. The Government submitted an undated note signed by the applicant to the effect that she had received from the investigator of the district prosecutor's office two golden rings and her passport, which had been seized at her house on 14 March 2005.
45. The Government also submitted a number of letters sent by the district prosecutor's office to the applicant. On 4 April 2005 the investigator informed the applicant that the investigation had established that her daughter had died as a result of grenade explosions caused by S.Ya. and R.Yu. The criminal proceedings against the two men had been terminated on account of their deaths. Two rings had been returned to the applicant. She could seek compensation for other damage through the Khasavyurt District Court. The decisions of the investigators could be appealed against to a higher-ranking prosecutor or to a court.
46. From the documents submitted it does not appear that the investigators attempted to take statements from the applicant, her husband or their neighbours.
47. The Government stated that the investigation of criminal case file no. 5111 was in progress and that disclosure of other documents would be in violation of Article 161 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, since the files contained information of a military nature and personal data concerning the witnesses or other participants in the criminal proceedings.
C. Court proceedings brought by the applicant
48. On 14 June 2005 the applicant complained to the Khasavyurt District Court of Dagestan (“the district court”) about the destruction of her property during the special operation conducted on 14 March 2005 and the failure of the authorities to initiate criminal proceedings into the death of S. A.. She sought a ruling obliging the district prosecutor's office to initiate an investigation into the crime and to prosecute the perpetrators.
49. On 2 August 2005 the district court refused to examine her complaint. It stated that the applicant was entitled to appeal against actions of the district prosecutor's office only within the course of an ongoing criminal investigation or that she could appeal against the authorities' refusal to initiate criminal proceedings. The court pointed out that she had failed to submit any evidence of an ongoing criminal investigation or of the authorities' refusal to initiate criminal proceedings.
50. The applicant did not appeal against that decision.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
51. For a summary of the relevant domestic law see Akhmadova and Sadulayeva v. Russia (no. 40464/02, §§ 67-69, 10 May 2007).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 2 OF THE CONVENTION
52. The applicant alleged that the authorities had breached both their negative and positive obligations under Article 2 in respect of her daughter. She also complained that no proper investigation had taken place. Article 2 reads:
“1. Everyone's right to life shall be protected by law. No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law.
2. Deprivation of life shall not be regarded as inflicted in contravention of this article when it results from the use of force which is no more than absolutely necessary:
(a) in defence of any person from unlawful violence;
(b) in order to effect a lawful arrest or to prevent the escape of a person lawfully detained;
(c) in action lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot or insurrection.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties' submissions
53. The Government contended that the complaint should be declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. They argued that the applicant had not used the normal recourse provided for by the domestic legislation. She had failed to appeal to a prosecutor's office or to a court against the decision to terminate the criminal proceedings against S.Ya. and R.Yu. In August 2005 her complaint to the district court had been left unexamined since she had failed to refer to the contested decision. They further argued that it had been open to the applicant to pursue civil proceedings.
54. The applicant contested that objection. She stated that the criminal investigation had proved to be ineffective and that her complaints to that end, including an application to the district court, had been futile. The applicant stressed that she had not been accorded any procedural status in the investigation allegedly relating to her daughter's death. The district prosecutor's office had not informed her of any procedural decisions and the district court had found the information contained in the letter of 4 April 2005 insufficient to review her complaint in substance. With reference to the Court's practice, she argued that she was not obliged to apply to civil courts in order to exhaust domestic remedies. Finally, she referred to the threats to herself and the alleged persecution of her lawyer B., as a result of which they had both left Russia and sought asylum abroad.
2. The Court's assessment
55. The Court notes that the Russian legal system provides, in principle, two avenues of recourse for the victims of illegal and criminal acts attributable to the State or its agents, namely civil and criminal remedies.
56. As regards a civil action to obtain redress for damage sustained through the alleged illegal acts or unlawful conduct of State agents, the Court has already found in a number of similar cases that this procedure alone cannot be regarded as an effective remedy in the context of claims brought under Article 2 of the Convention (see Khashiyev and Akayeva v. Russia, nos. 57942/00 and 57945/00, §§ 119-121, 24 February 2005, and Estamirov and Others v. Russia, no. 60272/00, § 77, 12 October 2006). In the light of the above, the Court confirms that the applicant was not obliged to pursue civil remedies. The Government's objection in this regard is thus dismissed.
57. As regards criminal-law remedies, the Court observes that under Russian law, parties to proceedings may challenge the progress of the criminal investigation before a supervising prosecutor or a judge. It is undisputed that the authorities were immediately aware of the applicant's daughter's death and took some steps to investigate it. However, the applicant and members of her family were excluded from these proceedings. Contrary to the usual practice under national law, the deceased's family members were not granted the official status of victims in the criminal proceedings, a procedural role which would have entitled them to intervene during the course of the investigation. In March and April 2005 the applicant submitted a number of complaints to various authorities, including the prosecutor's office, but this did not prompt the investigators to correct the situation and to accord a procedural status to the applicant. The Government's memorandum does not contain any explanation of this omission. Thus, it is unclear how the applicant could have made use of these provisions.
58. Proof of the ineffectiveness of the domestic legal mechanisms in the present case is provided by the fact that on 2 August 2005 the district court refused to consider on the merits the applicant's complaint about the investigation, referring, in essence, to the absence of any procedural decisions taken upon her complaint. The Court is thus not persuaded that any further appeals by the applicant would have made any difference. The applicant must therefore be regarded as having complied with the requirement to exhaust the relevant criminal-law remedies.
59. Accordingly, the Court dismisses the Government's preliminary objection in respect of the complaints under Article 2.
60. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
61. The applicant maintained that her daughter had been killed by the agents of the State who had carried out a security operation at her home. She referred to her own statements describing the operation. She insisted that the armed police officers had stormed her house without a warning and fired shots in the rooms, as a result of which her daughter had been killed. The documents from the domestic investigation were inconclusive and did not rule out her version of the events. She further maintained that the positive obligation to protect the right to life had been violated, since the special operation had been planned and executed without proper consideration for the safety of the inhabitants of the house. Finally, the applicant insisted that no proper investigation into the death had taken place, since the only proceedings instituted by the district prosecutor's office had been aimed at solving the crimes allegedly committed by S.Ya. and R.Yu.
62. The Government denied all those allegations. Citing the documents of the domestic investigation, they argued that the death of S. A. had been caused by splinters from explosive devices used by the two criminal suspects. The applicant and her family had refused to submit the girl's body for an autopsy which could have provided conclusive results as to the cause of death. As to their positive obligation, the Government emphasised that the applicant's husband had knowingly harboured two armed criminal suspects in his family home. He had later been found guilty of this crime. Two police officers had been wounded when they had tried to enter the house and take the girl out. The State servicemen had thus done everything possible to prevent any harm to the applicant and her family. Faced with violent resistance from the two men and in order to save the lives of the two officers who had entered the house, the police had been forced to open fire, as a result of which both suspects had been killed. As to the investigation, the Government contended that it had been in line with domestic law and the Convention requirements.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) As to the responsibility of the respondent State for the death of S. A. in the light of the substantive aspect of Article 2 of the Convention
63. It was not disputed by the parties that the applicant's daughter had been killed during a security operation aimed at the apprehension of two armed criminal suspects at the applicant's house. It was further recognised that both the police and the two suspects had employed lethal force; as a result of the operation, both suspects were killed and two police officers were wounded. The question to decide in the present case is whether the State authorities were directly responsible for the death of the applicant's daughter, as the applicant alleged.
64. The Court reiterates that Article 2, which safeguards the right to life and sets out the circumstances in which deprivation of life may be justified, ranks as one of the most fundamental provisions in the Convention, from which no derogation is permitted. In its extensive jurisprudence the Court has developed a number of general principles relating to the scope of the obligations under this provision, as well as to the establishment of facts in dispute, when confronted with allegations under Article 2 (for a summary of these, see Bazorkina v. Russia, no. 69481/01, §§ 103-109, 27 July 2006, and Akpınar and Altun v. Turkey, no. 56760/00, §§ 47-52, ECHR 2007-III). The Court also notes that the conduct of the parties when evidence is being obtained has to be taken into account (see Ireland v. the United Kingdom, 18 January 1978, § 161, Series A no. 25).
65. The Court reiterates that the evidentiary standard of proof required for the purposes of the Convention is proof “beyond reasonable doubt”, and that such proof may follow from the coexistence of sufficiently strong, clear and concordant inferences or of similar unrebutted presumptions of fact. The Court has also noted the difficulties for applicants to obtain the necessary evidence in support of allegations in cases where the respondent Government are in possession of the relevant documentation and fail to submit it. Where the applicant makes out a prima facie case and the Court is prevented from reaching factual conclusions owing to the lack of such documents, it is for the Government to argue conclusively why the documents in question cannot serve to corroborate the allegations made by the applicants, or to provide a satisfactory and convincing explanation of how the events in question occurred. The burden of proof is thus shifted to the Government and if they fail in their arguments, issues will arise under Article 2 and/or Article 3 (see Toğcu v. Turkey, no. 27601/95, § 95, 31 May 2005, and Akkum and Others v. Turkey, no. 21894/93, § 211, ECHR 2005-II).
66. The Court notes that despite its requests for the entire investigation file concerning the death of the applicant's daughter, the Government produced only part of the documents. The Government referred to Article 161 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. In previous cases the Court has already found this explanation insufficient to justify the withholding of key information requested by it (see Imakayeva v. Russia, no. 7615/02, § 123, ECHR 2006-XIII).
67. The Court notes, however, that the investigation in the present case focused primarily on the actions of the two criminal suspects. From the outset of the proceedings the authorities considered that the girl's death had resulted from the explosions caused by the two men while they had resisted the police. It does not appear that any elements in the investigation conducted by the district prosecutor's office contained information which could have warranted different conclusions. Therefore, the main problem in the present case is not the Government's failure to disclose certain documents, but rather the quality of the investigation itself, which will be addressed below.
68. The Court notes that the applicant's allegation that the State servicemen were responsible for the death of S. A. is based exclusively on her own statement. No other statements or evidence to support this assertion have been provided by the applicant to the Court or to the domestic investigation.
69. The description of the body drawn up on 14 March 2005 by a forensic expert and the statements collected on 26 April 2005 from two investigators, one attesting witness and the criminal expert who had examined the body indicated that the death had been caused by splinters from an explosive device (see paragraphs 33, 37 and 39-41 above). These documents and statements appear coherent and the Court does not discern any reasons to question their credibility. The investigation found that the two criminal suspects had used hand grenades against the police officers; safety pins from grenades were found in the house. The police had used firearms and the two suspects' deaths had been caused by bullet wounds (see paragraph 39 above). There is no mention in any of the descriptions of the events that the security forces used explosive devices against the two suspects. The applicant did not allege this either. Thus, the domestic investigation concluded that the child's death had resulted from the actions of the two criminal suspects who had been killed during the operation. Although many aspects of the domestic investigation are open to criticism (see below), the Court cannot find its conclusions to be so faulty as to reject them altogether as “defying logic” or improbable (contrast Beker v. Turkey, no. 27866/03, §§ 51-52, 24 March 2009).
70. The Court further notes that pursuant to the decision taken by the applicant and her family, no autopsy of the body was conducted. In the note signed by the applicant's sister-in-law on 14 March 2005 the decision not to conduct an autopsy was justified by the fact that there was no need to establish the cause of death since the family was aware of it (see paragraph 43 above); therefore, it appears that the family accepted the forensic expert's conclusion that the death had resulted from splinter wounds. While fully appreciating that this choice was made under the influence of a shock following tragic and traumatic events, the Court notes that it resulted in the absence of a document which could have provided a complete and accurate record of injuries and an objective analysis of clinical findings, including the cause of death (see Salman v. Turkey [GC], no. 21986/93, §106, ECHR 2000-VII).
71. In such circumstances the Court finds that it has not been established to the required standard of proof “beyond reasonable doubt” that the security forces were directly responsible for the death of S. A..
72. Accordingly, the Court finds no direct State responsibility, and thus no violation of Article 2 of the Convention in this respect.
(b) The alleged failure to safeguard the right to life of S. A.
73. The Court has not found it established that State agents were responsible for the death of the applicant's daughter. However, this does not necessarily preclude the responsibility of the Government under Article 2 of the Convention (see Osmanoğlu v. Turkey, no. 48804/99, § 71, 24 January 2008). According to the established case-law of the Court, the first sentence of Article 2 § 1 enjoins the State not only to refrain from the intentional and unlawful taking of life, but also to take appropriate steps to safeguard the lives of those within its jurisdiction (see L.C.B. v. the United Kingdom, 9 June 1998, § 36, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-III). The State's obligation in this respect extends beyond its primary duty to secure the right to life by putting in place effective criminal-law provisions to deter the commission of offences against the person, backed up by law-enforcement machinery for the prevention, suppression and punishment of breaches of such provisions. Article 2 of the Convention may also imply a positive obligation on the authorities to take preventive operational measures to protect an individual whose life is at risk from the criminal acts of another individual (see Osman v. the United Kingdom, 28 October 1998, § 115, Reports 1998-VIII).
74. In this connection the Court reiterates that, in the light of the difficulties in policing modern societies, the unpredictability of human conduct and the operational choices which must be made in terms of priorities and resources, the scope of the positive obligation must be interpreted in a way which does not impose an impossible or disproportionate burden on the authorities. Not every claimed risk to life, therefore, can entail for the authorities a Convention requirement to take operational measures to prevent that risk from materialising. For a positive obligation to arise, it must be established that the authorities knew or ought to have known at the time of the existence of a real and immediate risk to the life of an identified individual or individuals from the criminal acts of a third party and that they failed to take measures within the scope of their powers which, judged reasonably, might have been expected to avoid that risk (see Osman, cited above, § 116).
75. In the light of the foregoing, the Court will have to determine whether the way in which the police operation was conducted showed that the police officers had taken appropriate care to ensure that any risk to the life of the applicant's daughter was kept to a minimum. In carrying out its assessment of the planning and control phase of the operation from the standpoint of Article 2 of the Convention, the Court must have particular regard to the context in which the incident occurred as well as to the way in which the situation developed (see Andronicou and Constantinou v. Cyprus, 9 October 1997, § 182, Reports 1997-VI).
76. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that its ability to evaluate the operation has been seriously hampered by the absence of any meaningful investigation into the police's conduct. Nevertheless, the Court will assess the organisation of the operation on the basis of the material available to it, in particular by relying on the relevant evidence submitted by the Government, which is not disputed by the applicant.
77. First of all, the Court notes that the operation was not spontaneous and the police had time to gather and bring to the applicant's house a significant number of well-equipped and trained servicemen. They arrived in the early hours of the morning and surrounded the house, without encountering any difficulties or resistance from the suspected criminals (see paragraphs 39 and 42 above). The prosecutor's office and the police conducting the operation were aware of the danger posed by the two criminal suspects, as is demonstrated by the impressive scope of the security arrangements. They also had sufficient time and personnel for the adequate planning and execution of the search and apprehension, while bearing in mind the need to ensure the safety of the inhabitants of the house, including three small children. However, there is nothing in the documents reviewed by the Court to suggest that any serious consideration was devoted to this issue at the planning stage of the operation.
78. It further appears that once the operation had commenced, the police took steps to remove the applicant's family from the house. According to the Government, as the head of the criminal investigations department of the district police office stated, one member of the special police force was allowed into the house and was able to walk away unharmed with the applicant, her husband and their two children (see paragraph 42 above). Nevertheless, it remains entirely unclear why at that moment it was impossible to evacuate the applicant's daughter. In the absence of any explanations from the authorities, this has to be seen as a major failure of the operation, which subjected the child to an impermissibly high risk of injury or death.
79. The police officers should have been aware of the extreme vulnerability of a six-year-old girl, who would undoubtedly have been frightened and disoriented by the events. Once it became apparent that she had been left behind, ensuring her safety should have been the primary concern for the law-enforcement personnel. However, from the documents submitted by the Government, it does not appear that any precautions were taken with a view to safeguard the child's life. Instead, it appears that an exchange of fire was provoked by the sending of two officers of the special police force to enter the house by the main door. This led to the wounding of the two officers and the deaths of both suspects and S. A.. While bearing in mind the limitations on the scope of its review as mentioned above, the Court finds that such conduct by the police could hardly be found to be compatible with the requirement to minimise the risk to life of persons in need of protection.
80. Finally, the Court is surprised by the lack of diligence displayed in the immediate aftermath of the skirmish. Thus, it is impossible to understand why a local resident was allowed on to the site before the investigators and emergency services. The Court will discuss the deficiencies of the investigation below; however, the control over security arrangements whereby a civilian was able to penetrate the police lines can be best described as seriously flawed.
81. In the light of the foregoing, and in so far as conclusions may be drawn from the material before it, the Court finds that the actions of the authorities in respect of the planning, control and execution of the operation were not sufficient to safeguard the life of S. A.. The authorities failed to take the reasonable measures available to them in order to prevent a real and immediate risk to the life of the applicant's daughter.
82. There has accordingly been a violation of the positive obligations arising under Article 2.
(c) The alleged inadequacy of the investigation of the kidnapping
83. The Court has on many occasions stated that the obligation to protect the right to life under Article 2 of the Convention also requires by implication that there should be some form of effective official investigation when individuals have been killed as a result of the use of force. It has developed a number of guiding principles to be followed for an investigation to comply with the Convention's requirements (for a summary of these principles see Bazorkina, cited above, §§ 117-119).
84. In the present case the investigation took some steps to establish the circumstances of S. A.'s death. The investigator and forensic and criminal experts drew up a description of the body and took photographs of it. Their statements were collected in April 2005. These measures were taken in the course of the proceedings conducted by the district prosecutor's office against the two men suspected of the murder of a police inspector and involvement in illegal armed groups.
85. However, no separate inquiry was initiated for the purpose of ascertaining the details of the applicant's daughter's death. Consequently, other important investigative steps have not been taken, such as questioning the other witnesses and ordering additional expert reports.
86. The Court is appalled by the fact that as a result of this failure the applicant was never accorded any procedural status, and was thus entirely excluded from the investigation concerning her daughter's death. The investigators in the present case blatantly ignored the requirements to safeguard the interests of the next of kin in the proceedings and to allow public scrutiny. What is even more disturbing is that this situation was not corrected when the applicant attempted to bring this failure to the attention of the district court, whose role in principle should be to act as a safeguard against the arbitrary exercise of powers by the investigating authorities (see, mutatis mutandis, Trubnikov v. Russia (dec.), no. 49790/99, 14 October 2003).
87. These factors resulted in the investigation's failure to examine all the circumstances of the girl's death, including the aspects of the police operation, as the positive obligations under Article 2 require.
88. In the light of the foregoing, the Court holds that the authorities failed to carry out an effective criminal investigation into the circumstances surrounding the death of S. A., in breach of Article 2 in its procedural aspect.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 3 OF THE CONVENTION
89. The applicant relied on Article 3 of the Convention, submitting that as a result of her daughter's death and the State's failure to investigate it properly, she had endured mental suffering in breach of Article 3 of the Convention. Article 3 reads:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
A. The parties' submissions
90. The Government disagreed with these allegations and argued that it had not been established that the applicant's daughter's death had been caused by State agents. They also denied that there had been any deficiencies in the investigation.
91. The applicant maintained her submissions.
B. The Court's assessment
92. The Court would refer to its practice by which the application of Article 3 is usually not extended to the relatives of persons who have been killed by the authorities in violation of Article 2 (see Yasin Ateş v. Turkey, no. 30949/96, § 135, 31 May 2005) or to cases of unjustified use of lethal force by State agents (see Isayeva and Others v. Russia, nos. 57947/00, 57948/00 and 57949/00, § 229, 24 February 2005), as opposed to the relatives of the victims of enforced disappearances. In such cases the Court would normally limit its findings to Article 2. In the present case the Court did not find that the applicant's daughter had been killed by State agents and considers that the grievances expressed by the applicant are covered by its above findings under the substantive and procedural headings of Article 2.
93. It therefore concludes that, even if this complaint were to be declared admissible, there is no need to examine it separately.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
94. The applicant further stated that her house and property had been damaged during the security operation on 14 March 2005. She invoked Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads, in so far as relevant:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law. ...”
A. The parties' submissions
95. First, the Government stressed that the applicant had failed to seek damages from the State or from third parties through civil proceedings, and therefore had failed to exhaust domestic remedies. The Government then contended that the damage to the house had been partly caused by the explosions of hand grenades employed by the two criminal suspects and that the State could therefore not be held responsible for it. They further argued that the documents obtained during the investigation demonstrated that some parts of the house had been unfinished and uninhabitable and that the load-bearing walls and roof had not suffered any significant damage. Furthermore, the valuables collected by the investigator during the search on 14 March 2005 had been returned to the applicant after she had signed for them. No other valuables or documents had been collected.
96. The applicant reiterated the complaint.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Admissibility
97. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies. As regards criminal-law remedies, the Court observes that the applicant alleged that the damage had been caused to her property during the security operation of 14 March 2005. The applicant raised the question of the damage to her property in her formal complaints to the authorities (paragraph 21). However, for the same reasons as noted above in respect of her complaint under Article 2, not only was no investigation conducted into this allegation, but the applicant was not accorded any procedural status. This deprived her of any possibility of participating in the proceedings or even of appealing effectively against their outcome. The Court refers to its conclusions in paragraph 58 above, and finds that the applicant exhausted domestic remedies in this respect.
98. Furthermore, in the absence of any domestic findings concerning the responsibility for the damage caused to the applicant's property, the Court is not persuaded that the court remedy referred to by the Government was accessible to the applicant and would have had any prospects of success (see Betayev and Betayeva v. Russia, no. 37315/03, § 112, 29 May 2008). The Government's objection concerning non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must therefore be dismissed.
99. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that the complaint is not inadmissible on any other grounds and must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
100. The Court notes that the Government did not deny that the applicant's property had been damaged during the security operation on 14 March 2005. They disagreed about the extent to which the State authorities had been responsible for the losses and the amount of damage caused.
101. The Court observes that the applicant brought her complaint about the property to the attention of both the prosecutor's service and the district court. She also took steps to record her losses with the assistance of the local administration (paragraph 30 above). Unfortunately, as noted above, no steps were taken to verify these complaints and to establish the exact circumstances of the events. The Government did not disclose any documents from the domestic investigation which could shed light on the events either; and the witnesses' statements simply confirmed that the house and household items had been damaged. It also follows from these statements that the damage had been at least partly caused by the State agents who had stormed the house. Accordingly, the Court finds that there was an interference with the applicant's right to the protection of her property.
102. In the absence of any arguments from the Government as to the lawfulness and proportionality of this interference, the Court finds that there has been a violation of the applicant's right to protection of property guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
103. The applicant complained that she had been deprived of effective remedies in respect of the aforementioned violations, contrary to Article 13 of the Convention, which provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties' submissions
104. The Government contended that the applicant had had effective remedies at her disposal as required by Article 13 of the Convention and that the authorities had not prevented her from using them. The applicant had had an opportunity to challenge the acts or omissions of the investigating authorities in court pursuant to Article 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and had availed herself of it. They added that participants in criminal proceedings could also claim damages in civil proceedings. In sum, the Government submitted that there had been no violation of Article 13.
105. The applicant reiterated the complaint.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Admissibility
106. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
107. The Court reiterates that in circumstances where, as here, a criminal investigation into the circumstances of a violent death has been ineffective and the effectiveness of any other remedy that might have existed, including civil remedies suggested by the Government, has consequently been undermined, the State has failed in its obligation under Article 13 of the Convention (see Khashiyev and Akayeva, cited above, § 183, and Medova v. Russia, no. 25385/04, § 130, ECHR 2009-...(extracts)).
108. As to the applicants' complaint under Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that in a situation where the authorities denied involvement in the alleged damage to the applicant's belongings and where the domestic investigation completely failed to examine the matter, the applicant did not have any effective domestic remedies in respect of the alleged violations of her property rights. Accordingly, there has been a violation on that account (see Karimov and Others v. Russia, no. 29851/05, § 150, 16 July 2009).
109. Consequently, there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 2 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
110. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
111. Referring to the note of 15 March 2005 about the damage to the house (see paragraph 30 above), the applicant claimed 800,000 Russian roubles (RUB – 18,800 euros (EUR)) under this heading.
112. The Government disputed that the State bore responsibility for the damage caused and regarded these claims as unfounded.
113. The Court reiterates that there must be a clear causal connection between the damage claimed by the applicant and the violation of the Convention. Furthermore, under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court, any claim for just satisfaction must be itemised and submitted in writing together with the relevant supporting documents or vouchers, “failing which the Chamber may reject the claim in whole or in part”.
114. The Court notes that the applicant submitted one report drawn up on 15 March 2005, confirming that her house and household items had suffered significant damage. However, in the absence of a more detailed breakdown of costs and of any other additional evidence concerning the value of the lost and damaged items, the Court is sceptical about accepting it as final evidence of the amount claimed. The Court nevertheless agrees that the applicant must have borne some costs in relation to the lost property, and that there is a clear causal connection between these and the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 found above, since the damage was at least partly caused by State agents.
115. In the light of the above considerations, the Court finds it appropriate to awards an amount of EUR 8,000 to the applicant as compensation for the pecuniary losses sustained, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
B. Non-pecuniary damage
116. The applicant claimed EUR 300,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage for the suffering she had endured as a result of the loss of her daughter and the failure to investigate it properly.
117. The Government found the amount claimed exaggerated.
118. The Court has found a violation of the positive obligation to protect the right to life of the applicant's daughter and a violation of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of property under Articles 2 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court accepts that the applicant has suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the findings of violations. It awards her EUR 60,000, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
C. Costs and expenses
119. The applicant was represented by two lawyers from the International Protection Centre. They submitted a breakdown of costs borne by them, which included fifty-six hours of research and drafting legal documents at a rate of EUR 60 per hour and EUR 120 of postal and stationary expenses. The aggregate claim in respect of costs and expenses related to legal representation amounted to EUR 3,480.
120. The Government did not dispute the reasonableness of and justification for the amounts claimed under this heading.
121. The Court has to establish first whether the costs and expenses indicated by the applicant's representatives were actually incurred and, second, whether they were necessary (see McCann and Others v. the United Kingdom, 27 September 1995, § 220, Series A no. 324).
122. Having regard to the information submitted by the applicant, the Court is satisfied that these rates are reasonable and reflect the expenses actually incurred by the applicant's representatives.
123. As to whether the costs and expenses incurred for legal representation were necessary, the Court notes that this case was relatively complex and required a certain amount of research and preparation.
124. Having regard to the details of the claims submitted by the applicant, the Court awards her the amount of EUR 3,480 as claimed, together with any value-added tax that may be chargeable to her.
D. Default interest
125. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Dismisses the Government's objections as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the complaints under Article 2 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
2. Declares the complaints under Articles 2, 3 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible;
3. Holds that there has been no substantive violation of Article 2 of the Convention in respect of S. A.;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention on account of the State's failure to comply with its positive obligation to protect the life of S. A.;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of the Convention on account of the failure to conduct an effective investigation into the circumstances in which S. A. died;
6. Holds that no separate issues arise under Article 3 of the Convention;
7. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
8. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in respect of the alleged violations of Article 2 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
9. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 8,000 (eight thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage to the applicant;
(ii) EUR 60,000 (sixty thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage to the applicant;
(iii) EUR 3,480 (three thousand four hundred and eighty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses, to be converted into Russian roubles at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
10. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 April 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 2; violazione di P1-1; Violazione dell’ Art. 13


PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA ABDURASHIDOVA C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 32968/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
8 aprile 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Abdurashidova c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e da Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 18 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 32968/05) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, la Sig.ra Z. A. (“la richiedente”), il 22 luglio 2005.
2. La richiedente fu rappresentata di fronte alla Corte da avvocati del Centro Internazionale di Protezione, un NGO registrato a Mosca. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, il Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani e successivamente dal suo nuovo Rappresentante, il Sig. G. Matyushkin.
3. Il 22 aprile 2008 la Corte decise di applicare l’ Articolo 41 dell’Ordinamento di Corte ed accordare un trattamento prioritario alla richiesta e dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Decise anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione).
4. Il Governo obiettò all'esame unito dell'ammissibilità e dei meriti della richiesta. Avendo considerato l'eccezione del Governo, la Corte l’ha respinsta.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. La richiedente nacque nel 1978. Lei viveva nel villaggio di Solnechnoye nel distretto di Khasavyurt di Dagestan, Federazione russa. Attualmente vive all'estero dopo avere chiesto asilo. La richiedente è la madre di S. (anche scrittto S.) A., nata nel 1998.
A. Gli eventi del 14 marzo 2005
1. Il racconto della richiedente
6. Alle5.30 di mattina approssimativamente del 14 marzo 2005 circa cinquanta uomini in due APC (carro armati ) ed una macchina VAZ bianca 2121 di Niva con la targa di registrazione 008 26 arrivarono all'alloggio della richiedente a Solnechnoye.
7. Gli uomini erano armati e dotati con set di radio portabili. Loro no si presentarono né mostrarono qualsiasi documento. La richiedente pensò che loro fossero dei membri delle Forze Armate Governative. Sembra che i membri delle Forze Armate arrivarono per arrestare il marito della richiedente e due uomini che stavano soggiornando nell'alloggio quella notte. Gli uomini irruppero nell'alloggio della richiedente e aprirono il fuoco. Il marito della richiedente gridò ai membri delle Forze Armate: “Non sparate! Ci sono bambini nell'alloggio.” nonostante l'avvertimento i membri delle Forze Armate continuarono a sparare. Loro portarono fuori il marito della richiedente; i tre figli della richiedente rimasero nelle loro stanze e la richiedente era nel corridoio.
8. Durante la sparatoria i due figli della richiedente B.(nato nel 1997) ed I. (nato nel 2002) corsero fuori dalle loro camere da letto nel corridoio. Ad un certo punto B. corse fuori dalla camera da letto di sua sorella, gridando che S. era stato ferito e stava sanguinando. Sembra che S. A. era stata colpita da un frammento di una pallottola di fucile.
9. La richiedente tentò di andare nella stanza di sua figlia, ma i membri delle Forze Armate la spinsero fuori dall'alloggio nel cortile. Quando la richiedente chiese a loro di permetterle di andare dentro, i membri delle Forze Armate glielo impedirono puntandole la pistola. Lei fu messa a giacere a terra con le sue mani dietro al suo capo.
10. Quando la sparatoria finì, il loro vicino di casa il Sig. I.I. andò nell'alloggio e trasportò il corpo di S. A..
11. Come risultato della sparatoria i due uomini che stavano alloggiando nell'alloggio della richiedente furono uccisi, ed il marito della richiedente fu portato al Diaprimento dell'Interno del distretto di Khasavyurt (“il ROVD di Khasavyurt”).
12. Dopo la sparatoria la richiedente vide che il suo alloggio, così come le sue proprietà di famiglia, erano stati danneggiati dagli spari. Inoltre, i documenti d’identità della famiglia, inclusi i passaporti e i certificati di nascita, erano stati portati via dai membri delle Forze Armate.
13. La richiedente presentò che dopo la sparatoria, i membri delle Forze Armate avevano portato via due borse di plastica con i documenti e i valori della famiglia della richiedente, incluso il braccialetto d’oro della richiedente e due anelli.
14. La descrizione della richiedente degli eventi del 14 marzo 2005 è basata su molti racconti senza data forniti da lei ai suoi rappresentanti e sulle lettere che la richiedente spedì alle autorità. La richiedente presentò anche degli articoli pubblicati sul giornale “Druzhba” (Дружба) l’8 aprile 2005 e il 15 aprile 2005 ed un articolo pubblicato sul giornale “Niyso-Dagestan” (Нийсо-Дагестан) il 14 aprile 2005.
2. Informazioni presentate dal Governo
15. Il Governo presentò, con riferimento ai documenti dai file dell’indagine penale (vedere sotto), che i due uomini che erano stati all'alloggio della richiedente nella notte del 14 marzo 2005 erano stati sospettati di rapina a mano armata di una donna e di un attacco ad un membro delle Forze Armate della polizia stradale, il Sig. M.M. che era morto più tardi. I crimini erano stati commessi da tre persone il 31 dicembre 2004, e il 1 gennaio 2005 l'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto di Khasavyurt (l'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto) aprì un'indagine penale sull'incidente. All'indagine fu assegnato il di file 5111. È stato stabilito che durante l'attacco i criminali avevano preso possesso dei documenti d’identità della polizia M.M. e della sua pistole d’ordinanza PM con un numero di serie noto.
16. La polizia ottenne le informazioni per cui le due persone sospette, il Sig. S.Ya. ed il Sig. R.Yu., avevano trovato rifugio presso l’alloggio della richiedente e che loro avevano immagazzinato armi ed armamenti, incluso la pistola PM. Il 14 marzo 2005 l'investigatore dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto decise di eseguire una perquisizione urgente presso l’alloggio della richiedente allo scopo di trovare le due persone sospette e le armi. Poiché le persone sospette avrebbero potuto essere armate, l'accusatore era stato assistito dai membri delle Forze Armate del ROVD di Khasavyurt e dalle forze di polizia speciale di Dagestan.
17. All’arrivo all'alloggio della richiedente, gli agenti della polizia il Sig. P.A. ed il Sig. S.O. informarono la richiedente e suo marito dello scopo della loro visita e suggerirono di evacuare l'edificio per la loro propria sicurezza. La richiedente, suo marito ed i loro due figli B. ed I. uscirono dell'alloggio. Poi la richiedente informò i poliziotti che sua figlia S. era rimasta nell'alloggio. Il Sig. P.A. ed il Sig. S.O. ritornarono all'alloggio per prendere la bambina, ma il Sig. S.Ya. ed il Sig. R.Yu. che si erano rifugiati nell'alloggio gettarono granate a mano verso di loro. Entrambi i poliziotti furono feriti. I loro colleghi per coprirli, aprirono il fuoco ed uccisero entrambe le persone sospette.
18. Dopo che lo scontro finì, il luogo fu ispezionato dall'investigatore dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto e da esperti forensi e medici, in presenza di due testimoni. Loro scoprirono i corpi del Sig. S.Ya. ed il Sig. R.Yu. e della figlia della richiedente, S. A.. Nella stanza in cui i due fuggitivi si stavano nascondendo, trovarono anche linguette di sicurezza provenienti da granate a mano ed una pistola a mano del PM col numero di serie che corrispondeva a quello rubato da M.M.
B. Reazione delle autorità agli eventi del 14 marzo 2005
1. La corrispondenza della richiedente con le autorità Statali riguardo alla morte di S. A.
19. Brevemente dopo che la sparatoria era terminata, gli esperti dal ROVD di Khasavyurt fecero fotografie di S. A. e vollero portare il suo corpo all'obitorio per un'autopsia. La richiedente ed i suoi parenti rifiutarono di dare il loro permesso e scrissero una dichiarazione ufficiale di rifiuto.
20. Dall'inizio della sua corrispondenza con le autorità la richiedente fu assistita dal Sig. B., capo dell'organizzazione locale dei diritti umani Romashka (Ромашка). La richiedente ed il Sig. B. contattarono i vari enti ufficiali, incluso il Presidente russo, il Governo di Dagestan, l'amministrazione di distretto di Khasavyurt, i mass media e gli uffici degli accusatori a livelli diversi descrivendo le circostanze dell’uccisione di S. A. e richiedendo un'indagine sul crimine. La richiedente trattenne copie di un numero delle loro lettere e li presentò alla Corte. Le informazioni attinenti sono riassunte sotto.
21. Il 16 marzo 2005 la richiedente scrisse ad un certo numero di autorità Statali, incluso l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto, l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Dagestan e l'Accusatore Generale. Lei descrisse gli eventi del 14 marzo 2005 e richiese un'indagine sulla morte di sua figlia ed il perseguimento dei colpevoli. La richiedente si lamentò anche che la sua proprietà era stata distrutta illegalmente durante l'operazione speciale ed il risarcimento richiesto per il danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale causati dalle azioni dei membri delle Forze Armate.
22. Nel marzo o nell’aprile 2005 la richiedente informò l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Dagestan che i membri delle Forze Armate del ROVD di Khasavyurt avevano partecipato all'operazione speciale del 14 marzo 2005.
23. Il 20 aprile 2005 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Dagestan informò la richiedente che la sua azione di reclamo in merito alle azioni illegali ed i membri delle Forze Armate del ROVD Khasavyurt durante l’arresto di suo marito era stata spedita all'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto per un esame.
24. Il 26 aprile 2005 il distretto ufficio della cancelleria Statale (ЗАГС) emise una dichiarazione che confermava la morte di S. A. il 14 marzo 2005.
25. Il 26 aprile 2005 l'amministrazione del villaggio di Solnechnoye emise un certificato di morte per S. A..
26. Il 28 aprile 2005 la richiedente scrisse di nuovo alle autorità, incluso l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto, l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Dagestan e l'Accusatore Generale. Nella sua lettera lei indicò che il 16 marzo 2005 lei si era già lamentata dell’uccisione di sua figlia, ma le autorità erano andate a vuoto nell’ iniziare un'indagine penale sulla morte. Lei richiese chiarimenti a riguardo delle ragioni per l'insuccesso nell’iniziare l'indagine e perseguire i perpetratori.
27. Il 17 maggio e il 30 giugno 2005 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Dagestan informò la richiedente che la sua azione di reclamo della morte di S. A. era stata spedita all'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto per un esame.
28. Il 25 maggio 2005 la Corte distrettuale di Khasavyurt condannò il marito della richiedente alla reclusione di tre mesi per aver dato ospitalità a due criminali. Nella sua sentenza la corte affermò, inter alia che sua “figlia S. minorenne era stata uccisa nel corso di un'operazione speciale tesa ad arrestare i criminali che si stavano nascondendo nell'alloggio.” Il marito della richiedente accettò la sua colpa e non fece appello contro la sentenza.
29. Sembra che il Sig. B. che aveva assistito la richiedente nella preparazione delle sue azioni di reclamo presso le autorità nazionali fu arrestato nel novembre 2005 perché sospettato di possesso illegale di armi. In seguito a dichiarazioni di tortura e alla conseguente pressione pubblica, fu rilasciato e fu assolto. Lui lasciò la Russia nel 2006 e chiese asilo in un altro paese.
2. La distruzione della proprietà della richiedente
30. Il 15 marzo 2005 una commissione dell'amministrazione di Solnechnoye, incluso il capo dell'amministrazione, il capo contabile ed i due vicini di casa della richiedente visitarono l'alloggio della richiedente. Loro esaminarono la scena e stesero il seguente rapporto sui danni:
“Durante l'operazione speciale del 14 marzo 2005 l'alloggio... fu praticamente distrutto; come risultato degli spari e delle esplosioni le finestre e le porte furono divelte, il tetto fu danneggiato dai colpi, una potente esplosione diede luogo a crepe nei muri e nel soffitto; la mobilia nel soggiorno e nella cucina, il frigorifero e il set della Tivù furono rese inutilizzabili.”
Secondo il rapporto, l'alloggio della richiedente era, per la maggior parte inabitabile e richiedeva riparazioni. Il rapporto inoltre valutava il costo delle riparazioni a fra 650,000 e 800,000 rubli russi (RUB), senza specificare dei dettagli supplementari.
3. Informazioni presentate dal Governo
31. In risposta ad una specifica richiesta dalla Corte, il Governo presentò 26 pagine di documenti dai file dell’ indagine penali menzionati sopra. Benché questo non fosse impresso su molti documenti, sembra che il Governo presentò copie delle decisioni per aprire i procedimenti penali nelle cause a cui furono assegnati i numeri di file 5111, 51151 e 51153.
32. Il Governo presentò che il 14 marzo 2005 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto aveva aperto l’indagine penale n. 51151 sull'attacco agli agenti di polizia e l'acquisto illegale e deposito di armi e munizioni. L'indagine fu aperta nella prospettiva del ferimento dei due poliziotti, il Sig. P.A. ed il Sig. S.O. La decisione non menzionò le morti delle persone sospette e della figlia della richiedente. L'indagine ottenne informazioni secondo cui il Sig. S.Ya. ed il Sig. R.Yu. erano coinvolti con gruppi armati illegali ed avevano lottato contro le autorità in Cecenia. Il 14 marzo 2005, l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto aprì così, un nuovo file di indagine riguardo alla partecipazione in gruppi armati illegali a cui fu assegnato il numero 51153.
33. Il 14 marzo 2005 l'investigatore dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto, assistito da esperti medici e forensi, alla presenza di due testimoni esaminò il corpo di S. A.. Loro notarono due grandi ferite aperte: una che misurava 10 cm per 8 cm al capo ed una che misurava 10 cm per 6 cm alla parte superiore del torso. Il Governo presentò una copia del rapporto competente. Gli esperti fecero anche delle fotografie; comunque, come segue dai susseguenti documenti e dalle osservazioni del Governo, non fu possibile sviluppare le fotografie perché la pellicola era difettosa.
34. Il21 marzo 2005 i file d’indagini penale N. 51151 e 51153 furono congiunti e fu assegnato loro il numero 51151. La decisione non faceva riferimento alla morte della figlia della richiedente o alle morti delle persone sospette.
35. Nessuna indagine penale separata fu aperta sulla morte della figlia della richiedente. Il Governo presentò che nel corso dell'indagine con file n. 51151 le autorità avevano stabilito che S. A. era morta a causa delle ferite di schegge causate dalle esplosioni delle granate a mano. Gli agenti di polizia non avevano usato granate ed avevano utilizzato solamente pistole a mano. I rapporti forensi sui corpi del Sig. S.Ya. e del Sig. R.Yu. conclusero che erano morti come risultato delle ferite di pallottole. Vedendo che nessuna autopsia era stata eseguita sul corpo di S. A. a causa del rifiuto dei suoi parenti di sottoporla a tale esame, l'indagine si appellò alla descrizione del suo corpo che faceva riferimento a ferite da schegge. Concluse che la sua morte era stata il risultato dell'esplosione di granate a mano gettate dai criminali sospettati.
36. Il 2 aprile 2005 i procedimenti penali contro il Sig. S.Ya. ed il Sig. R.Yu. furono terminato a causa delle loro morti. L'indagine della causa penale n. 5111 continuò.
37. Il 26 aprile 2005 l'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto prese le dichiarazioni da due investigatori, dal medico e dai consulenti legali che avevano esaminato il corpo della bambina e dei due testimoni. Il Governo presentò copie delle loro testimonianze, oltre alla dichiarazione dell'esperto medico e alla dichiarazione di un testimone. Il consulente legale spiegò che lui aveva fatto fotografie dell'alloggio, dei due corpi maschili nel cortile e del corpo della ragazza nell'alloggio dei vicini. Una volta che fu sviluppata la pellicola, delle fotografie si danneggiarono perché la pellicola era difettosa. Così, non fu sviluppata nessuna fotografie del corpo della ragazza.
38. Secondo il Governo, l'esperto medico affermò di aver esaminato il corpo della ragazza nell'alloggio dei vicini e di aver notato due grandi ferite aperte al capo e nella parte superiore del torso. Queste ferite avrebbero potuto essere causate da schegge da un ordigno esplosivo. Il corpo era stato portato poi ai parenti che avevano rifiutato di sottoporlo ad un'autopsia.
39. L'investigatore presentò che nella tarda notte del 14 marzo 2005 era stato allertato che delle persone sospettate dell'assassinio dell’ Ispettore M.M. si stavano nascondendo nell'alloggio dell'imam di Solnechnoye. Di mattina presto lui andò sulla scena, accompagnato da membri delle Forze Armate del ROVD di Khasavyurt e dell'unità di polizia speciale di Dagestan. Loro invitarono anche due testimoni residenti a Khasavyurt, T. E. e M.. Una volta all'alloggio, i membri delle Forze Armate circondarono l'alloggio. Dopo che la polizia ordinò a tutti di lasciare l'alloggio. Una donna, un uomo e due bambini uscirono nell’ingresso e la polizia li condusse fuori dall'alloggio. La donna disse che un’altra figlia era rimasta nell'alloggio. Due membri delle Forze Armate dell'unità di polizia speciale entrarono nell'alloggio ed immediatamente dopo questo si udirono delle esplosioni. Molti poliziotti corsero all'alloggio ed incominciarono a sparare per coprire i loro colleghi. Le persone che si rifugiavano nell'alloggio spararono di nuovo e gettarono granate a mano alcune delle quali esplosero fuori dall'alloggio, ed alcune nell'alloggio. Appena i due poliziotti uscirono dall'edificio, gli altri membri delle Forze Armate spararono alle porte e finestre dell'alloggio con mitragliatrici e fucili automatici. Quando la sparatoria dall'alloggio si ridusse, i poliziotti entrarono e portarono fuori i due corpi maschili. Loro dissero che c'era il corpo di una figlia nell'alloggio. Un vicino di casa entrò e portò il corpo all'alloggio vicino. Poi il corpo fu esaminato dagli ufficiali dell'ufficio dell'accusatore, in presenza di due testimoni. Loro notarono due grandi ferite aperte di schegge –una alla fronte del capo ed un’ altra vicino alla scapola. L'investigatore aggiunse che la polizia non aveva usato granate a mano; loro avevano sparato con mitragliatrici e fucili automatici. L'investigatore rispose anche ad un numero di domande riguardo alla proprietà mancante e ai documenti d'identità ed ai danni causati all'alloggio della richiedente. Lui affermò che loro avevano raccolto ed avevano preso due anelli d’oro ed il passaporto della richiedente. Nessun altro documento o oggetto di valore erano stati trovati o erano stati sequestrati. In merito allo stato dell'alloggio, l'investigatore specificò, che i vetri delle finestre, la mobilia e parti del tetto erano state danneggiate. I muri non erano stati danneggiati. Delle parti dell'alloggio erano in qualsiasi caso non finite e non erano abitabili. Lo stato dell'alloggio avrebbe potuto essere accertato dalle fotografie prese immediatamente dopo l'attacco.
40. Un altro investigatore, un membro della squadra che lavorava sull’assassinio di M.M., dichiarò di essere arrivato all'alloggio della richiedente approssimativamente alle 9 di mattina del 14 marzo 2005. Là gli furono date istruzioni di esaminare il corpo della figlia, insieme con i consulenti legali e criminale . Loro notarono due grandi ferite, causate da schegge da un ordigno esplosiva. La madre della ragazza rifiutò di sottoporre il corpo ad un'autopsia e firmò un documento a quell'effetto. Dopo che il corpo fu esaminato, i parenti lo presero per la sepoltura. L'esperto penale informò più tardi l'investigatore che la pellicola era difettosa e che nessuna fotografia avrebbe potuto essere sviluppata.
41. Il testimone M. G. ha affermato che lui ed il suo amico T. E. stavano facendo il loro jogging mattutino quando la polizia chiese a loro di essere testimoni di una perquisizione a Solnechnoye. Quando i due uomini arrivarono all'alloggio, furono circondati dalla polizia. Loro videro un uomo, una donna e due figli fuori, accompagnati dai membri delle Forze Armate. La donna disse che un altro figlio era rimasto nell'alloggio. Due agenti della polizia entrarono e poi seguirono molte esplosioni. Poi molti più poliziotti accorsero all'alloggio ed i testimoni furono portati via ad una distanza sicura, da dove loro non potevano vedere l'alloggio. Poterono sentire i colpi che erano stati sparati e delle esplosioni. Una volta che fu finita la sparatoria, i testimoni furono invitati dall'investigatore ad essere presenti durante la perquisizione. Di fronte all'alloggio c’erano due corpi maschili. Qualcuno portò fuori il corpo di un figlio che fu portato all'alloggio dei vicini. L'investigatore trovò e prese due anelli d’oro ed il passaporto di una donna. L'investigatore notò anche e prese un numero di linguette di sicurezza provenienti da granate a mano e di cartucce vuote, così come una pistola a mano. Le stanze furono ispezionate prima da un esperto artificiere e poi dagli investigatori e dai testimoni. L'alloggio era parzialmente danneggiato, ma i muri portanti ed il tetto erano intatti. Delle stanze non erano finite. Il Governo presentò una copia della testimonianza di M. G. e dichiarò che T. E. aveva fatto dichiarazioni simili.
42. Nelle loro osservazioni il Governo citò estensivamente una dichiarazione non datata da parte del Sig. A.A., il capo del reparto dell’ indagine penale del ROVD Khasavyurt, nessuna copia di questa è stata presentata. Secondo il Governo, il Sig. A.A. affermò che il reparto era stato informato dell'ubicazione delle persone sospette dell’ assassinio di M.M.. La mattina presto del 14 marzo 2005 lui era arrivato all'alloggio della richiedente, accompagnato dai membri dalle Forze Armate del servizio di polizia speciale. I membri delle Forze Armate circondarono l'alloggio. Un membro delle Forze Armate del servizio di polizia speciale si diresse all'alloggio e bussò alla porta. Lui fu fatto entrare. Un minuto più tardi uscì dell'alloggio, insieme con un uomo, una donna e due figli. Disse la donna che un terzo figlio era rimasto nell'alloggio. Lei voleva ritornare all'alloggio, ma non le fu concesso . Due membri delle Forze Armate del servizio speciale di polizia andarono all'alloggio per recuperare il figlio. Appena loro vi erano entrati, da qui provennero dei rumori di esplosioni. Molti più membri delle Forze Armate accorsero all'alloggio per aiutare i loro colleghi. Fu sparato contro di loro dalla casa e più granate furono gettate. I due poliziotti feriti furono assistiti nel lasciare l'alloggio, ed i membri delle Forze Armate spararono alle finestre e alle porte dell'alloggio. I poliziotti non erano dotati di granate. Quando la sparatoria dall’alloggio diminuì, molti poliziotti andarono nell'alloggio. Loro trovarono i corpi di due uomini e di una ragazza. I corpi maschili furono portati nel cortile. Un residente locale prese il corpo della figlia e lo portò all'alloggio dei vicini. Al Sig. A.A. fu detto dai suoi colleghi che il corpo aveva due grandi ferite di schegge. Un esperto di esplosivi esaminò l'alloggio, seguendo un investigatore che conduceva una perquisizione in presenza di due testimoni. Il Sig. A.A. affermò anche di aver visto la pistola sequestrata col numero di serie che corrispondeva a quella presa da M.M. ed un numero di cartucce vuote. Gli investigatori li misero in borse e sigillarono il cortile dell'alloggio.
43. Il Governo presentò una nota del 14 marzo 2005 in cui la Sig.ra R. Ya. affermò che la famiglia aveva rifiutato di sottoporre il corpo di S. A. ad un'autopsia allo scopo di stabilire la causa della sua morte. Il nota dichiarava che la famiglia conosceva la causa della morte della figlia e che loro volevano procedere con la sepoltura in conformità con i riti religiosi.
44. Il Governo presentò una nota non datata firmata dalla richiedente all'effetto che lei aveva ricevuto dall'investigatore dell'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto due anelli d’oro ed il suo passaporto che erano stati sequestrati dal suo alloggio il 14 marzo 2005.
45. Il Governo presentò anche un numero di lettere spedite dall'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto alla richiedente. Il 4 aprile 2005 l'investigatore informò la richiedente che l'indagine aveva stabilito che sua figlia era morta come risultato di esplosioni di granate causate da S.Ya. e R.Yu. I procedimenti penali contro i due uomini erano stati terminati a causa delle loro morti. I due anelli erano stati restituiti alla richiedente. Lei avrebbe potuto chiedere il risarcimento per un altro danno presso la Corte distrettuale di Khasavyurt. Avrebbe potuto fare ricorso contro le decisioni degli investigatori presso un accusatore di alto-rango o presso una corte.
46. Dai documenti presentati non sembra che gli investigatori tentarono di prendere delle dichiarazioni dalla richiedente, da suo marito o dai loro vicini di casa.
47. Il Governo affermò che l'indagine della causa penale con file n. 5111 erano in corso e che la rivelazione di altri documenti sarebbe stata in violazione dell’ Articolo 161 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale, poiché i file contenevano informazioni di natura militare e dati personali riguardo ai testimoni o agli altri partecipanti nei procedimenti penali.
C. Atti introdotti dalla richiedente
48. Il 14 giugno 2005 la richiedente si lamentò presso la Corte distrettuale di Khasavyurt del Dagestan (“la corte distrettuale”) della distruzione della sua proprietà durante l'operazione speciale condotta il 14 marzo 2005 e l'insuccesso delle autorità nell’ iniziare dei procedimenti penali sulla morte di S. A.. Lei chiese una direttiva che obbligasse l'ufficio dell'accusatore del distretto ad iniziare un'indagine per il reato e perseguire i perpetratori.
49. Il 2 agosto 2005 la corte distrettuale rifiutò di esaminare la sua azione di reclamo. Affermò che alla richiedente era concesso fare appello solamente contro azioni dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto all'interno del periodo di un'indagine penale in corso o che lei avrebbe potuto fare appello contro il rifiuto delle autorità di iniziare procedimenti penali. La corte indicò che lei non era riuscita a presentare qualsiasi prova di un'indagine penale in corso o del rifiuto delle autorità di iniziare procedimenti penali.
50. La richiedente non fece appello contro quella decisione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
51. Per un riassunto del diritto nazionale attinente vedere Akhmadova e Sadulayeva c. Russia (n. 40464/02, §§ 67-69, 10 maggio 2007).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ALLEGATO DELL’ARTICOLO 2 DELLA CONVENZIONE
52. La richiedente addusse che le autorità avevano violato i loro obblighi sia negativi che positivi sotto l’Articolo 2 a riguardo di sua figlia. Lei si lamentò anche che nessuna indagine corretta aveva avuto luogo. L’Articolo 2 recita:
"1. Il diritto di ogni persona alla vita è protetto dalla legge. La morte non può essere inflitta a nessuno intenzionalmente, salvo nel corso dell’ esecuzione di una sentenza capitale pronunziata da un tribunale nel caso in cui il reato sia punito da questa pena per legge.
2. La morte non è considerata come inflitta in violazione di questo articolo nei casi in cui risultasse da un ricorso alla forza resa assolutamente necessaria:
a) per garantire la difesa di ogni persona contro la violenza illegale;
b) per effettuare un arresto regolare o per impedire l'evasione di una persona regolarmente detenuta;
c) per reprimere, conformemente alla legge, una sommossa o un'insurrezione. "
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
53. Il Governo sostenne che l'azione di reclamo avrebbe dovuto essere dichiarata inammissibile per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. Loro dibatterono che la richiedente non aveva usato il ricorso normale previsto dalla legislazione nazionale. Lei non era riuscita a fare appello presso ufficio di un accusatore o presso una corte contro la decisione di terminare i procedimenti penali contro S.Ya. e R.Yu. Nell’ agosto 2005 la sua azione di reclamo presso la corte distrettuale era stata lasciata non esaminata poiché lei non era riuscita a far riferimento alla decisione contestata. Dibatté inoltre che era aperto alla richiedente intraprendere procedimenti civili.
54. La richiedente contestò quell'eccezione. Lei affermò che l'indagine penale si era rivelata inefficace e che le sue azioni di reclamo a questo fine, inclusa una richiesta presso la corte distrettuale erano state futili. La richiedente sottolineò che non le era stato concesso nessuno status procedurale nell'indagine presumibilmente relativa alla morte di sua figlia. L'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto non l'aveva informata di qualsiasi decisioni procedurale e la corte distrettuale aveva trovato le informazioni contenute nella lettera del 4 aprile 2005 insufficienti fare una revisione la sua azione di reclamo nella sostanza. Con riferimento alla pratica della Corte, lei dibatté, di non essere stata obbligata a fare domanda presso le corti civili per esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali. Infine, lei si riferì alle minacce a lei e ala persecuzione addotta del suo avvocato B., il cui risultato è stato che aveva lasciato la Russia ed aveva chiesto all'estero asilo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
55. La Corte nota che l'ordinamento giuridico russo prevede, in principio, due vie di ricorso per le vittime di atti illegali e penali attribuibili allo Stato o ai suoi agenti, vale a dire via un ricorso civile e uno penale.
56. Riguardo ad un'azione civile per ottenere compensazione per danno subito per gli atti illegali ed addotti o la condotta illegale di agenti Statali, la Corte ha già trovato in un numero di cause simili che questa procedura non può essere considerata una via di ricorso effettiva nel contesto di rivendicazioni introdotte sotto l’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione (vedere Khashiyev ed Akayeva c. Russia, N. 57942/00 e 57945/00, §§ 119-121, 24 febbraio 2005, ed Estamirov ed Altri c. Russia, n. 60272/00, § 77 12 ottobre 2006). Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte conferma, che la richiedente non era obbligata a intraprendere una via di ricorso civile. L'eccezione del Governo a questo riguardo così è respinta.
57. Riguardo alla via di ricorso penale , la Corte osserva che sotto legge russa, parti a procedimenti possono impugnare il progresso dell'indagine penale di fronte ad un accusatore che supervisiona o un giudice. È incontrastato che le autorità immediatamente erano consapevoli della morte della figlia della richiedente e presero dei passi per investigare su questa. Comunque, la richiedente e i membri della sua famiglia furono esclusi da questi procedimenti. Contrariamente alla pratica consueta sotto la legge nazionale, ai membri della famiglia della defunta non fu accordato lo status ufficiale di vittime nei procedimenti penali, un ruolo procedurale che avrebbe dato loro un titolo per intervenire durante il corso dell'indagine. Nel marzo e nell’ aprile 2005 la richiedente introdusse un numero di azioni di reclamo presso le varie autorità, incluso l'ufficio dell'accusatore ma questo non incitò gli investigatori a correggere la situazione e a concedere uno status procedurale alla richiedente. Il memorandum del Governo non contiene qualsiasi chiarimento di questa omissione. Così, è poco chiaro come la richiedente avrebbe potuto avvalersi di queste disposizioni.
58. Prova dell'inefficacia dei meccanismi legali e nazionali nella presente causa è offerta dal fatto che il 2 agosto 2005 la corte distrettuale rifiutò di considerare i meriti l'azione di reclamo della richiedente dell'indagine, facendo riferimento, in pratica, all'assenza di qualsiasi decisione procedurale presa sulla sua azione di reclamo. La Corte non è persuasa così che qualsiasi ulteriore ricorso da parte della richiedente avrebbero fatto una qualsiasi differenza. Si deve perciò considerare la richiedente come essendosi attenuta col requisito di esaurimento delle attinenti vie di ricorso di legge penale.
59. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'eccezione preliminare del Governo a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 2.
60. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
61. La richiedente sostenne che sua figlia era stata uccisa dagli agenti dello Stato che aveva eseguito un'operazione di sicurezza nella sua casa. Lei si riferì alle sue proprie dichiarazioni che descrivevano l'operazione. Lei insistette sul fatto che gli agenti di polizia armati avevano preso d'assalto il suo alloggio senza alcun avvertimento ed avevano sparato dei colpi nelle stanze, come risultato del quale era stata uccisa sua figlia. I documenti dall'indagine nazionale erano inconcludenti e non mostravano la sua versione degli eventi. Lei sostenne inoltre che l'obbligo positivo di proteggere il diritto alla vita era stato violato, poiché l'operazione speciale era stata progettata ed era stata eseguita senza una giusta considerazione per la sicurezza degli abitanti dell'alloggio. Infine, la richiedente insistette che non aveva avuto luogo nessuna indagine corretta sulla morte, poiché i soli procedimenti avviati dall’ ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto erano tesi a risolvere i reati presumibilmente commessi da S.Ya. e R.Yu.
62. Il Governo negò tutte queste dichiarazioni. Citando i documenti dell'indagine nazionale, dibatté che la morte di S. A. era stata causata da schegge di ordigni esplosive usati dalle due persone criminali sospette. La richiedente e la sua famiglia avevano rifiutato di sottoporre il corpo della ragazza ad un'autopsia che avrebbe potuto offrire risultati conclusivi in merito alla causa della morte. Riguardo al suo obbligo positivo, il Governo enfatizzò, che il marito della richiedente aveva di proposito dato rifugio a due persone criminali sospette armate nella sua casa di famiglia. Lui era stato trovato più tardi colpevole di questo crimine. Due agenti di polizia si erano feriti quando avevano tentato di entrare nell'alloggio e prendere la ragazza. I membri delle Forze Armate Statali avevano fatto così tutto il possibile per prevenire qualsiasi danno alla richiedente e alla sua famiglia. Di fronte alla resistenza violenta dei due uomini e per salvare le vite dei due ufficiali che erano entrati nell'alloggio la polizia era stata costretta ad aprire il fuoco, come risultato di ciò entrambe le persone sospette erano state uccise. Riguardo all'indagine, il Governo sostenne, che era stata in linea con il diritto nazionale ed i requisiti della Convenzione.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Riguardo alla responsabilità dello Stato rispondente per la morte di S. A. alla luce dell'aspetto effettivo dell’Articolo 2 della Convenzione
63. Non fu contestato dalle parti che la figlia della richiedente era stata uccisa durante un'operazione di sicurezza tesa all’arresto di due persone criminali sospette armate nell’alloggio della richiedente. Fu riconosciuto inoltre che sia la polizia che le due persone sospette avevano utilizzato forza letale; come risultato dell'operazione, le due persone sospette furono uccise e due agenti della polizia furono feriti. La questione da decidere nella presente causa è se le autorità Statali erano direttamente responsabili per la morte della figlia della richiedente, come addotto dalla richiedente.
64. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 2 che salvaguarda il diritto alla vita e stabilisce le circostanze nelle quali può essere giustificata la privazione della vita si classifica come una delle disposizioni più fondamentali nella Convenzione dalla quale non è permessa nessuna deroga. Nella sua ampia giurisprudenza la Corte ha sviluppato un numero di principi generali relativi alla sfera degli obblighi sotto questa disposizione, così come alla determinazione dei fatti in controversia, quando si è a confronto con delle dichiarazioni sotto l’Articolo 2 (per un riassunto di questi, vedere Bazorkina c. Russia, n. 69481/01, §§ 103-109, 27 luglio 2006, ed Akpınar ed Altun c. Turchia, n. 56760/00, §§ 47-52 ECHR 2007-III). La Corte nota anche che la condotta delle parti quando ne è stata ottenuta prova doveva essere presa in considerazione (vedere Irlanda c. Regno Unito, 18 gennaio 1978, § 161 Serie A n. 25).
65. La Corte reitera che lo standard probatorio delle prove richiesta ai fini della Convenzione è la prova “oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio”, e che simile prova può derivare dalla coesistenza di inferenze sufficientemente forti, chiare e concordanti o da simili presunzioni di fatto non confutate. La Corte ha notato anche le difficoltà per i richiedenti di ottenere le prove necessarie in appoggio delle dichiarazioni in casi in cui il Governo rispondente è in possesso della documentazione attinente e fallisce nel presentarla. Dove la richiedente redige una causa prima facie e alla Corte viene impedito di giungere a conclusioni che riguardano i fatti a causa della mancanza di simili documenti, spetta al Governo dibattere conclusivamente perché i documenti in oggetto non possono servire a corroborare le dichiarazioni fatte dai richiedenti, od offrire un chiarimento soddisfacente e convincente di come gli eventi in oggetto sono accaduti. L'onere della prova viene spostato così sul Governo e se fallisce nei suoi argomenti, dei problemi deriveranno sotto l’Articolo 2 e/o l’ Articolo 3 (vedere Toğcu c. Turchia, n. 27601/95, § 95, 31 maggio 2005, ed Akkum ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 21894/93, § 211 ECHR 2005-II).
66. La Corte nota che nonostante le sue richieste per l’intero file dell’ indagine riguardo alla morte della figlia della richiedente, il Governo ha prodotto solamente parte dei documenti. Il Governo si riferì all’ Articolo 161 del Codice di Procedura penale. In cause precedenti la Corte ha già trovato questo chiarimento insufficiente per giustificare la ritenuta di informazioni chiave richieste da lei (vedere Imakayeva c. Russia, n. 7615/02, § 123 ECHR 2006-XIII).
67. Comunque, la Corte nota che l'indagine nella presente causa si concentrata primariamente sulle azioni delle due persone criminali sospette. Dall'inizio dei procedimenti le autorità considerarono che la morte della ragazza era stata il risultato delle esplosioni causate dai due uomini mentre loro opponevano resistenza alla polizia. Non sembra che qualsiasi elemento nell'indagine condotta dall'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto contenesse informazioni che avrebbero potuto garantire conclusioni diverse. Perciò, il problema principale nella presente causa non è l'insuccesso del Governo di rivelare certi documenti, ma piuttosto la qualità dell'indagine stessa a cui ci si rivolgerà sotto.
68. La Corte nota che la dichiarazione della richiedente per cui i membri delle Forze Armate Statali erano responsabili per la morte di S. A. è basato esclusivamente su la sua propria dichiarazione. Nessun altra dichiarazione o prova a sostegno di questa asserzione sono state fornite dalla richiedente alla Corte o all'indagine nazionale.
69. La descrizione del corpo redatta il 14 marzo 2005 da un consulente legale e le dichiarazioni raccolte il 26 aprile 2005 da due investigatori, da un testimone e dall'esperto penale che avevano esaminato il corpo indicavano che la morte era stata causata da schegge da un ordigno esplosivo (vedere paragrafi 33, 37 e 39-41 sopra). Questi documenti e dichiarazioni sembrano coerenti e la Corte non discerne qualsiasi ragione di mettere in dubbio la loro credibilità. L'indagine trovò che le due persone criminali sospette avevano usato granate a mano contro gli agenti di polizia; delle linguette di sicurezza da granata erano state trovate nell'alloggio. La polizia aveva usato delle armi da fuoco e le morti delle due persone sospette erano state causate da ferite di proiettili (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra). Non c'è menzione in una qualsiasi delle descrizioni degli eventi che le forze di sicurezza usarono apparecchiature esplosive contro le due persone sospette. Neanche la richiedente ha addotto questo. Così, l'indagine nazionale concluse che la morte della figlia era stata il risultato delle azioni delle due persone criminali sospette che erano state uccise durante l'operazione. Benché molti aspetti dell'indagine nazionale siano aperti alla critica (vedere sotto), la Corte non può trovare le sue conclusioni così difettose da respingerle insieme come “sfidanti la logica” o improbabili (per contrasto Beker c. Turchia, n. 27866/03, §§ 51-52 del 24 marzo 2009).
70. La Corte nota inoltre che facendo seguito alla decisione presa dalla richiedente e dalla sua famiglia, non fu condotta nessuna autopsia del corpo. Nella nota firmata dalla cognata della richiedente il 14 marzo 2005 la decisione di non condurre un'autopsia fu giustificata dal fatto che non c'era nessun bisogno di stabilire la causa della morte poiché la famiglia ne era consapevole (vedere paragrafo 43 sopra); perciò, sembra che la famiglia accettò la conclusione del consulente legale per cui la morte era stata il risultato di ferite di schegge. Concordando pienamente che questa scelta fu fatta sotto l'influenza di uno shock in seguito a eventi tragici e traumatici, la Corte nota che diede luogo all'assenza di un documento che avrebbe potuto offrire un documento completo ed accurato dei danni ed un'analisi obiettiva delle costatazioni cliniche, inclusa la causa della morte (vedere Salman c. Turchia [GC], n. 21986/93, §106 ECHR 2000-VII).
71. In simili circostanze la Corte costata che non è stato stabilito secondo lo standard richiesto delle prove “oltre ogni dubbio ragionevole” che le forze di sicurezza fossero state direttamente responsabili per la morte di S. A..
72. Di conseguenza, la Corte non trova responsabilità Statale diretta, e così nessuna violazione dell’Articolo 2 della Convenzione a questo riguardo.
(b) L'insuccesso addotto nel salvaguardare il diritto alla vita di S. A.
73. La Corte non ha trovato stabilito che gli agenti Statali fossero responsabili per la morte della figlia della richiedente. Questo non esclude necessariamente comunque, la responsabilità del Governo sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione (vedere Osmanoğlu c. Turchia, n. 48804/99, § 71 del 24 gennaio 2008). Secondo la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte, la prima frase dell’ Articolo 2 § 1 non solo comanda allo Stato di astenersi dal togliere illegalmente ed intenzionalmente la vita, ma anche di prendere i passi appropriati per salvaguardare le vite di coloro che sono all'interno della sua giurisdizione (vedere L.C.B. c. Regno Unito, 9 giugno 1998, § 36 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-III). L'obbligo dello Stato a questo riguardo si estende oltre al suo dovere primario di garantire il diritto alla vita fissando dei provvedimenti giuridici penali effettivi per impedire il perpetrazione di reati contro la persona, appoggiati su un sistema di giuridico di esecuzione per la prevenzione, la soppressione e la punizione di violazioni di simili disposizioni. L’Articolo 2 della Convenzione può implicare anche un obbligo positivo sulle autorità di prendere misure operative e preventive per proteggere un individuo la cui vita è a rischio per gli atti penali di un altro individuale (vedere Osman c. Regno Unito, 28 ottobre 1998, § 115 Relazioni 1998-VIII).
74. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che, alla luce delle difficoltà delle politiche delle società moderne, l'imprevedibilità della condotta umana e le scelte operative che devono essere fatte in termini di priorità e di risorse lo scopo dell'obbligo positivo deve essere interpretato in modo che non imponga un carico impossibile o sproporzionato sulle autorità. Non ogni rischio rivendicato alla vita, perciò può chiamare in cause per le autorità il requisito delle Convenzione di prendere misure operative per prevenire che questo rischio si materializzi . Perché sorga un obbligo positivo ,deve essere stabilito che le autorità hanno saputo o avrebbero dovuto sapere al tempo dell'esistenza di un vero ed immediato rischio per la vita di un individuo identificato o di individui a causa di atti criminali di una terza parte e che loro non riuscirono a prendere delle misure all'interno della sfera dei loro poteri che, giudicate ragionevolmente, ci si sarebbe potuto aspettare evitassero quel rischio (vedere Osman, citato sopra, § 116).
75. Alla luce del precedente, la Corte dovrà determinare se il modo in cui fu condotta l'operazione di polizia mostrò che gli agenti di polizia avevano preso la cura appropriata per assicurare che qualsiasi rischio alla vita della figlia della richiedente fosse mantenuto al minimo. Nell'eseguire la sua valutazione della pianificazione e della fase di controllo dell'operazione dal posto d'osservazione dell’Articolo 2 della Convenzione, la Corte deve avere particolare riguardo al contesto nel quale accadde l'incidente così come al modo in cui si sviluppò la situazione (vedere Andronicou e Constantinou c. Cipro, 9 ottobre 1997, § 182 Relazioni 1997-VI).
76. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota che la sua capacità di valutare l'operazione è stata impedita dalla grave assenza di qualsiasi indagine significativa nella condotta della polizia. Ciononostante, la Corte valuterà l'organizzazione dell'operazione sulla base del materiale disponibile a sé, in particolare appellandosi alle prove attinenti presentate dal Governo che non sono contestate dalla richiedente.
77. Prima di tutto, la Corte nota che l'operazione non era spontanea e la polizia aveva avuto tempo per raggruppare e portare all'alloggio della richiedente un numero significativo ben equipaggiato ed addestrato di membri delle Forze Armate. Loro arrivarono le prime ore della mattina e circondarono l'alloggio, senza incontrare qualsiasi difficoltà o resistenza da parte dei criminali sospettati (vedere paragrafi 39 e 42 sopra). L'ufficio dell'accusatore e la polizia che hanno condotto l'operazione erano consapevoli del pericolo rappresentato dalle due persone criminali sospette, come è dimostrato dalla sfera impressionante delle disposizioni di sicurezza. Loro avevano anche tempo sufficiente e personale per la pianificazione adeguata e l’ esecuzione della perquisizione e dell’arresto, tenendo presente il bisogno di garantire la sicurezza degli abitanti dell'alloggio, incluso tre piccoli figli. Non c'è comunque, nulla nei documenti visionati dalla Corte tale da suggerire che qualsiasi considerazione seria fu dedicata a questo problema allo stadio della pianificazione dell'operazione.
78. Sembra inoltre che una volta cominciata l'operazione, la polizia intraprese dei passi per rimuovere la famiglia della richiedente dall'alloggio. Secondo il Governo, come il capo del reparto dell’indagine penale dell'ufficio di polizia di distretto ha affermato, un membro delle forze di polizia speciale fu ammesso nell'alloggio e fu in grado allontanarsi incolume con la richiedente, suo marito ed i loro due figli (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra). Ciononostante, rimane completamente poco chiaro perché in quel momento fosse stato impossibile evacuare la figlia della richiedente. In assenza di qualsiasi chiarimento dalle autorità, questo deve essere considerato un insuccesso notevole dell'operazione che sottopose la figlia ad un elevato rischio inammissibile di danno o di morte.
79. Gli agenti di polizia avrebbero dovuto essere consapevoli della vulnerabilità estrema di una ragazza di sei anni che sarebbe stata indubbiamente spaventata e che sarebbe stata disorientata dagli eventi. Una volta divenuto evidente che lei era stata lasciata indietro , assicurare la sua sicurezza avrebbe dovuto essere la preoccupazione primaria per il personale dell’esecuzione giudiziaria. Dai documenti presentati dal Governo, non sembra comunque, che qualsiasi precauzione fu presa nella prospettiva di salvaguardare la vita della bambina. Invece, sembra che uno scambio di fuoco fu provocato dall’invio di due ufficiali della polizia speciale a entrare con la forza nel l'alloggio dalla porta principale. Questo condusse al ferimento dei due ufficiali e alle morti di entrambe persone sospette e di S. A.. Tenendo presente le limitazioni sulla sfera della sua revisione come menzionato sopra, la Corte costata che simile condotta da parte della polizia non avrebbe potuto essere trovata proprio come compatibile col requisito di minimizzare il rischio per la vita di persone necessitanti di protezione.
80. Infine, la Corte è sorpresa della mancanza di diligenza mostrata immediatamente dopo il conflitto. Così, è impossibile capire perché un residente locale fu ammesso sul luogo prima degli investigatori e dei servizi d'emergenza. La Corte discuterà le deficienze dell'indagine sotto; comunque, il controllo sopra le disposizioni di sicurezza per cui un civile era in grado penetrare le linee di polizia può essere descritto meglio come seriamente inficiato.
81. Alla luce del precedente, ed nella misura in cui conclusioni possono essere dedotte dal materiale di fronte a sé, la Corte trova che le azioni delle autorità a riguardo della pianificazione, del controllo e dell'esecuzione dell'operazione non erano sufficienti per salvaguardare la vita di S. A.. Le autorità andarono a vuoto nell’ adottare le misure ragionevoli disponibili a loro per prevenire un vero ed immediato rischio per la vita della figlia della richiedente.
82. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione degli obblighi positivi derivanti dall’ Articolo 2 sotto.
(c) L'inadeguatezza addotta dell'indagine del rapimento
83. La Corte ha in molte occasioni affermato che l'obbligo di proteggere anche il diritto alla vita sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione richiede per implicazione che ci dovrebbe essere una forma di indagine ufficiale ed effettiva quando degli individui sono stati uccisi come risultato dell'uso della forza. Ha sviluppato un numero di principi guida da seguire perché un'indagine si attenga coi requisiti della Convenzione (per un riassunto di questi principi vedere Bazorkina, citata sopra, §§ 117-119).
84. Nella presente causa l'indagine prese dei passi per stabilire le circostanze della morte di S. A.. L'investigatore e gli esperti forensi e penali stesero una descrizione del corpo e fecero delle fotografie di questo. Le loro dichiarazioni furono raccolte nell’ aprile 2005. Queste misure furono prese nel corso dei procedimenti condotti dall'ufficio dell'accusatore di distretto contro i due uomini sospettati dell'assassinio di un ispettore di polizia e il coinvolgimento in gruppi armati illegali.
85. Comunque, nessuna indagine separata fu iniziata al fine di accertare i dettagli della morte della figlia della richiedente. Di conseguenza, altri importanti passi investigativi non sono stati presi, come mettere in dubbio gli altri testimoni ed ordinare dei rapporti degli esperti supplementari.
86. La Corte è atterrita dal fatto che come risultato di questo insuccesso alla richiedente non fu mai concesso alcun status procedurale, e fu esclusa così completamente dall'indagine che concerneva la morte di sua figlia. Gli investigatori nella presente causa ignorarono palesemente i requisiti di salvaguardia degli interessi del parente prossimo nei procedimenti e di concedere uno scrutinio pubblico. Ciò che disturba anche più è che questa situazione non fu corretta quando la richiedente tentò di portare questo insuccesso all'attenzione della corte distrettuale il cui ruolo in principio dovrebbe essere comportarsi come una salvaguardia contro l'esercizio arbitrario dei poteri da parte delle autorità inquirenti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Trubnikov c. Russia (dec.), n. 49790/99, 14 ottobre 2003).
87. Questi fattori diedero luogo all'insuccesso dell'indagine nell’ esaminare tutte le circostanze della morte della ragazza, incluso gli aspetti dell'operazione di polizia come gli obblighi positivi sotto l’Articolo 2 richiedono.
88. Alla luce del precedente, la Corte sostiene, che le autorità andarono a vuoto nell’ eseguire un'indagine penale effettiva nelle circostanze che circondano la morte di S. A., in violazione dell’Articolo 2 nel suo aspetto procedurale.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 3 DELLA CONVENZIONE
89. La richiedente si appellò all’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione, presentando che come risultato della morte di sua figlia e dell'insuccesso dello Stato di investigare su questa in modo appropriato, lei aveva sopportato una sofferenza mentale in violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione. L’Articolo 3 recita:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamenti o punizioni inumani o degradanti.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
90. Il Governo non fu d'accordo con queste dichiarazioni e dibatté che non era stato stabilito che la morte della figlia della richiedente era stata causata da agenti Statali. Negò anche che c'era stata una qualsiasi deficienza nell'indagine.
91. La richiedente mantenne le sue osservazioni.
B. La valutazione della Corte
92. La Corte si riferirebbe alla sua pratica per cui l’applicazione dell’ Articolo 3 non di solito è estesa ai parenti di persone che sono state uccise dalle autorità in violazione dell’ Articolo 2 (vedere Yasin Ateş c. Turchia, n. 30949/96, § 135 31 maggio 2005) o a causa dell’ uso ingiustificato di forza letale da parte di agenti Statali (vedere Isayeva ed Altri c. Russia, N. 57947/00, 57948/00 e 57949/00, § 229 24 febbraio 2005), come opposto ai parenti delle vittime di scomparse forzate. In simile casi la Corte normalmente limiterebbe le sue costatazioni all’ Articolo 2. Nella presente causa la Corte non ha trovato che la figlia della richiedente era stata uccisa da agenti Statali ed era stato considerato che i danni espressi dalla richiedente è coperto dalle sue costatazioni sopra sotto le direttive effettive e procedurali dell’ Articolo 2.
93. Conclude perciò che, anche se questa azione di reclamo venisse dichiarata ammissibile, non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminarla separatamente.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
94. La richiedente affermò inoltre che il suo alloggio e la sue proprietà erano state danneggiate durante l'operazione di sicurezza del 14 marzo 2005. Lei invocò l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che recita così, nella parte attinente:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale. ...”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
95. Prima, il Governo sottolineò che la richiedente non era riuscita a chiedere i danni dallo Stato o da terze parti tramite procedimenti civili, e perciò non era riuscita ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali. Il Governo contese poi che il danno all'alloggio era stato causato in parte dalle esplosioni di granate a mano utilizzate dalle due persone criminali sospette e che lo Stato non poteva essere ritenuto perciò responsabile per questo. Dibatté inoltre che i documenti ottenuti durante l'indagine dimostravano che delle parti dell'alloggio non erano state finite ed erano inabitabili e che i muri portanti e il tetto non avevano subito qualsiasi danno significativo. Inoltre, gli oggetti di valore sequestrati dall’l'investigatore durante la ricerca il 14 marzo 2005 erano stati restituiti alla richiedente dopo che lei aveva firmato per loro. Nessuno altro oggetto di valore o documento erano stati sequestrati.
96. La richiedente reiterò l'azione di reclamo.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
97. Il Governo dibatté che la richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le via di ricorso nazionali. Riguardo alle vie di ricorso penali , la Corte osserva che la richiedente addusse che il danno era stato causato alla sua proprietà durante l'operazione di sicurezza del 14 marzo 2005. La richiedente sollevò la questione del danno alla sua proprietà nelle sue azioni di reclamo formali alle autorità (paragrafo 21). Comunque, per le stesse ragioni notate sopra a riguardo della sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 2, non solo non era stata condotta nessuna indagine su questa dichiarazione, ma alla richiedente non fu concesso nessuno status procedurale. Questo la spogliò di qualsiasi possibilità di partecipare ai procedimenti o anche di fare appello efficacemente contro il loro risultato. La Corte si riferisce alle sue conclusioni nel paragrafo 58 sopra, e costata che la richiedente esaurì le via di ricorso nazionali a questo riguardo.
98. Inoltre, in assenza di qualsiasi giudizio nazionale riguardo alla responsabilità per il danno causato alla proprietà della richiedente, la Corte non si persuade che la via di ricorso di corte a cui fa riferimento il Governo fosse accessibile alla richiedente ed avrebbe avuto una qualsiasi prospettiva di successo (vedere Betayev e Betayeva c. Russia, n. 37315/03, § 112 del 29 maggio 2008). L'eccezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve perciò essere respinta.
99. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che l'azione di reclamo non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo e deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
100. La Corte nota che il Governo non negò che la proprietà della richiedente fosse stata danneggiata durante l'operazione di sicurezza del 14 marzo 2005. Non era d'accordo con la misura in cui le autorità Statali erano state responsabili per le perdite e con l'importo del danno causato.
101. La Corte osserva che la richiedente introdusse la sua azione di reclamo della proprietà all'attenzione sia del servizio dell'accusatore che della corte distrettuale. Lei prese anche passi per registrare le sue perdite con l'assistenza dell'amministrazione locale (paragrafo 30 sopra). Sfortunatamente, come notato sopra, nessuno passo fu preso per verificare queste azioni di reclamo e stabilire le circostanze esatte degli eventi. Il Governo non rivelò qualsiasi documento dall'indagine nazionale che avrebbe potuto fare luce sugli eventi; e le dichiarazioni dei testimoni confermarono semplicemente che l'alloggio e gli articoli della famiglia erano stati danneggiati. Ne segue anche da queste dichiarazioni che il danno era stato causato almeno in parte dagli agenti Statali che avevano preso d'assalto l'alloggio. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che c'era stata un'interferenza col diritto della richiedente alla protezione della sua proprietà.
102. In mancanza di qualsiasi argomento da parte del Governo in merito alla legalità ed alla proporzionalità di questa interferenza, la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione del diritto della richiedente alla protezione della proprietà garantito dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
103. La richiedente si lamentò di essere stata privata delle vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo delle violazioni summenzionate, contrariamente all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
104. Il Governo contese che la richiedente aveva avuto delle vie di ricorso effettive a sua disposizione come richiesto dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione e che le autorità non le avevano impedito di utilizzarle. La richiedente aveva avuto un'opportunità di impugnare gli atti o le omissioni delle autorità inquirenti presso una corte facendo seguito all’ Articolo 125 del Codice di Procedura penale e si era giovata di queste. Aggiunse che partecipanti a procedimenti penali avrebbero potuto chiedere anche dei danni in procedimenti civili. Insomma, il Governo presentò, che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13.
105. La richiedente reiterò l'azione di reclamo.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
106. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato sull’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
107. La Corte reitera che nelle circostanze in cui, come qui, un'indagine penale nelle circostanze di una morte violenta è stata inefficace e l'efficacia di qualsiasi altra via di ricorso esistente, inclusa la via di ricorso civile suggerita dal Governo, è stata di conseguenza minata, lo Stato è andato a vuoto nel suo obbligo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione (vedere Khashiyev ed Akayeva, citata sopra, § 183, e Medova c. Russia, n. 25385/04, § 130 ECHR 2009 -... (estratti)).
108. Riguardo all'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che in una situazione in cui le autorità negarono il coinvolgimento nel danno addotto alle proprietà della richiedente e in cui l'indagine nazionale andò a vuoto completamente nell’ esaminare la questione, la richiedente non aveva nessuna via di ricorso nazionale effettive a riguardo delle violazioni addotte dei suoi diritti di proprietà. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione anche per questo (vedere Karimov ed Altri c. Russia, n. 29851/05, § 150 del 16 luglio 2009).
109. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
V. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
110. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno patrimoniale
111. Facendo riferimento alla nota del 15 marzo 2005 del danno all'alloggio (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra), la richiedente chiese 800,000 rubli russi (RUB-18,800 euro (EUR)) sotto questo capo.
112. Il Governo contestò che lo Stato avesse la responsabilità per il danno causato e considerò queste rivendicazioni come infondate.
113. La Corte reitera che ci deve essere un collegamento causale chiaro fra il danno rivendicato dal richiedente e la violazione della Convenzione. Inoltre, sotto l’Articolo 60 dell’Ordinamento di Corte qualsiasi rivendicazione per soddisfazione equa deve essere particolareggiata e deve essere presentata per iscritto insieme con gli attinenti documenti o ricevute di sostegno, “in mancanza di ciò la Camera può respingere questa rivendicazione per intero o in parte.”
114. La Corte nota che la richiedente ha presentato un rapporto steso il 15 marzo 2005, confermando che il suo alloggio e gli articoli di famiglia avevano sofferto di danni significativi. Comunque, in mancanza di un elenco più particolareggiato dei costi e di qualsiasi altra prova supplementare riguardo al valore degli articolo perduti o danneggiati, la Corte è scettica in merito a se accettarlo come prova definitiva dell'importo chiesto. La Corte concorda ciononostante che la richiedente ha dovuto sopportare dei costi in relazione alla proprietà perduta, e che c'è un collegamento causale e chiaro fra questi e la violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 trovata sopra, poiché il danno fu causato almeno in parte dagli agenti Statali.
115. La Corte trova appropriato assegnare un importo di EUR 8,000 alla luce delle considerazioni sopra, alla richiedente come risarcimento per le perdite patrimoniali subite, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quell'importo.


B. Danno non-patrimoniale

116. La richiedente chiese EUR 300,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale per la sofferenza che lei aveva sopportato come risultato della perdita di sua figlia e dell'insuccesso di investigare in modo appropriato su questa.
117. Il Governo trovò l'importo chiesto esagerato.
118. La Corte ha trovato una violazione dell'obbligo positivo di proteggere il diritto alla vita della figlia della richiedente ed una violazione del diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà sotto gli Articoli 2 e 13 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte accetta che la richiedente ha sofferto di un danno non-patrimoniale che non può essere compensato solamente dalla costatazione di violazione. Assegna la somma di EUR 60,000, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quell'importo.
C. Costi e spese
119. La richiedente fu rappresentata a Centro due avvocati dal Internazionale di Protezione. Loro presentarono una lista di costi sopportati da loro che includeva cinquanta-sei ore di ricerca e di redazione di documenti legali ad un tasso di EUR 60 all’ ora ed EUR 120 di spese postali e di cancelleria. La rivendicazione globale a riguardo di costi e spese riferita alla rappresentanza legale corrispondeva ad EUR 3,480.
120. Il Governo non contestò la ragionevolezza e la giustificazione degli importi chiesti sotto questo capo.
121. La Corte deve prima stabilire se i costi e le spese indicate dai rappresentanti della richiedente davvero furono sostenuti e, secondo, se loro sono stati necessari (vedere McCann ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 27 settembre 1995, § 220 Serie A n. 324).
122. Avendo riguardo alle informazioni presentate dalla richiedente, la Corte è soddisfatta, che questi tassi sono ragionevoli e davvero riflettono le spese incorse dai rappresentanti della richiedente.
123. In merito a s se i costi e le spese incorsi per la rappresentanza legale sono stati necessari, la Corte nota che questa causa era relativamente complessa e richiedeva un certo importo di ricerca e di preparazione.
124. Avendo riguardo ai dettagli delle rivendicazioni presentati dalla richiedente, la Corte le assegna l'importo di EUR 3,480 come chiesto, insieme a qualsiasi importo dell’Iva che può essere a suo carico.
D. Interesse di mora
125. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Respinge le eccezioni del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 2 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
2. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 2, 3 e 13 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibili;
3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione effettiva dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione a riguardo di S. A.;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione a causa dell'inosservanza dello Stato del suo obbligo positivo di proteggere la vita di S. A.;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione a causa dell'insuccesso nel condurre un'indagine effettiva sulle circostanze in cui morì S. A.;
6. Sostiene che nessuno problema separato derivante sotto l’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione;
7. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
8. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione a riguardo delle violazioni addotte dell’ Articolo 2 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
9. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 8,000 (otto mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno patrimoniale alla richiedente;
(ii) EUR 60,000 (sessanta mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale alla richiedente;
(iii) EUR 3,480 (tre mila quattrocento ed ottanta euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della richiedente, a riguardo dei costi e delle spese da convertire in rubli russi in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
10. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l’ 8 aprile 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.