Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF YERSHOVA v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 1387/04/2010
STATO: Russia
DATA: 08/04/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION
CASE OF YERSHOVA v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 1387/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
8 April 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Yershova v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 18 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 1387/04) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mrs M. G. Y. (“the applicant”), on 8 December 2003.
2. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Ms V. Milinchuk, former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. On 12 July 2007 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant was born in 1954 and lives in Yakutsk.
5. She was an employee of the municipal company, Yakutskgorteploset (the Yakutsk Town Heating Supply Municipal Company, “the company”).
A. Legal status of the Yakutskgorteploset municipal company
6. The company was founded by a decision of the Municipal Property Management Committee of Yakutsk Town Council of 30 June 1992. Sections 3 and 4 of the company's statute stipulated that the company's main objective was to provide uninterrupted heating supply to all the people of Yakutsk, with maintenance work and transportation services, as well as commercial activity. The town of Yakutsk retained ownership of the company's property, while the company exercised the right of economic control in respect of it. Any change to the company's statutory capital was a prerogative of the founder committee. The company could not sell or in any other way alienate or dispose of the property under its economic control without the consent of the founder. The founder received 10% of the company's net income. In accordance with section 7 of the statute, the higher management body of the company was its founder. Only the founder committee could liquidate or reorganise the company, appoint a liquidation commission or approve a liquidation balance sheet in respect of the company.
7. The company was under an obligation to use its assets in accordance with the statutory objectives. Section 5 of the statute stipulated that the company could independently undertake a wide range of economic activities, make contracts and plan its commercial activity. It could also decide on the salary scales for the company's employees and determine the amount of funds to be allocated for salaries.
B. Judgments in the applicant's favour and the company's liquidation
1. First judgment in the applicant's favour
8. In August 2000 the applicant was dismissed from the company.
9. On 7 December 2000 the Yakutsk Town Court of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic reinstated the applicant and ordered the company to pay her 16,632.32 Russian roubles (RUB) in arrears. The judgment was not appealed against and became enforceable on 17 December 2000. The applicant was immediately reinstated at the company.
10. According to the Government, the company paid the applicant RUB 16,632.32 between October 2000 [sic] and February 2001, thus voluntarily completing the enforcement of the award. They have not submitted any documents in this respect.
2. Liquidation order in respect of the company
11. At some point the Municipal Property Management Committee of Yakutsk Town Council withdrew a major part of its assets from the company and transferred it to a newly-created municipal unitary enterprise called the Yakutsk Municipal Unitary Enterprise, MUP Teploenergiya «МУП Теплоэнергия») (“MUP Teploenergiya”). It appears that the newly-created enterprise had the same designated goal, that is, the supply of heating, assumed the same functions and was registered at the same address in Yakutsk as the company. The exact date of the transfer is unclear.
12. On 16 January 2001 the head of Yakutsk Town Council ordered the liquidation of the company, because it had become unprofitable, and appointed a liquidation commission.
13. According to a letter from the head of the Supreme Commercial Court of the Russian Federation of 11 October 2007, the applicant had not forwarded the writs of execution in respect of the judgment of 7 December 2000 to the company's insolvency manager.
3. Second judgment in the applicant's favour
14. On 14 June 2001 the applicant was again dismissed. She brought a court action challenging the dismissal.
15. On 3 December 2001 the Yakutsk Town Court allowed the applicant's action against the employer and awarded her compensation of RUB 50,357 payable by the liquidation commission of the company.
4. Enforcement proceedings in respect of two judgments
16. On 1 March 2001 the bailiff sent the writ of execution in respect of the first judgment to the head of the liquidation commission.
17. In January 2002 the applicant forwarded the writs of execution in respect of the second judgment to the insolvency manager.
18. She was listed in the list of creditors. The global amount of her claims was RUB 95,339.46, of which RUB 66,999.46 constituted the judgment debt and RUB 28,350 unpaid severance benefits.
19. By letters of 28 January and 27 May 2002 the insolvency manager of the company confirmed that the applicant's claims arising from the judgments of both 7 December 2000 and 3 December 2001 were included in the registry of the company creditors' claims.
5. Further developments in the insolvency proceedings
20. On 16 May 2001 the Yakutsk Town Court, on a complaint by a private individual, quashed the Municipal Property Management Committee's decision on the transfer of the company's assets' to MUP Teploenergiya and the decision by the head of Yakutsk Town Council to liquidate the company stating that it was unlawful. It appears that at some point this decision was upheld on appeal by the Supreme Court of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic. The parties have not submitted copies of the respective judicial decisions.
21. On 9 November 2001 the Commercial Court of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic declared the company insolvent and ordered the liquidation commission to start payments in respect of the creditors' claims.
22. On 29 November 2002 a local prosecutor's office opened criminal proceedings against Yakutsk Town Council on suspicion of the deliberate creation of the insolvency of the enterprise in relation to the transfer of a major part of the company's assets to the newly-created municipal company, MUP Teploenergiya.
23. On 16 May 2002 the Presidium of the Supreme Court of Sakha (Yakutiya) quashed the judgment of 16 May 2001 on a supervisory review and confirmed the lawfulness of the Town Council's decision to transfer the municipal company's property to MUP Teploenergiya. With reference to section 104 of the Federal Insolvency Act (see paragraph 42 below), the court found that the transferred property in question had been withdrawn from circulation, that it constituted an exempt asset because of its vital importance for the region and the authorities had lawfully transferred the property in question to a different company.
24. On 11 June 2002 the criminal proceedings were discontinued, owing to the absence of a criminal act in the actions of the town administration.
25. On 26 November 2002 the Commercial Court of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic declared the enterprise insolvent and discharged it from all obligations and debts, including those before the applicant.
26. By a letter of 16 January 2003 the prosecutor informed the applicant about the intention of the prosecutor's office to challenge the judgment of 16 May 2002 by the Presidium of the Supreme Court of Sakha (Yakutiya) by way of the supervisory-review proceedings. The parties have not submitted any information on the outcome of the proceedings.
C. The applicant's action against the liquidation commission
27. On 25 February 2003 the applicant brought new court proceedings, claiming that the local authorities should be held vicariously liable for the company's debts.
28. On 24 March 2003 the Yakutsk Town Court dismissed the applicant's claim as having no basis in domestic law.
29. On 23 April 2003 the Supreme Court of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic quashed the decision and remitted the case for re-examination to the first-instance court. The Supreme Court noted, in particular, that Yakutsk Town Council had handed a significant part of the company's assets over to a newly created municipal enterprise. The court considered that the company's inability to satisfy its creditors' claims was closely linked to the transfer. The court considered that the lower court had not examined these circumstances when deciding on the local administration's liability for the company's debts.
30. On 10 June 2003 the Yakutsk Town Court examined the case afresh. With reference to the decision to discontinue the criminal proceedings in respect of suspicion of deliberate creation of insolvency, the court found that the removal and transfer of the company's assets had been lawful and dismissed the applicant's claims.
31. On 9 July 2003 the Supreme Court of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic upheld that decision.
D. Proceedings before the Constitutional Court
32. The applicant applied to the Constitutional Court, claiming that the provisions of the Federal Insolvency Act, which stipulated that, where there was a lack of assets, the debtor was to be released from claims that were unsatisfied in the insolvency proceedings, were incompatible with the Constitution.
33. On 8 June 2004 the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation rejected her complaint.
E. Current enforcement status of the judgments in the applicant's favour
34. According to the Government, the debtor company enforced the judgment of 7 December 2000 between October 2000 and February 2001. According to the applicant, the judgment of 7 December 2000, in the part concerning the payment of RUB 16,632.32, and the award of 3 December 2001 remain unenforced to date.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Municipal unitary enterprises
35. The Civil Code of the Russian Federation defines State and municipal unitary enterprises as special forms of legal entity that do not exercise a right of ownership in respect of a property allocated to them by its owner (Article 113 § 1). The State or municipal authority retains ownership of the property but the enterprise may exercise in respect of that property the right of economic control («право хозяйственного ведения») or operational management («право оперативного управления») (Article 113 § 2). The name of the unitary enterprise must indicate the owner of its property (Article 113 § 3).
36. The unitary enterprise, based on the right of economic control, is set up by a decision of the State or the local self-government body authorised for this purpose (Article 114).
37. The constituent document of the enterprise, based on the right of economic control, is called The Rules and is approved by the State body or by the local self-government body. If, at the end of the fiscal year, the cost of the net assets of the enterprise, based on the right of economic control, proves to be less than the size of its authorised fund, the founder of the enterprise is under obligation to effect a reduction of the statutory capital in conformity with the procedure established by law. If the cost of the net assets falls below the amount fixed under domestic law, the enterprise may be liquidated by a court decision (Article 114).
38. The owner has the right to establish the enterprise and to decide on the goals of the enterprise and the scope of its designated activities. The owner exercises control over the use of property in accordance with the designated purpose, has the right to reorganise or liquidate the unitary enterprise and receives a part of the enterprise's profit (Article 295 § 1).
39. The manager of a unitary enterprise is appointed by, and reports to, the property owner (Article 113 § 4).
40. The owner's consent must be obtained for any transaction that may lead to the encumbrance or alienation of the real estate. The enterprise independently disposes of the rest of the property under its economic control, with the exception of the cases established by law or by other legal acts (Article 295 § 2).
B. Insolvency of unitary enterprises with the right of economic control
41. Unitary enterprises, with the right of economic control over a property, may be declared insolvent in accordance with the insolvency procedure applicable to private companies. The State or municipal owner of a property is not liable for debts of unitary enterprises with the right of economic control over that property unless the owner has caused the enterprise to become insolvent or violated the procedure for its liquidation (Article 114 § 7 and 56 of the Civil Code and section 184 of the Federal Insolvency Act, Federal Law no. 6-FZ of 8 January 1998, in force at the material time).The State or municipal owner of the property may pay, but is not obliged to pay, debts of a unitary enterprise in the framework of insolvency proceedings (sections 1 and 89 of the Insolvency Act).
C. Specific provisions concerning transfer of communal infrastructure facilities of vital importance
1. Federal Insolvency Act
42. If the debtor's assets include assets which have been withdrawn from circulation, the owner should accept the assets from the insolvency manager or transfer them to other persons (section 104 § 2). Such assets as, inter alia, communal infrastructure facilities of vital importance for a region are to be transferred to a municipal authority. The authority accepts responsibility for the designated use of the facilities within one month of receipt of the respective notification from the insolvency manager (section 104 § 4). Transfer of the facilities to the municipal authorities is conducted as is (“по фактическому состоянию”) without further conditions. The facilities are financed from the respective budgets (Article 104 § 5).
2. Ruling no. 8-П of 16 May 2000 by the Constitutional Court
43. By Ruling no. 8-П of 16 May 2000 the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation verified the compatibility of Article 104 § 4 of the Federal Insolvency Act with the Russian Constitution. The Court held, in particular:
“4. [...] Communal infrastructure having vital importance for a region constituting a debtor's estate is being used not only in the owner's private interests but also in the public interests protected by the State. Therefore, the relations concerning its functioning and use for a designated purpose are public in nature. In regulating this area, the legislator may decide, with regard to public purposes, that certain objects necessary for the survival of the population may be transferred to the relevant municipal authority in the course of the insolvency proceedings. [This ... serves the purpose of] redistribution of social functions between public authorities at different levels”.
The Constitutional Court decided that the provisions allowing the transfer of various objects of special importance to society, including communal infrastructure objects, to local authorities were put in place in order to ensure that their designated use complied with the Constitution of the Russian Federation. However, the practical interpretation of these provisions by the domestic courts might have contradicted their constitutional meaning. The Constitutional Court found that these provisions could not be interpreted as allowing for the transfer of such facilities to local authorities without payment to creditors during insolvency proceedings, of reasonable and fair compensation which is able to secure a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights. The court further held the said provision to be unconstitutional in so far as it allowed the property transfer without effective judicial control.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
44. The applicant complained, under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, that the judgments of 7 December 2000 and 3 December 2001 had not been enforced. The Court will examine this complaint under Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto. These provisions, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 6
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Alleged abuse of the right of petition
45. The Government submitted that the amount awarded by the judgment of 7 December 2000 had been paid to the applicant by the debtor company between October 2000 [sic] and February 2001. They considered that the applicant had abused her right of petition because she had not informed the Court that the judgment in question had already been enforced. They claimed that her application should be struck out of the list of cases.
46. The applicant disagreed. She pointed out that, contrary to the Government's submission, the execution of the judgment could not have started in October 2000, that is, two months before that very judicial decision had been issued. In any event, the Government had failed to substantiate their argument with any evidence of an actual payment made to her pursuant to the judgment.
47. The Court reiterates that, except in extraordinary cases, an application may only be rejected as abusive if it is knowingly based on factual errors (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, §§ 53-54, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV,; I.S. v. Bulgaria (dec.), no. 32438/96, 6 April 2000; and Varbanov v. Bulgaria, no. 31365/96, § 36, ECHR 2000-X). It notes that the parties did not submit any documents, such as bank documents, confirming that the applicant had actually received the money transfers referred to by the Government or that these payments had indeed been made pursuant to the judgment of 7 December 2000. In the absence of any documentary evidence of the payments, the Court is unable to conclude that the applicant's submissions are knowingly based on factual errors. The objection must accordingly be dismissed.
2. Compatibility ratione personae (responsibility of the State)
a. The parties' submissions
48. The Government submitted that the State could not be held liable for the continued non-enforcement of the judgments. Firstly, the company was not a State body. Furthermore, in accordance with Articles 113 and 114 of the Civil Code, the debtor company, a municipal unitary enterprise, was a separate legal entity having the right of economic control over the property allocated to it. Even though the company had been founded by a decision of the local authorities and could not, in accordance with Article 295 of the Civil Code, conduct any transaction leading to encumbrance or alienation of the real estate, it enjoyed sufficient independence in the wide range of its activities. With reference to Article 114 § 7 of the Civil Code, the Government argued that the State was not answerable for the company's debts.
49. Furthermore, in Russian law the owner could be held liable for unpaid debts of a municipal unitary enterprise only where the owner had caused the enterprise's insolvency. The Government argued that this was not the case. The authorities ordered the company to be liquidated, because it had become unprofitable. The Town Council had transferred the company's property to MUP Teploenergiya, a municipal unitary enterprise, in order to ensure the continued heating supply of the town. The company's assets were withdrawn from circulation and their transfer to a different company by the authorities' decision was justified by a vital public interest. As regards the manner of the transfer, the criminal proceedings against the authorities had been discontinued. Therefore, the transfer of the company's asset was lawful, and it could not be said that the owner caused the company's insolvency.
50. Finally, they submitted that, by contrast with the case of Mykhaylenky and Others v. Ukraine (nos. 35091/02, 35196/02, 35201/02, 35204/02, 35945/02, 35949/02, 35953/02, 36800/02, 38296/02 and 42814/02, § 46, ECHR 2004-XII), the company enjoyed sufficient institutional and operational independence from the State to absolve the State from responsibility under the Convention for its acts and omissions. Indeed, there was nothing in the present case to suggest that the State either was a principal debtor of the company or that its control extended to the applicant's terms of employment. The State had not prohibited the seizure of the company's property. On the contrary, the debtor company was an independent entity and was not, as such, controlled by any State body.
51. The Government concluded, accordingly, that the judgment was given against a private debtor. To this extent, the case was similar to the cases of Reynbakh v. Russia and Bobrova v. Russia, in which the Court found that the principle that judgments must be executed cannot be interpreted as compelling the State to substitute itself for a private defendant in the case of the latter's insolvency (see Reynbakh v. Russia, no. 23405/03, § 18, 29 September 2005, and Bobrova v. Russia, no. 24654/03, § 16, 17 November 2005). They maintained that the judgments against the company could not be enforced owing to the company's lack of funds, and in these circumstances the State could not be held responsible for the continued non-enforcement of the judgments. The measures applied by the authorities were adequate and sufficient and they acted diligently in order to assist the creditor in execution of a judgment (see Fociac v. Romania, no. 2577/02, §§ 69–70, 3 February 2005). They invited the Court to reject the complaint as incompatible ratione personae.
52. The applicant maintained that the debtor company was, in fact, a State-run enterprise controlled by Yakutsk Town Council and financed from the town budget. Its liquidation was ordered by the authorities. Moreover, the Town Council had transferred the company's property to a newly-created company MUP Teploenergiya. The latter had the same customers and suppliers, performed exactly the same functions and was registered at the same address as its predecessor. The debtor enterprise could not have been regarded as private, since it supplied heating to all premises in Yakutsk, in accordance with pre-established tariffs. In these circumstances the Town Council was liable for the debts of the company if the latter lacked funds to honour its obligations, as decided by the judgment of 7 December 2000 in the applicant's favour.
b. The Court's assessment
53. The Court reiterates at the outset that, where an applicant complains of an inability to enforce a court award in his or her favour, the extent of the State's obligations under Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 varies depending on whether the debtor is the High Contracting Party within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention or a private individual (see Anokhin v. Russia (dec.), no. 25867/02, 31 May 2007). Where a judgment is against the State, the latter must take the initiative to enforce it fully and in due time (see Akashev v. Russia, no. 30616/05, §§ 21–23, 12 June 2008, and Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, §§ 33-42, ECHR 2002-III). When the debtor is a private individual or company, the position is different, since the State is not, as a general rule, directly liable for debts of private individuals or companies and its obligations under the Convention are limited to providing the necessary assistance to the creditor in the enforcement of the respective court awards, for example, through a bailiff service or insolvency procedures (see, for example, Kesyan v. Russia, no. 36496/02, 19 October 2006, and Fociac, cited above, § 70).
54. Given the special status of municipal unitary enterprises under Russian law (see paragraphs 35-40 above), they can be qualified neither as State authorities, such as the local administration, nor placed in the same category as ordinary private companies. On the one hand, a municipal unitary enterprise is set up by a public authority, which remains the owner of the property, retains control over the use of property in accordance with the designated purpose, receives part of the enterprise's profit and has the right to reorganise or liquidate the enterprise and to transfer its assets to another legal person. On the other hand, a municipal unitary enterprise enjoys independence in its operational activities and the authorities are not responsible for its debts under domestic law.
55. In deciding whether the municipal company's acts or omissions are attributable under the Convention to the municipal authority concerned, the Court will have regard to such factors as the company's legal status, the rights that such status gives it, the nature of the activity it carries out and the context in which it is carried out, and the degree of its independence from the authorities (see, mutatis mutandis, Radio France and Others v. France (dec.), no. 53984/00, ECHR 2003-X (extracts), with further references). The Court will notably have to consider whether the company enjoyed sufficient institutional and operational independence from the State to absolve the latter from its responsibility under the Convention for its acts and omissions (see Mykhaylenky and Others, cited above, § 44, and, mutatis mutandis, Shlepkin v. Russia, no. 3046/03, § 24, 1 February 2007).
56. As regards the company's legal status, the Government argued that municipal enterprises are incorporated under the domestic law as separate legal entities and that the State is absolved from the responsibility for its debts, save in a limited number of cases specified in Article 56 of the Civil Code. In the Court's view, the company's legal status under the domestic law, however important, is not decisive for the determination of the State's responsibility for the company's acts or omissions under the Convention. Indeed, on several occasions, the Court has held the State liable for companies' debts regardless of their formal classification under domestic law (see, among others, mutatis mutandis, Mykhaylenky and Others, cited above, § 45; Lisyanskiy v. Ukraine, no. 17899/02, § 19, 4 April 2006; Cooperativa Agricola Slobozia-Hanesei v. Moldova, no. 39745/02, §§ 18-19, 3 April 2007; Grigoryev and Kakaurova v. Russia, no. 13820/04, § 35, 12 April 2007; and R. Kaÿapor and Others v. Serbia, nos. 2269/06, 3041/06, 3042/06, 3043/06, 3045/06 and 3046/06, § 98, 15 January 2008). Accordingly, the applicant company's domestic legal status as a separate legal entity does not, on its own, absolve the State from its responsibility under the Convention for the company's debts.
57. As regards the company's institutional and operational independence from the State, the Court notes the Government's argument that the degree of the State's involvement in the company's activities cannot be equated with that in the Mykhaylenky and Others case (cited above). At the same time, the Court notes that the company's independence was limited by the existence of strong institutional links with the municipality and by the constraints attached to the use of the assets and property. The Court notes in this respect that the city of Yakutsk was the company's owner in accordance with domestic law and retained ownership of the property conferred to the company. The Town Council approved all transactions with that property, controlled the company's management and decided whether the company should have continued its activity or been liquidated.
58. The company's institutional links with the public administration were particularly strengthened in the instant case by the special nature of its activities. As one of the main heating suppliers in the city of Yakutsk, the company provided a public service of vital importance to the city's population. The company's assets were withdrawn from circulation and enjoyed special status under the domestic law.
59. The Court notes that the relations arising from the management of communal infrastructure of vital importance were qualified by the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation as public in nature (see judgment of 16 May 2000, cited above). Accordingly, the Constitutional Court concluded that the legislator may decide, having regard to the public purposes, that certain objects necessary for the survival of the population, may be transferred to the respective municipal authority in the course of insolvency proceedings. The Government itself noted that the Town Council transferred the company's property lawfully and in the public interest.
60. The public nature of the municipal company's functions and its ensuing dependence on the municipal authorities were amply demonstrated by the process of the company's liquidation. The Administration decided to wind up the company and, furthermore, disposed of the company's assets as it saw fit: they were transferred to MUP Teploenergiya, a newly-created unitary enterprise performing the same functions as the debtor company (compare, mutatis mutandis, Lisyanskiy, cited above, § 19).
61. The Court notes the Government's argument that the municipality was not the company's main debtor and should thus not be considered to have caused the company's insolvency. However, this fact does not in itself obviate the company's institutional and operational dependence on the municipal authorities as demonstrated above.
62. In view of the foregoing, and given in particular the public nature of the company's functions, the significant control over its assets by the municipal authority and the latter's decisions resulting in the transfer of these assets and the company's subsequent liquidation, the Court concludes that the company did not enjoy sufficient institutional and operational independence from the municipal authority. Accordingly, notwithstanding the company's status as a separate legal entity, the municipal authority, and hence the State, is to be held responsible under the Convention for its acts and omissions (see Mykhaylenky and Others, cited above, § 44; Lisyanskiy, cited above, § 20; Shlepkin, cited above, § 24; Grigoryev and Kakaurova, cited above, §§ 35-36; and Kaÿapor and Others, cited above, § 98).
63. The Government's objection must therefore be dismissed.
3. Non-exhaustion
64. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust the domestic remedies available to her, because she had not complained to the court about the bailiffs' and the insolvency manager's shortcomings. The applicant disagreed, having pointed out that she had raised her problem before various domestic authorities, but to no avail.
65. The Court reiterates that it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one available in theory and in practice at the relevant time (see Akdivar and Others, cited above, § 68). In the present case, the Government have not shown how the suggested remedies would have met these requirements (compare, for example, John Sammut and Visa Investments Limited v. Malta (dec.), no. 27023/03, §§ 39–46, 16 October 2007). The Court notes, in particular, that insolvency proceedings in respect of the company started in 2001, the applicant had been placed on the list of the company's creditors and notified thereof by the insolvency manager. By the time the insolvency proceedings commenced, the debtor company had already been unable to meet the creditors' claims for some time. The Court concludes that, in these circumstances, any civil action against the authorities would not bring the applicant closer to her goal, that is the payment of the judgment debt (see Grigoryev and Kakaurova, cited above, § 29).
The Court finally notes that, insofar as the judgments given in the applicant's favour were apparently not enforced owing to the alleged lack of funds on the part of the debtor company, this deficit was caused, to a large extent, by the transfer of the main funds to a newly created municipal enterprise by the decision of the Town Council, which the applicant was not even able to contest before the courts. In such circumstances, the Court finds that the applicant was absolved from lodging complaints against the bailiffs' conduct since the reasons for the non-enforcement of the judgment were beyond the bailiffs' influence (see, mutatis mutandis, Mykhaylenky and Others, cited above, § 39). The Court accordingly dismisses the Government's objection.
4. Conclusion
66. The Court further notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
67. The Government submitted that the judgment of 7 December 2000 was fully enforced between October 2000 and February 2001, that is, within a reasonable time. The applicant did not submit the writ of execution to the liquidation commission and did not make a complaint against the insolvency manager to a court. The insolvency manager in her letters informed the applicant that her claims under the judgment had been included in the registry of the creditor's claims by mistake.
68. The applicant maintained her claims. She submitted that she had not and could not have received payments under the first judgment in her favour between October 2000 and February 2001, because the judgment itself was not issued until 7 December 2000 and the writ of execution was not forwarded to the debtor company until March 2001.
69. The Court reiterates at the outset that an unreasonably long delay in the enforcement of a binding judgment may breach the Convention. To decide if the delay was reasonable, the Court will look at how complex the enforcement proceedings were, how the applicant and the authorities behaved, and what the nature of the award was (see Raylyan v. Russia, no. 22000/03, § 31, 15 February 2007).
70. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the judgment of 3 December 2001 has not yet been enforced. The delay of enforcement has thus lasted over seven years. As regards the judgment of 7 December 2000, the Court is not persuaded that the execution of the court award could have started in October 2000, that is, two months earlier than the judgment in the applicant's favour was delivered. In any event, it is not in possession of any documents showing that the payments referred to by the Government had actually been made. The Court considers that the judgment of 7 December 2000 has accordingly remained unenforced for more than eight years to date.
71. The periods of seven and eight years are prima facie incompatible with the Convention. The Government justify the delay mainly with regard to the respective liquidation and disbandment of the defendants, but the Court has previously rejected this excuse in similar circumstances (see Shlepkin, cited above, § 25).
72. The Court reiterates that, having previously rejected such a justification in similar circumstances (see Shlepkin, cited above, §§ 24-25) it does not see any reason to reach a different conclusion in the present case. Indeed, the company's debts were found to be imputable to the State authorities, which had thus to ensure that the judgment debt was paid in a timely and appropriate manner. While liquidation proceedings may objectively justify some limited delays in enforcement, the continuing non-enforcement of the judgments in the applicant's favour for seven or eight years could hardly be justified in any circumstances. The facts of the present case would rather suggest that the municipal authorities did not consider themselves bound by the obligation to honour the judgment debt after they had decided to liquidate the debtor company and to create a new one in its place.
73. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
74. The applicant further complained under Article 4 of the Convention that she did not receive payment for her work at the municipal enterprise and, under Article 6 of the Convention, that the proceedings in her case had been unfair.
75. The Court has examined these complaints as submitted by the applicant. However, having regard to all the material in its possession, it finds that these complaints do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. It follows that this part of the application must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
76. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
77. The applicant claimed 355,840.98 Russian roubles (RUB) in respect of pecuniary damage. Of this sum, RUB 16,632.32 and RUB 50,367.14 represented the debt owed by the enterprise pursuant to the judgments in the applicant's favour, RUB 28,350 was for unpaid severance benefits and RUB 260,504.52 was for inflation losses. In support of her claims, she submitted a detailed calculation of the inflation losses based on the refinancing rate of the Central Bank of Russia. She further claimed 3,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
78. The Government submitted that no just satisfaction should be awarded to the applicant because her rights under the Convention had not been violated. Alternatively, they argued that the finding of a violation would constitute sufficient just satisfaction.
79. As regards the claim for pecuniary damage, the Court does not discern any causal link between the claim of unpaid severance and the applicant's non-enforcement complaint; it therefore rejects this claim. At the same time, the Court notes that the judgments of 7 December 2000 and 3 December 2001 have remained unenforced. It further notes that the Government did not comment on the applicant's claims for pecuniary damage and did not object to the method of calculation suggested. Making its estimate on the basis of the information at its disposal, the Court awards her EUR 1,837 under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable, and dismisses the remainder of her claims under this head.
80. As regards the claim for non-pecuniary damage, the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant EUR 3,000 plus any tax that may be chargeable in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
81. The applicant also claimed RUB 567.68 for postal expenses. The Government submitted that the applicant's claim should be rejected because the applicant had failed to substantiate it with any documents.
82. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 16 under this head.
C. Default interest
83. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the non-enforcement complaint under Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, plus any tax that may be chargeable, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable on the date of the settlement:
(i) EUR 1,837 (one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven euros) in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 16 (sixteen euros) in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 April 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA YERSHOVA C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 1387/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBURGO
8 aprile 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Yershova c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, compose di:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 18 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 1387/04) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, la Sig.ra M. G. Y. (“la richiedente”), l’8 dicembre 2003.
2. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani.
3. Il 12 luglio 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. La richiedente nacque nel 1954 e vive in Yakutsk.
5. Lei era un'impiegata della società municipale, Yakutskgorteploset (la Città di Yakutsk che Scalda Approvvigionamento Società Municipale, “la società”).
A. La condizione giuridica della società municipale Yakutskgorteploset
6. La società fu fondata per decisione del Comitato della Gestione del Comitato della Proprietà Municipale della Città di Yakutsk del 30 giugno 1992. Le Sezioni 3 e 4 dello statuto della società stipulavano che l'obiettivo principale della società era offrire forniture di riscaldamento ininterrotto a tutte le persone di Yakutsk, con lavori di manutenzione e servizi di trasporto, così come l'attività commerciale. La città di Yakutsk mantenne il possesso della proprietà della società, mentre la società esercitò il diritto di controllo economico a riguardo di sé. Qualsiasi cambio al capitale legale della società era una prerogativa del comitato fondatore. La società non poteva vendere o in qualsiasi altro modo alienare o disporre della proprietà sotto il suo controllo economico senza il beneplacito del fondatore. Il fondatore riceveva il 10% del reddito netto della società. In conformità con la sezione 7 dello statuto, il corpo di gestione più alto della società era il suo fondatore. Solamente il comitato fondatore avrebbe potuto liquidare o avrebbe potuto riorganizzare la società, avrebbe potuto nominare una commissione di liquidazione o avrebbe potuto approvare un rendiconto patrimoniale di liquidazione a riguardo della società.
7. La società era sotto l’ obbligo di utilizzare i suoi beni in conformità con gli obiettivi legali. La Sezione 5 dello statuto stipulava che la società avrebbe potuto intraprendere indipendentemente una serie ampia di attività economiche, avrebbe potuto fare contratti e avrebbe potuto progettare la sua attività commerciale. Avrebbe potuto decidere anche i livelli di salario per gli impiegati della società e avrebbe potuto determinare l'importo dei finanziamenti da assegnare per i salari.
B. Sentenze a favore della richiedente e la liquidazione della società
1. Prima sentenza a favore della richiedente
8. Nell’ agosto 2000 la richiedente fu licenziata dalla società.
9. Il 7 dicembre 2000 la Corte della Città di Yakutsk della Repubblica di Sakha (Yakutiya) riabilitò la richiedente ed ordinò alla società di pagarle 16,632.32 rubli russi (RUB) per arretrati. NO fu fatto ricorso contro la sentenza e divenne esecutiva il 17 dicembre 2000. La richiedente immediatamente fu riabilitata presso la società.
10. Secondo il Governo, la società ha pagato alla richiedente RUB 16,632.32 fra l’ottobre 2000 [sic] e il febbraio 2001, completando volontariamente così l'esecuzione dell'assegnazione. Non ha presentato qualsiasi documento a questo riguardo.
2. Ordine di liquidazione a riguardo della società
11. Ad un certo punto il Comitato della Gestione della Proprietà Municipale del Consiglio della Città di Yakutsk ritirò una parte notevole dei suoi beni dalla società e lo trasferì ad un'impresa unitaria municipale di recente creata chiamata l’ Impresa Unitaria Municipale di Yakutsk (MUP Teploenergiya «МУП Теплоэнергия») (“MUP Teploenergiya”). Sembra che l'impresa di recente creata avesse lo stesso scopo designato cioè l'approvvigionamento di riscaldamento, che assumesse le stesse funzioni e fosse registrata allo stesso indirizzo in Yakutsk della società. La data esatta del trasferimento è poco chiara.
12. Il 16 gennaio 2001 il capo del Consiglio della Città Yakutsk ordinò la liquidazione della società, perché era divenuta senza profitto, e nominò una commissione di liquidazione.
13. Secondo una lettera dal capo del Tribunale di commercio Supremo della Federazione russa dell’11 ottobre 2007, la richiedente non aveva spedito gli ordini di esecuzione della sentenza a riguardo della sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000 al direttore dell’ insolvenza della società.
3. Seconda sentenza a favore della richiedente
14. Il 14 giugno 2001 la richiedente fu respinta di nuovo. Lei introdusse un'azione di corte impugnando questa decisione.
15. Il 3 dicembre 2001 la Corte della Città di Yakutsk accolse l'azione della richiedente contro il datore di lavoro ed assegnò il suo risarcimento di RUB 50,357 pagabile dalla commissione di liquidazione della società.
4. Procedimenti di esecuzione a riguardo di due sentenze
16. Il 1 marzo 2001 l'ufficiale giudiziario spedì l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza a riguardo della prima sentenza al capo della commissione di liquidazione.
17. Nel gennaio 2002 la richiedente spedì gli ordini di esecuzione della sentenza a riguardo della seconda sentenza al direttore dell’ insolvenza.
18. Lei fu iscritta nella lista dei creditori. L'importo globale delle sue rivendicazioni era RUB 95,339.46 di cui RUB 66,999.46 costituiva il debito di sentenza e RUB 28,350 i benefici di separazione non retribuiti.
19. Con le lettere del 28 gennaio e del 27 maggio 2002 il direttore dell’ insolvenza della società confermò che le rivendicazioni della richiedente che nascevano dalle sentenze sia del7 dicembre 2000 che del 3 dicembre 2001 furono incluse nella cancelleria delle rivendicazioni dei creditori della società.
5. Ulteriori sviluppi nella procedura fallimentare
20. Il 16 maggio 2001 la Corte della Città di Yakutsk, su un'azione di reclamo da parte di un individuo privato annullò la decisione del Comitato della Gestione della Proprietà Municipale sul trasferimento dei beni della società a MUP Teploenergiya e la decisione da parte del capo del Consiglio della Città di Yakutsk di liquidare la società affermando che era illegale. Sembra che ad un certo punto questa decisione fu sostenuta su ricorso dalla Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Sakha (Yakutiya). Le parti non hanno presentato copie delle rispettive decisioni giudiziali.
21. Il 9 novembre 2001 il Tribunale di commercio della Repubblica Sakha (Yakutiya) dichiarò la società insolvente ed ordinò che la commissione di liquidazione avviasse pagamenti a riguardo delle rivendicazioni dei creditori.
22. Il 29 novembre 2002 l'ufficio di un accusatore locale aprì procedimenti penali contro il Consiglio della Città di Yakutsk su sospetto della creazione intenzionale dell'insolvenza dell'impresa in relazione al trasferimento di una parte notevole dei beni della società alla società municipale di recente creata, MUP Teploenergiya.
23. Il 16 maggio 2002 il Presidium della Corte Suprema di Sakha (Yakutiya) annullò la sentenza del 16 maggio 2001 su una revisione direttiva e confermò la legalità della decisione del Consiglio di Città per trasferire la proprietà della società municipale a MUP Teploenergiya. Con riferimento alla sezione 104 dell'Atto sull’Insolvenza Federale (vedere paragrafo 42 sotto), la corte trovò che la proprietà trasferita in oggetto era stata ritirata dalla circolazione, che costituiva un bene esente a causa della sua importanza vitale per la regione e che le autorità avevano trasferito legalmente la proprietà in oggetto ad una società diversa.
24. L’ 11 giugno 2002 i procedimenti penali furono cessati, a causa dell'assenza di un atto penale nelle azioni dell'amministrazione della città.
25. Il 26 novembre 2002 il Tribunale di commercio della Repubblica Sakha (Yakutiya) dichiarò l'impresa insolvente e l'assolse da tutti gli obblighi e i debiti, incluso quelli di fronte alla richiedente.
26. Con una lettera del 16 gennaio 2003 l'accusatore informò la richiedente dell'intenzione dell'ufficio dell'accusatore di impugnare la sentenza del 16 maggio 2002 del Presidium della Corte Suprema di Sakha (Yakutiya) tramite dei procedimenti di revisione direttiva. Le parti non hanno presentato nessuna informazione sul risultato dei procedimenti.
C. L'azione della richiedente contro la commissione di liquidazione
27. Il 25 febbraio 2003 la richiedente introdusse nuovi atti, chiedendo che le autorità locali dovessero essere sostenute responsabili per procura dei debiti della società.
28. Il 24 marzo 2003 la Corte della Città di Yakutsk respinse la rivendicazione della richiedente come priva di base in diritto nazionale.
29. Il 23 aprile 2003 la Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Sakha (Yakutiya) annullò la decisione e rinviò la causa per riesame alla corte di prima - istanza. La Corte Suprema notò, in particolare, che il Consiglio della Città di Yakutsk aveva dato una parte significativa dei beni della società finita ad un'impresa municipale di recente creata. La corte considerò che l'incapacità della società di soddisfare le rivendicazioni dei suoi creditori fu collegata da vicino al trasferimento. La corte considerò che la corte inferiore non aveva esaminato queste circostanze nel decidere sulla responsabilità dell'amministrazione locale per i debiti della società.
30. Il 10 giugno 2003 la Corte della Città di Yakutsk esaminò da capo la causa. Con riferimento alla decisione di cessare i procedimenti penali in riguardo di sospetto della creazione intenzionale dell'insolvenza, la corte trovò che l'allontanamento e il trasferimento dei beni della società erano stati legali ed aveva respinto le rivendicazioni della richiedente.
31. Il 9 luglio 2003 la Corte Suprema della Repubblica Sakha (Yakutiya) sostenne quella decisione.
D. Procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale
32. La richiedente fece domanda alla Corte Costituzionale, chiedendo che le disposizioni dell'Atto sull’ Insolvenza Federale che convenne che, dove c'era una mancanza di beni, il debitore doveva essere sollevato dalle rivendicazioni che erano insoddisfatte nelle procedura fallimentare, era incompatibile con la Costituzione.
33. L’ 8 giugno 2004 la Corte Costituzionale della Federazione russa respinse la sua azione di reclamo.
E. Status dell’ esecuzione corrente delle sentenze a favore della richiedente
34. Secondo il Governo, la società debitrice eseguì la sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000 fra l’ ottobre 2000 e il febbraio 2001. Secondo la richiedente, la sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000, nella parte riguardo al pagamento di RUB 16,632.32, e l'assegnazione del 3 dicembre 2001 rimane non eseguita ad oggi.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Imprese unitarie e municipali
35. Il Codice civile della Federazione russa definisce le imprese di Stato e unitarie municipali come forme speciali di persona giuridica che non esercitano un diritto di proprietà a riguardo di una proprietà assegnata a loro dal suo proprietario (Articolo 113 § 1). L'autorità Statale o municipale mantiene il possesso della proprietà ma l'impresa può esercitare a riguardo di questa proprietà il diritto di controllo economico («право хозяйственного ведения») o gestione operativa («право оперативного управления») (Articolo 113 § 2). Il nome dell'impresa unitaria deve indicare il proprietario della sua proprietà (Articolo 113 § 3).
36. L'impresa unitaria, basata sul diritto di controllo economico, viene costituita tramite una decisione dello Stato o del corpo di autogoverno locale autorizzato a questo fine (Articolo 114).
37. Il documento costituente dell'impresa, basato sul diritto di controllo economico è chiamato Le norme ed è approvato dall’ente Statale o dall’ente di autogoverno locale. Se, alla fine dell'esercizio finanziario, il costo dei beni netti dell'impresa, basato sul diritto di controllo economico si rivela essere meno dell’entità del suo finanziamento autorizzato, il fondatore dell'impresa è sotto l’obbligo di effettuare una riduzione del capitale legale in conformità alla procedura stabilita dalla legge. Se il costo dei beni netti rientra nell'importo fissato sotto il diritto nazionale, l'impresa può essere liquidata tramite una decisione di corte (Articolo 114).
38. Il proprietario ha diritto a stabilire l'impresa e decidere gli scopi dell'impresa e la sfera delle sue attività designate. Il proprietario esercita controlli sull'uso di proprietà in conformità col fine designato, ha diritto a riorganizzare o liquidare l'impresa unitaria e riceve una parte del profitto dell'impresa (Articolo 295 § 1).
39. Il direttore di un'impresa unitaria è nominato, e deve fare rapporto a questi, dal proprietario della proprietà (Articolo 113 § 4).
40. Il beneplacito del proprietario deve essere ottenuto per qualsiasi operazione che può condurre all’ipoteca o all'alienazione del beni immobili. L'impresa dispone indipendentemente del resto della proprietà sotto il suo controllo economico, ad eccezione di casi stabiliti dalla legge o da altri atti legali (Articolo 295 § 2).
B. L'Insolvenza delle imprese unitarie col diritto di controllo economico
41. Le imprese unitarie, col diritto di controllo economico su una proprietà, possono essere dichiarate insolventi in conformità con la procedura di insolvenza applicabile alle società private. Il proprietario Statale o municipale di una proprietà non è responsabile per i debiti delle imprese unitarie col diritto di controllo economico di questa proprietà a meno che il proprietario ha causato l’insolvenza dell'impresa per o ha violato la procedura per la sua liquidazione (Articolo 114 § 7 e 56 del Codice civile e sezione 184 dell'Atto di Insolvenza Federale, Legge Federale n. 6-FZ dell’8 gennaio 1998, in vigore al tempo attinente). Il proprietario Statale o municipale della proprietà può pagare, ma non è obbligato a pagare, i debiti di un'impresa unitaria nella struttura di procedura fallimentare (sezioni 1 e 89 dell’Atto sul’Insolvenza).
C. Le specifiche disposizioni riguardo al trasferimento di attrezzature di infrastrutture comunali d'importanza vitale
1. Atto d’ Insolvenza federale
42. Se i beni del debitore includono dei beni che sono stati ritirati dalla circolazione, il proprietario dovrebbe accettare i beni dal direttore dell’ insolvenza o dovrebbe trasferirli alle altre persone (sezione 104 § 2). Simili beni come, inter alia, le attrezzature delle infrastrutture comunali d'importanza vitale per una regione qualsiasi saranno trasferiti ad un'autorità municipale. L'autorità accetta la responsabilità per l'uso designato delle attrezzature entro un mese dal ricevimento della rispettiva notifica dal direttore dell’ insolvenza (sezione 104 § 4). Il trasferimento delle attrezzature alle autorità municipali viene condotto così come è (“по фактическому состоянию”) senza ulteriori condizioni. Le attrezzature sono finanziate dai rispettivi bilanci (Articolo 104 § 5).
2. Decidendo n. 8-Ï del 16 maggio 2000 della Corte Costituzionale
43. Con la Decisione n. 8-Ï del 16 maggio 2000 la Corte Costituzionale della Federazione russa verificò la compatibilità dell’ Articolo 104 § 4 dell'Atto sull’Insolvenza Federale con la Costituzione russa. La Corte sostenne, in particolare:
“4. [...] L’infrastruttura comunale che ha un’importanza vitale per una qualsiasi regione che costituisce l'appezzamento di terreno di un debitore non solo viene usata negli interessi privati del proprietario ma anche negli interessi pubblici protetti dallo Stato. Perciò, le relazioni concernenti il suo funzionando ed uso per un fine designato sono pubbliche per natura. Nel regolare questa area, il legislatore può decidere, con riguardo agli scopi di pubblica utilità che certi oggetti necessari per la sopravvivenza della popolazione possono essere trasferiti all'autorità municipale attinente nel corso delle procedura fallimentare. [Questo... serve il fine della] redistribuzione delle funzioni sociali fra autorità pubbliche a livelli diversi.”
La Corte Costituzionale decise che le disposizioni che ammettevano il trasferimento di vari oggetti d'importanza speciale a società, incluso oggetti di infrastruttura comunali ad autorità locali erano state stabilite per assicurare che il loro uso designato si attenesse con la Costituzione della Federazione russa. Comunque, l'interpretazione pratica di queste disposizioni da parte delle corti nazionali avrebbe contraddetto il loro significato costituzionale. La Corte Costituzionale trovò che queste disposizioni non potevano essere interpretate come se lasciassero spazio al trasferimento di simili attrezzature ad autorità locali senza pagamento dei creditori durante procedura fallimentare, senza risarcimento ragionevole ed equo in grado di garantire un equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. La corte inoltre ha ritenuto essere incostituzionale detta disposizione nella misura in cui permetteva il trasferimento della proprietà senza un controllo giudiziale effettivo.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
44. La richiedente si lamentò, sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che le sentenze del 7 dicembre 2000 e del 3 dicembre 2001 non erano state eseguite. La Corte esaminerà questa azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Queste disposizioni, nelle parti attinenti, si leggono come segue:
Articolo 6
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'abuso addotto del diritto di ricorso
45. Il Governo presentò che l'importo assegnato dalla sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000 era stato pagato al richiedente dalla società debitrice fra l’ottobre 2000 [sic] e il febbraio 2001. Considerò che la richiedente aveva abusato del suo diritto di ricorso perché lei non aveva informato la Corte che la sentenza in oggetto era già stata eseguita. Sostenne che la sua richiesta avrebbe dovuto essere cancellata dal ruolo delle cause.
46. La richiedente non fu d'accordo. Lei indicò che, contrariamente all'osservazione del Governo, l'esecuzione della sentenza non avrebbe potuto cominciare nel ottobre 2000, cioè , due mesi prima che la stessa decisione giudiziale fosse stata emessa. In qualsiasi caso, il Governo era andato a vuoto nel provare il loro argomento con qualsiasi prova di un pagamento effettivo fattole facendo seguito alla sentenza.
47. La Corte reitera che, eccetto in cause straordinarie, una richiesta può essere respinta solamente come abusiva se è basato di proposito su errori riguardanti i fatti (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. Turchia, 16 settembre 1996 §§ 53-54, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV; I.S. c. la Bulgaria (dec.), n. 32438/96, 6 aprile 2000; e Varbanov c. Bulgaria, n. 31365/96, § 36 ECHR 2000-X). Nota che le parti non hanno presentato nessun documento, come documenti di banca che confermavano che la richiedente davvero avesse ricevuto i trasferimenti di soldi assegnati dal Governo o che questi pagamenti erano stati fatti davvero facendo seguito alla sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000. In assenza di qualsiasi prova documentaria dei pagamenti, la Corte è incapace di concludere che le osservazioni della richiedente fossero basate di proposito su errori riguardanti i fatti. L'eccezione deve essere respinta di conseguenza.
2. Compatibilità ratione personae (la responsabilità dello Stato)
a. Le osservazioni delle parti
48. Il Governo presentò che lo Stato non poteva essere ritenuto responsabile per la non-esecuzione continuata delle sentenze. In primo luogo, la società non era un ente Statale. Inoltre, in conformità con gli Articoli 113 e 114 del Codice civile, la società debitrice, un'impresa unitaria municipale era una persona giuridica separata avente il diritto di controllo economico sulla proprietà assegnatale. Anche se la società era stata fondata tramite una decisione delle autorità locali e non si sarebbe potuto condurre, in conformità con l’Articolo 295 del Codice civile, nessuna operazione che conduceva all’ipoteca o all'alienazione del beni immobili, godeva dell'indipendenza sufficiente nella serie ampia delle sue attività. Con riferimento all’ Articolo 114 § 7 del Codice civile, il Governo dibatté che lo Stato non era responsabile per i debiti della società.
49. Nella legge russa il proprietario potrebbe essere ritenuto inoltre, responsabile solamente per debiti non retribuiti di un'impresa unitaria municipale dove il proprietario ha provocato l'insolvenza dell'impresa. Il Governo dibatté che questa non era il caso. Le autorità ordinarono alla società di essere liquidata, perché era divenuta senza profitto. Il Consiglio della Città aveva trasferito la proprietà della società a MUP Teploenergiya, un'impresa unitaria municipale per garantire la fornitura del riscaldamento continuato della città. I beni della società furono ritirati dalla circolazione ed il loro trasferimento ad una società diversa tramite decisione delle autorità fu giustificato da un interesse pubblico vitale. Riguardo al metodo del trasferimento, i procedimenti penali contro le autorità erano stati cessati. Perciò, il trasferimento del bene della società era legale, e non si poteva dire che il proprietario avesse provocato l'insolvenza della società.
50. Infine, presentò che, per contrasto con la causa Mykhaylenky ed Altri c. Ucraina (N. 35091/02, 35196/02 35201/02, 35204/02 35945/02, 35949/02 35953/02, 36800/02 38296/02 e 42814/02, § 46 ECHR 2004-XII), la società godeva dell'indipendenza istituzionale ed operativa sufficiente dallo Stato per assolvere lo Stato dalla responsabilità sotto la Convenzione per i suoi atti e le sue omissioni. Non c'era effettivamente, nulla nella presente causa che suggerisse che lo Stato era un debitore principale della società o che il suo controllo si estendesse alle condizioni di lavoro della richiedente. Lo Stato non aveva proibito la confisca della proprietà della società. Al contrario, la società debitrice era un'entità indipendente e non era, come tale, controllata da qualsiasi ente Statale.
51. Il Governo concluse, di conseguenza, che la sentenza fosse resa contro un debitore privato. In questa misura, la causa era simile alle cause Reynbakh c. Russia e Bobrova c. Russia dove la Corte trovò che il principio per cui le sentenze devono essere eseguite non può essere interpretato come se obbligasse lo Stato a sostituirsi ad un imputato privato in caso dell'insolvenza di quest’ultimo (vedere Reynbakh c. Russia, n. 23405/03, § 18, 29 settembre 2005, e Bobrova c. Russia, n. 24654/03, § 16 17 novembre 2005). Sostenne che le sentenze contro la società non potevano essere eseguite a causa della mancanza di finanziamenti da parte della società, ed in queste circostanze lo Stato non poteva essere ritenuto responsabile per la non-esecuzione continua delle sentenze. Le misure applicate dalle autorità erano adeguate e sufficienti e loro agirono diligentemente per assistere il creditore nell’ esecuzione di una sentenza (vedere Fociac c. Romania, n. 2577/02, §§ 69–70 3 febbraio 2005). Invitò la Corte a respingere l'azione di reclamo come incompatibile ratione personae.
52. La richiedente sostenne che la società debitrice era, dinfatti, un'impresa gestita dallo Stato e controllata dal Consiglio della Città di Yakutsk e finanziata dal bilancio della città. La sua liquidazione fu ordinata dalle autorità. Inoltre, il Consiglio della Città aveva trasferito la proprietà della società ad una società di recente creata la MUP Teploenergiya. Quest’ultima aveva gli stessi clienti e fornitori, assolveva precisamente le stesse funzioni ed era registrata allo stesso indirizzo del suo predecessore. L'impresa debitrice non poteva essere riguardata come privata, poiché forniva il riscaldamento a tutti i locali a Yakutsk, in conformità con le tariffe prefissate. In queste circostanze il Consiglio della Città era responsabile per i debiti della società se a quest’ultima fossero mancati i finanziamenti per onorare i suoi obblighi, come deciso dalla sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000 a favore della richiedente.
b) La valutazione della Corte
53. La Corte reitera all'inizio che, dove un richiedente si lamenta di un'incapacità per eseguire un'assegnazione di corte a suo favore, la misura degli obblighi dello Stato sotto l’Articolo 6 e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 varia in base a se il debitore è un’Alta Parte Contraente all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione o un individuo privato (vedere Anokhin c. Russia (dec.), n. 25867/02, 31 maggio 2007). Dove una sentenza è contro lo Stato, quest’ultimo deve prendere l'iniziativa per eseguirla pienamente ed in tempo dovuto (vedere Akashev c. Russia, n. 30616/05, §§ 21–23, 12 giugno 2008, e Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, §§ 33-42 ECHR 2002-III). Quando il debitore è un individuo privato o una società, la posizione è diversa, poiché lo Stato non è, come norma generale, direttamente responsabile per i debiti di individui o di società privati ed i suoi obblighi sotto la Convenzione sono limitati ad offrire l'assistenza necessaria al creditore nell'esecuzione delle rispettive assegnazioni di corte, per esempio per un servizio di ufficiale giudiziario o procedure di insolvenza (vedere, per esempio, Kesyan c. Russia, n. 36496/02, 19 ottobre 2006, e Fociac citata sopra, § 70).
54. Dato lo status speciale delle imprese unitarie e municipali sotto la legge russa (vedere paragrafi 35-40 sopra), loro non possono né essere qualificate come autorità Statali, come l'amministrazione locale , né possono essere messe nella stessa categoria delle società private ed ordinarie. Da una parte, un'impresa unitaria municipale viene stabilita da un'autorità pubblica che rimane il proprietario della proprietà, mantiene il controlli sull'uso della proprietà in conformità col fine designato, riceve parte del profitto dell'impresa e ha diritto a riorganizzare o liquidare l'impresa e trasferire i suoi beni ad un altro soggetto giuridico. Dall’altra parte un'impresa unitaria municipale gode dell'indipendenza nelle sue attività operative e l’ autorità non è responsabile per i suoi debiti sotto il diritto nazionale.
55. Nel decidere se gli atti della società municipale od omissioni sono attribuibili sotto la Convenzione all'autorità municipale riguardata, la Corte avrà riguardo a tali fattori come la condizione giuridica della società, i diritti che simile status le dà, la natura dell'attività eseguita ed il contesto nel quale viene eseguita, ed il grado della sua indipendenza dalle autorità (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Radio France ed Altri c. Francia (dec.), n. 53984/00, ECHR 2003-X (estratti), con gli ulteriori riferimenti). La Corte dovrà considerare in particolare se la società godeva dell'indipendenza istituzionale ed operativa sufficiente dallo Stato per assolvere quest’ultimo dalla sua responsabilità sotto la Convenzione per i suoi atti ed omissioni (vedere Mykhaylenky ed Altri, citata sopra, § 44, e, mutatis mutandis, Shlepkin c. Russia, n. 3046/03, § 24 del 1 febbraio 2007).
56. Riguardo alla condizione giuridica della società, il Governo dibatté che le imprese municipali sono incorporate sotto il diritto nazionale come persone giuridiche separate e che lo Stato è assolto dalla responsabilità per i loro debiti, salvo in un numero limitato di casi specificati nell’ Articolo 56 del Codice civile. Nella prospettiva della Corte, la condizione giuridica della società sotto il diritto nazionale, comunque importante, non è decisiva per la determinazione della responsabilità dello Stato per gli atti della società od omissioni sotto la Convenzione. Effettivamente, la Corte ha ritenuto lo Stato responsabile per i debiti delle società nonostante la loro classificazione formale in molte occasioni, sotto il diritto nazionale (vedere, fra altre, mutatis mutandis, Mykhaylenky ed Altri, citata sopra, § 45; Lisyanskiy c. Ucraina, n. 17899/02, § 19 4 aprile 2006; Cooperativa Agricola Slobozia-Hanesei c. Moldavia, n. 39745/02, §§ 18-19 del 3 aprile 2007; Grigoryev e Kakaurova c. Russia, n. 13820/04, § 35 12 aprile 2007; e R. Kaÿapor ed Altri c. Serbia, N. 2269/06, 3041/06 3042/06, 3043/06 3045/06 e 3046/06, § 98 del 15 gennaio 2008). Di conseguenza, la condizione giuridica nazionale della società della richiedente come persona giuridica separata non assolve, da sola, lo Stato dalla sua responsabilità sotto la Convenzione per i debiti della società.
57. Riguardo all'indipendenza istituzionale ed operativa della società dallo Stato, la Corte nota l'argomento del Governo per cui il grado del coinvolgimento dello Stato nelle attività della società non può essere associato a quello nella causa Mykhaylenky ed Altri (citata sopra). Allo stesso tempo, la Corte nota, che l'indipendenza della società era limitata dal'esistenza di forti collegamenti istituzionali col municipio e con le restrizioni annesse all'uso dei beni e delle proprietà. La Corte nota a questo riguardo che la città di Yakutsk era il proprietario della società in conformità con il diritto nazionale e manteneva il possesso della proprietà conferita alla società. Il Consiglio della Città approvò tutte le operazioni con questa proprietà, controllò la gestione della società e decise se la società avrebbe dovuto continuare la sua attività o avrebbe dovuto entrare in liquidazione.
58. I collegamenti istituzionali della società con l'amministrazione pubblica erano particolarmente forti nella presente causa per la natura speciale delle sue attività. Come uno dei fornitori di riscaldamento principali nella città di Yakutsk, la società offriva un servizio pubblico d'importanza vitale alla popolazione della città. I beni della società furono ritirati dalla circolazione e godevano dello status speciale sotto il diritto nazionale.
59. La Corte nota che le relazioni che sorgono dalla gestione delle infrastrutture comunali d'importanza vitale furono qualificate dalla Corte Costituzionale della Federazione russa come pubbliche per natura (vedere sentenza del 16 maggio 2000, citata sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte Costituzionale concluse che il legislatore avrebbe potuto decidere, avendo riguardo agli scopi di pubblica utilità, che certi oggetti necessari per la sopravvivenza della popolazione, potessero essere trasferiti alla rispettiva autorità municipale nel corso di una procedura fallimentare. Il Governo stesso nota che il Consiglio di Città trasferì legalmente la proprietà della società e nell'interesse pubblico.
60. La natura pubblica delle funzioni della società municipale e la sua dipendenza che ne consegue dalle autorità municipali fu dimostrata ampiamente con il processo della liquidazione della società. L'Amministrazione decise di liquidare la società e, inoltre, ha disposto dei beni della società come riteneva più adattamento: loro furono trasferiti alla MUP Teploenergiya, un'impresa unitaria di recente creata che assolveva le stesse funzioni della società debitrice (confronta , mutatis mutandis, Lisyanskiy citata sopra, § 19).
61. La Corte nota l'argomento del Governo per cui il municipio non era il debitore principale della società e non si sarebbe dovuto considerare così che avesse provocato l'insolvenza della società. Questo fatto non risolve in se stesso comunque, la dipendenza istituzionale ed operativa della società dalle autorità municipali come dimostrato sopra.
62. Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede, e dato in particolare la natura pubblica delle funzioni della società, il controllo significativo sui suoi beni da parte dell'autorità municipale e le decisioni di quest’ultima che danno luogo al trasferimento di questi beni e la liquidazione susseguente della società, la Corte conclude che la società non godeva dell'indipendenza istituzionale operativa sufficiente dall'autorità municipale. Di conseguenza, nonostante lo status della società come una persona giuridica separata, l'autorità municipale, e quindi lo Stato, sarà ritenuto responsabile sotto la Convenzione per i suoi atti ed omissioni (vedere Mykhaylenky ed Altri, citata sopra, § 44; Lisyanskiy, citata sopra, § 20; Shlepkin, citata sopra, § 24; Grigoryev e Kakaurova, citata sopra, §§ 35-36; e Kaÿapor ed Altri, citata sopra, § 98).
63. L'eccezione del Governo deve essere perciò respinta.
3. Non - esaurimento
64. Il Governo dibatté che la richiedente non era riuscita ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibile a lei, perché lei non si era lamentata presso la corte dei difetti degli ufficiali giudiziari e del direttore dell’ insolvenza. La richiedente non fu d'accordo, dopo avendo indicato che lei aveva sollevato il suo problema di fronte alle varie autorità nazionali, ma inutilmente.
65. La Corte reitera che spetta allo Stato richiedere il non-esaurimento per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso disponibile era effettiva in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente (vedere Akdivar ed Altri, citatoa sopra, § 68). Nella presente causa, il Governo non ha mostrato come le vie di ricorso suggerite avrebbero soddisfatto questi requisiti (confronta, per esempio John Sammut and Visa Investments Limited c. Malta (dec.), n. 27023/03, §§ 39–46 del 16 ottobre 2007). La Corte nota, in particolare, che la procedura fallimentare a riguardo della società cominciata nel 2001, che la richiedente era stata messa nel ruolo dei creditori della società ed era stata notificata a riguardo di questo da parte del direttore dell’ insolvenza. Entro il tempo in cui la procedura fallimentare cominciò, la società debitrice non era già in grado di soddisfare le rivendicazioni dei creditori da qualche tempo. La Corte conclude che, in queste circostanze qualsiasi azione civile contro le autorità non avrebbe portato la richiedente più vicina alla sua meta cioè il pagamento del debito di sentenza (vedere Grigoryev e Kakaurova, citata sopra, § 29).
La Corte infine nota che, nella misura in cui le sentenze rese a favore della richiedente non furono eseguite apparentemente a causa della mancanza addotta di finanziamenti da parte della società debitrice, questo deficit fu causato, in gran misura, dal trasferimento dei finanziamenti principali ad un'impresa municipale di recente creata tramite la decisione del Consiglio di Città che la richiedente non era neanche in grado di contestarre di fronte alle corti. In simili circostanze, la Corte costata che la richiedente è stato assolta dal presentare reclami contro la condotta degli ufficiali giudiziari poiché le ragioni per la non-esecuzione della sentenza erano oltre l'influenza degli ufficiali giudiziari (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Mykhaylenky ed Altri, citata sopra, § 39). La Corte respinge di conseguenza l'eccezione del Governo.
4. Conclusione
66. La Corte nota inoltre che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
67. Il Governo presentò che la sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000 fu eseguita pienamente fra l’ottobre 2000 e il febbraio 2001, cioè all'interno di un termine ragionevole. La richiedente non presentò l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza alla commissione di liquidazione e non introdusse un'azione di reclamo contro il direttore dell’ insolvenza presso una corte. Il direttore dell’ insolvenza nelle sue lettere informò la richiedente che le sue rivendicazioni sotto la sentenza erano state incluse nel registro delle rivendicazioni dei creditori per errore.
68. La richiedente sostenne le sue rivendicazioni. Lei presentò di non aver ricevuto e di non aver potuto ricevere i pagamenti sotto la prima sentenza a suo favore fra l’ ottobre 2000 e il febbraio 2001, perché la sentenza stessa non fu emessa fino al 7 dicembre 2000 e l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza non fu spediti alla società debitrice sino al marzo 2001.
69. La Corte reitera all'inizio che un irragionevolmente ritardo lungo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza vincolante può violare la Convenzione. Per decidere se il ritardo fosse ragionevole, la Corte guarderà a quanto complessi erano i procedimenti di esecuzione, a come la richiedente e le autorità si comportarono, e a quale era la natura dell'assegnazione (vedere Raylyan c. Russia, n. 22000/03, § 31 15 febbraio 2007).
70. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte nota che la sentenza del 3 dicembre 2001 non è stata ancora eseguita. Il ritardo di esecuzione è durato così più di sette anni. Riguardo alla sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000, la Corte non si persuade che l'esecuzione dell'assegnazione della corte avesse potuto cominciare nell’ ottobre 2000, cioè, due mesi prima che la sentenza a favore della richiedente fosse consegnata. In qualsiasi caso, non è in possesso di qualsiasi esposizione di documenti che i pagamenti a cui fa riferimento il Governo davvero sono stati fatti. La Corte considera che la sentenza del 7 dicembre 2000 è rimasta di conseguenza non eseguita per più di otto anni ad oggi.
71. I periodi di sette ed otto anni sono incompatibili prima facie con la Convenzione. Il Governo ha giustificato il ritardo principalmente riguardo alla rispettiva di liquidazione e il licenziamento degli imputati, ma la Corte prima ha respinto questa scusa in circostanze simili (vedere Shlepkin, citata sopra, § 25).
72. La Corte reitera che, prima avendo respinto tale giustificazione in circostanze simili (vedere Shlepkin, citata sopra, §§ 24-25) non vede qualsiasi ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa. Effettivamente, i debiti della società furono trovati essere imputabili alle autorità Statali che doveva assicurare così che il debito di sentenza venisse pagato in modo opportuno ed appropriato. Mentre i procedimenti di liquidazione possono giustificare obiettivamente dei ritardi limitati nell’ esecuzione, la non-esecuzione continua delle sentenze a favore della richiedente per sette od otto anni non potrebbe essere giustificata proprio in nessuna circostanza. I fatti della presente causa suggerirebbero piuttosto che le autorità municipali non si considerarono legate all'obbligo di onorare il debito di sentenza dopo che loro avevano deciso di liquidare la società debitrice e crearne una nuova al suo posto.
73. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte a concludere che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
74. La richiedente si lamentò inoltre sotto l’Articolo 4 della Convenzione di non aver ricevuto il pagamento per il suo lavoro presso l’impresa municipale e, sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione, che i procedimenti nella sua causa erano stati ingiusti.
75. La Corte ha esaminato queste azioni di reclamo come presentate dalla richiedente. Comunque, avendo riguardo a tutto il materiale i suo possesso, trova, che queste azioni di reclamo non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di una violazione dei diritti e delle libertà esposti nella Convenzione o nei suoi Protocolli. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere respinta come manifestamente mal-fondata, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
76. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”

A. Danno
77. La richiedente chiese 355,840.98 rubli russi (RUB) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale. Di questa somma, RUB 16,632.32 e RUB 50,367.14 rappresentavano il debito dovuto dall'impresa facendo seguito alle sentenze a favore della richiedente, RUB 28,350 era per i benefici di separazione non retribuiti e RUB 260,504.52 erano per le perdite d’ inflazione. In appoggio delle sue rivendicazioni, lei presentò un calcolo particolareggiato delle perdite d’ inflazione basato sul tasso di rifinanziamento della Banca Centrale della Russia. Lei chiese inoltre 3,000 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
78. Il Governo presentò che nessuna soddisfazione equa dovrebbe essere assegnata al richiedente perché i suoi diritti sotto la Convenzione non erano stati violati. Alternativamente, loro dibatterono che la sentenza di una violazione avrebbe costituito la soddisfazione equa e sufficiente.
79. Come riguardi la rivendicazione per danno patrimoniale, la Corte non discerne qualsiasi collegamento causale fra la rivendicazione di separazione non retribuita e l'azione di reclamo di non-esecuzione del richiedente; respinge perciò questa rivendicazione. Allo stesso tempo, la Corte nota, che le sentenze del7 dicembre 2000 e del 3 dicembre 2001 sono rimaste non eseguite. Nota inoltre che il Governo non fece commenti sulle rivendicazioni del richiedente per danno patrimoniale e non obiettò al metodo del calcolo suggerito. Facendo la sua stima sulla base delle informazioni a sua disposizione, la Corte assegna EUR 1,837 sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, e respinge il resto delle sue rivendicazioni sotto questo capo.
80. Riguardo alla rivendicazione per danno non-patrimoniale, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare EUR 3,000 alla richiedente più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
81. La richiedente ha anche chiesto RUB 567.68 per spese postali. Il Governo presentò che la rivendicazione della richiedente dovrebbe essere respinta perché la richiedente non era riuscita a provarla con qualsiasi documento.
82. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso di costi e spese solamente se viene mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 16 sotto questo capo.
C. Interesse di mora
83. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo di non-esecuzione sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare alla richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell'accordo:
(i) EUR 1,837 (mille ottocento e trenta-sette euro) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 3,000 (tre mila euro) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale;
(iii) EUR 16 (sedici euro) a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti di percentuale;
4. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l’8 aprile 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.