Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VRBICA v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 32540/05/2010
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 01/04/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF VRBICA v. CROATIA
(Application no. 32540/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
1 April 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Vrbica v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 11 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 32540/05) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Montenegrin national, Mr M. V. (“the applicant”), on 26 August 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr S. R. and Mrs M. O. of Law Firm R. & O., advocates practising in Karlovac. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs Š. Stažnik.
3. On 17 November 2007 the President of the First Section decided to communicate the complaints concerning property, fairness and an effective remedy to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
4. The Government of Montenegro, having been informed of their right to intervene (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 2(a) of the Rules of Court), did not avail themselves of this right.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1937 and lives in Cetinje (Montenegro).
6. On 15 October 1991 the Titograd Court of First Instance (Osnovni sud u Titogradu) gave judgment no. P-437/87 ordering the companies C.O. and P. – both incorporated under Croatian law and with their head offices in Croatia – to pay the applicant jointly and severally damages in the total amount of 600,000 Yugoslav dinars for injuries sustained in a road traffic accident, together with accrued statutory default interest and the costs of proceedings. The judgment became final on 6 January 1992.
A. The proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment
7. On 16 October 2001 the applicant instituted non-contentious proceedings before the Koprivnica Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Koprivnici) seeking that the above foreign judgment be recognised in Croatia.
8. On 20 November 2001 the Municipal Court accepted the applicant's request and issued a decision recognising the Montenegro court's judgment.
9. On 4 March 2002 the applicant applied for rectification of that decision because it incorrectly stated that the case number of the recognised judgment was P-437/97 instead of P-437/87.
10. On 13 March 2002 the Koprivnica Municipal Court issued a decision rectifying the error. It served it on the applicant's representatives two days later.
B. The first enforcement proceedings
11. Meanwhile, on 3 December 2001 the applicant instituted enforcement proceedings before the Koprivnica Municipal Court against the companies C.O. and P. by submitting an application for enforcement of the recognised judgment.
12. On 6 February 2002 the court issued a writ of execution (rješenje o ovrsi) by garnishment of funds from the debtors' bank accounts.
13. The judgment debtors appealed, arguing that number P-437/97 figured in the decision on recognition as a number of the recognised judgment while the actual number of the judgment sought to be enforced was P-437/87. In his reply, the applicant submitted that the decision on recognition contained a clerical error, that he had applied for its rectification and that the proceedings instituted thereby were still pending.
14. On 16 April 2002 the Koprivnica County Court (Županijski sud u Koprivnici) quashed the writ of execution of 6 February 2002 and remitted the case. It held that the decision on recognition of the foreign judgment indeed contained the number P-437/97 as a number of the recognised judgment whereas the judgment sought to be enforced had the number P-437/87. The court observed that this discrepancy might have been caused by a clerical error but nevertheless quashed the writ of execution, giving precedence to the principle of strict formal legality in enforcement proceedings. The second-instance decision was served on the applicant's representatives on 10 May 2002.
15. In the resumed proceedings, on 13 June 2002 the Koprivnica Municipal Court issued an instruction, which the applicant's representatives received four days later, inviting him to submit within fifteen days the proper enforcement title (that is, the judgment with the same number as the one stated to be the number of the recognised judgment in the decision of 20 November 2001) or a rectified decision on recognition.
16. As the applicant failed to do so, on 6 August 2002 the court declared his application for enforcement inadmissible.
17. The applicant appealed and enclosed that court's decision on rectification of 13 March 2002 (see paragraph 10 above).
18. On 17 September 2002 the Koprivnica County Court dismissed the applicant's appeal. It held that the first-instance decision to declare the application for enforcement inadmissible was justified, given that the applicant had failed to satisfy the request of the first-instance court even though he could have done so as he had been in possession of the rectified decision at the relevant time. The second-instance decision was served on the applicant's representatives on 15 October 2002.
19. The applicant then lodged a constitutional complaint against that decision, which the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) dismissed on 17 September 2004.
C. The second enforcement proceedings and the civil proceedings for declaring the enforcement inadmissible
1. The second enforcement proceedings
20. Meanwhile, on 24 December 2002 the applicant instituted the second enforcement proceedings before the Koprivnica Municipal Court against the judgment debtors by resubmitting his application for enforcement together with the rectified decision on recognition.
21. On 7 March 2003 the court issued a writ of execution by garnishment of funds from the debtors' bank accounts.
22. The debtors appealed, arguing that the enforcement had become time-barred, given that the ten-year statutory limitation period running from the finality of the judgment sought to be enforced had elapsed on 6 January 2002. In reply, the court instructed them, pursuant to the Enforcement Act, to institute separate civil proceedings before it against the applicant with a view to declaring the enforcement inadmissible.
23. After these civil proceedings ended in the applicant's disfavour (see paragraphs 25-29 below), on 10 December 2004 the Koprivnica Municipal Court issued a decision discontinuing the enforcement proceedings.
24. The applicant appealed, but his appeal was dismissed by the Koprivnica County Court on 25 January 2005.
2. The civil proceedings for declaring the enforcement inadmissible
25. On 19 May 2003 the judgment debtors, companies C.O. and P., brought a civil action against the applicant in the Koprivnica Municipal Court, seeking to have the enforcement declared inadmissible.
26. On 8 June 2004 the Koprivnica Municipal Court gave judgment for the plaintiffs, finding that the enforcement was time-barred and thus inadmissible.
27. On 28 September 2004 the Koprivnica County Court dismissed an appeal by the applicant and upheld the first-instance judgment.
28. The courts held that the applicant's request of 16 October 2001 for recognition of a foreign judgment instituting the relevant non-contentious proceedings had not interrupted the running of the statutory limitation period within which the enforcement of the recognised judgment could have been sought. The courts held so because they considered that a judgment debtor was not a party to such proceedings and was thus unaware that a judgment creditor had undertaken steps to enforce the judgment. The courts also noted that the applicant had not used the opportunity to institute enforcement proceedings directly – a step that would certainly have interrupted the running of the statutory limitation period – in which case the recognition of the enforcement title could have been decided incidentally as a preliminary issue in those proceedings. Lastly, the courts noted that the applicant had instituted the first enforcement proceedings within the ten-year statutory limitation period but that they had ended with a decision declaring his application for enforcement inadmissible, in which case, pursuant to section 389(2) of the Obligations Act, they did not interrupt the running of the limitation period.
29. The applicant then lodged a constitutional complaint against the second-instance judgment, alleging violations of his constitutional rights to a fair hearing, equality and property. On 20 April 2005 the Constitutional Court dismissed his constitutional complaint.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Obligations Act
30. The relevant part of the Obligations Act (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 29/1978, 39/1985 and 57/1989, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/1991 with subsequent amendments) provided as follows:
Section 379 (1)
Claims determined by a final court decision or a decision of another competent authority
“All claims determined by a final court decision or a decision of another competent authority ... lapse in ten years, even if for certain claims a statute provides for a shorter limitation period.”
Section 388
Bringing of an action
“[Running of the] limitation [period] is interrupted by bringing of a civil action in a court or by taking any other legal action before other competent authority by the creditor against the debtor with a view to determining, securing or enforcing his or her right.”
Section 389
Abandoning, dismissing or declaring an action inadmissible
“(1) An interruption of limitation period resulting from bringing of a civil action in a court or from taking of any other legal action before other competent authority by the creditor against the debtor with a view to determining, securing or enforcing his or her right, is considered never to have occurred if the creditor abandons the civil action or any other action undertaken.
(2) Likewise, it is considered that an interruption has never occurred if the creditor's civil action or application was dismissed or declared inadmissible, or if the measure obtained to secure or enforce the debt was set aside.”
Section 390 (1)
Declaring a civil action inadmissible for lack of jurisdiction
“If a civil action against the debtor is declared inadmissible for lack of jurisdiction or any other reason which does not concern the merits of the case, and the creditor brings another civil action within three months following finality of the decision declaring the [first] civil action inadmissible, it is considered that the limitation period was interrupted by the first civil action.”
B. The Enforcement Act
1. Relevant provisions
31. The relevant part of the Enforcement Act (Ovršni zakon, Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia, nos. 57/1996, 29/1999, 42/2000, 173/2003, 194/2003, 151/2004, 88/2005, 121/2005 and 6720/08), as in force at the material time, provided as follows:
Section 11 (1)
Legal remedies
“Unless otherwise provided by this Act, [the parties may lodge] an appeal against first-instance decisions.”
Section 17
Enforcement of a decision of a foreign court
“Enforcement on the basis of a decision of a foreign court may be ordered and carried out in the Republic of Croatia only if that decision meets the requirements for its recognition and enforcement provided by a statute or an international agreement.”
Section 19 (1)
Application of provisions of other statutes
“Unless otherwise provided by this Act or another statute, in enforcement ... proceedings the provisions of the Civil Procedure Act shall apply mutatis mutandis.”
Section 33 (1)
Certificate of enforceability
“If an application for enforcement is lodged with the court which did not decide on the claim at first instance, the application shall be accompanied with the original or a copy of the enforcement title having the certificate of enforceability ...”
2. The Supreme Court's practice
In its decisions no. Gzz-22/00-2 of 5 July 2000 the Supreme Court interpreted section 33(1) of the Enforcement Act as follows:
“Section 33(1) of the Enforcement Act provides: 'If an application for enforcement is lodged with the court which did not decide on the claim at first instance, the application shall be accompanied with the original or a copy of the enforcement title having the certificate of enforceability ...' It follows by converse implication from that provision that an application for enforcement does not have to be accompanied by the enforcement title having the certificate of enforceability when the application for enforcement is [lodged with and] based on the decision of the court which decided on the claim [at first instance].”
C. The Civil Procedure Act
32. The relevant part of the Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parničnom postupku, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 and 35/1991, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia nos. 53/1991, 91/1992, 58/1993, 112/1999, 88/2001, 117/2003, 88/2005, 2/2007, 84/2008 and 123/2008) as in force at the material time, provided as follows:
Section 109
“(1) ...
(2) When returning a submission to a party with a view to correcting or supplementing it, the court shall specify a time-limit for its re-submission.
(3) ...
(4) If a submission is not returned to the court within the specified time-limit, it shall be considered withdrawn. If it is returned without correction or supplement, it shall be declared inadmissible.”
Section 352 (1)
“In an appeal the parties may rely on new facts and adduce new evidence...”
Reopening of proceedings following a final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom
Section 428a
“(1) When the European Court of Human Rights has found a violation of a human right or fundamental freedom guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms or additional protocols thereto ratified by the Republic of Croatia, a party may, within thirty days of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights becoming final, file a petition with the court in the Republic of Croatia which adjudicated in the first instance in the proceedings in which the decision violating the human right or fundamental freedom was rendered, to set aside the decision by which the human right or fundamental freedom was violated.
(2) The proceedings referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall be conducted by applying, mutatis mutandis, the provisions on the reopening of proceedings.
(3) In the reopened proceedings the courts are required to respect the legal opinions expressed in the final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom.”
D. The Conflict of Laws Act
1. Relevant provisions
33. The relevant part of the Conflict of Laws Act (Zakon o rješevanju sukoba zakona s propisima drugih zemalja u određenim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 43/1982 and 72/1982, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/1991) reads as follows:
Section 101 (5)
If no separate decision on recognition of a foreign decision has been rendered, any court may in the proceedings [before it] decide on recognition of that decision as a preliminary issue, but only with effect for those proceedings.
2. The Supreme Court's practice
34. In its decisions nos. Gž 6/1992-2 of 19 August 1992, Gž 2/1995-2 of 14 June 1995 and Gž-4/1995-2 of 15 June 1995 the Supreme Court held that the lower courts had breached the principle of adversarial hearing in the non-contentious proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment because they had not served the application for recognition to the judgment debtor nor held any hearing before reaching their decisions.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
35. The applicant complained that the refusal of the domestic courts to enforce the recognised foreign judgment of 15 October 1991 violated his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
36. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
37. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. As to whether there was an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of 'possessions'
(a) The arguments of the parties
38. The Government first submitted that the case did not disclose any interference with the applicant's property rights. They argued that when a judgment could not be enforced because the enforcement had become time-barred, this did not constitute interference within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. They explained that the right of a creditor to enforce his or her claim lapses upon the expiration of the statutory limitation period, which periods were determined by clear legal regulations, and their expiration did not depend on any actions or acts by the state authorities. Moreover, if the debtor fulfilled his or her obligation after the expiration of the limitation period, he or she could not claim back what had been given. Furthermore, the debtor must plead that the limitation period had expired, because the court could not take it into account of its own motion, but only if the debtor raised it. Therefore, the Government argued that the applicant's claim still existed, but, due to the expiration of the statutory limitation period in which he had failed to undertake necessary legal steps for its enforcement, he could no longer enforce his claim through the courts. For this reason, the Government argued that his claim had not been extinguished or limited and therefore there had been no deprivation or control of possessions by the state authorities.
39. The applicant argued that on the basis of the Koprivnica Municipal Court's decision on recognition of the final judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance of 15 October 1991, he had acquired an undisputed and outstanding claim for damages against the companies C.O. and P., that is to say a pecuniary right. By refusing to enforce that judgment, the Croatian courts had prevented him from realising his acquired pecuniary right, thereby violating his right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(b) The Court's assessment
40. The Court reiterates that an applicant may allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or claims that are sufficiently established to be regarded as “assets”. A claim may be regarded as an asset only when it is sufficiently established to be enforceable (see, for example, Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301-B). As the applicant's claim in the present case had been acknowledged by the final judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance of 15 October 1991 that was subsequently recognised in Croatia by a decision of the Koprivnica Municipal Court of 20 November 2001, the Court considers that the applicant's claim was sufficiently established to qualify as an “asset” protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
41. The Court further notes that the applicant had instituted enforcement proceedings in order to enforce the above foreign judgment rendered in his favour, but that the enforcement was eventually declared inadmissible as time-barred by the Koprivnica Municipal Court on 8 June 2004 because the ten-year time-limit for seeking enforcement had expired. In this connection, the Court reiterates that the impossibility of obtaining the execution of a final judgment in an applicant's favour constitutes an interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among other authorities, Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 40, ECHR 2002-III, and Jeličić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 41183/02, § 48, ECHR 2006-XII). In these circumstances, the Court considers that there has been an interference with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of his “possessions” in the present case.
2. As to whether the interference was “provided for by law”
(a) The arguments of the parties
(i) The Government
42. The Government argued that the interference had been provided for by law as it had been based on sections 379(1) and 389(1) of the Obligations Act, which had provided that claims determined by a final court decision lapse in ten years, and that an interruption of the limitation period resulting from the bringing of a civil action or any other legal action was considered never to have occurred if the creditor abandoned that action. In interpreting these provisions, the domestic courts had held that lodging a request for recognition of a foreign court judgment did not constitute an action of the creditor which could interrupt the running of the statutory limitation period within the meaning of section 388 of the Obligations Act because it was neither undertaken against the debtor nor aimed at determining, securing or enforcing the claim. Accordingly, no interruption of the limitation period had occurred when the applicant had submitted his request for recognition of a foreign judgement. The limitation period could only be interrupted by lodging an application for enforcement within that period.
43. Although the applicant's first application for enforcement had been lodged before the expiration of the limitation period that application could not have interrupted it because, pursuant to section 389(1) of the Obligations Act, the limitation period was considered not to have been interrupted if the creditor had abandoned his action. In this connection, the Government emphasised that in its instruction of 13 June 2002, the Koprivnica Municipal Court had invited the applicant to rectify his application for enforcement while warning him explicitly that otherwise it would be considered withdrawn. Since the applicant had failed to act according to that instruction, it had been considered that he had abandoned his application for enforcement. Accordingly, no interruption of the limitation period had occurred.
44. As to the applicability to the present case of section 390(1) of the Obligations Act – which provides an exemption from section 389(2) of the same Act, in which situations the running of the statutory limitation period shall be interrupted even though the creditor's action has been declared inadmissible – the Government first pointed out that it was for the domestic courts to assess whether the conditions for its application had been met. In this connection they reiterated that under the Court's case-law it was not the Court's task to assume the role of domestic courts, and that it was primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic legislation. They further argued that this section referred primarily to situations where the creditor's action had been declared inadmissible for lack of jurisdiction (hence the title of the section). However, in the present case, in its decision of 6 August 2002, the Koprivnica Municipal Court had not declared the applicant's application for enforcement inadmissible “for lack of jurisdiction or any other reason which does not concern the merits of the case”, as provided in section 390(1) of the Obligations Act, but because the applicant had abandoned his application for enforcement within the meaning of section 389(1) of that Act. Therefore, the limitation period could not have been interrupted by lodging the first application for enforcement. Lastly, the Government pointed out that the applicant had never relied on section 390(1) of the Obligations Act in any of the above proceedings.
(ii) The applicant
45. The applicant argued that in the present case the “final court decision” within the meaning of section 379(1), to which the ten-year statutory limitation period applied, was not the judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance of 15 October 1991, as the domestic courts and the Government had mistakenly held, but the Koprivnica Municipal Court's decision on recognition of that judgment of 20 November 2001. That being so, it could not have been argued that the applicant had not sought its enforcement within the ten-year statutory limitation-period, as the domestic courts had held.
46. As regards the Government's argument that his first application for enforcement had been declared inadmissible because he had failed to observe the Koprivnica Municipal Court instruction of 13 June 2002, and submit the rectified decision on recognition, the applicant referred to the Supreme Court's practice developed in respect of section 33 of the Enforcement Act, according to which the enforcement creditor was not required to enclose an enforcement title with his application for enforcement if the enforcement title (that is, a decision to be enforced) originated from the same court before which the enforcement was being sought. Since it was the Koprivnica Municipal Court's decision on recognition and not the judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance that, in the applicant's view, constituted the enforcement title in the present case, and given the fact that he sought the enforcement before the very same Koprivnica Municipal Court, it had been the duty of that court to obtain and correct that decision on recognition of its own motion.
47. The applicant further argued that, even assuming that it was the judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance that constituted the enforcement title, as the Government claimed, the interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions would have nevertheless not been lawful.
48. In this connection the applicant first submitted that the domestic courts had misapplied the domestic law when they held that the institution of proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment did not constitute an “action of the creditor against the debtor with a view to determining, securing or enforcing his right” within the meaning of section 388 of the Obligations Act, capable of interrupting the running of the statutory limitation period. The applicant explained that this was so because a foreign judgment could not have been enforced before it had been recognised in Croatia. Instituting proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment was therefore a necessary precondition for its enforcement.
49. The applicant further referred to the failure of the domestic courts to apply section 390(1) of the Obligations Act even though all conditions for its application had been met in his case. In particular, his first application for enforcement had been declared inadmissible on 6 August 2002 for his alleged failure to act upon the instruction of the Koprivnica Municipal Court of 13 June 2002, that is to say, for the reason that did not concern the merits of the case. In its decision of 6 August 2002 the Koprivnica Municipal Court had not declared his application for enforcement withdrawn, as the Government suggested, which might have led to the conclusion that he had “abandoned” it, within the meaning of section 389(1) of the Obligations Act. Rather, that court expressly declared his application for enforcement inadmissible, which was the first condition for applicability of section 390(1) of the Obligations Act. Furthermore, since he had brought his second application for enforcement on 24 December 2002, that is well within three months of 15 October 2002, the date on which the decision of 6 August 2002 declaring his first application for enforcement inadmissible had become final, the second condition for applicability of section 390(1) of the Obligations Act had also been met. It followed that the limitation period should have been interrupted on 3 December 2001 when he had lodged his first application for enforcement. That was within ten years of the finality of the judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance of 15 October 1991, which had become final on 6 January 1992.
50. In these circumstances, the applicant argued that the interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions could not have been considered lawful.
(b) The Court's assessment
51. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II). In this respect the Court agrees with the Government that the decisions of the domestic courts in the present case had a legal basis in domestic law as their refusal to allow the enforcement of the foreign judgment rendered in the applicant's favour was based on sections 379(1) and 389 of the Obligations Act.
52. However, the Court further reiterates that the existence of a legal basis is not in itself sufficient to satisfy the principle of lawfulness, which also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application. That principle also requires the Court to verify whether the way in which the domestic law is interpreted and applied by the domestic courts produces consequences that are consistent with the principles of the Convention (see, for example, Apostolidi and Others v. Turkey, no. 45628/99, § 70, 27 March 2007, and Nacaryan and Deryan v. Turkey, nos. 19558/02 and 27904/02, § 58, 8 January 2008).
53. In this connection, the Court first notes that the application by the domestic courts of the above provisions of the Obligations Act followed from their prior finding that instituting proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment did not constitute a legal action of the creditor within the meaning of section 388 of the same Act capable of interrupting the running of the statutory limitation period. Therefore, the domestic courts held that the ten-year statutory limitation period provided in section 379(1) of the Obligations Act within which the enforcement of a judgment could be sought had not been interrupted when the applicant on 16 October 2001 had lodged a request for recognition of the judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance of 15 October 1991 with the Koprivnica Municipal Court. Having regard to section 389 of the Obligations Act, the domestic courts considered that the running of this statutory limitation period could not have been interrupted either when the applicant had lodged his first application for enforcement on 3 December 2001 because that application had eventually been declared inadmissible on account of his failure to observe the time-limit set down by the first-instance court and provide a rectified decision on recognition (see paragraph 28 above).
54. The Court further notes that the view of the domestic courts that institution of proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment did not constitute a legal action of the creditor within the meaning of section 388 of the Obligations Act was based on their assumption that a judgment debtor was not a party to such proceedings and was thus unaware that a judgment creditor had undertaken steps to enforce the judgment. However, that supposition contradicts the established case-law of the Supreme Court according to which proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment are not ex parte proceedings but adversarial proceedings where a judgment debtor has to be informed of their commencement and be allowed to participate in them (see paragraph 34 above). It is true that companies C.O. and P. as the judgment debtors indeed did not participate in the proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment instituted by the applicant. However, this was so only because of the failure of the Koprivnica Municipal Court to notify them that the applicant had instituted those proceedings. Even though this error of the Koprivnica Municipal Court should not have had negative consequences for the applicant, the same court nevertheless used it, in the civil proceedings instituted by the companies C.O. and P. to have the enforcement against them declared inadmissible, to justify its refusal to enforce the judgment in the applicant's favour (see paragraphs 25-29 above).
55. What is more, leaving aside the domestic law considerations, the Court finds untenable the view of the domestic courts that instituting proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment does not interrupt the running of a statutory limitation period. If this view were to be accepted, it would lead to a situation where a judgment creditor could lose the right to enforce a foreign judgment owing to possible procrastination in the proceedings for its recognition, that is to say, for reasons beyond his or her control. That situation would seriously jeopardise the principle of legal certainty and would be irreconcilable with the principle of the rule of law.
56. The foregoing considerations are sufficient for the Court to conclude that the impugned interference in the form of the Koprivnica Municipal Court's judgment of 8 June 2004 was incompatible with the principle of lawfulness and therefore contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, because the manner in which that court interpreted and applied the relevant domestic law, in particular section 388 of the Obligations Act, was not foreseeable for the applicant, who could have reasonably expected that instituting proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment would interrupt the running of the statutory limitation period (see, for example and mutatis mutandis, Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, §§ 51-60, and Fokas v. Turkey, no. 31206/02, §§ 42-44, 29 September 2009).
57. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
58. The applicant further complained that the refusal of the Croatian courts to allow the enforcement of the recognised foreign judgment of 15 October 1991 had been contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
59. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
60. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
61. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal; in this way it embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect. However, that right would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. It would be inconceivable for Article 6 § 1 to describe in detail the procedural guarantees afforded to litigants – proceedings that are fair, public and expeditious – without protecting the implementation of judicial decisions. To construe Article 6 as being concerned exclusively with access to a court and the conduct of proceedings would indeed be likely to lead to situations incompatible with the principle of the rule of law which the Contracting States undertook to respect when they ratified the Convention. Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 (see Hornsby v. Greece, 19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II).
62. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that the domestic courts refused to enforce the final and enforceable judgment of the Titograd Court of First Instance of 15 October 1991 rendered in the applicant's favour, that was recognised in Croatia on 20 November 2001, because they considered that the ten-year statutory limitation period stipulated in section 379(1) of the Obligations Act, within which the applicant could have sought enforcement, had expired. Thus, in the Court's view, the judgment of the Koprivnica Municipal Court of 8 June 2004 to declare the enforcement of the above-mentioned Montenegro's court judgment inadmissible may be regarded as imposing a restriction on his right of access to a court. The Court must therefore examine whether the applicant's right of access to a court was unduly restricted by that decision.
63. In this connection the Court first reiterates that the right of access to a court right is not absolute, but may be subject to limitations. These are permitted by implication, since the right of access by its very nature calls for regulation by the State. In this respect, the Contracting States enjoy a certain margin of appreciation, although the final decision as to the observance of the Convention's requirements rests with the Court. However, these limitations must not restrict or reduce the access left to an individual in such a way or to such an extent that the very essence of the right is impaired. Furthermore, a limitation will not be compatible with Article 6 § 1 if it does not pursue a legitimate aim and if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be achieved (see, for example, Ashingdane v. the United Kingdom, 28 May 1985, § 57, Series A no. 93, and Stubbings and Others v. the United Kingdom, 22 October 1996, § 50, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV).
1. As to whether the restriction pursued a legitimate aim
(a) The arguments of the parties
64. The Government argued that the restriction of the applicant's right of access to a court in the present case had pursued a legitimate aim as the interests of legal certainty required that creditors with a passive attitude who did not exercise their rights within the specified time-limit should, after the expiration of the limitation period, lose their right to enforce their claim.
65. The applicant agreed.
(b) The Court's assessment
66. The Court reiterates that statutory limitation periods serve several important purposes, namely to ensure legal certainty and finality, protect potential respondents from stale claims which might be difficult to counter and prevent the injustice which might arise if courts were required to decide upon events which took place in the distant past on the basis of evidence which might have become unreliable and incomplete because of the passage of time (see Stubbings and Others, cited above, § 51; and, mutatis mutandis, Vo v. France [GC], no. 53924/00, § 92, ECHR 2004-VIII; and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, §§ 68-69, ECHR 2007-X). Accordingly, the existence of a limitation period per se is not incompatible with the Convention. What the Court needs to ascertain in a given case is whether the nature of the time-limit in question and/or the manner in which it was applied is compatible with the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Phinikaridou v. Cyprus, no. 23890/02, § 52, ECHR 2007-XIV (extracts)).
2. As to whether the restriction was proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued
(a) The arguments of the parties
(i) The Government
67. The Government emphasised that under section 379(1) of the Obligations Act the claims determined by a final judgement – like the applicant's claim in the present case – elapsed in ten years, which meant that the limitation period for such claims was longer than the general limitation period. In fact the applicant had benefited from the longest limitation period provided for by the Obligations Act. Nevertheless, the applicant had submitted his first application for enforcement only one month before the expiration of that limitation period and after that had assumed a passive attitude in these proceedings, because of which the enforcement court considered that he had abandoned his application, as a consequence of which the running of the limitation period had not been interrupted.
68. In particular, during the enforcement proceedings the court had invited the applicant to correct his application for enforcement because the reference number indicated in the decision on recognition of 20 November 2001 was incorrect, for which reason he had had to request its rectification. The enforcement court had instructed the applicant how and within what time-limit he should have corrected his application for enforcement, and had warned him of the consequences of his failure to do so. However, the applicant had failed to follow the court's order without a valid reason. He had not provided the court with the document sought within the specified time-limit nor afterwards, that is until the issuance of the decision of 6 August 2002 declaring his application for enforcement inadmissible. In this connection the Government pointed out that the applicant had been in possession of the rectified decision on recognition at the time when the enforcement court had invited him to submit it. What is more, the applicant had himself stated in his appeal against the decision declaring his application for enforcement inadmissible that he had not submitted the rectified decision because he had considered that it had been the court's task to obtain it ex officio. The applicant had been represented by advocates from Croatia, who should have been aware of the consequences of someone's failure to act upon the court's order in enforcement proceedings.
69. That being so, the Government considered that no unreasonable time-limits had been imposed on the applicant, nor had he been prevented from realising his rights. Moreover, given that enforcement proceedings were strictly formal proceedings in which an enforcement court acts exclusively upon applications by enforcement creditors, which must be accompanied with all the necessary documents (a valid enforcement title is an essential prerequisite for allowing enforcement), the Government deemed that, because of his passive attitude, the applicant bore the entire responsibility for declaring inadmissible his application for enforcement.
(ii) The applicant
70. The applicant repeated his above arguments (see paragraphs 45-50). He also pointed out that in the first enforcement proceedings the Koprivnica Municipal Court had invited him to submit the rectified decision on recognition even though this decision had been issued by the same court in the proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment. Therefore, instead of asking him to submit the rectified decision, the court could have simply consulted the case file concerning the proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment. That being so, and given that the same court had made a clerical error that had required rectification, the applicant considered that declaring his application for enforcement inadmissible on account of his failure to submit the rectified decision on recognition, had been disproportionate in the circumstances.
(b) The Court's assessment
71. In order to satisfy itself that the very essence of the applicant's “right to a tribunal” was not impaired by declaring the enforcement inadmissible, the Court must examine whether the view of the domestic courts that the institution of the proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment by the applicant did not interrupt the running of the ten-year statutory limitation period, and the resultant sanction for failing to respect that time-limit, infringed the proportionality principle (see, mutatis mutandis, Levages Prestations Services v. France, 23 October 1996, § 42, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-V, and Osu v. Italy, no. 36534/97, § 35, 11 July 2002).
72. In this connection the Court refers to its above findings in respect of the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, according to which the applicant could have reasonably expected that instituting proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment would interrupt the running of the statutory limitation period and that the judgment of the Koprivnica Municipal Court of 28 September 2004 to the contrary was not in line with the established case-law of the Supreme Court (see paragraphs 54-56 above). In these circumstances, the refusal of the domestic courts to allow the enforcement of the recognised foreign judgment of 15 October 1991 rendered in the applicant's favour infringed the proportionality principle and thus impaired the very essence of his right of access to a court.
73. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No.1 THERETO
74. The applicant also complained that he had not had an effective remedy against the refusal of the domestic courts to enforce the recognised foreign judgment of 15 October 1991. He relied on Article 13 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto. Article 13 reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
75. The Government contested that argument.
76. As already noted above (see paragraph 41), the interference with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions occurred when the the Koprivnica Municipal Court in its judgment of 8 June 2004 declared inadmissible the enforcement of the foreign judgment in his favour because it became time-barred. The applicant appealed against that judgment and subsequently lodged a constitutional complaint.
77. The Court reiterates in this connection that the “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant. (see Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 157, ECHR 2000-X). It therefore notes that the applicant had at his disposal effective domestic remedies to complain against the violation of his Convention right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions – an appeal and a constitutional complaint – of which he availed himself. The mere fact that the outcome of the appellate proceedings and the proceedings before the Constitutional Court was not favourable to him does not render those remedies ineffective.
78. It follows that this complaint is inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 of the Convention as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 thereof.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
79. The applicant also complained that he had been discriminated against, claiming that the Croatian courts had refused to enforce the recognised foreign judgment of 15 October 1991 because of his Montenegrin origin and nationality. He relied on Article 14 of the Convention, which read as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
80. The Court considers this complaint unsubstantiated as the applicant provided no details whatsoever. Moreover, there is no evidence to suggest that in deciding as they did the domestic courts were guided by improper motives, such as the applicant's nationality or ethnic origin.
81. It follows that this complaint is also inadmissible under Article 35 § 3 of the Convention as manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 thereof.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
82. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
83. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences. If national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI). In this connection the Court notes that the applicant can now file a petition under section 428a of the Civil Procedure Act (see paragraph 32 above) with the Koprivnica Municipal Court for the reopening of the above civil proceedings for declaring the enforcement admissible in respect of which the Court has found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto.
84. Given the nature of the applicant's complaints and the reasons for which it has found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto, the Court considers that in the present case the most appropriate way of redress would be to reopen the proceedings complained of in due course (see, mutatis mutandis, Trgo v. Croatia, no. 35298/04, § 75, 11 June 2009; Lungoci v. Romania, no. 62710/00, § 56, 26 January 2006, and Yanakiev v. Bulgaria, no. 40476/98, § 90, 10 August 2006).
85. Having regard to the foregoing and given that the applicant's representatives did not submit a claim for just satisfaction, the Court considers that there is no call to award him any sum on that account.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints concerning peaceful enjoyment of possessions and access to a court admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 1 April 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following separate opinions are annexed to this judgment:
(a) concurring opinion of Judge Spielmann;
(b) concurring opinion of Judge Malinverni.
C.L.R.
A.M.W.

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE SPIELMANN
(Translation)
I.
1. Like all my colleagues, I voted in favour of finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and of Article 6 of the Convention.
2. However, like Judge Malinverni I have difficulty in following the reasoning that led the Court to find a violation of Article 6 of the Convention. While I too consider that there has been a violation of Article 6 in this case, this is not because the applicant's right of access to a court was infringed, but because, both by displaying excessive formalism and by interpreting the relevant statutory provisions arbitrarily, the judicial authorities deprived him of the fair hearing to which he was entitled (see paragraph 15 of the concurring opinion of Judge Malinverni).
3. In paragraph 61 of the judgment the Court rightly considers the matter from the standpoint of execution of judicial decisions by citing the Hornsby v. Greece judgment (19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II). It should be recalled that in Hornsby the Court held as follows:
“40. The Court reiterates that, according to its established case-law, Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal; in this way it embodies the 'right to a court', of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect (see the Philis v. Greece judgment of 27 August 1991, Series A no. 209, p. 20, § 59). However, that right would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. It would be inconceivable that Article 6 § 1 should describe in detail procedural guarantees afforded to litigants – proceedings that are fair, public and expeditious – without protecting the implementation of judicial decisions; to construe Article 6 as being concerned exclusively with access to a court and the conduct of proceedings would be likely to lead to situations incompatible with the principle of the rule of law which the Contracting States undertook to respect when they ratified the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, the Golder v. the United Kingdom judgment of 21 February 1975, Series A no. 18, pp. 16-18, §§ 34-36). Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the 'trial' for the purposes of Article 6; moreover, the Court has already accepted this principle in cases concerning the length of proceedings (see, most recently, the Di Pede v. Italy and Zappia v. Italy judgments of 26 September 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV, pp. 1383-84, §§ 20-24, and pp. 1410-11, §§ 16-20 respectively.”
4. The execution of a decision follows on from the trial, unlike the issue of access to a court, which precedes the trial.
5. The Court recently extended the principle set forth in the Hornsby judgment to the execution of foreign decisions. In its McDonald v. France decision of 29 April 20081 it held as follows:
“The Court acknowledges that the refusal to grant authority to execute the judgments of the American court constituted interference with the applicant's right to a fair hearing.”2 (translation)
6. In the present case the applicant was denied the fair hearing to which he was entitled. However, the problem arose at the final stage of the proceedings, taken as a whole. In my view, the question arising was therefore not one of access to a court.
II.
7. Like my colleague Judge Malinverni, I would very much have liked the principle of the reopening of proceedings, on account of its importance, to have been reflected in the operative part of the judgment (see paragraph 17 of Judge Malinverni's concurring opinion and the references cited).

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE MALINVERNI
(Translation)
1. I voted with all my colleagues in favour of finding a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and of Article 6 of the Convention.
2. While I agree in all respects with the reasoning that led the Court to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, I have more difficulty in following the approach by which it found a violation of Article 6.
3. The Court essentially reached its finding of a violation of Article 6 on the ground that the applicant had not had access to a court, as this Article implicitly requires: “Thus, in the Court's view, the judgment of the Koprivnica Municipal Court of 8 June 2004 to declare the enforcement of the above-mentioned Montenegro court's judgment inadmissible may be regarded as imposing a restriction on his right of access to a court” (see paragraph 62 of the judgment). Very logically, the Court goes on to ask the question “whether the applicant's right of access to a court was unduly restricted by that decision” (ibid.).
4. I wonder whether this is the right approach.
5. After all, “on 16 October 2001 the applicant instituted non-contentious proceedings before the Koprivnica Municipal Court seeking that the ... foreign judgment be recognised in Croatia” and “on 20 November 2001 the Municipal Court accepted the applicant's request and issued a decision recognising the Montenegro court's judgment” (see paragraphs 7 and 8).
6. This suggests to me that the applicant did indeed have access to a court. The proceedings, instituted on 16 October 2001 with the application to the Koprivnica Municipal Court, ended on 8 June 2004, when the same court declared the applicant's request inadmissible. Throughout that time, the various courts did not remain inactive. Thus, when the applicant applied on 4 March 2002 for rectification of the decision because it incorrectly stated that the case number of the recognised judgment was P-437/97 instead of P-437/87, the Koprivnica Municipal Court issued a decision rectifying the error, which was served on the applicant's representatives two days later (see paragraphs 9 and 10).
7. In more general terms, can the right of access to a court be said to have been infringed simply by the fact that, with the passing of time, an action becomes time-barred? I am not sure.
8. I would also note that the competent courts bear a significant share of the responsibility for the fact that the action could not be pursued because it was time-barred.
9. Firstly, they displayed excessive formalism. The Koprivnica Municipal Court itself rightly corrected the clerical error concerning the case number (see paragraph 10 of the judgment). Unfortunately, on an appeal by the judgment debtors, the appellate court – in my view, incorrectly – quashed the writ of execution of 6 February 2002 on account of the typing error in the case number. While acknowledging that the discrepancy might have been caused by a clerical error, it nevertheless quashed the writ of execution, giving precedence to the principle of strict formal legality (see paragraph 14).
10. The case was therefore remitted to the first-instance court, which required the applicant to have the case number amended in accordance with the appellate court's demand. With the passing of time as further appeals were lodged, the applicant's action became time-barred. On 28 September 2004 the Koprivnica County Court dismissed an appeal by the applicant.
11. Can it reasonably be maintained in these circumstances that the applicant did not have access to a court?
12. Besides being guilty of excessive formalism, the competent judicial authorities also incorrectly interpreted and applied the relevant provisions of domestic law. In interpreting the relevant provisions, the domestic courts held that lodging a request for recognition of a foreign court judgment did not constitute an act by a creditor which could interrupt the running of the statutory limitation period within the meaning of section 388 of the Obligations Act because it was neither directed against the debtor nor aimed at determining, securing or enforcing the claim. Accordingly, no interruption of the limitation period had occurred when the applicant had submitted his request for recognition of a foreign judgment.
13. Without a doubt, the domestic courts' interpretation to the effect that the institution of the proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment by the applicant did not interrupt the running of the ten-year statutory limitation period was unforeseeable. An interpretation more favourable to the applicant, and to the very notion of a fair trial, would have been to hold that instituting proceedings for recognition of a foreign judgment would interrupt the running of the statutory limitation period. As the judgment indeed notes in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, it is untenable to hold the view that instituting proceedings for the recognition of a foreign judgment does not interrupt the running of a statutory limitation period (see paragraph 55).
14. In short, I consider that the domestic courts interpreted the relevant provisions of the Obligations Act very incorrectly and applied them in a manner bordering on arbitrary.
15. My conclusion is therefore that there has been a violation of Article 6 in this case, not because the applicant was deprived of his right of access to a court, but because, both by displaying excessive formalism and by interpreting the relevant statutory provisions arbitrarily, the competent judicial authorities deprived the applicant of the right to a fair hearing.
16. In paragraph 84 the judgment states that “given the nature of the applicant's complaints and the reasons for which it has found a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 thereto, the Court considers that in the present case the most appropriate way of redress would be to reopen the proceedings complained of in due course”.
17. For reasons I have explained on many occasions, either alone or together with other judges, in particular Judge Spielmann,3 I would very much have liked this principle, on account of its importance, to have been reflected in the operative part of the judgment.
1 (no. 18648/04), published in Clunet (Journal de droit international), 2009, p. 193, commentary by Fabien Marchadier; and Revue critique de droit international privé, 2008, p. 830, commentary by Patrick Kinsch.

2 It should be noted that the Pellegrini v. Italy judgment (no. 30882/96, ECHR 2001-VIII) concerned the opposite situation (restrictions imposed by the Convention on the possibility of granting authority, in accordance with domestic law, to execute foreign judgments that do not meet the European standard of a fair trial). Legal experts have commented as follows on the McDonald decision cited above:
“[The decision] takes an innovative approach … on this point, by making it possible henceforth to attach the right to recognition or execution of foreign judgments directly to the right to a fair hearing. Thus, the respect due for foreign judgments as such, independently of any substantive rights that may be involved, is deemed a sufficient basis for the right to their international execution” (Patrick Kinsch, Revue critique de droit international privé, 2008, p. 839) (translation).
or:
“The Court accepts – for the first time (the question had been expressly left open by the Sylvester v. Austria (no. 2) judgment of 9 October 2003, no. 54640/00) – that a refusal to recognise a foreign judgment can be regarded as constituting interference with the right to a fair hearing” (ibid., pp. 838-39) (translation).
or:
“… Article 6 of the Convention concerns all stages of the trial, including execution of the judgment. And in that regard, no distinction should be made according to the origin of the judgment” (Fabien Marchadier, Clunet, 2009, p. 196) (translation).
This question has occupied the minds of legal specialists for some time (see Fabien Marchadier, Les objectifs généraux du droit international privé à l’épreuve de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, Brussels, Bruylant, 2007, nos. 272 et seq., in particular no. 275 (concerning the obligation to recognise foreign judgments de plano); Patrick Kinsch, “The Impact of Human Rights on the Application of Foreign Law and on the Recognition of Foreign Judgments – A Survey of the Cases Decided by the European Human Rights Institutions”, in T. Einhorn and K. Siehr, eds., Intercontinental Cooperation Through Private International Law – Essays in Memory of Peter E. Nygh, The Hague, 2004, pp. 197-228; Patrick Kinsch, Droits de l’homme, droits fondamentaux et droit international privé, Recueils de cours de l’Académie de Droit International de la Haye, vol. 318 (2005), in particular p. 94: “Le refus de la reconnaissance d’un jugement étranger en tant qu’ingérence dans des droits garantis”; and Fabien Marchadier, “La protection européenne des situations constituées à l’étranger”, Dalloz, 2007, p. 2700).

3 See my joint concurring opinions with Judge Spielmann appended to the following judgments: Vladimir Romanov v. Russia (no. 41461/02, 24 July 2008); Ilatovskiy v. Russia (no. 6945/04, 9 July 2009); Fakiridou and Schina v. Greece (no. 6789/06, 14 November 2008); Lesjak v. Croatia (no. 25904/06, 18 February 2010); and Prežec v. Croatia (no. 48185/07, 15 October 2009). See also my concurring opinion joined by Judges Casadevall, Cabral Barreto, Zagrebelsky and Popović in the case of Cudak v. Lithuania ([GC], no. 15869/02, 23 March 2010), as well as the concurring opinion of Judges Rozakis, Spielmann, Ziemele and Lazarova Trajkovska in Salduz v. Turkey ([GC], no. 36391/02, ECHR 2008-...).


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA VRBICA C. CROATIA
(Richiesta n. 32540/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
1 aprile 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Vrbica c. Croatia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e da André Wampach, Cancelliere di Sezione Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato l’11 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 32540/05) contro la Repubblica di Croazia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino Montenegrino, il Sig. M. V. (“il richiedente”),il 26 agosto 2005.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. S. R. e dalla Sig.ra M. O. della Studio legale R. & O., avvocati che praticano a Karlovac. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il 17 novembre 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di comunicare al Governo le azioni di reclamo riguardo alla proprietà, l'equità ed una via di ricorso effettiva. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
4. Il Governo del Montenegro,che è stato informato del suo diritto ad intervenire (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 2(a) dell’Ordinamento di Corte), non si è giovato di questo diritto.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1937 e vive a Cetinje (Montenegro).
6. Il 15 ottobre 1991 il Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd (Osnovni sud u Titogradu) rese la sentenza n. P-437/87 che ordinava alle società C.O. e P.- entrambe incorporate sotto la legge croata e con le loro sedi centrali in Croazia –di pagare congiuntamente e separatamente al richiedente dei danni nell'importo totale di 600,000 dinar iugoslavi per danni subiti in un incidente stradale, insieme con l’interesse di mora legale accumulato ed i costi dei procedimenti. La sentenza divenne definitiva il 6 gennaio 1992.
A. I procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera
7. Il 16 ottobre 2001 il richiedente avviò dei procedimenti di non-contenzioso di fronte alla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica (Općinski sud u Koprivnici) chiedendo che la sentenza estera qui sopra venisse riconosciuta in Croazia.
8. Il 20 novembre 2001 la Corte Municipale accettò la richiesta del richiedente ed emise una decisione che riconosceva la sentenza della corte del Montenegro.
9. Il 4 marzo 2002 il richiedente fece domanda per una rettifica di questa decisione perché affermava erroneamente che il numero della causa della sentenza riconosciuta era P-437/97 invece di P-437/87.
10. Il 13 marzo 2002 la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica emise una decisione che rettificava l'errore. La notificò due giorni più tardi ai rappresentanti del richiedente.
B. I primi procedimenti di esecuzione
11. Nel frattempo,il 3 dicembre 2001, il richiedente avviò procedimenti di esecuzione di fronte alla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica contro le società C.O. e P. presentando una richiesta per l’esecuzione della sentenza riconosciuta.
12. Il 6 febbraio 2002 la corte emise un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza (rješenje od ovrsi) con pignoramento dei fondi dai conti bancari dei debitori.
13. I debitori della sentenza fecero appello, dibattendo che il numero P-437/97 che figurava nella decisione sul riconoscimento come numero della sentenza riconosciuta mentre il numero effettivo della sentenza che si cercava di far eseguire era P-437/87. Nella sua replica, il richiedente presentò, che la decisione sul riconoscimento conteneva un errore materiale per il quale lui aveva fatto domanda per la sua rettifica e che i procedimenti avviati a questo fine erano ancora pendenti.
14. Il 16 aprile 2002 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Koprivnica (Županijski sud u Koprivnici) annullò l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza del 6 febbraio 2002 e rinviò la causa. Sostenne che la decisione sul riconoscimento della sentenza estera conteneva davvero il numero P-437/97 come numero della sentenza riconosciuta mentre la sentenza che si cercava di far eseguire aveva il numero P-437/87. La corte osservò che era probabile che questa discrepanza fosse stata causata da un errore materiale ma ciononostante annullò l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza, dando precedenza al principio della legalità formale e severa nei procedimenti di esecuzione. La decisione di seconda - istanza fu notificata ai rappresentanti del richiedente il 10 maggio 2002.
15. Nei procedimenti ripresi, il 13 giugno 2002 la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica emise un'istruzione che i rappresentanti del richiedente ricevettero quattro giorni più tardi, invitandolo a presentare entro quindici giorni il titolo di esecuzione corretto (cioè , la sentenza con lo stesso numero come affermava essere il numero della sentenza riconosciuta nella decisione del 20 novembre 2001) o una decisione di rettificata sul riconoscimento.
16. Siccome il richiedente non riuscì a fare così, il 6 agosto 2002 la corte dichiarò la sua richiesta per esecuzione inammissibile.
17. Il richiedente fece appello ed incluse questa decisione della corte sulla rettifica del 13 marzo 2002 (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra).
18. Il 17 settembre 2002 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Koprivnica respinse il ricorso del richiedente. Sostenne che la decisione di prima - istanza di dichiarare la richiesta per l’esecuzione inammissibile era giustificata, dato che il richiedente non era riuscito a soddisfare la richiesta della corte di prima - istanza anche se lui avrebbe potuto fare così siccome era in proprietà della decisione rettificata al tempo attinente. La decisione di seconda - istanza fu notificata ai rappresentanti del richiedente il 15 ottobre 2002.
19. Il richiedente presentò poi un reclamo costituzionale contro questa decisione, che la Corte Costituzionale (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) respinse il 17 settembre 2004.
C. I secondi procedimenti di esecuzione ed i procedimenti civili per dichiarare l'esecuzione inammissibile
1. I secondi procedimenti di esecuzione
20. Nel frattempo, il richiedente avviò i secondi procedimenti di esecuzione di fronte alla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica contro i debitori della sentenza del 24 dicembre 2002 sottoponendo di nuovo la sua richiesta per l’esecuzione insieme con la decisione di rettificata sul riconoscimento.
21. Il 7 marzo 2003 la corte emise un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza tramite pignoramento dei fondi dai conti bancari dei debitori.
22. I debitori fecero appello, dibattendo che l'esecuzione era andata in prescrizione per decorrenza dei termini, dato che il periodo limite dei dieci - anni di prescrizione legale che decorre dalla finalità della sentenza che si cercava di far eseguire era scaduto il 6 gennaio 2002. In replica, la corte li istruì, facendo seguito all'Atto di Esecuzione, di avviare procedimenti civili separati di fronte a sé contro il richiedente nella prospettiva di dichiarando l'esecuzione inammissibile.
23. Dopo che questi procedimenti civili terminarono a sfavore del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 25-29 sotto), il 10 dicembre 2004 la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica emise una decisione che cessava i procedimenti di esecuzione.
24. Il richiedente fece appello, ma il suo ricorso fu respinto dall'Organo giudiziario locale di Koprivnica il 25 gennaio 2005.
2. I procedimenti civili per dichiarare l'esecuzione inammissibile
25. Il 19 maggio 2003 i debitori della sentenza, le società C.O. e P., introdussero un'azione civile contro il richiedente presso la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica, cercando che di far dichiarare inammissibile l'esecuzione.
26. L’ 8 giugno 2004 la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica rese la sentenza per i querelanti, trovando che l'esecuzione era impossibile per decorrenza dei termini e così inammissibile.
27. Il 28 settembre 2004 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Koprivnica respinse un ricorso da parte del richiedente e sostenne la sentenza di prima - istanza.
28. Le corti sostennero che la richiesta del richiedente del 16 ottobre 2001 per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera che avviava gli attinenti procedimenti di non-contenzioso non aveva interrotto la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale entro cui l'esecuzione della sentenza riconosciuta avrebbe potuta essere cercata. Le corti sostennero così perché loro considerarono che un debitore di sentenza non era una parte a simili procedimenti e non era a conoscenza perciò che un creditore di sentenza aveva intrapreso dei passi per eseguire la sentenza. Le corti notarono anche che il richiedente non aveva usato l'opportunità di avviare direttamente procedimenti di esecuzione - un passo che certamente avrebbe interrotto la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale - in tal caso il riconoscimento del titolo di esecuzione avrebbe potuto essere deciso incidentalmente come questione pregiudiziale in quei procedimenti. Infine, le corti notarono che il richiedente aveva avviato i primi procedimenti di esecuzione entro il termine di prescrizione legale dei dieci - anni ma che erano stati terminati da una decisione che dichiarava la sua richiesta per l’esecuzione inammissibile, in quel caso, facendo seguito alla sezione 389(2) dell’Atto degli Obblighi, non interruppero la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione.
29. Il richiedente presentò poi un reclamo costituzionale contro la sentenza di seconda - istanza, adducendo violazione dei suoi diritti costituzionali ad un'udienza corretta, all’equità e alla proprietà. Il 20 aprile 2005 la Corte Costituzionale respinse la sua azione di reclamo costituzionale.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. L' Atto degli Obblighi
30. La parte attinente dell' Atto degli Obblighi (Zakon o obveznim odnosima, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista della Iugoslavia N. 29/1978, 39/1985 e 57/1989, e Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia n. 53/1991 con susseguenti emendamenti) prevedeva ciò che segue:
Sezione 379 (1)
Rivendicazioni determinate da una decisione di corte definitiva o da una decisione di un'altra autorità competente
“Tutte le rivendicazioni determinate da una decisione di corte definitiva o da una decisione di un'altra autorità competente... cadono in prescrizione dopo dieci anni, anche se per certe rivendicazioni un statuto prevede un termine di prescrizione più breve.”
Sezione 388
Introduzione di un'azione
“[La decorrenza ] [del periodo] di limitazione viene interrotta introducendo un'azione civile presso una corte o intraprendendo qualsiasi altra azione legale di fronte ad un’altra autorità competente da parte del creditore contro il debitore nella prospettiva di determinare, garantire o eseguire il suo diritto.”
Sezione 389
Abbandonare, respingere o dichiarare un'azione inammissibile
“(1) un'interruzione del termine di prescrizione che è il risultato dell’introduzione di un'azione civile presso una corte o dell’intraprendere qualsiasi altra azione legale di fronte ad un’ autorità competente da parte del creditore contro il debitore nella prospettiva di determinare, garantire o eseguire il suo diritto, viene considerata mai verificatasi, se il creditore abbandona l'azione civile o qualsiasi altra azione impegnata.
(2) similmente, si considera che non si è mai verificata un'interruzione se l'azione civile del creditore o la richiesta furono respinte o dichiarate inammissibile, o se la misura ottenuta per garantire o per eseguire il debito viene accantonata.”
Sezione 390 (1)
Dichiarazione un'azione civile inammissibile per mancanza di giurisdizione
“Se un'azione civile contro il debitore viene dichiarata inammissibile per mancanza di giurisdizione o per qualsiasi altra ragione che non concerne i meriti della causa, ed il creditore introduce un'altra azione civile all'interno dei tre mesi seguenti la finalità della decisione che dichiara la [prima] azione civile inammissibile, si considera che il termine di prescrizione è stato interrotto dalla prima azione civile.”
B. L'Atto di Esecuzione
1. Disposizioni attinenti
31. La parte attinente dell' Atto di Esecuzione (Ovršni zakon, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia, N. 57/1996, 29/1999, 42/2000 173/2003, 194/2003 151/2004, 88/2005 121/2005 e 6720/08), come in vigore al tempo attinente, prevedeva ciò che segue:
Sezione 11 (1)
Viedi ricorso legali
“A meno che altrimenti previsto da questo Atto, [le parti possono depositare] un ricorso contro le decisioni di prima - istanza.”
Sezione 17
Esecuzione di una decisione di un giudice straniero
“L’Esecuzione sulla base di una decisione di un giudice straniero può essere ordinata e può essere eseguita nella Repubblica di Croazia solamente se questa decisione soddisfa i requisiti per il suo riconoscimento e l’ esecuzione prevista da uno statuto o da un accordo internazionale.”
Sezione 19 (1)
L’applicazione delle disposizioni di altri statuti
“A meno che altrimenti previsto da questo Atto o da un altro statuto, in esecuzione... dei procedimenti le disposizioni dell’Atto sulla Procedura Civile si applicheranno mutatis mutandis.”
Sezione 33 (1)
Certificato di esecutorietà
“Se una richiesta per l’esecuzione viene depositata presso la corte che non ha deciso sulla rivendicazione in prima istanza, la richiesta sarà accompagnata dall'originale o da una copia del titolo di esecuzione che ha il certificato di esecutorietà...”
2. La pratica della Corte Suprema
Nelle sue decisioni n. Gzz-22/00-2 del 5 luglio 2000 la Corte Suprema interpretò la sezione 33(1) dell'Esecuzione Atto come segue:
“La Sezione 33(1) dell' Atto d’Esecuzione prevede: 'Se una richiesta per esecuzione viene depositata presso la corte che non decise sulla rivendicazione in prima istanza, la richiesta sarà accompagnata dall'originale o da una copia del titolo di esecuzione che ha il certificato di esecutorietà... ' ne segue per implicazione contraria di questa disposizione che una richiesta per esecuzione non debba essere accompagnata dal titolo di esecuzione che ha il certificato di esecutorietà quando la richiesta per esecuzione viene [depositata presso e] basata sulla decisione della corte che decise sulla rivendicazione [in prima istanza].”
C. L’ Atto di Procedura Civile
32. La parte attinente dell’ Atto di Procedura Civile (Zakon o parničnom postupku, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista della Iugoslavia N. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 e 35/1991, e Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia N. 53/1991, 91/1992 58/1993, 112/1999 88/2001, 117/2003 88/2005, 2/2007 84/2008 e 123/2008) come in vigore al tempo attinente, prevedeva ciò che segue:
Sezione 109
“(1)...
(2) Nel restituire un'osservazione ad una parte nella prospettiva di correggerla o completarla, la corte specificherà un tempo-limite per la sua re-osservazione.
(3)...
(4) se un'osservazione non viene restituita alla corte all'interno del tempo-limite specificato, sarà considerata riservata. Se viene restituita senza correzioni o supplementi, sarà dichiarata inammissibile.”
Sezione 352 (1)
“In un ricorso le parti possono appellarsi su fatti nuovi e possono addurre prova nuova...”
Riapertura di procedimenti in seguito ad una sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani a Strasburgo che ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o della libertà
Sezione 428a
“(1) quando la Corte europea dei Diritti umani ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano o della libertà fondamentale garantita dalla Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali o dai protocolli supplementari ratificati dalla Repubblica di Croazia, una parte può, entro trenta giorni da quando la sentenza della Corte europea dei Diritti umani diviene definitiva, introdurre un ricorso presso la corte nella Repubblica di Croazia che giudicò in prima istanza sui procedimenti in cui la decisione che violava il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale fu resa, accantonare la decisione con cui il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale fu violata.
(2) i procedimenti a cui si fa riferimento nel paragrafo 1 di questa sezione saranno condotti applicando, mutatis mutandis, le disposizioni sulla riapertura di procedimenti.
(3) nei procedimenti riaperti le corti sono costrette a rispettare le opinioni giuridiche espresse nella sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani che ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o della libertà.”
D. L’Atto del Conflitto delle Leggi
1. Disposizioni attinenti
33. La parte attinente dell’Atto del Conflitto delle Leggi (Zakon o rješevanju sukoba zakona s propisima drugih zemalja u određenim odnosima, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista della Iugoslavia N. 43/1982 e 72/1982, e Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia n. 53/1991) recita ciò che segue:
Sezione 101 (5)
Se nessuna decisione separata su il riconoscimento di una decisione estera è stata resa qualsiasi corte può nei procedimenti [di fronte a sé] decidere sul riconoscimento di queta decisione come una questione pregiudiziale, ma solamente con effetto per quei procedimenti.
2. La pratica della Corte Suprema
34. Nelle sue decisioni N. Gž 6/1992-2 del 19 agosto 1992, Gž 2/1995-2 dek 14 giugno 1995 e Gž-4/1995-2 del 15 giugno 1995 la Corte Suprema ha sostenuto che le corti inferiori avevano violato il principio dell’udienza del contraddittorio nei procedimenti di non-contenzioso per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera perché loro non avevano notificato la richiesta per riconoscimento al debitore di sentenza né avevano sostenuto qualsiasi udienza prima di giungere alle loro decisioni.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
35. Il richiedente si lamentò che il rifiuto delle corti nazionali di eseguire la sentenza estera
riconosciuta del 15 ottobre 1991 ha violato il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
36. Il Governo contestò questo argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
37. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarats perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Riguardo a se c'era un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della 'proprietà
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
38. Il Governo prima presentò che la causa non rivelava alcuna interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente. Dibatté che quando una sentenza non poteva essere eseguita perché l'esecuzione era divenuta prescritta, questo non costituiva un’ interferenza all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Spiegò che il diritto di un creditore a far eseguire la sua rivendicazione cade alla scadenza del termine di prescrizione legale i cui periodi furono determinati da regolamentazioni legali e chiare, e la loro scadenza non dipese da nessuna azione o atto da parte delle autorità statali. Inoltre, se il debitore adempisse il suo obbligo dopo la scadenza del termine di prescrizione, non potrebbe rivendicare di nuovo ciò che era stato reso. Inoltre, il debitore doveva far ricorso per dire che il termine di prescrizione era scaduto, perché la corte non poteva fare la considerazione di sua propria iniziativa, ma solamente se il debitore lo avesse sollevato. Perciò, il Governo dibatté che la rivendicazione del richiedente esisteva ancora, ma, a causa della scadenza del termine di prescrizione legale entro cui non era riuscito ad intraprendere i passi legali necessari per la sua esecuzione, lui non avrebbe più potuto far eseguire la sua rivendicazione tramite le corti. Per questa ragione, il Governo dibatté, che la sua rivendicazione non era stata estinta o non era stata limitata e non c'era stata perciò nessuna privazione o controllo di proprietà da parte delle autorità statali.
39. Il richiedente dibatté che sulla base della decisione della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica sul riconoscimento della sentenza definitiva del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd del 15 ottobre 1991, lui aveva acquisito una rivendicazione incontrastata ed insoluta per danni contro le società C.O. e P. vale a dire un diritto patrimoniale. Rifiutando di eseguire questa sentenza, le corti croate gli avevano impedito da realizzare il suo diritto patrimoniale acquisito, violando con ciò il suo al godimento tranquillo della proprietà, protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
40. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nella misura in cui le decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistente” o rivendicazioni che sono stabilite sufficientemente da essere riguardate come “beni.” Una rivendicazione può essere considerata un bene solamente quando è sufficientemente stabilito da essere esecutivo (vedere per esempio, Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 Serie A n. 301-B). Siccome la rivendicazione del richiedente nella presente causa era stata riconosciuta dalla sentenza definitiva del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd del 15 ottobre 1991 che fu riconosciuta successivamente in Croazia da una decisione della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica del 20 novembre 2001, la Corte considera che la rivendicazione del richiedente era sufficientemente stabilita da qualificarsi come “bene” protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. La Corte nota inoltre che il richiedente aveva avviato procedimenti di esecuzione per far eseguire la sentenza estera sopra resa a suo favore, ma che l'esecuzione fu dichiarata infine inammissibile come prescritta dalla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica l’8 giugno 2004 perché il tempo-limite dei dieci –anni per chiedere l’esecuzione era scaduto. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che l'impossibilità di ottenere l'esecuzione di una sentenza definitiva a favore di un richiedente costituisce un'interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà, come esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 40, ECHR 2002-III, e Jeličić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 41183/02, § 48 ECHR 2006-XII). In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che c'è stata un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo della “proprietà” nella presente causa.
2. Riguardo a se l'interferenza era “prevista dalla legge”
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
(i) Il Governo
42. Il Governo dibatté che l'interferenza era prevista dalla legge siccome era basata sulle sezioni 379(1) e 389(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi che prevedevano che le rivendicazioni determinate da un da una decisione definitiva della corte sarebbero cadute in prescrizione entro dieci anni, e che un'interruzione del termine di prescrizione come risultato dell’introduzione di un'azione civile o qualsiasi altra azione legale non sarebbe mai stata considerata avvenuta se il creditore avesse abbandonato quell'azione. Nell'interpretare queste disposizioni, le corti nazionali avevano sostenuto, che depositando una richiesta per il riconoscimento di una sentenza di un giudice straniero non costituiva un'azione del creditore che avrebbe potuto interrompere la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale all'interno del significato della sezione 388 dell’Atto degli Obblighi perché non fu né impegnato contro il debitore né teso a determinare, garantire o far eseguire la rivendicazione. Non si era verificata di conseguenza, nessuna interruzione del termine di prescrizione quando il richiedente aveva presentato la sua richiesta per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera. Il termine di prescrizione avrebbe potuto essere interrotto solamente depositando una richiesta per l’ esecuzione entro quel periodo.
43. Benché la prima richiesta del richiedente per esecuzione fosse stata depositata prima della scadenza del termine di prescrizione quella richiesta non avrebbe potuto interromperlo perché, facendo seguito alla sezione 389(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi, si considerava che il termine di prescrizione non sarebbe stato interrotto, se il creditore avesse abbandonato la sua azione. In questo collegamento, il Governo enfatizzò, che nella sua istruzione del 13 giugno 2002, la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica aveva invitato il richiedente a rettificare la sua richiesta per l’ esecuzione avvertendolo esplicitamente che altrimenti sarebbe stata considerata riservata. Poiché il richiedente non era riuscito ad agire secondo questa istruzione, era stato considerato che lui aveva abbandonato la sua richiesta per l’esecuzione. Non si era verificata di conseguenza, nessuna interruzione del termine di prescrizione.
44. Riguardo all'applicabilità alla presente causa della sezione 390(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi – che prevedeva un'esenzione dalla sezione 389(2) dello stesso Atto nelle cui le situazioni la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale si interromperà anche se l'azione del creditore è stata dichiarata inammissibile - il Governo prima indicò che spettava alle corti nazionali valutare se le condizioni per la sua richiesta erano state soddisfatte. In questo collegamento reiterò che sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte non era il compito della Corte presumere il ruolo delle corti nazionali, e che spettava primariamente alle autorità nazionali, in particolare alle corti, chiarire i problemi di interpretazione della legislazione nazionale. Dibatté inoltre che questa sezione si riferiva primariamente a situazioni in cui l'azione del creditore era stata dichiarata inammissibile per mancanza di giurisdizione (da cui il titolo della sezione). Comunque, nella presente causa, nella sua decisione del 6 agosto 2002 la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica non aveva dichiarato inammissibile la richiesta del richiedente per l’esecuzione “per mancanza di giurisdizione o qualsiasi altra ragione non concernente i meriti della causa”, come previsto nella sezione 390(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi, ma perché il richiedente aveva abbandonato la sua richiesta per l’esecuzione all'interno del significato della sezione 389(1) di quell'Atto. Perciò, il termine di prescrizione non poteva essere interrotto depositando la prima richiesta per esecuzione. Infine, il Governo indicò che il richiedente non si era appellato mai alla sezione 390(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi in nessuno dei procedimenti sopra.
(ii) Il richiedente
45. Il richiedente dibatté che nella causa presente la “decisione definitiva di corte” all'interno del significato della sezione 379(1) a cui il termine di prescrizione legale dei dieci - anni si applicava, non era la sentenza del Giudice di prima istanza del Titograd di 15 ottobre 1991, come le corti nazionali ed il Governo avevano sostenuto erroneamente, ma la decisione della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica sul riconoscimento di quella sentenza del 20 novembre 2001. Essendo così, non si poteva dibattere che il richiedente non aveva chiesto la sua esecuzione entro la limitazione del periodo legale dei dieci - anni, come avevano sostenuto le corti nazionali.
46. Riguardo all'argomento del Governo per cui la sua prima richiesta per esecuzione era stata dichiarata inammissibile perché lui non era riuscito ad osservare l’ istruzione della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica del 13 giugno 2002, e a presentare la decisione rettificata sul riconoscimento, il richiedente ha fatto riferimento alla pratica della Corte Suprema sviluppata a riguardo della sezione 33 dell'Atto di Esecuzione secondo cui al creditore dell’ esecuzione non fu richiesto di includere un titolo di esecuzione con la sua richiesta per esecuzione se il titolo di esecuzione (cioè , una decisione da eseguire) è nato dalla stessa corte davanti a cui veniva chiesta l'esecuzione. Poiché era la decisione della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica sul riconoscimento e non la sentenza del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd che, nella prospettiva del richiedente, costituiva il titolo di esecuzione nella presente causa, e dato il fatto che lui richiese l'esecuzione di fronte alla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica stessa, era il dovere di questa corte ottenere e correggere questa decisione sul riconoscimento di sua propria iniziativa.
47. Il richiedente dibatté inoltre che, presumendo anche che fosse la sentenza del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd che ha costituito il titolo di esecuzione, come rivendica il Governo, l'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà non avrebbe potuto essere ciononostante legale.
48. In questo collegamento il richiedente prima presentò che le corti nazionali avevano usato malamente il diritto nazionale nel sostenere che l'istituzione di procedimenti per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera non costituiva un’ “azione del creditore contro il debitore nella prospettiva di determinare, garantire od eseguire il suo diritto” all'interno del significato della sezione 388 dell’Atto degli Obblighi, capace di interrompere la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale. Il richiedente spiegò ciò era tale perché una sentenza estera non poteva essere eseguita prima di essere riconosciuta in Croazia. I procedimenti che si avviavano per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera erano perciò un requisito indispensabile necessario per la sua esecuzione.
49. Il richiedente si riferì inoltre all'insuccesso delle corti nazionali nell’applicare la sezione 390(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi anche se tutte le condizioni per la sua richiesta erano state soddisfatte nella sua causa. In particolare, la sua prima richiesta per esecuzione era stata dichiarata inammissibile il 6 agosto 2002 per la sua omissione di agire su istruzione della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica del 13 giugno 2002, cioè, per la ragione che non riguardava i meriti della causa. Nella sua decisione del 6 agosto 2002 la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica non aveva dichiarato la sua richiesta per esecuzione ritirata, come suggerì il Governo che avrebbe condotto alla conclusione che lui l’aveva “abbandonata”, all'interno del significato della sezione 389(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi. Piuttosto, questa corte ha dichiarato espressamente la sua richiesta per esecuzione inammissibile che era la prima condizione per l'applicabilità della sezione 390(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi. Inoltre, poiché lui aveva introdotto la sua seconda richiesta per esecuzione il 24 dicembre 2002, cioè ben entro i tre mesi dal 15 ottobre 2002, la data in cui la decisione del 6 agosto 2002 che dichiarava la sua prima richiesta per esecuzione inammissibile era divenuta definitiva anche la seconda condizione per l'applicabilità della sezione 390(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi era stata rispettata. Ne seguì che il termine di prescrizione avrebbe dovuto essere interrotto il 3 dicembre 2001 quando lui aveva depositato la sua prima richiesta per esecuzione. Il che era entro dieci anni dalla finalità della sentenza del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd del 15 ottobre 1991 che era divenuta definitiva il 6 gennaio 1992.
50. In queste circostanze, il richiedente dibatté, che l'interferenza col suo diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà non poteva essere considerata legale.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
51. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II). A questo riguardo la Corte si confà col Governo che le decisioni delle corti nazionali nella presente causa hanno avuto una base legale in diritto nazionale siccome il loro rifiuto di concedere l'esecuzione della sentenza estera resa a favore del richiedente furono basate sulle sezioni 379(1) e 389 dell' Atto degli Obblighi.
52. La Corte reitera inoltre comunque, che l'esistenza di una base legale non è di per sé sufficiente per soddisfare il principio della legalità che presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione. Questo principio costringe anche la Corte a verificare se il modo in cui il diritto nazionale viene interpretato e applicato dalle corti nazionali produca conseguenze che siano coerenti coi principi della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Apostolidi ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 45628/99, § 70, 27 marzo 2007, e Nacaryan e Deryan c. Turchia, N. 19558/02 e 27904/02, § 58 del 8 gennaio 2008).
53. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota prima, che l’applicazione da parte delle corti nazionali delle disposizioni dell'Atto degli Obblighi seguito dalla loro antecedente sentenza che avviava procedimenti per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera non ha costituito un'azione legale del creditore all'interno del significato della sezione 388 dello stesso Atto capace di interrompere la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale. Perciò, le corti nazionali sostennero che il termine di prescrizione legale dei dieci - anni previsto nella sezione 379(1) dell' Atto Obblighi entro il quale avrebbe potuto essere chiesta l'esecuzione di una sentenza non era stato interrotto quando il richiedente il 16 ottobre 2001 aveva depositato una richiesta per riconoscimento della sentenza del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd del 15 ottobre 1991 dalla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica. Avendo riguardo alla sezione 389 dell’Atto degli Obblighi, le corti nazionali considerarono che la decorrenza di questo termine di prescrizione legale non poteva essere interrotta quando il richiedente aveva depositato la sua prima richiesta per esecuzione il 3 dicembre 2001 perché questa richiesta era stata dichiarata infine inammissibile a causa del suo insuccesso nell’ osservare il tempo-limite stabilito dalla corte di prima - istanza ed era stata fornita una decisione rettificata sul riconoscimento (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra).
54. La Corte nota inoltre che la prospettiva delle corti nazionali che l’istituzione di procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera non costituivano un'azione legale del creditore all'interno del significato della sezione 388 dell' Atto degli Obblighi era basata sulla loro presunzione che un debitore di sentenza non era una parte a simili procedimenti e non sapeva così che un creditore di sentenza aveva intrapreso passi per far eseguire la sentenza. Comunque, questa supposizione contraddice la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte Suprema secondo la quale i procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera non sono procedimenti ex parte ma procedimenti di contraddittorio dove un debitore di sentenza doveva essere informato del loro principio e in cui gli si doveva concedere di partecipare a questi (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). È vero che le società C.O. e P. come debitori di sentenza non parteciparono davvero ai procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera avviati dal richiedente. Questo fu così comunque, solamente a causa dell'insuccesso della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica di notificare loro che il richiedente aveva avviato quei procedimenti. Anche se questo errore della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica non avrebbe dovuto avere conseguenze negative per il richiedente, la stessa corte l'usò ciononostante, nei procedimenti civili avviati dalle società C.O. e P. per far dichiarare l'esecuzione contro loro inammissibile, per giustificare il suo rifiuto dell’esecuzione della sentenza a favore del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 25-29 sopra).
55. Inoltre, lasciando a parte le considerazioni di diritto nazionale, la Corte costata indifendibile la prospettiva delle corti nazionali secondo cui avviando procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera non si interromperebbe la decorrenza di un termine di prescrizione legale. Se questa prospettiva fosse accettata, condurrebbe ad una situazione in cui un creditore di sentenza potrebbe perdere il diritto di far eseguire una sentenza estera a causa del possibile temporeggiamento nei procedimenti per il suo riconoscimento vale a dire per ragioni che vanno oltre il suo controllo. Questa situazione metterebbe seriamente in pericolo il principio della certezza legale e non sarebbe riconciliabile col principio della preminenza del diritto.
56. Le precedenti considerazioni sono sufficienti per la Corte per concludere che l'interferenza contestata nella forma della sentenza della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica dell’ 8 giugno 2004 era incompatibile col principio della legalità e perciò contravvenne all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, perché il modo in cui questa corte interpretò e applicò il diritto nazionale attinente, in particolare la sezione 388 dell’Atto degli, non era prevedibile per il richiedente che si sarebbe potuto aspettare ragionevolmente che avviando procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera avrebbe interrotto la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale (vedere, per esempio e mutatis mutandis, Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, §§ 51-60, e Fokas c. Turchia, n. 31206/02, §§ 42-44 del 29 settembre 2009).
57. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
58. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che il rifiuto delle corti croate di concedere l'esecuzione della sentenza estera riconosciuta del 15 ottobre 1991 era stato contrario all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che recita ciò che segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
59. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
60. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
61. La Corte reitera che l’ Articolo 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto di portare di fronte ad una corte o tribunale qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi; essendo così incarna il “diritto ad una corte” di cui il diritto di accesso che è il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte a corti in questioni civili ne costituisce un aspetto. Comunque, questo diritto sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di uno Stato Contraente concedesse ad una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante di rimanere non operante a danno di una parte. Sarebbe inconcepibile per l’Articolo 6 § 1 descrivere in dettaglio le garanzie procedurali riconosciute ai contendenti -procedimenti che siano equi, pubblici e rapidi -senza proteggere l'attuazione di decisioni giudiziali. Costruire l’Articolo 6 preoccupandosi esclusivamente dell’ accesso ad una corte e alla condotta di procedimenti probabilmente condurrebbe a situazioni incompatibili col principio della preminenza del diritto che gli Stati Contraenti si impegnarono a rispettare quando ratificarono la Convenzione. L’esecuzione di una sentenza data da qualsiasi corte deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, 19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II).
62. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte osserva che le corti nazionali rifiutarono di eseguire la sentenza esecutiva e definitiva del Giudice di prima istanza di Titograd del 15 ottobre 1991 resa a favore del richiedente che è stata riconosciuta in Croazia il 20 novembre 2001 perché loro considerarono che il termine di prescrizione legale dei dieci - anni contenuto nella sezione 379(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi entro il quale il richiedente avrebbe potuto chiedere l’esecuzione, era scaduto. Così, nella prospettiva della Corte, la sentenza della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica dell’ 8 giugno 2004 per dichiarare l'esecuzione della summenzionata sentenza della corte del Montenegro inammissibile può essere considerata imponente una restrizione sul suo diritto di accesso ad una corte. La Corte deve esaminare perciò se il diritto del richiedente di accesso ad una corte fu ristretto impropriamente da quella decisione.
63. In questo collegamento la Corte prima reitera che il diritto di accesso ad un diritto di corte non è assoluto, ma può essere soggetto a limitazioni. Queste sono permesse per implicazione, poiché il diritto di accesso per sua stessa natura richiama una regolamentazione da parte dello Stato. A questo riguardo, gli Stati Contraenti godono di un certo margine di valutazione, benché la decisione definitiva riguardo all'osservanza dei requisiti della Convenzione rimanga presso la Corte. Comunque, queste limitazioni non devono restringere e non devono ridurre l'accesso lasciato ad un individuo in tale modo o in tale misura che la stessa essenza del diritto venga danneggiata. Inoltre, una limitazione non sarà compatibile con l’ Articolo 6 § 1 se non persegue uno scopo legittimo e se non c'è una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo che si cerca di realizzare (vedere, per esempio, Ashingdane c. Regno Unito, 28 maggio 1985, § 57 Serie A n. 93, e Stubbings ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 22 ottobre 1996, § 50 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV).
1. Riguardo a se la restrizione perseguiva uno scopo legittimo
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
64. Il Governo dibatté che la restrizione del diritto del richiedente di accesso ad una corte nella presente causa perseguiva uno scopo legittimo siccome gli interessi della certezza legale richiedevano che i creditori con un atteggiamento passivo che non esercitavano i loro diritti all'interno del tempo-limite specificato dovevano, dopo la scadenza del termine di prescrizione, perdere il loro diritto a far eseguire la loro rivendicazione.
65. Il richiedente concordò.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
66. La Corte reitera che i termini di prescrizione legali servivano fini molto importanti, vale a dire assicurare la certezza legale e la finalità, proteggere i potenziali convenuti dalle vecchie rivendicazioni che sarebbero difficili da opporvisi e prevenire l'ingiustizia che sorgerebbe se corti fossero costrette a decidere su eventi che ebbero luogo in un passato distante sulla base di prove che sarebbero divenute inattendibili ed incomplete a causa del trascorrere del di tempo (vedere Stubbings ed Altri, citata sopra, § 51; e, mutatis mutandis, Vo c. Francia [GC], n. 53924/00, § 92 ECHR 2004-VIII; e J. A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, §§ 68-69 ECHR 2007-X). Di conseguenza, l'esistenza di un termine di prescrizione di per sé non è incompatibile con la Convenzione. Ciò la Corte ha bisogno di accertare in una determinata causa è se la natura del tempo-limite in oggetto e/o il modo un cui fu appliccato è compatibile con la Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Phinikaridou c. Cipro, n. 23890/02, § 52 ECHR 2007-XIV (estratti)).
2. Riguardo a se la restrizione era proporzionata allo scopo legittimo perseguito
(a) Gli argomenti delle parti
(i) Il Governo
67. Il Governo enfatizzò che sotto la sezione 379(1) dell' Atto degli Obblighi le rivendicazioni determinate da una sentenza definitiva - come la rivendicazione del richiedente nella presente causa -scadevano entro dieci anni il che voleva dire che il termine di prescrizione per simili rivendicazioni era più lungo del termine di prescrizione generale. Infatti il richiedente aveva tratto profitto dal termine di prescrizione più lungo previsto dall’atto degli Obblighi. Ciononostante, il richiedente aveva presentato la sua prima richiesta per esecuzione solamente un mese prima della scadenza di quel termine di prescrizione e dopo aver assunto un atteggiamento passivo in questi procedimenti a causa dei quali la corte di esecuzione considerò che lui avesse abbandonato la sua richiesta, come conseguenza di cui non era stata interrotta la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione.
68. In particolare, durante i procedimenti di esecuzione la corte aveva invitato il richiedente a correggere la sua richiesta per esecuzione perché il numero di riferimento indicato nella decisione su riconoscimento del 20 novembre 2001 era incorretto per la qual ragione lui avrebbe dovuto richiedere la sua rettifica. La corte di esecuzione aveva istruito il richiedente come ed all'interno di quale tempo-limite lui avrebbe dovuto correggere la sua richiesta per esecuzione, e l'aveva avvertito delle conseguenze del suo insuccesso nell’agire così. Comunque, il richiedente non era riuscito ad eseguire l'ordine della corte senza una ragione valida. Lui non aveva fornito alla corte il documento chiesto all'interno del tempo-limite specificato né dopo, cioè sino all'emissione della decisione del 6 agosto 2002 che dichiarava la sua richiesta per esecuzione inammissibile. In questo collegamento il Governo indicò che il richiedente era stato in proprietà della decisione rettificata su riconoscimento al tempo in cui la corte di esecuzione l'aveva invitato a presentarlo. Inoltre, il richiedente aveva lui stesso dichiarato nel suo ricorso contro la decisione che dichiarava la sua richiesta per esecuzione inammissibile che lui non aveva presentato la decisione rettificata perché lui aveva considerato che fosse il compito della corte di ottenerlo ex officio. Il richiedente era stato rappresentato da difensori della Croazia che avrebbero dovuto essere consapevoli delle conseguenze di qualsiasi omissione di atti su ordine della corte in procedimenti di esecuzione.
69. Essendo così, il Governo considerò che nessun tempo-limite irragionevole era stato imposto sul richiedente, né che gli era stato impedito da realizzare i suoi diritti. Inoltre, dato che procedimenti di esecuzione erano procedimenti severamente formali nei quali una corte di esecuzione agisce esclusivamente sulle richieste da parte dei creditori di esecuzione che devono essere accompagnate da tutti i documenti necessari (un titolo di esecuzione valido è un requisito indispensabile essenziale per concedere l’ esecuzione), il Governo ritenne che, a causa del suo atteggiamento passivo, il richiedente portava l’ intera responsabilità per dichiarare inammissibile la sua richiesta per esecuzione.
(ii) Il richiedente
70. Il richiedente ripeté i suoi argomenti sopra (vedere paragrafi 45-50). Lui indicò anche che nei primi procedimenti di esecuzione la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica l'aveva invitato a presentare la decisione rettificata su riconoscimento anche se questa decisione era stata emessa dalla stessa corte nei procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera. Invece di chiedergli di presentare la decisione rettificata, la corte avrebbe potuto perciò consultare semplicemente, l'archivio di causa riguardo ai procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera. Essendo così, e dato che la stessa corte aveva fatto un errore materiale che aveva richiesto una rettifica, il richiedente considerò che dichiarare la sua richiesta per esecuzione inammissibile a causa del suo insuccesso nel presentare la decisione rettificata su riconoscimento, era stato sproporzionato nelle circostanze.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
71. Per soddisfarsi che la stessa essenza “diritto ad un tribunale” del richiedente non è stata danneggiata dichiarando l'esecuzione inammissibile, la Corte deve esaminare se la prospettiva delle corti nazionali per cui l'istituzione dei procedimenti per riconoscimento di una sentenza estera da parte del richiedente non ha interrotto la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale dei dieci - anni, e la sanzione risultante per non essere riuscito a rispettare questo tempo-limite, infranse il principio di proporzionalità (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Levages Prestations Servizi c. Francia, 23 ottobre 1996 § 42, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-V ed Osu c. Italia, n. 36534/97, § 35 dell’11 luglio 2002).
72. In questo collegamento la Corte si riferisce alle sue costatazioni sopra a riguardo dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione secondo cui il richiedente si avrebbe potuto aspettarsi ragionevolmente che avviando procedimenti per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera avrebbe interrotto la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale e che la sentenza della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica del 28 settembre 2004 al contrario non era in linea con la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte Suprema (vedere paragrafi 54-56 sopra). In queste circostanze, il rifiuto delle corti nazionali di concedere l'esecuzione della sentenza estera riconosciuta del 15 ottobre 1991 resa a favore del richiedente ha infranto il principio di proporzionalità e così danneggiato la stessa essenza del suo diritto di accesso ad una corte.
73. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO NO.1
74. Il richiedente si lamentò anche di non avere mai avuto una via di ricorso effettiva contro il rifiuto delle corti nazionali di eseguire la sentenza estera riconosciuta del 15 ottobre 1991. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione, preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 inoltre. L’Articolo 13 si legge come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
75. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
76. Come già notato sopra (vedere paragrafo 41), l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo della proprietà accaduto quando la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica nella sua sentenza dell’ 8 giugno 2004 ha dichiarato inammissibile l'esecuzione della sentenza estera a suo favore perché divenuta prescritta. Il richiedente fece appello contro questa sentenza e successivamente presentò un reclamo costituzionale.
77. La Corte reitera in questo collegamento che “l'efficacia” di una “via di ricorso” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 13 non dipende dalla certezza di un risultato favorevole per il richiedente. (vedere Kudła c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 157 ECHR 2000-X). Nota perciò che il richiedente aveva a sua disposizione vie di ricorso nazionali effettive per lamentarsi contro la violazione del suo diritto della Convenzione al godimento tranquillo della proprietà - un ricorso ed un'azione di reclamo costituzionale - di cui lui si giovò. Il mero fatto che i risultati dei procedimenti di appello ed i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale non gli erano favorevole non rende quelle vie di ricorso inefficaci.
78. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente inammissibile sotto l’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione come mal-fondata e deve essere respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 a riguardo.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
79. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che lui era stato discriminato, rivendicando che le corti croate avevano rifiutato di eseguire la sentenza estera riconosciuta del 15 ottobre 1991 a causa della sua origine Montenegrina e la sua nazionalità. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione che recita come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
80. La Corte considera questa azione di reclamo non comprovata siccome il richiedente non ha fornito nessun dettaglio. Non c'è inoltre, nessuna prova che suggerisca che nel decidere come hanno fatto le corti nazionali sono state guidate da motivi impropri, come la nazionalità del richiedente o l’origine etnica.
81. Ne segue che anche questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente inammissibile sotto l’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione come mal-fondata e deve essere respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 a riguardo.
V. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
82. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
83. La Corte reitera che una sentenza nella quale trova una violazione impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di porre fine alla violazione e riparare le sue conseguenze. Se la legge nazionale non concedesse -o concedesse solamente una riparazione parziale , l’Articolo 41 conferisce poteri alla Corte per riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come le sembra più appropriato (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 32-33 ECHR 2000-XI). In questo collegamento la Corte nota che il richiedente ora può introdurre un ricorso sotto la sezione 428a dell’Atto di Procedura Civile (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra) presso la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica per la riapertura dei procedimenti civili e per dichiarare l'esecuzione ammissibile a riguardo dei quali la Corte ha trovato sopra violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
84. Data la natura delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e le ragioni per cui ha trovato violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che nella presente causa il modo più appropriato di compensazione sarebbe riaprire i procedimenti si cui ci si lamenta in tempo debito (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Trgo c. Croazia, n. 35298/04, § 75 dell’11 giugno 2009; Lungoci c. Romania, n. 62710/00, § 56, 26 gennaio 2006, e Yanakiev c. Bulgaria, n. 40476/98, § 90 del 10 agosto 2006).
85. Avendo riguardo a ciò che precede e dato che i rappresentanti del richiedente non hanno presentato una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna necessità di assegnargli qualsiasi somma a questo riguardo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo concernenti il godimento tranquillo di proprietà e l’ accesso ad una corte ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 1 aprile 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, le seguenti opinioni separate sono annesse a questa sentenza:
(a) opinione concordante del Giudice Spielmann;
(b) opinione concordante del Giudice Malinverni.
C.L.R.
A.M.W.
OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE SPIELMANN
(traduzione)
I.
1. Come tutti i miei colleghi, votai a favore di una costatazione della violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
2. Come il Giudice Malinverni ho comunque, delle difficoltà nel seguire il ragionamento che ha condotto la Corte a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Mentre anch’io considero che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 in questa causa, questo non è perché il diritto del richiedente all’ accesso ad una corte fu infranto, ma perché, sia con mostrando un formalismo eccessivo ed interpretando arbitrariamente le disposizioni legali attinenti, le autorità giudiziali lo spogliarono dell'udienza corretta a cui aveva diritto (vedere paragrafo 15 dell'opinione concordante del Giudice Malinverni).
3. Nel paragrafo 61 della sentenza la Corte considera esattamente la questione dal posto d'osservazione di esecuzione delle decisioni giudiziali citando la sentenza Hornsby c. Grecia (19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II). Si dovrebbe ricordare che in Hornsby la Corte sostenne ciò che segue:
“40. La Corte reitera che, secondo la sua giurisprudenza consolidata, l’Articolo 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto a presentare qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi di fronte ad una corte o tribunale; essendo così incarna il 'diritto ad una corte' di cui il diritto di accesso che è il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte a corti in questioni civili ne costituisce un aspetto (vedere la sentenza Philis c. Grecia del 27 agosto 1991, Serie A n. 209, p. 20, § 59). Comunque, questo diritto sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di un Stato Contraente concedesse a una decisione giudiziale definitiva vincolante di rimanere non operante a danno di una parte. Sarebbe inconcepibile che l’Articolo 6 § 1 debba descrivere in dettaglio le garanzie procedurali riconosciute ai contendenti-procedimenti che sono equi, pubblici e rapidi-senza proteggere l'attuazione delle decisioni giudiziali; costruire l’Articolo 6 preoccupandosi esclusivamente dell’ accesso ad una corte e la condotta dei procedimenti condurrebbe probabilmente a situazioni incompatibili col principio della preminenza del diritto che gli Stati Contraenti si impegnarono a rispettare nel ratificare la Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, la sentenza Golder c. Regno Unito del 21 febbraio 1975, Serie A n. 18, pp. 16-18, §§ 34-36). L’esecuzione di una sentenza resa con qualsiasi corte deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del processo ai fini dell’ Articolo 6; la Corte ha accettato già inoltre, questo principio in cause riguardo alla lunghezza di procedimenti (vedere, più recentemente, le sentenze De Pede c. Italia e Zappia c. Italia del 26 settembre 1996, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV, rispettivamente pp. 1383-84, §§ 20-24, e pp. 1410-11, §§ 16-20).”
4. L'esecuzione di una decisione segue il processo, diversamente dalla questione di accesso ad una corte che precede il processo.
5. La Corte estese recentemente il principio stabilito nella sentenza Hornsby all'esecuzione di decisioni estere. Nella sua decisione McDonald c. Francia del 29 aprile 20081 ha sostenuto ciò chesegue:
“La Corte ammette che il rifiuto di accordare l’autorità per eseguire le sentenze della corte americana ha costituito un’ interferenza col diritto del richiedente ad un'udienza corretta. ”2 (traduzione)
6. Nella presente causa al richiedente fu negato l'udienza corretta a cui aveva diritto. Comunque, il problema si pose allo stadio definitivo dei procedimenti, preso nell'insieme. Nella mia prospettiva, la questione che ne nasceva non era perciò una questione di accesso ad una corte.
II.
7. Come il mio collega il Giudice Malinverni, avrei gradito moltissimo che il principio della riapertura dei procedimenti, a causa della sua importanza si riflettesse nella parte operativa della sentenza (vedere paragrafo 17 dell'opinione concordante del Giudice Malinverni ed i riferimenti citati).

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE MALINVERNI
(traduzione)
1. Io votai con tutti i miei colleghi a favore della costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
2. Mentre io concordo a tutti i riguardi col ragionamento che ha condotto la Corte a trovare una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, ho più difficoltà nel seguire l'approccio col quale ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 6.
3. La Corte essenzialmente giunse alla sua costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 sulla base che il richiedente non aveva avuto accesso ad una corte, come questo Articolo implicitamente richiede: “Così, nella prospettiva della Corte, la sentenza della Corte Municipale di Koprivnica dell’ 8 giugno 2004 per dichiarare l'esecuzione della summenzionata sentenza della corte del Montenegro inammissibile può essere considerata imponente una restrizione sul suo diritto di accesso ad una corte” (vedere paragrafo 62 della sentenza). Molto logicamente, la Corte prosegue a chiedersi “se il diritto del richiedente di accesso ad una corte fu ristretto impropriamente da questa decisione” (ibid.).
4. Io mi chiedo se questo è l'approccio corretto.
5. Dopo tutto, “il 16 ottobre 2001 il richiedente avviò procedimenti di non-contenzioso di fronte alla Corte Municipale di Koprivnica chiedendo che la... sentenza estera venisse riconosciuta in Croazia” e “il 20 novembre 2001 la Corte Municipale accettò la richiesta del richiedente ed emise un riconoscimento della decisione la sentenza della corte del Montenegro” (vedere paragrafi 7 e 8).
6. Questo mi suggerisce che il richiedente aveva davvero accesso ad una corte. I procedimenti, avviati il 16 ottobre 2001 con la richiesta presso la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica, terminò l’8 giugno 2004, quando la stessa corte dichiarò la richiesta del richiedente inammissibile. Per tutto questo tempo, le varie corti non rimasero inattive. Così, quando il richiedente fece domanda il 4 marzo 2002 per la rettifica della decisione perché affermava erroneamente che il numero della causa della sentenza riconosciuta era P-437/97 invece del P-437/87, la Corte Municipale di Koprivnica emise una decisione che rettificava l'errore che fu notificata due giorni più tardi ao rappresentanti del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 9 e 10).
7. In termini più generali, si può dire il diritto di accesso ad una corte sia stato infranto semplicemente per il fatto, che, con il trascorrere del tempo, un'azione cade in prescrizione? Io non ne sono sicuro.
8. Io noterei anche che le corti competenti portano una quota significativa di responsabilità per il fatto che l'azione non poteva essere intrapresa perché era prescritta.
9. In primo luogo, loro mostrarono del formalismo eccessivo. La Corte Municipale di Koprivnica stessa corresse esattamente l'errore materiale riguardo al numero della causa (vedere paragrafo 10 della sentenza). Sfortunatamente, su un ricorso da parte dei debitori di sentenza, la corte di appello - nella mia prospettiva, erroneamente-annullò l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza del 6 febbraio 2002 a causa dell'errore di dattilografia nel numero di causa. Mentre ammise che è probabile che la discrepanza fosse stata causata da un errore materiale, annullò ciononostante l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza, dando precedenza al principio della legalità formale e severa (vedere paragrafo 14).
10. La causa fu rinviata perciò alla corte di prima - istanza che costrinse il richiedente a far correggere il numero di causa in conformità con la richiesta della corte di appello. Con il trascorrere del tempo nel momento in cui ulteriori ricorsi furono depositato, l'azione del richiedente cadde in prescrizione. Il 28 settembre 2004 l'Organo giudiziario locale di Koprivnica respinse un ricorso da parte del richiedente.
11. Si può sostenere ragionevolmente in queste circostanze che il richiedente non avesse avuto accesso ad una corte?
12. Oltre ad essere colpevole di formalismo eccessivo, le autorità giudiziali competenti anche interpretarono e applicarono erroneamente, le disposizioni attinenti di diritto nazionale. Nell'interpretare le disposizioni attinenti, le corti nazionali sostennero, che depositare una richiesta per riconoscimento di una sentenza di giudice straniero non costituì un atto di un creditore che avrebbe potuto interrompere la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale all'interno del significato della sezione 388 dell’Atto degli perché non fu né diretto contro il debitore né teso a determinare, garantire o eseguire la rivendicazione. Non si era verificata di conseguenza, nessuna interruzione del termine di prescrizione quando il richiedente aveva presentato la sua richiesta per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera.
13. Senza dubbio, l'interpretazione delle corti nazionali all'effetto che l'istituzione dei procedimenti per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera da parte del richiedente non ha interrotto la decorrenza termine di prescrizione legale dei dieci - anni era imprevedibile. Un'interpretazione più favorevole al richiedente, ed alla stessa nozione di un processo equo, sarebbe stato sostenere che l’avvio procedimenti per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera avrebbe interro la decorrenza del termine di prescrizione legale. Come la sentenza davvero nota in relazione all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, è indifendibile sostenere la prospettiva che l’avvio procedimenti per il riconoscimento di una sentenza estera non interrompe la decorrenza di un termine di prescrizione legale (vedere paragrafo 55).
14. In breve, io considero che le corti nazionali interpretarono le disposizioni attinenti dell’Atto degli Obblighi Agiscono molto erroneamente e le applicarono in un modo che si avvicina all’arbitrarietà
15. La mia conclusione è perciò che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 in questa causa, non perché il richiedente fu privato del suo diritto di accesso ad una corte, ma perché, mostrando un formalismo eccessivo ed interpretando arbitrariamente le disposizioni legali attinenti, le autorità giudiziali competenti spogliarono il richiedente del diritto ad un'udienza corretta.
16. Nel paragrafo 84 il giudizio enuncia che “data la natura delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e le ragioni per cui ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che nella presente causa il modo più appropriato di compensazione sarebbe riaprire i procedimenti di cui si lamenta in tempo debito.”
17. Per le ragioni che ho spiegato in molte occasioni, da solo o insieme con altri giudici in particolare il Giudice Spielmann,3 avrei gradito moltissimo che questo principio, a causa della sua importanza venisse riflesso nella parte operativa della sentenza.
1 (n. 18648/04), pubblicato in Clunet (Giornale di Diritto Internazionale), 2009, p. 193, commento di Fabien Marchadier; e Revisione Critica del diritto internazionale privato, 2008, p. 830, commento di Patrick Kinsch.

2 dovrebbe essere notato che la sentenza Pellegrini c. Italia (n. 30882/96, ECHR 2001-VIII) riguarda la situazione opposta (restrizioni imposte dalla Convenzione sulla possibilità di accordare autorità, in conformità con il diritto nazionale per eseguire sentenze estere che non soddisfano lo standard europeo di un processo equo). Gli esperti legali hanno fatto commenti come segue sulla decisione McDonald citata sopra:
“[La decisione] prende un approccio innovativo… su questo punto, rendendo d'ora innanzi possibile accostare direttamente il diritto al riconoscimento o all’esecuzione di sentenze estere al diritto ad un'udienza corretta. Così, il riguardo dovuto per le sentenze estere come tali, indipendentemente da qualsiasi diritto effettivo che può essere coinvolto, è ritenuto una base sufficiente per il diritto alla loro esecuzione internazionale” (Patrick Kinsch, Revisione Critica del diritto internazionale privato, 2008, p. 839) (traduzione).
o:
“La Corte accetta - per la prima volta (la questione era stata lasciata espressamente aperta da Sylvester c. Austria (n. 2) sentenza di 9 ottobre 2003, n. 54640/00)-che un rifiuto a riconoscere una sentenza estera può essere considerato costituente un’interferenza col diritto ad un'udienza corretta” (ibid., pp. 838-39) (traduzione).
o:
“… L’Articolo 6 della Convenzione concerne tutti gli stadi del processo, incluso l’esecuzione della sentenza. Ed a questo riguardo, nessuna distinzione dovrebbe essere resa secondo l'origine della sentenza” (Fabien Marchadier, Clunet, 2009, p. 196) (traduzione).
Questa questione ha occupato le menti di specialisti legali per del tempo (vedere Fabien Marchadier, Les objectifs généraux du droit international privé à l’épreuve de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, Brussels Bruylant, 2007 N. 272 et seq., in particolare n. 275 (riguardo all'obbligo per riconoscere sentenze estere de plano ); Patrick Kinsch, “L'Impatto dei Diritti umani sull’applicazione della Legge Estera e sul Riconoscimento di Sentenze Estere- Un Esame delle Cause Decise dalle Istituzioni europee dei Diritti umani”, in T. Einhorn e K. Siehr, eds., Cooperazione Intercontinentale Per il Diritto internazionale Privato-Composizioni in Memoria di Pietro E. Nygh, le Hague, 2004, pp. 197-228; Patrick Kinsch, Droits de l’homme, droits fondamentaux et droit international privé, Recueils de cours de l’Académie de Droit International de la Haye vol. 318 (2005), in particolare p. 94: Le refus de la reconnaissance d’un jugement étranger en tant qu’ingérence dans des droits garantis”; e Fabien Marchadier, ““La protection européenne des situations constituées à l’étranger”,, Dalloz, 2007, p. 2700).

3 vedere le mie opinioni concordanti unite con il Giudice Spielmann allegate alle seguenti sentenze: Vladimir Romanov c. Russia (n. 41461/02, 24 luglio 2008); Ilatovskiy c. Russia (n. 6945/04, 9 luglio 2009); Fakiridou e Schina c. Grecia (n. 6789/06, 14 novembre 2008); Lesjak c. Croazia (n. 25904/06, 18 febbraio 2010); e Prežec c. Croazia (n. 48185/07, 15 ottobre 2009). Vedere anche la mia opinione concordante congiunta con i Giudici Casadevall, Cabral Barreto, Zagrebelsky e Popović nella causa Cudak c. Lituania ([GC], n. 15869/02, 23 marzo 2010), così come l'opinione concordante dei Giudici Rozakis, Spielmann, Ziemele e Lazarova Trajkovska in Salduz c. Turchia ([GC], n. 36391/02, ECHR 2008 -...).


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.