Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GEORGIY NIKOLAYEVICH MIKHAYLOV v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 06

NUMERO: 4543/04/2010
STATO: Russia
DATA: 01/04/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violations of Art. 6-1
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF GEORGIY NIKOLAYEVICH MIKHAYLOV v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 4543/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
1 April 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Georgiy Nikolayevich Mikhaylov v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Anatoly Kovler,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 9 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 4543/04) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr G. N. M. (“the applicant”), on 24 January 2004.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr O. G., a lawyer practising in Frankfurt am Main. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr G. Matyushkin, Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. On 21 October 2008 the Court declared the application partly inadmissible and decided to communicate the complaints concerning access to the appeal court, the length of the civil proceedings and the alleged interference with the applicant's right to property to the Government. It also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Background of the case
4. The applicant was born in 1944 and lives in St. Petersburg.
5. In 1979 the applicant was convicted of engaging in an illegal business activity and sentenced to four years' imprisonment. The court also ordered the confiscation of his property, namely an art collection. As part of this collection allegedly disappeared, in 1985 the applicant was convicted of fraudulent theft of State property.
6. In 1989 both judgments were quashed and the proceedings against the applicant were terminated on the ground that no criminal offence had been committed.
7. Between 1989 and 1998 the applicant unsuccessfully tried to recover his art collection.
B. First-instance proceedings
8. In July 1998 the applicant lodged a claim with the Oktyabrskiy District Court of St. Petersburg (“the district court”) against the local departments of the Ministries of Justice, the Interior and Finance and the St. Petersburg Prosecutor's Office, seeking compensation for the pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage caused by the confiscation of his property.
9. On 22 July 1998 the district court scheduled a hearing on 1 December 1998.
10. On 1 December 1998 the district court held a hearing, acceded to the defendant's requests and postponed the proceedings until 18 May 1999.
11. On 19 February 1999 criminal proceedings were instituted against third persons for misappropriation of the applicant's art collection; on an unspecified date the applicant was granted victim status in the criminal case.
12. Between 18 May and 31 August 1999 the district court postponed hearings on four occasions at the defendants' request.
13. On 31 August 1999 the district court granted the applicant's request to hear three witnesses and postponed the hearing until 16 September 1999.
14. On 16 September 1999 the district court heard two witnesses, granted the applicant's request to summon two other witnesses and postponed the hearing until 17 December 1999.
15. On 17 December 1999 the hearing was postponed because the judge was ill.
16. On 12 January 2000 the hearing was postponed because of the applicant's absence.
17. On 20 January 2000 the district court heard two witnesses and postponed the hearing until 22 February 2000 at the applicant's request.
18. On 22 February 2000 the hearing was postponed because the judge was ill; a new hearing was scheduled on 9 June 2000.
19. Between 9 June and 17 October 2000 hearings were postponed on three occasions at the applicant's request.
20. On 17 October 2000 the hearing was postponed until 21 November 2000 pending receipt of information from other courts confirming the applicant's claims.
21. On 21 November 2000 the district court granted the applicant's application to request materials from the criminal case in which the applicant had been granted victim status in substantiation of his pecuniary damage claims; the hearing was postponed until 13 February 2001.
22. The 13 February 2001 hearing was postponed until 26 April 2001 because of the applicant's absence.
23. The 26 April 2001 hearing was postponed because of a defendant's absence.
24. On 12 July 2001 the applicant requested the district court to amend his statement of claims; the hearing was rescheduled on 20 November 2001.
25. On 20 November 2001 the hearing was postponed because of a defendant's absence and the applicant's failure to submit an additional list of his lost property.
26. On 12 March 2002 the applicant provided the district court with an additional list of his lost property; the hearing was postponed because of the defendants' absence.
27. On 10 September 2002 a hearing was postponed because of the applicant's and defendants' absence.
28. On 13 February 2003 a hearing was postponed because the defendants had not been notified of it and failed to appear.
29. On 26 February 2003 the district court held a hearing and dismissed the applicant's claim. The court orally delivered only the operative part of the judgment, without providing any reasons.
C. Ensuing events
30. On 11 July 2003 the applicant appealed against the judgment of 26 February 2003. In his appeal he mentioned that the full text of the judgment had not yet been prepared and that therefore his appeal was preliminary and would be amended.
31. On the same day the applicant complained to the St. Petersburg City Court (“the city court”) that the full text of the judgment of 26 February 2003 had still not been prepared, whereas Article 199 of the Code of Civil Procedure (“CCP”) provided that a reasoned judgment was to be finalised within five days.
32. On 22 July 2003 the city court informed the applicant that Judge K. (the presiding judge in his case) was on holiday and that the full text of the judgment of 26 February 2003 would be drafted as soon as possible.
33. On 25 July 2003 the district court received the applicant's appeal.
34. On 1 September 2003 the district court dismissed the applicant's appeal on the ground of his failure to respect the ten-day time-limit prescribed by law. It mentioned that the applicant's appeal had been received on 25 July 2003, whereas the judgment had been given on 26 February 2003.
35. On 4 September 2003 the applicant was informed that the full text of the judgment had been finalised on 3 September 2003.
36. The applicant appealed against the decision of 1 September 2003. He claimed that, under Article 338 of the CCP, an appeal was to be lodged within ten days of the adoption of a final version of the judgment in issue. In his case, the final version of the judgment had been created on 3 September 2003, that is, two days after his appeal was rejected. He therefore applied for a renewal of the above time-limit.
37. On 29 October 2003 the city court rejected the applicant's appeal against the decision of 1 September 2003, having found no reason to quash it on account of a violation of Article 199 of the CCP by the district court.
38. The text of the judgment of 26 February 2003 bears a court's stamp confirming that it became final on 29 October 2003.
39. The applicant did not pursue supervisory review proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
Code of Civil Procedure of the Russian Federation (CCP)
40. A court may restore a procedural term established by a federal law after its expiry if it finds that reasons for failure to comply with such a term were valid (Article 112 § 1). A request to restore the term after its expiry must be lodged with the court before which the procedural act in question should have been performed, and must be examined at a court hearing. Parties to the proceedings are to be notified of the time and place of the hearing, but their failure to attend it does not preclude the court from deciding upon the issue (Article 112 § 2). The necessary procedural act in respect of which the procedural term has expired, such as lodging a complaint, or submission of documents, must be performed simultaneously with the lodging of the request for restoration of the term (Article 112 § 3). The court's ruling on the restoration of (or refusal to restore) the procedural term may be appealed against (Article 112 § 4 as in force at the material time).
41. A judgment must be delivered immediately after the examination of a civil case. The preparation of a reasoned judgment may be postponed for not more than five days after the examination of a case; however, the first-instance court must pronounce the operative part of the judgment at the same hearing in which the examination of the case is completed (Article 199 of the CCP).
42. An appeal in a civil case may be lodged within ten days of the delivery of a first-instance judgment in its final form (Article 338 of the CCP).
43. An appeal statement is to be returned to the appellant where (i) a judge's instructions concerning an appeal statement have not been complied with; or (ii) the term for lodging an appeal has expired, provided that restoration of the term concerned has not been requested (Article 342 § 1 of the CCP).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
44. The applicant complained about lack of access to the appeal court in his civil case and the length of the civil proceedings. He relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing within a reasonable time by a ... tribunal ...”
A. Submissions by the parties
45. The Government contested the applicant's arguments. They emphasised at the outset that pursuant to domestic regulations case materials in civil cases were to be kept in archives for five years, and explained that the applicant's case materials had been destroyed. They further submitted that, although the time-limit for preparation of a reasoned judgment in the applicant's case had not been respected, the judge responsible for it had been dismissed from office. The delay in preparation of the reasoned judgment amounted to six months and five days. The applicant's appeal statement had been returned to him because it had not contained a request to restore the time-limits in keeping with Articles 112 and 342 § 1 of the CCP. The proceedings had been lengthy because of objective factual circumstances. The applicant's civil case had been particularly complex: the civil case had been closely linked to the criminal investigation and hearings had been postponed on several occasions to obtain the criminal case materials; the defendants had been State agencies; the applicant had confirmed that the case had been complex as he had amended his statement of claims and had not attended every hearing. In the Government's submission, the applicant's civil case had been examined within four years and seven months. A period of inactivity of the district court of one year, five months and twenty-one days had been attributable to the applicant. A delay of four months and eighteen days had been attributable to the judge's illness; moreover, the judge had been disciplined for protracting the case and dismissed from office. The length of the proceedings would have been shorter had the applicant not contributed to the delays. The Government further claimed that the applicant had not requested supervisory review of the rulings of 1 September and 29 October 2003 or complained about the excessive length of his civil proceedings to the Judiciary Qualification Board. In sum, the Government claimed that there had been no violation of the applicant's rights under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
46. The applicant maintained his claims. He submitted that he had waited nine months to receive the text of the judgment. The applicant also asserted that the length of the proceedings had been excessive and that he had attended every hearing he had been notified of.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Admissibility
47. In so far as the Government may be understood to claim that the applicant's failure to complain to the Judiciary Qualification Board about the excessive length of the civil proceedings amounted to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, the Court notes that it has already found that an application to the Judiciary Qualification Board is not an effective remedy against the excessive length of proceedings (see Kormacheva v. Russia, no. 53084/99, §§ 61 and 62, 29 January 2004, and Falimonov v. Russia, no. 11549/02, § 50, 25 March 2008). It therefore dismisses the Government's objection.
48. In so far as the Government may be understood to plead non-exhaustion as regards the applicant's failure to apply for supervisory review of the rulings of 1 September and 29 October 2003, the Court reiterates that supervisory review in civil proceedings under Russian law is not an effective remedy to be exhausted (see Tumilovich v. Russia (dec.), no. 47033/99, 22 June 1999, and Denisov v. Russia (dec.), no. 33408/03, 6 May 2004). The Court thus dismisses the Government's objection.
49. The Court notes that the applicant's complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds and must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) Access to court
50. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal. In this way it embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect (see Golder v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1975, §§ 35-36, Series A no. 18).
51. The Court further reiterates that, whilst the Convention does not provide any right to an appeal in civil cases, if a right of appeal is provided in domestic law, Article 6 § 1 applies to such appellate procedures (see Delcourt v. Belgium, 17 January 1970, § 25, Series A no. 11). The right of access to an appeal court is not absolute and the State, which is permitted to place limitations on the right of appeal, enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in relation to such limitations (see Brualla Gomez de la Torre v. Spain, 19 December 1997, § 33, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VIII, and De Ponte Nascimento v. the United Kingdom, (dec.), no. 55331/00, 31 January 2002). The Court reiterates, however, that the limitations in question must pursue a legitimate aim and there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be achieved (see Levages Prestations Services v. France, 23 October 1996, § 40, Reports 1996-V).
52. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court points out that under domestic law the applicant was entitled to lodge a regular appeal against the first-instance judgment in his civil case within ten days from the delivery of the text of the first-instance judgment in its final form (see paragraph 42 above). It reiterates in this respect that the rules governing the formal steps to be taken in lodging an appeal are aimed at ensuring the proper administration of justice. Litigants should expect the existing rules to be applied. However, the rules in question, or the application thereof, should not prevent persons amenable to the law from making use of an available remedy (see Société Anonyme Sotiris and Nikos Koutras Attee v. Greece, no. 39442/98, § 20, ECHR 2000-XII).
53. The reason why the applicant's appeal was not examined by the domestic courts is that the district court found that the applicant had failed to comply with the time-limit for lodging his appeal. The Court observes in this connection that it is not its task to take the place of the domestic courts. It is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic legislation. The role of the Court is limited to verifying whether the effects of such interpretation are compatible with the Convention (see Maresti v. Croatia, no. 55759/07, § 36, 25 June 2009).
54. However, the right to the effective protection of the courts entails that the parties to civil proceedings must be able to avail themselves of the right to lodge an appeal from the moment they can effectively apprise themselves of court decisions which may infringe their legitimate rights or interests (see Miragall Escolano and Others v. Spain, nos. 38366/97, 38688/97, 40777/98, 40843/98, 41015/98, 41400/98, 41446/98, 41484/98, 41487/98 and 41509/98, § 37, ECHR 2000-I). Given that the applicant was not able to become acquainted with the district court's reasoned judgment before 4 September 2003 (see paragraph 35 above), he cannot not be said to have had an effective right to appeal against it prior to that date.
55. In the Court's opinion, the fact that the applicant had no opportunity to study the text of the first-instance judgment prior to lodging his appeal is difficult to reconcile with Article 6 of the Convention, which, according to the Court's established case-law, embodies as a principle linked to the proper administration of justice the requirement that court decisions should adequately state the reasons on which they are based (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 26, ECHR 1999-I, and Angel Angelov v. Bulgaria, no. 51343/99, § 38, 15 February 2007).
56. It is true that the Government argued that the applicant could have gained access to appeal proceedings by filing a specific request for restoration of the procedural term for lodging an appeal. The Court notes that it is not entirely clear whether the applicant actually missed the term in question since, first, the reasoned judgment in its final form was prepared only on 3 September 2003 and, secondly, the judgment became final on 29 October 2003 (see paragraph 38 above). Supposing, however, for argument's sake, that the term for lodging an appeal expired before 25 July 2003, as suggested by the district court (see paragraph 34 above), the Court observes that in his appeal statement and complaint to the city court of 11 July 2003 the applicant referred to the district court's failure to provide him with the reasoned text of the judgment within the term established by law and unequivocally stated that he wished to appeal against the judgment in question (see paragraphs 30 and 31 above). Therefore the applicant may be considered to have made an implied request to restore the procedural term. To assume the contrary would, in the Court's view, be excessively formalistic. Furthermore, given that the manner in which the court proceedings had been administered contributed to the applicant's failure to comply with a time-limit for lodging an appeal, it was for the national courts to restore the time-limit in question on their own motion.
57. In sum, the Court concludes that the district court interpreted a procedural rule on time-limits in such a way as to prevent the applicant's appeal being examined on the merits, with the effect that the latter's right to the effective protection of the courts was infringed (see, mutatis mutandis, Zvolský and Zvolská v. the Czech Republic, no. 46129/99, § 51, ECHR 2002-IX, and Fetaovski v. “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, no. 10649/03, § 39, 19 June 2008).
58. Lastly, the Court observes that the Government admitted the district court judge's failure to comply with a legal requirement to produce a reasoned judgment within five days from the date of its pronouncement. It follows that the applicant was prevented from effectively exercising his right to appeal solely because of the district court's failure to perform its duty and provide him with a finalised text of the judgment in a timely fashion.
59. All in all, having regard to the circumstances of the case as a whole, the Court finds that the applicant did not enjoy a practical, effective right of access to court.
60. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of lack of access to court.
(b) Length of proceedings
61. The Court will now examine whether the length of the civil proceedings instituted by the applicant was “reasonable”. It points out that the parties made no submissions as to the exact period to be taken into consideration. It considers that the relevant period started in July 1998, when the applicant brought his claims before the district court. In the absence of the parties' submissions as to the exact date on which the proceedings ended, the Court is ready to accept that they were pending until the date when the judgment of 26 February 2003 became final. Given that the official stamp on the text of the first-instance judgment defines the date in question as 29 October 2003 (see paragraph 38 above), the Court finds that the overall length of the proceedings amounts to almost five years and three months.
62. The Court notes that the prevailing part of this period relates to the examination of the applicant's civil case in the first instance and points out that the first-instance proceedings could not be regarded as completed until the moment when a party to the proceedings has an opportunity to become acquainted with a reasoned written text of the first-instance decision, irrespective of whether it was previously delivered orally (see, mutatis mutandis, Soares Fernandes v. Portugal, no. 59017/00, § 17, 8 April 2004, and Groshev v. Russia, no. 69889/01, § 22, 20 October 2005). It concludes, therefore, that the first-instance proceedings ended on 4 September 2003, when the applicant was informed that the text of the judgment of 26 February 2003 had been finalised on 3 September 2003. The overall length of examination of the applicant's civil case in the first instance amounted to five years and one month.
63. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings coming within the scope of Article 6 § 1 must be assessed in each case according to the particular circumstances. The Court has to have regard, inter alia, to the complexity of the factual or legal issues raised by the case, to the conduct of the applicant and the competent authorities and to what was at stake for the former (see Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-VII). In addition, only delays attributable to the State may justify a finding of a failure to comply with the “reasonable time” requirement (see Pedersen and Baadsgaard v. Denmark, no. 49017/99, § 44, 19 June 2003).
64. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court considers that the applicant's civil dispute was not particularly complex. It is not convinced by the Government's argument that the fact that the defendants were State agencies could in any manner add to the complexity of the proceedings for compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. Further, the Court notes that the applicant did amend his statement of claims on one occasion (see paragraph 24 above). However, it is not persuaded that this factor in itself rendered the task of the district court more difficult. In any event, assuming that the applicant's civil proceedings were not straightforwardly simple, the Court cannot accept that the complexity of the case, taken on its own, was such as to justify the overall length of the proceedings (see Malinin v. Russia (dec.), no. 58391/00, 8 July 2004, and Ivanov v. Russia (dec.), no. 31266/02, 5 October 2006).
65. As to the applicant's conduct, the Court notes that on three occasions delays were caused by the applicant's failure to appear (see paragraphs 16, 22 and 27 above). It observes at the same time that the hearing of 10 September 2002 would most likely have been postponed even if the applicant had attended it, owing to the defendants' absence. It follows that the total delay incurred as a result of the applicant's failure to appear in the court room amounted to less than four months.
66. As regards the delays caused by the applicant's requests to summon witnesses, as well as his requests for information on the criminal case in which he was victim (see paragraphs 13, 14, 21 and 20), the Court reiterates that the applicant cannot be blamed for taking full advantage of the resources afforded by national law in the defence of his interests (see, among other authorities, Patta v. the Czech Republic, no. 12605/02, § 69, 18 April 2006, and Stojanov v. “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, no. 34215/02, § 56, 31 May 2007). Accordingly, it finds no reason to conclude that the applicant's behaviour was dilatory.
67. The Court further observes that substantial periods of inactivity for which the Government have not submitted any satisfactory explanation are attributable to the domestic authorities. For example, the Government failed to provide any justification for the delay from July 1998, when the applicant lodged his claim, to 1 December 1998 when the district court held its first hearing in the case (see paragraph 9 above). Further delays in the proceedings were due to infrequent hearings scheduled with significant intervals of sometimes several months (see Falimonov, cited above, § 57). The Government did not explain why no hearings had been scheduled between 1 December 1998 and 18 May 1999, 26 April and 12 July 2001, 12 July and 20 November 2001, 20 November 2001 and 12 March 2002, 12 March and 10 September 2002 and 10 September 2002 and 13 February 2003.
68. The Court also considers that the domestic authorities were responsible for a substantial delay in the proceedings caused by the defendants' failure to attend hearings (see paragraphs 12, 23, 25, 26 and 28 above). The Government have not provided any information suggesting that the domestic authorities took adequate steps in order to ensure the defendants' presence, or reacted in any way to the defendants' behaviour, or used the measures available to them to discipline the participants to the proceedings and ensure that the case be heard within a reasonable time (see Kesyan v. Russia, no. 36496/02, § 58, 19 October 2006).
69. Moreover, the Court cannot but be struck with the fact that it took the district court more than six months to prepare the text of the first-instance judgment. It takes note of the Government's submission that this delay was in breach of domestic rules and considers that it is clearly attributable to the State.
70. Lastly, the Court reiterates that the dispute in the present case concerns compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage caused by confiscation of the applicant's property in the course of criminal proceedings that were discontinued for lack of a crime. In such circumstances it cannot be said that the issue at stake for the applicant was of no particular importance.
71. In the light of the foregoing considerations, the Court finds that the applicant's civil case was not heard within a “reasonable time”. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of the excessive length of civil proceedings.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
72. The applicant complained that refusal to admit his appeal against the judgment in his civil case had deprived him of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads, in so far as relevant, as follows:
“Every ... person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions...”
73. The Government contested that argument.
74. The applicant maintained his complaint and submitted that he had lost property of considerable value because of the State agencies' actions.
75. The Court has already examined the applicant's complaint concerning the lack of access to the appeal court under Article 6 of the Convention. In view of its conclusion that there has been a violation of that provision, it finds that no separate issue arises under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
76. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
77. The applicant did not submit a claim for just satisfaction. Accordingly, the Court considers that there is no call to award him any sum on that account.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of lack of access to court;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of the excessive length of civil proceedings;
4. Holds that no separate issue arises under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 1 April 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazioni dell’ Art. 6-1
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA GEORGIY NIKOLAYEVICH MIKHAYLOV C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 4543/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
1 aprile 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Georgiy Nikolayevich Mikhaylov c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger, Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste, Anatoly Kovler, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e da Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 9 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 4543/04) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, Sig. G. N. M. (“il richiedente”), il 24 gennaio 2004.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. O. G., un avvocato che pratica a Francoforte am Main. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal Sig. G. Matyushkin, Rappresentante della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani.
3. Il 21 ottobre 2008 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente inammissibile e decise di comunicare al Governo le azioni di reclamo riguardo all’ accesso alla corte di ricorso, la lunghezza dei procedimenti civili e l'interferenza addotta col diritto del richiedente alla proprietà. Decise anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. Background della causa
4. Il richiedente nacque nel 1944 e vive a San Pietroburgo.
5. Nel 1979 il richiedente fu condannato per avere preso parte ad un esercizio d'impresa illegale e condannato alla reclusione di quattro anni. La corte ordinò anche il sequestro della sua proprietà, vale a dire una collezione di arte. Siccome parte di questa collezione presumibilmente scomparve, nel 1985 il richiedente fu dichiarato colpevole di furto fraudolento della proprietà Statale.
6. Nel 1989 ambo le sentenze furono annullate ed i procedimenti contro il richiedente furono terminati sulla base che nessun reato penale era stato commesso.
7. Fra il 1989 ed il 1998 il richiedente inutilmente tentò di recuperare la sua collezione di arte.
B. Procedimenti di Prima - istanza
8. Nel luglio 1998 il richiedente depositò una rivendicazione presso la Corte distrettuale di Oktyabrskiy di San Pietroburgo (“la corte distrettuale”) contro i reparti locali dei Ministeri di Giustizia, dell'Interno e delle Finanze e l'Ufficio dell’ Accusatore di San Pietroburgo, chiedendo il risarcimento per il danno patrimoniale e il danno non-patrimoniale causati dal sequestro della sua proprietà.
9. Il 22 luglio 1998 la corte distrettuale programmò un'udienza per il 1 dicembre 1998.
10. Il 1 dicembre 1998 la corte distrettuale sostenne un'udienza, accolse le richieste dell'imputato e posticipò i procedimenti al 18 maggio 1999.
11. Il 19 febbraio 1999 dei procedimenti penali furono avviati contro una terza persona per appropriazione indebita della collezione d’ arte del richiedente; in una data non specificata al richiedente fu accordato lo status di vittima nella causa penale.
12. Fra il 18 maggio e il 31 agosto 1999 la corte distrettuale posticipò le udienze in quattro occasioni su richiesta degli imputati.
13. Il 31 agosto 1999 la corte distrettuale accolse la richiesta del richiedente di ascoltare tre testimoni e posticipò l'udienza al 16 settembre 1999.
14. Il 16 settembre 1999 la corte distrettuale ascoltò due testimoni, accolse la richiesta del richiedente di citare in causa altri due testimoni e posticipò l'udienza al 17 dicembre 1999.
15. Il 17 dicembre 1999 l'udienza fu posticipata perché il giudice era malato.
16. Il 12 gennaio 2000 l'udienza fu posticipata a causa dell'assenza del richiedente.
17. Il 20 gennaio 2000 la corte distrettuale ascoltò due testimoni e posticipò l'udienza al 22 febbraio 2000 su richiesta del richiedente.
18. Il 22 febbraio 2000 l'udienza fu posticipata perché il giudice era malato; una nuova udienza fu fissata il 9 giugno 2000.
19. Fra il 9 giugno ed il 17 ottobre 2000 delle udienze furono posticipati in tre occasioni su richiesta del richiedente.
20. Il 17 ottobre 2000 l'udienza fu posticipata al 21 novembre 2000 essendo pendente il ricevimento di informazioni dalle altre corti che confermavano le rivendicazioni del richiedente.
21. Il 21 novembre 2000 la corte distrettuale accolse la richiesta del richiedente per richiedere dei materiali dalla causa penale nella quale al richiedente era stato accordato lo status di vittima in prova delle sue rivendicazioni di danno patrimoniale; l'udienza fu posticipata al 13 febbraio 2001.
22. Il 13 febbraio 2001 l’udienza fu posticipata al 26 aprile 2001 a causa dell'assenza del richiedente.
23. Il 26 aprile 2001 l’ udienza fu posticipata a causa dell'assenza di un imputato.
24. Il 12 luglio 2001 il richiedente richiese alla corte distrettuale di correggere la sua dichiarazione di rivendicazioni; l'udienza fu riprogrammata il 20 novembre 2001.
25. Il 20 novembre 2001 l'udienza fu posticipata a causa dell'assenza di un imputato e l'insuccesso del richiedente nel presentare una lista supplementare della sua proprietà perduta.
26. Il 12 marzo 2002 il richiedente fornì alla corte distrettuale una lista supplementare della sua proprietà perduta; l'udienza fu posticipata a causa dell'assenza degli imputati.
27. Il 10 settembre 2002 un'udienza fu posticipata a causa dell'assenza del richiedente e degli imputati.
28. Il 13 febbraio 2003 un'udienza fu posticipata perché agli imputati non ne era stata notificata l’udienza e non erano stati in grado di comparire.
29. Il 26 febbraio 2003 la corte distrettuale sostenne un'udienza e respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente. La corte consegnò solamente oralmente la parte operativa della sentenza, senza fornire alcuna ragione.
C. Eventi conseguenti
30. Il 11 luglio 2003 il richiedente fece appello contro la sentenza del 26 febbraio 2003. Nel suo ricorso lui menzionò che il pieno testo della sentenza non era stato ancora preparato e che perciò il suo ricorso era preliminare e sarebbe stato corretto.
31. Lo stesso giorno il richiedente si lamentò presso la Corte della Città di San Pietroburgo (“la corte urbana”) che il pieno testo della sentenza del 26 febbraio 2003 non era ancora stato preparato, mentre l’Articolo 199 del Codice di Procedura Civile (“CCP”) prevedeva che un giudizio ragionato avrebbe dovuto essere reso definitivo entro cinque giorni.
32. Il 22 luglio 2003 la corte urbana informò il richiedente che il Giudice K. (il giudice che presiedeva nella sua causa) era in vacanza e che il pieno testo della sentenza del 26 febbraio 2003 sarebbe stato redatto il più presto possibile.
33. Il 25 luglio 2003 la corte distrettuale ricevette il ricorso del richiedente.
34. Il 1 settembre 2003 la corte distrettuale respinse il ricorso del richiedente sulla base del suo insuccesso nel rispettare il tempo-limite dei dieci giorni previsto per legge. Menzionò che il ricorso del richiedente era stato ricevuto il 25 luglio 2003, mentre la sentenza era stata resa il 26 febbraio 2003.
35. Il 4 settembre 2003 il richiedente fu informato che il pieno testo della sentenza era stato reso definitivo il 3 settembre 2003.
36. Il richiedente fece appello contro la decisione del 1 settembre 2003. Lui disse che, sotto l’Articolo 338 del CCP, un ricorso sarebbe stato depositato entro dieci giorni dall'adozione di una versione definitiva della sentenza in oggetto. Nel suo caso, la versione definitiva della sentenza era stata creata il 3 settembre 2003, cioè, due giorni dopo che il suo ricorso fu respinto. Lui fece domanda perciò per un rinnovo del tempo-limite sopra.
37. Il 29 ottobre 2003 la corte urbana respinse il ricorso del richiedente contro la decisione del 1 settembre 2003, non avendo trovato nessuna ragione per annullarlo a causa di una violazione dell’Articolo 199 del CCP da parte della corte distrettuale.
38. Il testo della sentenza del 26 febbraio 2003 porta il francobollo di una corte che conferma che divenne definitiva il 29 ottobre 2003.
39. Il richiedente non intraprese procedimenti di revisione direttiva.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
Codice di Procedura Civile della Federazione russa (CCP)
40. Una corte può ripristinare un termine procedurale stabilito da una legge federale dopo la sua scadenza se trova che delle ragioni per l’inosservanza con tale termine erano valide (Articolo 112 § 1). Una richiesta per ripristinare il termine dopo la sua scadenza deve essere depositata preso la corte prima che l'atto procedurale in oggetto avrebbe dovuto essere compiuto, e deve essere esaminata in un'udienza di corte. Le parti ai procedimenti saranno notificate del giorno e del luogo dell'udienza, ma il loro insuccesso di frequentarla non preclude la corte dal decidere sul problema (Articolo 112 § 2). L'atto procedurale necessario a riguardo del quale è scaduto il termine procedurale, come presentare un reclamo o sottoporre di documenti, deve essere compiuto simultaneamente con la presentazione della richiesta per la ricostituzione del termine (Articolo 112 § 3). La corte sta decidendo se si può fare ricorso contro la ricostituzione (o il rifiuto di ripristinare) del termine procedurale (Articolo 112 § 4 come in vigore al tempo attinente).
41. Una sentenza deve essere consegnata immediatamente dopo l'esame di un giudizio civile. La preparazione di un giudizio ragionato può essere posticipata per non più di cinque giorni dopo l'esame di una causa; comunque, la corte di prima - istanza deve pronunciare la parte operativa della sentenza nella stessa udienza in cui è completato l'esame della causa (Articolo 199 del CCP).
42. Un ricorso in un giudizio civile può essere depositato entro dieci giorni dalla consegna di una sentenza di prima - istanza nella sua forma definitiva (Articolo 338 del CCP).
43. Una dichiarazione di ricorso sarà ritornata all'appellante dove (i) non ci si è attenuti alle istruzioni di un giudice riguardo ad una dichiarazione di ricorso; o (ii) il termine per depositare un ricorso è scaduto, purché la ricostituzione del termine riguardata non sia stata richiesta (Articolo 342 § 1 del CCP).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
44. Il richiedente si lamentò della mancanza di accesso alla corte di ricorso nel suo giudizio civile e della lunghezza dei procedimenti civili. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che nella parte attinente, recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
A. Osservazioni delle parti
45. Il Governo contestò gli argomenti del richiedente. Enfatizzò all'inizio che facendo seguito alle regolamentazioni nazionali i materiali della causa in giudizi civili avrebbero dovuti essere tenuti in archivio per cinque anni, e spiegò che i materiali della causa del richiedente erano stati distrutti. Presentò inoltre che, benché il tempo-limite per la preparazione di un giudizio ragionato nella causa del richiedente non fosse stato rispettato, il giudice responsabile per questo era stato dimesso d’ ufficio. Il ritardo nella preparazione del giudizio ragionato corrispose a sei mesi e cinque giorni. La dichiarazione di ricorso del richiedente era stata ritornata a lui perché non aveva sostenuto una richiesta per ripristinare il tempo-limite attenendosi agli Articoli 112 e 342 § 1 del CCP. I procedimenti erano stati lunghi a causa di circostanze di fatti obiettive. Il giudizio civile del richiedente era stato particolarmente complesso: il giudizio civile era collegato da vicino all'indagine penale e delle udienze erano state posticipate in molte occasioni per ottenere i materiali della causa penale; gli imputati erano agenzie Statali; il richiedente aveva confermato che la causa era stata complessa siccome lui aveva corretto la sua dichiarazione di rivendicazioni e non aveva frequentato ogni udienza. Nell'osservazione del Governo, il giudizio civile del richiedente era stato esaminato in quattro anni e sette mesi. Un periodo di inattività della corte distrettuale di un anno, cinque mesi e ventuno giorni era stato attribuibile al richiedente. Un ritardo di quattro mesi e diciotto giorni era stato attribuibile alla malattia del giudice; inoltre, il giudice era stato disciplinato per aver protratto la causa ed era stato dimesso d’ ufficio. La lunghezza dei procedimenti sarebbe stata resa più breve se il richiedente non avesse contribuito ai ritardi. Il Governo affermò inoltre che il richiedente non aveva richiesto una revisione direttiva delle direttive del 1 settembre e del 29 ottobre 2003 o si era lamentato della lunghezza eccessiva dei suoi procedimenti civili presso il Consiglio di Qualifica della Magistratura. Insomma, il Governo affermò, che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dei diritti del richiedente sotto l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
46. Il richiedente mantenne le sue rivendicazioni. Lui presentò di aver aspettato nove mesi per ricevere il testo della sentenza. Il richiedente asserì anche che la lunghezza dei procedimenti era stata eccessiva e che lui aveva frequentato ogni udienza che le era stata notificata .
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
47. Nella misura in cui si possa intendere che il Governo rivendichi che l’ insuccesso del richiedente nel lamentarsi presso il Consiglio di Qualifica della Magistratura della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti civili corrispose ad un non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali, la Corte nota che ha già trovato che una richiesta presso il Consiglio di Qualifica della Magistratura non è una via di ricorso effettiva contro la lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti (vedere Kormacheva c. Russia, n. 53084/99, §§ 61 e 62, 29 gennaio 2004, e Falimonov c. la Russia, n. 11549/02, § 50 25 marzo 2008). Respinge perciò l'eccezione del Governo.
48. Nella misura in cui si può intendere che il Governo invochi il non-esaurimento riguardo all'insuccesso del richiedente nel fare domanda per una revisione direttiva delle direttive del 1 settembre e del 29 ottobre 2003, la Corte reitera che la revisione direttiva in procedimenti civili sotto la legge russa non è una via di ricorso effettiva da esaurire (vedere Tumilovich c. Russia (dec.), n. 47033/99, 22 giugno 1999, e Denisov c. Russia (dec.), n. 33408/03, 6 maggio 2004). La Corte respinge così l'eccezione del Governo.
49. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo e devono essere dichiarato perciò ammissibili.
2. Meriti
(a) Accesso ad una corte
50. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo che 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto di introdurre qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi di fronte ad una corte o ad un tribunale. Così incarna il “diritto ad una corte” di cui il diritto di accesso cioè il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte a corti in questioni civili costituisce un aspetto (vedere Golder c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1975, §§ 35-36 Serie A n. 18).
51. La Corte reitera inoltre che, mentre la Convenzione non prevede qualsiasi diritto ad un ricorso in giudizi civili, se un diritto di appello viene offerto in diritto nazionale, l'Articolo 6 § 1 si applica così a procedure di appello (vedere Delcourt c. Belgio, 17 gennaio 1970, § 25 Serie A n. 11). Il diritto di accesso ad una corte di ricorso non è assoluto e lo Stato, a cui viene permesso di mettere delle limitazioni sul diritto di appello, gode di un certo margine di valutazione in relazione a simili limitazioni (vedere Brualla Gomez de la Torre c. Spagna, 19 dicembre 1997 § 33, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VIII e De Ponte Nascimento c. Regno Unito, (dec.), n. 55331/00, 31 gennaio 2002). Comunque, la Corte reitera che le limitazioni in oggetto devono intraprendere uno scopo legittimo e ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo che si cerca di realizzare (vedere Levages Prestations Services c. Francia, 23 ottobre 1996, § 40 Rapporti 1996-V).
52. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte indica che al richiedente fu concesso di depositare un ricorso regolare contro la sentenza di prima - istanza nel suo giudizio civile entro dieci giorni dalla consegna del testo dalla sentenza di prima - istanza nella sua forma definitiva sotto il diritto nazionale (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra). Reitera a questo riguardo che le norme che disciplinano i passi formali da prendere nel depositare un ricorso hanno lo scopo di garantire l'amministrazione corretta della giustizia. I contendenti dovrebbero aspettarsi che le norme esistenti vengano applicate. Comunque, le norme in oggetto, o la loro applicazione, non dovrebbero impedire a persone assoggettabili alla legge di avvalersi di una via di ricorso disponibile (vedere Société Anonyme Sotiris e Nikos Koutras Attee c. la Grecia, n. 39442/98, § 20 ECHR 2000-XII).
53. La ragione perché il ricorso del richiedente non fu esaminato dalle corti nazionali è che la corte distrettuale trovò che il richiedente non era riuscito ad attenersi col tempo-limite per depositare il suo ricorso. La Corte osserva in questo collegamento che non è suo compito prendere il posto delle corti nazionali. Spetta primariamente alle autorità nazionali, in particolare alle corti, chiarire i problemi di interpretazione della legislazione nazionale. Il ruolo della Corte è limitato a verificare se gli effetti di simile interpretazione sono compatibili con la Convenzione (vedere Maresti c. Croatia, n. 55759/07, § 36 25 giugno 2009).
54. Comunque, il diritto alla protezione effettiva delle corti comporta che le parti a procedimenti civili debbano essere in grado giovarsi del diritto a depositare un ricorso dal momento che possono apprendere effettivamente delle decisioni della corte che possono infrangere i loro diritti o interessi legittimi (vedere Miragall Escolano ed Altri c. Spagna, N. 38366/97, 38688/97 40777/98, 40843/98 41015/98, 41400/98 41446/98, 41484/98 41487/98 e 41509/98, § 37 ECHR 2000-I). Dato che il richiedente non è stato in grado essere a conoscenza del giudizio ragionato della corte distrettuale del 4 settembre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra), non si può dire che lui abbia avuto diritto a fare appello contro questo prima di quella data.
55. Secondo la Corte, il fatto che il richiedente non aveva nessuna opportunità di studiare il testo della sentenza di prima - istanza prima di depositare il suo ricorso è difficile da conciliare con l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione che, secondo la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte, incarna come principio collegato all'amministrazione corretta della giustizia il requisito che le decisioni di corte dovrebbero affermare adeguatamente le ragioni su cui sono basate (vedere García Ruiz c. Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 26 ECHR 1999-io, ed Angelo Angelov c. Bulgaria, n. 51343/99, § 38 15 febbraio 2007).
56. È vero che il Governo dibatté che il richiedente avrebbe potuto guadagnare accesso per fare appello procedimenti registrando una specifica richiesta per la ricostituzione del termine procedurale per depositare un ricorso. La Corte nota che non è completamente chiaro se il richiedente davvero superò il termine in oggetto poiché, il giudizio ragionato nella sua forma definitiva fu prima, preparato solamente il 3 settembre 2003 e, in secondo luogo, la sentenza divenne definitiva il 29 ottobre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra). Comunque, supponendo a favore dell’ argomento che il termine per il deposito di un ricorso fosse scaduto prima del 25 luglio 2003, come suggerito dalla corte distrettuale (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra), la Corte osserva che nella sua dichiarazione di ricorso e nell’ azione di reclamo presso corte urbana dell0 11 luglio 2003 il richiedente si riferì all'insuccesso della corte distrettuale nell’offrirgli il testo ragionato della sentenza all'interno del termine stabilito dalla legge ed affermò inequivocabilmente che lui desiderava fare appello contro la sentenza in oggetto (vedere paragrafi 30 e 31 sopra). Perciò si può considerare che il richiedente abbia fatto una richiesta implicita per ripristinare il termine procedurale. Presumere il contrario può, nella prospettiva della Corte, essere smodatamente formalistico. Inoltre, dato che la maniera in cui erano stati amministrati gli atti contribuì all'inosservanza del richiedente del tempo-limite per depositare un ricorso, spettava alle corti nazionali ripristinare il tempo-limite in oggetto di loro propria iniziativa.
57. Insomma, la Corte conclude, che la corte distrettuale interpretò una norma procedurale sul tempo-limite in modo tale da ostacolare che il ricorso del richiedente venisse esaminato sui meriti, con l'effetto che quest’ultimo diritto alla protezione effettiva delle corti è stato infranto (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Zvolský e Zvolská c. Repubblica ceca, n. 46129/99, § 51, ECHR 2002-IX, e Fetaovski c. “Precedente Repubblica iugoslava della Macedonia”, n. 10649/03, § 39 del 19 giugno 2008).
58. Infine, la Corte osserva che il Governo ammise l'inosservanza del giudice della corte distrettuale con il requisito giuridico di produrre un giudizio ragionato entro cinque giorni dalla data della sua dichiarazione. Ne segue che al richiedente fu impedito di esercitare efficacemente il suo diritto di fare appello solamente a causa dell'inadempimento della corte distrettuale nel rispettare il suo dovere e nel fornirgli un testo definitivo della sentenza in modo opportuno.
59. Riassumendo, avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa nell'insieme, la Corte costata che il richiedente non ha goduto un diritto pratico, effettivo di accesso ad una corte.
60. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della mancanza di accesso ad una corte.
(b) Lunghezza dei procedimenti
61. La Corte ora esaminerà se la lunghezza dei procedimenti civili avviati dal richiedente era “ragionevole.” Indica che le parti non fecero osservazioni riguardo al periodo esatto da prendere in esame. Considera che il periodo attinente cominciò nel luglio 1998, quando il richiedente introdusse le sue rivendicazioni di fronte alla corte distrettuale. In assenza delle osservazioni delle parti riguardo alla data esatta in cui terminarono i procedimenti, la Corte è pronta ad accettare che loro sono stati pendenti sino alla data in cui la sentenza del 26 febbraio 2003 divenne definitiva. Dato che il francobollo ufficiale sul testo della sentenza di prima - istanza definisce la data in oggetto come il 29 ottobre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra), la Corte costata che la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti corrispondeva pressoché a cinque anni e tre mesi.
62. La Corte nota che la parte prevalente di questo periodo si riferisce all'esame del giudizio civile del richiedente nella prima istanza ed evidenzia che i procedimenti di prima - istanza non potevano essere riguardati come completati sino al momento in cui una parte ai procedimenti avesse avuto un'opportunità venire a conoscenza di un testo scritto e ragionato della decisione di prima - istanza, anche se prima fosse stato consegnato oralmente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Soares Fernandes c. Portogallo, n. 59017/00, § 17, 8 aprile 2004, e Groshev c. Russia, n. 69889/01, § 22 del 20 ottobre 2005). Conclude, perciò, che i procedimenti di prima - istanza terminarono il 4 settembre 2003, quando il richiedente fu informato che il testo della sentenza del 26 febbraio 2003 era stato reso definitivo il 3 settembre 2003. La lunghezza complessiva dell’ esame del giudizio civile del richiedente nella prima istanza corrispose a cinque anni ed un mese.
63. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti che rientrano all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 deve essere valutata in ogni caso secondo le particolari circostanze. La Corte deve avere riguardo, inter alia, alla complessità dei fatti riguardati o delle questioni legali sollevate dalla causa, alla condotta del richiedente e delle autorità competenti ed a ciò che era in pericolo per il primo (vedere Frydlender c. Francia [GC], n. 30979/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-VII). Inoltre, solamente dei ritardi attribuibili allo Stato potrebbero giustificare una costatazione di un'inosservanza col requisito “del termine ragionevole” (vedere Pedersen e Baadsgaard c. Danimarca, n. 49017/99, § 44 19 giugno 2003).
64. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte considera che la controversia civile del richiedente non era particolarmente complessa. Non è convinta con l'argomento del Governo che il fatto che gli imputati erano agenzie Statali poteva in qualsiasi modo aggiungersi alla complessità dei procedimenti per il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il richiedente corresse la sua dichiarazione di rivendicazioni in un'occasione (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Comunque, non si persuade che questo fattore rese di per sé il compito della corte distrettuale più difficile. In qualsiasi caso, presumendo che i procedimenti civili del richiedente non fossero direttamente semplici, la Corte non può accettare che la complessità della causa, presa da sola fosse tale da giustificare la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti (vedere Malinin c. Russia (dec.), n. 58391/00, 8 luglio 2004, ed Ivanov c. Russia (dec.), n. 31266/02, 5 ottobre 2006).
65. In merito alla condotta del richiedente, la Corte nota, che in tre occasioni i ritardi furono causati dalla contumacia del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 16, 22 e 27 sopra). Osserva allo stesso tempo che l'udienza del 10 settembre 2002 avrebbe potuto probabilmente essere stata posticipata anche se il richiedente l'avesse frequentata, a causa dell'assenza degli imputati. Ne segue che il ritardo totale incorso come un risultato della contumacia del richiedente nella sala delle udienze corrispose a meno di quattro mesi.
66. Riguardo ai ritardi causati dalle richieste del richiedente per chiamare in causa dei testimoni, così come le sue richieste per informazioni sulla causa penale nelle quali lui era vittima (vedere paragrafi 13, 14 21 e 20), la Corte reitera che il richiedente non può essere biasimato per aver preso il pieno vantaggio delle risorse riconosciute dalla legge nazionale nella difesa dei suoi interessi (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Patta c. Repubblica ceca, n. 12605/02, § 69, 18 aprile 2006, e Stojanov c. “Precedente Repubblica iugoslava della Macedonia”, n. 34215/02, § 56 del 31 maggio 2007). Di conseguenza, non trova nessuna ragione di concludere che il comportamento del richiedente fosse stato dilatorio.
67. La Corte osserva inoltre che i periodi sostanziali di inattività per cui il Governo non ha presentato nessun chiarimento soddisfacente sono attribuibili alle autorità nazionali. Per esempio, il Governo andò a vuoto nel fornire qualsiasi giustificazione per il ritardo dal luglio 1998, quando il richiedente depositò la sua rivendicazione, al 1 dicembre 1998 quando la corte distrettuale sostenne la sua prima udienza nella causa (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Gli ulteriori ritardi nei procedimenti erano dovuti ad udienze infrequenti programmate ad intervalli significativi qualche volta di molti mesi (veda Falimonov, citata sopra, § 57). Il Governo non spiegò perché nessuna udienza era stata programmata fra il1 dicembre 1998 e il 18 maggio 1999, il 26 aprile e il 12 luglio 2001, il 12 luglio e il 20 novembre 2001, il20 novembre 2001 e il 12 marzo 2002, il 12 marzo e il 10 settembre 2002 ed il10 settembre 2002 e 13 febbraio 2003.
68. La Corte considera anche che le autorità nazionali fossero responsabili per un ritardo sostanziale nei procedimenti causati dall'insuccesso degli imputati nel frequentare le udienze (vedere paragrafi 12, 23, 25 26 e 28 sopra). Il Governo non ha fornito qualsiasi informazione che suggerisca che le autorità nazionali intrapresero passi adeguati per garantire la presenza degli imputati, o ha reagito in qualsiasi modo al comportamento degli imputati, o usato delle misure disponibili a loro per disciplinare i partecipanti ai procedimenti ed assicurare che la causa venisse ascoltata all'interno di un termine ragionevole (vedere Kesyan c. Russia, n. 36496/02, § 58 del 19 ottobre 2006).
69. Inoltre, la Corte può solo essere colpita dal fatto la corte distrettuale impiegò più di sei mesi per preparare il testo della sentenza di prima - istanza. Prende nota dell'osservazione del Governo che questo ritardo era in violazione degli articoli nazionali e considera che chiaramente è attribuibile allo Stato.
70. Infine, la Corte reitera che la controversia nella presente causa concerne il risarcimento per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale causato dal sequestro della proprietà del richiedente nel corso di procedimenti penali che sono stati cessati per mancanza di reato. In simili circostanze non può essere detto che il problema in gioco per il richiedente non fosse di nessuna particolare importanza.
71. Alla luce delle considerazioni precedenti, la Corte costata che il giudizio civile del richiedente non è stato ascoltato entro un “termine ragionevole.” C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti civili.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
72. Il richiedente si lamentò che il rifiuto di ammettere il suo ricorso contro la sentenza nel suo giudizio civile l'aveva spogliato del diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che recita, nella parte attinente, come segue:
“Ogni... persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà...”
73. Il Governo contestò quell'argomento.
74. Il richiedente mantenne la sua azione di reclamo e presentò che lui aveva perso una proprietà di valore considerevole a causa delle azioni delle agenzie Statali.
75. La Corte ha già esaminato l'azione di reclamo del richiedente riguardo alla mancanza di accesso alla corte di ricorso sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Nella prospettiva della sua conclusione per cui c'è stata una violazione di questa disposizione, trova che nessun problema separato deriva sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
76. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
77. Il richiedente non presentò una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna necessità di assegnargli qualsiasi somma a questo riguardo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della mancanza di accesso ad una corte;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti civili;
4. Sostiene che nessun problema separato deriva sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 1 aprile 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.