Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF LONZA v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 14062/07/2010
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 01/04/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of Art. 13
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF LONZA v. CROATIA
(Application no. 14062/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
1 April 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Lonza v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 11 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 14062/07) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, Mr V. L. (“the applicant”), on 23 February 2007.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr T. V., a lawyer practicing in Split. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.
3. On 19 June 2008 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant is a Croatian national who was born in 1944 and lives in Dubrovnik.
5. On 25 July 1984 the applicant brought a civil action in the Split Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Splitu) against two private individuals, seeking to be declared the owner of a flat in Dubrovnik.
6. In the period before the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia (5 November 1997), the Municipal Court held fourteen hearings.
7. In the period after 5 November 1997 the Municipal Court held further sixteen hearings and on 22 November 2001 gave its judgment for the applicant.
8. On 6 February 2002 the respondents lodged an appeal with the Split County Court (Županijski sud u Splitu). However, since it was established that one of the respondents had died in May 2004, the case was returned to the Municipal Court which, after the inheritance proceedings had been completed in February 2006, stayed the proceedings on 28 June 2006.
9. Meanwhile, on 12 January 2005 the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint under section 63 of the Constitutional Court Act complaining about the length of the above proceedings.
10. After the Municipal Court established that the inheritance proceedings after the respondent who had died had ended with a final decision on 24 February 2006, the court invited his son to take over the proceedings and on 27 November 2006 again sent the case-file to the Split County Court to decide on the appeal by the respondents.
11. On 1 March 2007 the Constitutional Court found a violation of the applicant's constitutional right to a hearing within a reasonable time. It awarded him 12,500 Croatian kunas (HRK) in compensation and ordered the Split County Court to give a decision in the applicant's case in the shortest time possible but no longer than ten months following the publication of its decision in the Official Gazette. The Constitutional Court's decision was published on 13 April 2007. The Constitutional Court found that the delays in the proceedings had been caused by the inefficiency of the Municipal Court.
12. On 19 December 2008 the Split County Court dismissed the appeal by the respondents and upheld the first-instance judgment of 22 November 2001.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
13. The relevant part of the Constitutional Act on the Constitutional Court (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 49/2002 of 3 May 2002 – “the Constitutional Court Act”) reads as follows:
Section 63
“(1) The Constitutional Court shall examine a constitutional complaint whether or not all legal remedies have been exhausted if the competent court fails to decide a claim concerning the applicant's rights and obligations or a criminal charge against him or her within a reasonable time ...
(2) If a constitutional complaint ... under paragraph 1 of this section is upheld, the Constitutional Court shall set a time-limit within which the competent court must decide the case on the merits...
(3) In a decision issued under paragraph 2 of this section, the Constitutional Court shall assess appropriate compensation for the applicant for the violation of his or her constitutional rights ... The compensation shall be paid out of the State budget within three months from the date a request for payment is lodged.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
14. The applicant complained that the length of the proceedings had been incompatible with the “reasonable time” requirement laid down in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The applicant also complained that the compensation he had been awarded for the length of proceedings was not adequate. Article 6 § 1 reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal...”
15. The Government contested these arguments.
16. The Court considers that the period to be taken into consideration began on 6 November 1997, the day after the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Croatia. However, in assessing the reasonableness of the time that elapsed after that date, account must be taken of the state of proceedings at the time of ratification. In this connection the Court notes that the proceedings commenced on 25 July 1984, when the applicant brought his civil action. Consequently, they were pending for more than thirteen years before the ratification.
17. The case was still pending on 1 March 2007 when the Constitutional Court gave its decision. On that date the proceedings had lasted some nine years and four months after the ratification, at two levels of jurisdiction.
18. The period to be taken into consideration ended on 19 December 2008 when the Split County Court gave its judgment. Thus, in total, the proceedings lasted twenty four years and five months at two levels of jurisdiction, of which more than eleven years were after Croatia's ratification of the Convention.
A. Admissibility
1. The applicant's victim status
19. The Government submitted that the Constitutional Court had accepted the applicant's request, found a violation of his right to a hearing within reasonable time and awarded him appropriate compensation. The violation complained of had, therefore, been remedied before the domestic authorities and, as a result, the applicant had lost his victim status.
20. The applicant replied that he could still be considered a victim of the violation complained of.
21. The Court notes that at the time when the Constitutional Court gave its decision, the proceedings had been pending for more than nine years after the ratification of the Convention by Croatia, at two levels of jurisdiction. It awarded the applicant a compensation for non-pecuniary damages and set a time limit for the Split County Court to give a decision in the case. The Split County Court failed to comply with the time-limit for adopting a decision imposed by the Constitutional Court. In view of these facts, the Court considers that the redress was insufficient (see the principles established under the Court's case-law in Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, §§ 65-107, ECHR 2006-V, or Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-213, ECHR 2006-V).
22. In these circumstances, in respect of the period covered by the Constitutional Court's finding, the applicant can still claim to be a “victim” of a breach of the “reasonable time” requirement.
2. Exhaustion of domestic remedies
23. As regards the length of proceedings following the Constitutional Court's decision, the Government argued that the applicant should have again complained to the Constitutional Court or to a higher court. They relied on the practice of the Constitutional Court, adopted in its decision no. U-IIIA-3763/2005 of 17 October 2007, where it found a further violation of the complainant's right to a hearing within a reasonable time in the circumstances where a lower court had failed to comply with a time-limit for adopting a decision, imposed by a previous decision of the Constitutional Court.
24. The applicant contested this argument claiming that he had properly exhausted all available remedies.
25. The Court observes at the outset that the applicant availed himself of an effective domestic remedy in respect of the length of the proceedings – a constitutional complaint (see Slaviček v. Croatia (dec.), no. 20862/02, ECHR 2002-VII) – and that the Constitutional Court found a violation of his right to a hearing within reasonable time and set a time-limit for the Split County Court for adopting a decision in the applicant's case. However, this time-limit was not complied with. In these circumstances the Court finds that the applicant was not required to lodge a further constitutional complaint since the decision of the Constitutional Court adopted upon his first complaint had no effect on the length of the proceedings he was complaining about.
26. It follows that the Government's objection as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies must be rejected.
3. Conclusion
27. The Court considers that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It also notes, having regard to the foregoing, that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
28. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see, among many other authorities, Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-VII).
29. The Government accepted that, in view of the findings of the Constitutional Court, the proceedings had lasted unreasonably long. The Court sees no reason to hold otherwise as it has frequently found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in cases raising similar issues as the present one (see, for example, Plazonić v. Croatia, no. 26455/04, 6 March 2008, and Medić v. Croatia, no. 49916/07, 26 March 2009). Therefore, already in the period which was subject to the Constitutional Court's scrutiny, the length of the proceedings was excessive and failed to meet the “reasonable time” requirement. It necessarily retained that character throughout the subsequent period of some one year and nine months after the delivery of the Constitutional Court's decision.
30. In the light of the foregoing, the Court considers that there has been a breach of Article 6 § 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
31. The applicant also complained under Article 13 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 6 § 1 thereof, that the Split County Court had not complied with the Constitutional Court's order to deliver a decision within the prescribed time-limit. Article 13 reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. Admissibility
32. The Court finds that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It also notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' arguments
33. The applicant called into question the effectiveness of the domestic remedies in connection with the length of proceedings since the Split County Court had not complied with the time-limit fixed by the Constitutional Court.
34. The Government argued that a constitutional complaint about the length of proceedings was an effective domestic remedy which provided both for speeding up of the proceedings at issue and for the award of just satisfaction. Furthermore, the Court had already accepted a constitutional complaint about the length of proceedings as an effective domestic remedy in that respect.
2. The Court's assessment
35. The Court notes that the complaint under Article 13 is mainly concerned with the fact that the Split County Court did not comply with the time limit for adopting its decision, imposed by the Constitutional Court. The Court reiterates that it has set out the relevant principles in respect of the applicant's complaint under Article 13 in the Kaić judgment (see Kaić and Others v. Croatia, no. 22014/04, § 38 in fine).
36. As regards the present case the Court notes that the applicant did not receive sufficient satisfaction for the inordinate length of the civil proceedings in view of the fact that the competent court has failed to comply with the time-limit set in relation to it and thereby has failed to implement the Constitutional Court's decision. Therefore, it cannot be held that the complaint the applicant resorted to was an adequate remedy for the length of those proceedings.
37. This conclusion, however, does not call into question the effectiveness of the remedy as such or the obligation to lodge a complaint about the length of pending proceedings under section 27 of the Courts Act and subsequently also a constitutional complaint under section 63 of the Constitutional Court Act in order to exhaust domestic remedies concerning complaints about the length of proceedings.
38. There has accordingly been a breach of Article 13 in the present case.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF THE OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
39. Lastly, the applicant complained that the length of the proceedings complained of had infringed his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on the grounds that while the proceedings at issue were pending, he had been prevented from freely disposing of his flat.
40. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
41. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the length complaint examined above under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
B. Merits
42. Having regard to its finding under Article 6 § 1, the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether, in this case, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Zanghì v. Italy, judgment of 19 February 1991, Series A no. 194-C, p. 47, § 23 and Buj v. Croatia, no. 24661/02, 1 June 2006, § 38).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
43. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
44. The applicant claimed EUR 10,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
45. The Government contested that claim.
46. The Court considers that the applicant must have sustained non-pecuniary damage. Ruling on an equitable basis, it awards him EUR 1,700 in this respect, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
B. Costs and expenses
47. The applicant, who was represented by a lawyer, also claimed an unspecified amount for the costs of his representation before the domestic courts and the Court, both in respect of his request for the protection of the right to a hearing within a reasonable time.
48. The Government contested that claim.
49. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. As the applicant's constitutional complaint was essentially aimed at remedying the violation of the Convention alleged before the Court, the costs incurred in respect of this remedy may be taken into account in assessing the claim for costs (see Scordino, cited above, § 22; and Medić, cited above, § 31). In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, though the applicant did not specified the costs of his legal representation, the Court awards him a sum of EUR 680 for costs and expenses before the Constitutional Court proceedings and EUR 1,200 in respect of the proceedings before the Court, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on these amounts.
C. Default interest
50. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
4. Holds that no separate issue arises under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts which are to be converted into Croatian kunas at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 1,700 (one thousand seven hundred euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,880 (one thousand eight hundred eighty euros) in respect of costs and expenses;
(iii) any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on the above amounts;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 1 April 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione dell’ Art. 13
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA LONZA C. CROATIA
(Richiesta n. 14062/07)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
1 aprile 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Lonza c. Croatia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e da André Wampach, Cancelliere di Sezione Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato l’11 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 14062/07) contro la Repubblica di Croazia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino croato, il Sig. V. L. (“il richiedente”), il 23 febbraio 2007.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato col Sig. T. V., un avvocato che pratica a Spalato. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il 19 giugno 2008 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente è un cittadino croato che nacque nel 1944 e vive a Dubrovnik.
5. Il 25 luglio 1984 il richiedente introdusse un'azione civile presso la Corte Municipale di Spalato (Općinski sud u Splitu) contro due individui privati, cercando di essere dichiarato il proprietario di un appartamento a Dubrovnik.
6. Nel periodo prima dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Croazia (il 5 novembre 1997), la Corte Municipale sostenne quattordici udienze.
7. Nel periodo dopo il 5 novembre 1997 la Corte Municipale sostenne inoltre sedici udienze e il 22 novembre 2001 diede la sua sentenza per il richiedente.
8. Il 6 febbraio 2002 i convenuti depositarono un ricorso presso la Corte di Contea di Spalato (Županijski sud u Splitu). Comunque, poiché fu stabilito che uno dei convenuti era morto nel maggio 2004, la causa fu rimandata alla Corte Municipale che, dopo che i procedimenti di eredità erano stati completati nel febbraio 2006, sospese i procedimenti il 28 giugno 2006.
9. Il 12 gennaio 2005 il richiedente presentò nel frattempo, un reclamo costituzionale sotto la sezione 63 dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale lamentandosi della lunghezza dei procedimenti sopra.
10. Dopo che la Corte Municipale stabilì che i procedimenti di eredità a riguardo del convenuto che era morto erano stati terminati con una decisione definitiva il 24 febbraio 2006, la corte invitò suo figlio a intraprendere i procedimenti e il 27 novembre 2006 rispedì il file della causa alla corte di Contea di Spalato per decidere sul ricorso da parte dei convenuti.
11. Il 1 marzo 2007 la Corte Costituzionale trovò una violazione del diritto costituzionale del richiedente ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole. Gli assegnò 12,500 kuna croati (HRK) per risarcimento ed ordinò alla Corte di Contea di Spalato di rendere una decisione nella causa del richiedente nel tempo più breve possibile ma non più tardi di dieci mesi dopo la pubblicazione della sua decisione sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale. La decisione della Corte Costituzionale fu pubblicata il 13 aprile 2007. La Corte Costituzionale trovò che i ritardi nei procedimenti erano stati causati dall'inefficienza della Corte Municipale.
12. Il 19 dicembre 2008 la Corte di Contea di Spalato respinse il ricorso da parte dei convenuti e sostenne la sentenza di prima -istanza del 22 novembre 2001.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
13. La parte attinente dell'Atto Costituzionale sulla Corte Costituzionale (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 49/2002 del 3 maggio 2002-“l’Atto della Corte Costituzionale”) si legge come segue:
Sezione 63
“(1) la Corte Costituzionale esaminerà un'azione di reclamo costituzionale se o meno tutte le vie di ricorso legali sono state esaurite se la corte competente è andata a vuoto nel decidere una rivendicazione riguardo ai diritti ed agli obblighi del richiedente o ad un'accusa criminale contro lui all'interno di un termine ragionevole...
(2) se un'azione di reclamo costituzionale... sotto il paragrafo 1 di questa sezione viene sostenuta, la Corte Costituzionale esporrà un tempo-limite entro il quale la corte competente deve decidere la causa sui meriti...
(3) In una decisione sotto il paragrafo 2 di questa sezione, la Corte Costituzionale valuterà il risarcimento appropriato per il richiedente per la violazione dei suoi diritti costituzionali... Il risarcimento sarà pagato con il bilancio Statale entro tre mesi dalla data in cui viene depositata una richiesta per il pagamento.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
14. Il richiedente si lamentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti era stata incompatibile col requisito del “termine ragionevole” stabilito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che il risarcimento che gli era stato assegnato per la lunghezza dei procedimenti non era adeguato. L’Articolo 6 § 1 recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
15. Il Governo contestò questi argomenti.
16. La Corte considera che il periodo da prendere in esame cominciò il 6 novembre 1997, il giorno dopo l'entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Croazia. Comunque, nel valutare la ragionevolezza del tempo trascorso dopo quella data, deve essere preso in conto lo stato dei procedimenti al tempo della ratifica. In questo collegamento la Corte nota che i procedimenti cominciarono il 25 luglio 1984, quando il richiedente introdusse la sua azione civile. Di conseguenza, loro erano pendenti da più di tredici anni prima della ratifica.
17. La causa era ancora pendente il 1 marzo 2007 quando la Corte Costituzionale rese la sua decisione. In quella data i procedimenti erano durati nove anni e quattro mesi dopo la ratifica, per due livelli di giurisdizione.
18. Il periodo da prendere in esame terminò il 19 dicembre 2008 quando la Corte della Contea di Spalato rese la sua sentenza. In totale, i procedimenti durarono così, venti quattro anni e cinque mesi per due livelli di giurisdizione di cui più di undici anni erano dopo la ratifica della Convenzione da parte della Croazia.
A. Ammissibilità
1. Lo status di vittima del richiedente
19. Il Governo presentò che la Corte Costituzionale aveva accettato la richiesta del richiedente, aveva trovato una violazione del suo diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di termine ragionevole e gli aveva assegnato risarcimento appropriato. La violazione di cui si lamentava, perciò, era stata rimediata di fronte alle autorità nazionali e, di conseguenza, il richiedente aveva perso il suo status di vittima.
20. Il richiedente rispose che lui avrebbe potuto essere ancora considerato una vittima della violazione di cui si lamentava
21. La Corte nota che al tempo in cui la Corte Costituzionale rese la sua decisione, i procedimenti erano pendenti da più di nove anni dopo la ratifica della Convenzione da parte della Croazia, per due livelli di giurisdizione. Assegnò un risarcimento al richiedente per danni non-patrimoniali e stabilì un termine di decadenza per la Corte della Contea di Spalato affinché rendesse una decisione nella causa. La Corte della Contea di Spalato non è riuscita ad attenersi col tempo-limite imposto dalla Corte Costituzionale per adottare una decisione. Nella prospettiva di questi fatti, la Corte considera, che la compensazione era insufficiente (vedere i principi stabiliti sotto la giurisprudenza della Corte in Cocchiarella c. Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, §§ 65-107, ECHR 2006-V, o Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, §§ 178-213 ECHR 2006-V).
22. In queste circostanze, a riguardo del periodo coperto dalla costatazione della Corte Costituzionale, il richiedente può ancora rivendicare di essere “vittima” di una violazione del requisito “del termine ragionevole”.
2. L'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
23. Riguardo alla lunghezza di procedimenti in seguito alla decisione della Corte Costituzionale, il Governo dibatté che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto lamentarsi di nuovo presso la Corte Costituzionale o presso una corte più alta. Si appellò alla pratica della Corte Costituzionale, adottata nella sua decisione n. U-IIIA-3763/2005 del 17 ottobre 2007, dove trovò un'ulteriore violazione del diritto del reclamante ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole nelle circostanze in cui una corte inferiore era andata a vuoto nell’ attenersi ad un tempo-limite per adottare una decisione, imposto da una precedente decisione della Corte Costituzionale.
24. Il richiedente contestò questo argomento rivendicando che lui aveva esaurito tutte le vie di ricorso disponibili in modo appropriato.
25. La Corte osserva all'inizio che il richiedente si è giovato di una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva a riguardo della lunghezza dei procedimenti - un'azione di reclamo costituzionale (vedere Slaviček c. Croatia (dec.), n. 20862/02, ECHR 2002-VII)-e che la Corte Costituzionale trovò una violazione del suo diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole e stabilì un tempo-limite per la Corte di Contea di Spalato per adottare una decisione nella causa del richiedente. Comunque, non si attenne a questo tempo-limite. In queste circostanze la Corte costata che il richiedente non era costretto a presentare un ulteriore reclamo costituzionale poiché la decisione della Corte Costituzionale adottata sulla sua prima azione di reclamo non aveva avuto effetto sulla lunghezza dei procedimenti di cui si stava lamentando.
26. Ne segue che l'eccezione del Governo riguardo all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
3. Conclusione
27. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota anche, avendo riguardo a ciò che precede, che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
28. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti deve essere valutata alla luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento ai seguenti criteri: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e delle autorità attinenti e cosa era in pericolo per il richiedente nella controversia (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Frydlender c. Francia [GC], n. 30979/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-VII).
29. Il Governo accettò che, nella prospettiva delle sentenze della Corte Costituzionale, i procedimenti duravano irragionevolmente da molto tempo. La Corte non vede alcuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti siccome ha frequentemente trovato violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in cause che sollevavano dei problemi simili a quelli presenti (vedere, per esempio, Plazonić c. Croazia, n. 26455/04, 6 marzo 2008, e Medić c. Croazia, n. 49916/07, 26 marzo 2009). Perciò, già nel periodo che era soggetta allo scrutinio della Corte Costituzionale, la lunghezza dei procedimenti era eccessiva e non riuscì a rispettare il requisito “del termine ragionevole”. Necessariamente mantenne questi carattere per tutto il periodo susseguente di circa un anno e nove mesi dopo la consegna della decisione della Corte Costituzionale.
30. Alla luce di ciò che precede, la Corte considera, che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
31. Il richiedente si lamentò anche sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione, preso a riguardo in concomitanza con l’Articolo 6 § 1 che la Corte di Contea di Spalato non si era attenuto con l'ordine della Corte Costituzionale di consegnare una decisione all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto. L’Articolo 13 si legge come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A. Ammissibilità
32. La Corte costata che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota anche che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
33. Il richiedente chiamò in questione l'efficacia delle vie di ricorso nazionali in collegamento con la lunghezza dei procedimenti poiché la Corte di Contea di Spalato non si era attenuta col tempo-limite fissato dalla Corte Costituzionale.
34. Il Governo dibatté che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale della lunghezza dei procedimenti era una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva che permetteva di velocizzare i procedimenti in questione e di assegnare la soddisfazione equa. La Corte aveva già accettato inoltre, un'azione di reclamo costituzionale della lunghezza di procedimenti come via di ricorso nazionale effettiva a quel riguardo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
35. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 concerne principalmente il fatto che la Corte di Contea di Spalato non si attenne col termine di decadenza per adottare la sua decisione, imposto dalla Corte Costituzionale. La Corte reitera che ha esposto i principi attinenti a riguardo dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 nella sentenza Kaić (vedere Kaić ed Altri c. Croatia, n. 22014/04, § 38 in fine).
36. Riguardo alla causa presente la Corte nota che il richiedente non ricevette la soddisfazione sufficiente per la lunghezza smodata dei procedimenti civili nella prospettiva del fatto che la corte competente è andata a vuoto nell’ attenersi col tempo-limite stabilito in relazione a questo e con ciò non è riuscita ad implementare la decisione della Corte Costituzionale. Perciò, non si può sostenere che l'azione di reclamo alla quale il richiedente è ricorso era una via di ricorso adeguata per la lunghezza di quei procedimenti.
37. Comunque, questa conclusione non richiama in questione l'efficacia della via di ricorso come tale o l'obbligo di presentare un reclamo della lunghezza di procedimenti pendenti sotto la sezione 27 dell’Atto delle Corti e successivamente anche un'azione di reclamo costituzionale sotto la sezione 63 dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale per esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali riguardo ad azioni di reclamo della lunghezza di procedimenti.
38. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 nella causa presente.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
39. Infine, il richiedente si lamentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti di cui si lamentava aveva infranto il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà come garantito dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 al motivo che mentre i procedimenti in questione erano pendenti, gli era stato impedito di disporre liberamente del suo appartamento.
40. Il Governo contestò questo argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
41. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata all'azione di reclamo della lunghezza esaminata sopra sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
B. Meriti
42. Avendo riguardo alla sua sentenza sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1, la Corte considera che non è necessario esaminare se, in questa causa, c’è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Zanghì c. Italia, sentenza del 19 febbraio 1991 Serie A n. 194-C, p. 47, § 23 e Buj c. Croazia, n. 24661/02, 1 giugno 2006 § 38).
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
43. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
44. Il richiedente chiese EUR 10,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
45. Il Governo contestò quella rivendicazione.
46. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto subire un danno non-patrimoniale. Decidendo su una base equa, gli assegna EUR 1,700 a questo riguardo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quell'importo.
B. Costi e spese
47. Il richiedente che fu rappresentato da un avvocato richiese anche un importo non specificato per i costi della sua rappresentanza di fronte alle corti nazionali e alla Corte, entrambe a riguardo della sua richiesta per la protezione del diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole.
48. Il Governo contestò quella rivendicazione.
49. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli in merito al quantum. Siccome l'azione di reclamo costituzionale del richiedente era tesa essenzialmente a rimediare la violazione della Convenzione addotta di fronte alla Corte, i costi incorsi a riguardo di questa via di ricorso possono essere presi in considerazione nel valutare la rivendicazione per costi (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 22; e Medić, citata sopra, § 31). Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, sebbene il richiedente no abbia specificato i costi della sua rappresentanza legale, la Corte gli assegna una somma di EUR 680 per costi e spese di fronte agli atti Costituzionali ed EUR 1,200 a riguardo dei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente su questi importi.
C. Interesse di mora
50. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che nessun problema separato deriva sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi che saranno convertiti in kuna croati al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 1,700 (mille settecento euro) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 1,880 (mille ottocento ottanta euro) a riguardo di costi e spese;
(iii) qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente sugli importi sopra;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 1 aprile 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.