Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF POPNIKOLOV v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 30388/02/2010
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 25/03/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction reserved
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF POPNIKOLOV v. BULGARIA
(Application no. 30388/02)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
25 March 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Popnikolov v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Mark Villiger,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 2 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 30388/02) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court on 2 February 2002 under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Bulgarian national, Mr D. N. P. (“the applicant”), who was born in 1955 and lives in Varna. The applicant complained both in his personal capacity and as Sole Trader “DINIPO-666-Dimitar Nikolov Popnikolov” (the “sole trader”) which he registered in 1992 in Varna.
2. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Dimova, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicant alleged in particular that the authorities had failed to comply with a final court judgment in his favour and had deprived him of a legitimate expectation of acquiring a State-owned property.
4. On 20 September 2007 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Renting of the property
5. On 1 October 1992 the applicant, acting as sole trader, entered into a contract with the State-owned company SIME ECO (“the company”) under which he leased part of its real estate – a production facility and fittings (“the property”) – for ten years.
6. The rental contract stipulated, inter alia, that if the company terminated the lease prematurely then it would compensate the lessee for any improvements to the property.
B. Proposal under section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act.
7. On 11 October 1994 the applicant submitted a proposal to the Ministry of Industry to purchase the property under the preferential privatisation procedure for lessees of State-owned properties or parts thereof provided for in section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act.
8. In a letter of 26 April 1995 the Minister of Industry rejected the applicant's proposal. On an unspecified date the latter appealed against the decision.
9. In a final judgment of 4 December 1996 the Supreme Court found in favour of the applicant, quashed the decision of the Minister of Industry as unlawful, and, finding that he fulfilled the statutory conditions to purchase the property under the preferential privatisation procedure, explicitly instructed the Minister of Industry to adopt the required decision in order to sell him the property under section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act. In particular, the court stated as follows:
“Thus, it should be accepted, in view of the outlined considerations, that the refusal made by the Minister of Industry to allow the purchase of the disputed property under the procedure of section 35(1)(2) of the [Privatisation Act] is unlawful and must therefore be quashed and ... the file remitted to the [competent] body under section 3 of the [Privatisation Act] for the matter to be decided in conformity with instructions given by the court above, in particular for an order to be issued for the privatisation of the property under the procedure of section 35(1)(2) of the [Privatisation Act].”
10. The Minister of Industry did not issue an order for the applicant to purchase the property under the procedure of section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act.
C. Mass privatisation programme
11. On 19 December 1995 the National Assembly adopted a programme for mass privatisation (the “privatisation programme”) which provided that ninety per cent of the company's shares would be privatised. On 24 September 1996 the Tender Commission promulgated a list of companies whose shares would be sold in the first tender of the said programme. It included the company.
12. On an unspecified date, the privatisation of the majority stockholding of the company was performed, together with the property as an asset. It is unclear whether this took place before or after the Supreme Court's judgment of 4 December 1996.
13. Thereafter, the company had three private shareholders and the State, which retained a ten per cent stockholding.
D. Proceedings against the State authorities
14. In 1997 the applicant, in his capacity of sole trader, initiated a civil action against the company, the Council of Ministers and the Ministry of Industry. He sought to have the privatisation contract of the company declared partially null and void, to the extent that it related to the property, on the basis of the Supreme Court's judgment of 4 December 1996 in his favour. In a final judgment of 21 August 2001 the Supreme Court of Cassation rejected the applicant's claim, as it found that no privatisation contract had been executed between the respondent parties in implementation of the results of the first tender of the privatisation programme, and therefore that there was no act whose validity could be challenged in the context of the initiated civil proceedings. In its reasoning the court inferred that the applicant should have challenged the authorities' decisions to include the company in the privatisation programme and the other administrative acts issued in that regard.
15. In the meantime, in 1998 the applicant, in his capacity as sole trader, had also initiated an administrative action against the Ministry of Industry in which he sought to have declared partially null and void, to the extent that it related to the property, (1) the decision of the Minister of Industry to include the company in the privatisation programme and (2) the privatisation contract for the sale of the company. In a final decision of 5 October 2000 the extended panel of the Supreme Administrative Court rejected the applicant's claim and found that neither of the acts constituted administrative acts which could be challenged in the context of administrative proceedings.
16. On 12 November 2001 the applicant sought the assistance of the Prime Minister and the Chief Public Prosecutor's Office to obtain enforcement of the Supreme Court's judgment of 4 December 1996. In a letter of 5 December 2001 the Ministry of Economy informed the applicant that it could not assist him, because by that time the State owned only 0.2 % of the share capital of the company and could not force the sale of the property to the applicant. Thus, the only way that he could obtain enforcement would be to seek to purchase the property directly from the company.
E. Proceedings against the company
17. On an unspecified date the applicant, in his capacity of sole trader, initiated proceedings against the company seeking to be compensated for the improvements he had made to the property.
18. In a judgment of 5 April 2004 the Varna Regional Court found partly in favour of the applicant. It recognised that in 1992 he had made improvements to the property in the amount of 200,352 old Bulgarian levs (BGL, approximately 12,637 German marks at the time), and, in view of the redenomination of the local currency of 4 July 1999, awarded him the current day equivalent of 200.35 new Bulgarian levs (BGN, approximately 102 euros (EUR)).
19. On appeal, the Supreme Court of Cassation upheld the judgment of the lower court in a final judgment of 28 March 2005.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
20. The Transformation and Privatisation of State and Municipally-Owned Enterprises Act (Закон за преобразуване и приватизация на държавни и общински предприятия: “the Privatisation Act”), adopted in 1992, provided for the transformation of public property and the privatisation of State and municipally-owned enterprises. In March 2002 it was superseded by other legislation.
21. Section 3 of the Act indicated the bodies competent to take decisions for privatisation. In the present case that body was the Minister of Industry.
22. Section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act provided that lessees of State and municipally-owned property could propose to buy the properties rented by them, without a public auction or competition and for a price equal to the property's valuation prepared by certified experts in accordance with rules adopted by the Government. Those preferential conditions were applicable to lessees of State and municipally-owned property who had concluded lease contracts before 15 October 1993 and where the said contracts were still in force on the date of the respective privatisation proposal.
23. Section 35(2) of the Privatisation Act, as worded after October 1997, provided that where a refusal by the competent administrative body to initiate a privatisation procedure following a proposal by the interested party had been quashed by means of a final court judgment, the relevant administrative body was obliged, within two months of the judgment becoming final, to initiate a privatisation procedure, prepare the privatisation of the property at issue and offer to sell the property to the entitled party.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
24. The applicant complained that the authorities had failed to comply with the Supreme Court's judgment of 4 December 1996 recognising his right to purchase the property under the preferential privatisation procedure of section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act, as provided in Article 6 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
25. The Government did not submit observations.
A. Admissibility
26. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
27. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal; in this way it embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect. However, that right would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. Execution of a judgment given by a court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 of the Convention (see Hornsby v. Greece, judgment of 19 March 1997, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II, p. 510, § 40, and Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 67, ECHR 2009-...).
28. Turning to the case at hand, the Court, observing that the Supreme Court judgment of 4 December 1996 concerned the applicant's alleged entitlement to acquire certain property under preferential conditions, is of the view that the said judgment was determinative for the applicant's civil rights and obligations, within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. Therefore, Article 6 § 1 is applicable in the case.
29. Furthermore, the Court notes that in its judgment of 4 December 1996 the Supreme Court established that the applicant met all the statutory conditions to purchase the property under the preferential privatisation procedure, quashed as unlawful the decision of the Minister of Industry of 26 April 1995 and explicitly instructed the latter to issue an order to sell him the property under section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act (see paragraph 9 above). Thereafter, the Minister of Industry had an obligation to comply with the said judgment by initiating the said preferential privatisation procedure and selling the property to the applicant. However, he failed to do so and the Government failed to provide any submissions and explanations for this lack of compliance by this State body (see paragraphs 10 and 25 above). What is more, by including the property as an asset of the company and selling the latter through the privatisation programme, the State rendered impossible the enforcement of the Supreme Court's judgment of 4 December 1996 (see paragraphs 12-13 and 16 above).
30. This is sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that in the specific circumstances of the present case there has been a violation of the applicant's right to have a final judgment in its favour enforced, as an aspect of its right of access to a court, as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
31. The applicant also complained of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that the authorities had infringed his statutory right, recognised by the Supreme Court in its judgment of 4 December 1996, to purchase the property under the preferential privatisation procedure of section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
32. The Government did not submit observations.
A. Admissibility
33. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The existence of “possessions”
34. The Court reiterates that an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his “possessions” within the meaning of this provision. “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (see Maltzan and Others v. Germany (dec.) [GC], nos. 71916/01, 71917/01 and 10260/02, § 74(c), ECHR 2005-V, and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35(c), ECHR 2004-IX).
35. As the present case does not concern any existing possessions of the applicant company, it remains to be examined whether it could have had any “legitimate expectation” of realising a property right.
36. The Court reiterates in this respect that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see Slivenko and Others v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II, and Kopecký, cited above, § 35(b)). However, the Court notes that in restitution cases it has held that once a Contracting State, having ratified the Convention including Protocol No. 1, enacts legislation providing for the full or partial restoration of property confiscated under a previous regime, such legislation may be regarded as generating a new property right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying the requirements for entitlement. The same may apply in respect of arrangements for restitution or compensation established under pre-ratification legislation, if such legislation remained in force after the Contracting State's ratification of Protocol No. 1 (see Maltzan and Others, cited above, § 74(d) and Kopecký, cited above, § 35(d)).
37. The Court finds it appropriate to apply this standard in the present case, which does not concern restitution of formerly nationalised property but the right to privatise leased State properties under preferential conditions once the person satisfies certain criteria and requirements for the said entitlement.
38. In this respect, the Court observes that domestic law as in force at the time outlined the conditions allowing a lessee of State-owned property to benefit from the preferential procedure under section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act, namely the rent contract concerning the property at issue should have been concluded before 15 October 1993 and be still in force on the date of the respective privatisation proposal (see paragraph 22 above). The Court further notes that in its judgment of 4 December 1996 the Supreme Court concluded that the applicant met all those conditions (see paragraph 9 above). The Court does not see a reason to doubt this conclusion and the Government failed to submit any arguments to the contrary.
39. Furthermore, the Supreme Court in its judgment of 4 December 1996 instructed the Minister of Industry to issue an order to sell the applicant the property under section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act (see paragraph 9 above). Thus, the unequivocal wording of the said judgment left no right of discretion on the part of the Minister of Industry as to the type of compliance expected by the domestic courts. Moreover, under domestic law the Minister of Industry had no latitude as to whether to commence a privatisation procedure under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act, or as to the conditions of the future transaction, including the price to be paid by the prospective buyer (see paragraph 22 above).
40. In view of the above, the Court concludes that the applicant had a legitimate expectation consisting of the right to purchase the property under the preferential conditions of section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act. Accordingly, the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. The existence of interference
41. The Court finds that the failure of the Minister of Industry to initiate a preferential privatisation procedure following the Supreme Court's judgment of 4 December 1996 in order to sell the property to the applicant represented an interference with the latter's right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
3. The lawfulness of the interference
42. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000-XII).
43. In the case at hand, after the Supreme Court in its judgment of 4 December 1996 established that the applicant had met all the statutory conditions to purchase the property and explicitly instructed the Minister of Industry to sell him the property under section 35(1)(2) of the Privatisation Act (see paragraph 9 above), the latter had an obligation to comply and to initiate the said procedure by selling the property to the applicant at the preferential price equal to the property's valuation. However, he failed to do so and instead the State sold the property as an asset of the company to third parties (see paragraphs 12-13 and 16 above). The Government did not provide any submissions and explanations for the actions of the State authorities involved (see paragraphs 10 and 32 above).
44. This is sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that in the specific circumstances of the present case the interference with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions was not in accordance with domestic law and did not meet the requirement of lawfulness under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
45. It follows that there has been a breach of that provision.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
46. Lastly, on 28 September 2005 the applicant complained that the proceedings against the company were unfair, and considered that the domestic courts had not awarded him the real value of the improvements he had made to the property. He argued, in particular, that the improvements had cost BGL 200,352, which in 1992 was equal to 22,000 United States dollars while the domestic courts had awarded him the present-day value of BGN 200.35 (approximately EUR 102).
47. However, in the light of all the material in its possession, and in so far as the matters complained of are within its competence, the Court finds that they do not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols.
It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
48. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
49. The applicant claimed compensation for the moral and pecuniary damage he had allegedly suffered and left it to the Court to determine the amount.
50. However, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and reserves it, due regard being had to the possibility that an agreement between the applicant and the respondent Government be reached (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of the Court).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints that the authorities failed to comply with a final court judgment and deprived the applicant of the legitimate expectation of acquiring a State-owned property admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within two months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 25 March 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; soddisfazione Equa riservata
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA POPNIKOLOV C. BULGARIA
(Richiesta n. 30388/02)
SENTENZA
(i meriti)
STRASBOURG
25 marzo 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Popnikolov c. Bulgaria,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste il Mark Villiger, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 2 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 30388/02) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata presso la Corte il 2 febbraio 2002 sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino bulgaro, Sig. D. N. P.(“il richiedente”) che nacque nel 1955 e vive a Varna. Il richiedente si lamentò sia nella sua veste personale e come Ditta Individuale “DINIPO-666-D. N. P.” (la “Ditta Individuale”) che lui registrò nel 1992 a Varna.
2. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra M. Dimova, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. Il richiedente addusse in particolare che le autorità erano andate a vuoto nell’ attenersi ad una sentenza di corte definitiva a suo favore e l'avevano spogliato di un'aspettativa legittima di acquisire una proprietà Statale.
4. Il 20 settembre 2007 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. Affitto della proprietà
5. Il 1 ottobre 1992 il richiedente, agendo che come Ditta Individuale entrò in un contratto con la società Statale SIME ECO (“la società”) con cui affittò parte del suo beni immobili- attrezzature e componenti di produzione (“la proprietà”)-per dieci anni.
6. Il contratto di affitto stipulava, inter alia che se la società avesse terminato prematuramente il contratto d'affitto avrebbe lei stessa compensato l'affittuario per qualsiasi miglioramento apportato alla proprietà.
B. Proposta sotto la sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione.
7. L’ 11 ottobre 1994 il richiedente presentò una proposta al Ministero dell’ Industria per acquistare proprietà possedute dallo Stato o parti di queste sotto la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale per affittuari prevista nella sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione.
8. In una lettera del 26 aprile 1995 il Ministro dell’ Industria respinse la proposta del richiedente. In una data non specificata quest’ultimo fece ricorso contro la decisione.
9. In una sentenza definitiva del 4 dicembre 1996 la Corte Suprema si espresse a favore del richiedente, annullò la decisione del Ministro dell’ Industria come illegale, e, trovando che lui adempiva le condizioni legali per acquistare la proprietà sotto la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale, istruì esplicitamente il Ministro dell’ Industria ad adottare la decisione richiesta di vendergli la proprietà sotto la sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione. In particolare, la corte affermò come segue:
“Così, dovrebbe essere accettato, nella prospettiva delle considerazioni delineate che il rifiuto reso dal Ministro dell’Industria di acconsentire all'acquisto della proprietà contestata sotto la procedura della sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ [Atto sulla Privatizzazione] è illegale e deve essere annullato perciò e... il file viene rinviato all’ente [competente] sotto la sezione 3 dell’ [Atto sulla Privatizzazione] per la questione di essere deciso in conformità alle istruzioni date dalla corte sopra, in particolare per un ordine di essere emesso per la privatizzazione della proprietà sotto la procedura della sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ [Atto sulla Privatizzazione].”
10. Il Ministro dell’ Industria non emise un ordine per il richiedente per l’acquisto della proprietà sotto la procedura della sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione.
C. Programma di privatizzazione di massa
11. Il 19 dicembre 1995 la Riunione Nazionale adottò un programma per la privatizzazione massiccia (il “programma di privatizzazione”) che prevedeva che il novanta per cento delle quote della società sarebbero stato privatizzato. Il 24 settembre 1996 la Commissione di Gara promulgò una lista di società le cui quote sarebbero state vendute nella prima gara del detto programma. Incluse la società.
12. In una data non specificata, la privatizzazione del pacchetto azionario di maggioranza della società fu compiuta, insieme con la proprietà come bene. È poco chiaro se questo successe prima o dopo la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996.
13. Da allora in poi, la società aveva tre azionisti privati e lo Stato che mantenne un dieci per cento del pacchetto azionario.
D. Procedimenti contro le autorità Statali
14. Nel 1997 il richiedente, nella sua veste di Azienda Individuale , iniziò un'azione civile contro la società, il Consiglio dei Ministri ed il Ministero dell’ Industria. Lui chiese di far dichiarare il contratto di privatizzazione della società in parte privo di valore legale, nella misura che si riferiva alla proprietà, sulla base della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996 a suo favore. In una sentenza definitiva del 21 agosto 2001 la Corte Suprema di Cassazione respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente, siccome trovò che nessun contratto di privatizzazione era stato eseguito fra le parti rispondenti in attuazione dei risultati della prima gara del programma della privatizzazione, e perciò che non c'era nessun atto la cui validità avrebbe potuto essere impugnata nel contesto dei procedimenti civili iniziati. Nei suoi ragionamenti la corte dedusse che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto impugnare le decisioni delle autorità di includere la società nel programma di privatizzazione e gli altri atti amministrativi emessi a quel riguardo.
15. Nel frattempo, nel 1998 il richiedente, nella sua veste di azienda individuale, aveva iniziato anche un'azione amministrativa contro il Ministero dell’ Industria nel quale lui cercava di far dichiarare in parte privo di valore legale, nella misura che si riferiva alla proprietà (1) la decisione del Ministro dell’ Industria di includere la società nel programma di privatizzazione e (2) il contratto di privatizzazione per la vendita della società. In una decisione definitiva del 5 ottobre 2000 il pannello della Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente e trovò che nessuno degli atti costituiva un atto amministrativo che avrebbe potuto essere impugnato nel contesto di procedimenti amministrativi.
16. Il 12 novembre 2001 il richiedente cercò l'assistenza del Primo Ministro e dell'Ufficio del Capo Accusatore Pubblico per ottenere l’esecuzione della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996. In una lettera del 5 dicembre 2001 il Ministero dell’ Economia informò il richiedente che non avrebbe potuto assisterlo, perché a quel tempo lo Stato possedeva solamente lo 0.2% del capitale di quota della società e non poteva forzare la vendita della proprietà al richiedente. Così, il solo modo per poter ottenere l’esecuzione sarebbe stato cercare di acquistare direttamente la proprietà dalla società.
E. Procedimenti contro la società
17. In una data non specificata il richiedente, nella sua veste ditta individuale, iniziò procedimenti contro la società cercando di essere compensato per i miglioramenti che aveva fatto alla proprietà.
18. In una sentenza del 5 aprile 2004 la Corte Regionale di Varna si espresse in parte a favore del richiedente. Riconobbe che nel 1992 aveva fatto miglioramenti alla proprietà nell'importo di 200,352 vecchi lev bulgari (BGL, approssimativamente 12,637 marchi tedeschi al tempo), e, nella prospettiva della ridenominazione della valuta locale del 4 luglio 1999, gli assegnò l’ equivalente al giorno corrente di 200.35 lev nuovi bulgari (BGN, approssimativamente 102 euro (EUR)).
19. Su ricorso, la Corte Suprema di Cassazione sostenne la sentenza della corte inferiore in una sentenza definitiva del 28 marzo 2005.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
20. L’Atto sulla Trasformazione e la Privatizzazione delle Imprese posseduto dallo Stato e dal Municipio (Закон за преобразуване и приватизация на държавни и общински предприятия: “l’Atto sulla Privatizzazione”), adottato nel 1992, prevedeva la trasformazione della proprietà pubblica e la privatizzazione delle imprese possedute dallo Stato e dal Municipio. Nel marzo 2002 fu sostituito con un’altra legislazione.
21. La Sezione 3 dell'Atto indicava le entità competenti per prendere delle decisioni di privatizzazione. Nella presente causa questo ente era il Ministro dell’ Industria.
22. La Sezione 35(1) dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione prevedeva che gli affittuari di proprietà possedute dallo Stato e dal Municipio avrebbero potuto proporre di comprare le proprietà affittate da loro, senza un'asta pubblica o la competizione e per un prezzo uguale alla valutazione della proprietà preparata da esperti muniti di certificato in conformità con le norme adottate dal Governo. Quelle condizioni preferenziali erano applicabili ad affittuari di proprietà di proprietà statale e municipale che avevano concluso un contratto d'affitto prima del 15 ottobre 1993 e dove detti contratti erano ancora in vigore nella data della rispettiva proposta di privatizzazione.
23. La Sezione 35(2) dell’ Atto sulla Privatizzazione, come espresso verbalmente dopo l’ottobre 1997, prevedeva che dove un rifiuto da parte dell’ente amministrativo competente per iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione a seguito di una proposta della parte interessata era stato annullato tramite una sentenza definitiva di corte, l’ente amministrativo attinente era obbligato, entro due mesi dalla sentenza divenuta definitiva, ad iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione, a preparare la privatizzazione della proprietà in questione e ad offrire di vendere la proprietà alla parte abilitata.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
24. Il richiedente si lamentò che le autorità erano andate a vuoto nell’attenersi alla sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996 che riconosceva il suo diritto ad acquistare la proprietà sotto la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale della sezione 35(1)(2) dell’ Atto du Privatizzazione, come previsto nell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
25. Il Governo non presentò osservazioni.
A. Ammissibilità
26. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
27. La Corte reitera che l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione garantisce ad ognuno il diritto di portare qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi di fronte ad una corte o tribunale; in questo modo incarna il “diritto ad una corte” di cui il diritto di accesso che è il diritto per avviare procedimenti di fronte a corti in questioni civili ne costituisce un aspetto. Comunque, questo diritto sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di uno Stato Contraente permettesse che una decisione giudiziale definitiva e legando rimanga non operativa a danno di una parte. L’esecuzione di una sentenza resa da una corte deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, sentenza del 19 marzo 1997, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II, p. 510, § 40, e Burdov c. Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 67 ECHR 2009 -...).
28. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte osservando che la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996che interessava il diritto addotto del richiedente ad acquisire una certa proprietà sotto le condizioni preferenziali, è della prospettiva che la detta sentenza era determinativa per i diritti civili del richiedente e gli obblighi, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Perciò, l’Articolo 6 § 1 è applicabile nella causa.
29. Inoltre, la Corte nota che nella sua sentenza del 4 dicembre 1996 la Corte Suprema stabilì che il richiedente soddisfaceva tutte le condizioni legali per acquistare la proprietà sotto la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale, annullò come illegale la decisione del Ministro dell’ Industria del 26 aprile 1995 ed istruì esplicitamente il secondo ad emettere un ordine per vendergli la proprietà sotto la sezione 35(1)(2) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Da allora in poi, il Ministro dell’ Industria aveva l’ obbligo si attenersi alla detta sentenza iniziando la detta procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale e vendendo la proprietà al richiedente. Comunque, lui non riuscì a fare così ed il Governo andò a vuoto nel fornire qualsiasi osservazione e chiarimento per questa mancanza di ottemperanza da parte di questo ente Statale (vedere paragrafi 10 e 25 sopra). Inoltre, includendo la proprietà come un bene della società e vendendo quest’ultimo tramite il programma di privatizzazione, lo Stato rese impossibile l'esecuzione della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996 (vedere paragrafi 12-13 e 16 sopra).
30. Questo è sufficiente per permettere alla Corte di concludere che nelle specifiche circostanze della presente causa c’è stata una violazione del diritto del richiedente di far eseguire una sentenza definitiva a suo favore, come un aspetto del suo diritto di accesso ad una corte, come garantito dall’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
31. Il richiedente si lamentò anche di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in quanto le autorità avevano infranto il suo diritto legale, riconosciuto dalla Corte Suprema nella sua sentenza del 4 dicembre 1996 di acquistare la proprietà sotto la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale della sezione 35(1)(2) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione.
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 letture:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
32. Il Governo non presentò osservazioni.
A. Ammissibilità
33. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve perciò essere dichiarata ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. L'esistenza della “proprietà”
34. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nella misura in cui le decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. “Lea proprietà” può essere una “proprietà esistente” o dei beni, incluse rivendicazioni a riguardo delle quali il richiedente può dibattere di avere almeno un’ “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (vedere Maltzan ed Altri c. Germania (dec.) [GC], N. 71916/01, 71917/01 e 10260/02 § 74(c), il 2005-V di ECHR, e Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35(c), ECHR 2004-IX).
35. Siccome la presente causa non riguarda nessuna proprietà esistente della società richiedente, rimane da esaminare se avrebbe potuto avere qualsiasi “aspettativa legittima” di vedesi realizzare un diritto di proprietà.
36. La Corte reitera a questo riguardo che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce il diritto di acquisire proprietà (vedere Slivenko ed Altri c. Lettonia (dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II, e Kopecký citata sopra, § 35(b)). Comunque, la Corte nota che in cause di restituzione ha ssotenuto che una volta che un Stato Contraente, che ha ratificato la Convenzione incluso il Protocollo N.ro 1, decreta una legislazione che prevede la pieno o la parziale restituzione della proprietà confiscata sotto un precedente regime, simile legislazione può essere considerata generante un nuovo diritto di proprietà protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i requisiti per averne diritto. Lo stesso si può applicare a riguardo delle disposizioni per la restituzione o il risarcimento stabiliti sotto la legislazione di pre-ratifica, se simile legislazione fosse rimasta in vigore dopo la ratifica dello Stato Contraente del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Maltzan ed Altri, citata sopra, § 74(d) e Kopecký, citata sopra, § 35(d)).
37. La Corte trova appropriato applicare questo standard nella presente causa che non concerne la restituzione di proprietà precedentemente nazionalizzata ma il diritto a privatizzare sotto condizioni preferenziali le proprietà Statali affittate una volta che la persona soddisfa certi criteri e requisiti per il detto diritto.
38. A questo riguardo, la Corte osserva, che diritto nazionale come in vigore al tempo ha sottolineato le condizioni che permettono ad un affittuario di proprietà Statale di trarre profitto dalla procedura preferenziale sotto la sezione 35(1)(2) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione, vale a dire il contratto di affitto riguardo alla proprietà in questione avrebbe dovuto essere concluso prima del 15 ottobre 1993 e avrebbe dovuto essere stato ancora in vigore nella data della rispettiva proposta di privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). La Corte nota inoltre che nella sua sentenza del 4 dicembre 1996 la Corte Suprema concluse che il richiedente soddisfaceva tutte quelle condizioni (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). La Corte non vede una ragione di dubitare questa conclusione ed il Governo andò a vuoto nel presentare qualsiasi argomento contrario.
39. Inoltre, la Corte Suprema nella sua sentenza del 4 dicembre 1996 istruì il Ministro di Industria per emettere un ordine per vendere la proprietà al richiedente sotto la sezione 35(1)(2) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Così, l'enunciazione inequivocabile della detta sentenza non lasciava nessun diritto di discrezione da parte del Ministro dell’ Industria riguardo al tipo di ottemperanza che ci si aspettava dalle corti nazionali. Sotto il diritto nazionale il Ministro dell’Industria non aveva inoltre, margine a riguardo di come e se cominciare una procedura di privatizzazione sotto la sezione 35(1) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione, o riguardo alle condizioni dell'operazione futura, incluso il prezzo da pagare dall’ eventuale acquirente (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra).
40. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte conclude, che il richiedente aveva un'aspettativa legittima che consisteva nel diritto di acquistare la proprietà sotto le condizioni preferenziali della sezione 35(1)(2) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione. Di conseguenza, il richiedente aveva una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. L'esistenza di interferenza
41. La Corte costata che l'insuccesso del Ministro dell’ Industria per iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale a seguito della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 4 dicembre 1996 per vendere la proprietà al richiedente rappresentava un'interferenza col diritto di quest’ultimo al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
3. La legalità dell'interferenza
42. La Corte reitera che il primo e la maggior parte di importante requisito di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza con un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale (veda Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000-XII).
43. Nella presente causa, dopo che la Corte Suprema nella sua sentenza del 4 dicembre 1996 ha stabilito che il richiedente aveva soddisfatto tutte le condizioni legali per acquistare la proprietà ed aveva istruito esplicitamente il Ministro dell’ Industria a vendergli la proprietà sotto la sezione 35(1)(2) dell’Atto sulla Privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra), quest’ultimo aveva l’ obbligo di attenervisi ed iniziare la detta procedura vendendo la proprietà al richiedente al prezzo preferenziale uguale alla valutazione della proprietà. Comunque, lui non riuscì a fare così ed invece lo Stato vendette la proprietà come bene della società a terze parti (vedere paragrafi 12-13 e 16 sopra). Il Governo non ha fornito alcuna osservazione e chiarimento per le azioni delle autorità Statali coinvolte (vedere paragrafi 10 e 32 sopra).
44. Questo è sufficiente per abilitare la Corte a concludere che nelle specifiche circostanze della presente causa l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà non era in conformità con il diritto nazionale e non soddisfaceva il requisito della legalità sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
45. Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione di quella disposizione.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
46. Il 28 settembre 2005 il richiedente si lamentò infine, che i procedimenti contro la società erano ingiusti, e considerò che le corti nazionali non gli avevano assegnato il vero valore dei miglioramenti che lui aveva fatto alla proprietà. Lui dibatté, in particolare, che i miglioramenti erano costati BGL 200,352 che nel 1992 era uguale a 22,000 dollari degli Stati Uniti mentre le corti nazionali gli avevano assegnato il valore attuale di BGN 200.35 (circa EUR 102).
47. Comunque, alla luce di tutto il materiale in suo possesso, ed nella misura in cui le questioni di cui ci si lamenta sono all'interno della sua competenza, la Corte costata che non rivelano qualsiasi comparizione di violazione dei diritti e delle libertà esposte nella Convenzione o nei suoi Protocolli.
Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
48. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
49. Il richiedente chiese il risarcimento per il danno morale e patrimoniale lui aveva presumibilmente subito e aveva lasciato che la Corte ne determinasse l'importo.
50. Comunque, la Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione e la riserva, avendo riguardo alla possibilità che venga raggiunto un accordo fra il richiedente ed al Governo rispondente (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento della Corte).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo per cui le autorità sono andate a vuoto nell’ attenersi ad una sentenza definitiva di corte e che hanno deprivato il richiedente dell'aspettativa legittima di acquisire una proprietà Statale ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro due mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera la cura di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 25 marzo 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.