Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MULLAI AND OTHERS v. ALBANIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 9074/07/2010
STATO: Albania
DATA: 23/03/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction reserved
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF MULLAI AND OTHERS v. ALBANIA
(Application no. 9074/07)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
23 March 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Mullai and Others v. Albania,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 2 March 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 9074/07) against the Republic of Albania lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by seven Albanian nationals, OMISSIS (“the individual applicants”) and by T. sh.p.k. (“the applicant company”), a limited liability company, on 1 December 2006.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr S. P., a lawyer practising in Tirana. The Albanian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their then Agent, Ms S. Meneri.
3. The applicants alleged a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention on account of the quashing of a final judgment, the authorities' failure to enforce a final court judgment and the excessive length of the proceedings.
4. On 12 September 2007 the President of the Section to which the case was allocated decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it was decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility. On the same date the application was given priority under Rule 41 of the Rules of Court.
5. The applicants and the Government each filed written observations (Rule 59 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The individual applicants were born in 1938, 1938, 1926, 1963, 1942, 1970 and 1954 respectively and live in Albania, the United States of America and Italy.
7. The applicant company is incorporated under Albanian law and is registered in Tirana.
A. Proceedings concerning the restitution of property
8. The individual applicants are the heirs of a certain Mr M. who, in 1947, was the owner of a three-storey villa and an adjacent plot of land situated in the centre of Tirana. On an unspecified date in 1947 the authorities confiscated the property, which remained in their possession until 1994.
9. On 30 December 1994, following the individual applicants' request in accordance with the Property Act 1993, the Tirana Commission on Restitution and Compensation of Properties (“the Commission”) allowed their claim to the villa and 1,100 sq. m of land. The Commission rectified that decision on 8 August 2002, recognising the individual applicants' property rights to a plot of land measuring 1,515 sq. m, which corresponded to the original property. The property title was entered in the Land Register.
10. From 1996 to 1998 the property concerned was leased by the individual applicants to the Libyan Embassy in Tirana.
B. Proceedings concerning the building permit
1. Administrative proceedings
11. On 30 April 1998 the individual applicants entered into an agreement with the applicant company for the construction of a tower block on their property. Under that agreement the applicant company was given authority to obtain the administrative authorisations needed for the construction. A final contract was to be concluded when the requisite permit had been obtained.
12. On 23 October 1998 and 22 December 1998 the Tirana Municipality's Council for Territorial Planning (Këshilli i Rregullimit Territorit të Bashkisë së Tiranës – “the municipal CTP”) granted the applicant company a planning permit and a building permit authorising it to erect a sixteen-storey building on the property. Consequently, on
15 July 1999 the Tirana Municipality Technical Council (Këshilli Teknik i Bashkisë së Tiranës) authorised the applicant company to demolish the existing three-storey villa and erect the new construction in its place.
13. On an unspecified date in 1999 the applicant company demolished the villa and developed the site according to the permits and plans approved by the Tirana Municipality (“the Municipality”).
14. On 31 August 1999, while the construction work was under way, the Prefect of Tirana, (“the Prefect”) issued a notice suspending the work. The notice stated that the building permit should have been granted by the national Council for Territorial Planning (“the national CTP”) and that the Municipality had exceeded its competence by authorising the construction of such a large building in the centre of Tirana (see paragraph 59 below).
15. On 6 September 1999 the Municipality informed the Prefect that the building permit was in order and had been issued on the basis of the relevant legal provisions. Notwithstanding this, on 4 October 1999, the Tirana Construction Police (Policia Ndërtimore) enforced the Prefect's notice and suspended work on the construction site.
16. On 12 January 2000, acting on the applicant company's request, the Prefect annulled his previous notice and the building work resumed.
17. On 22 January 2000 the Minister of Public Works (“the Minister”) ordered the suspension of the construction work on the basis that the municipal CTP's decisions (see paragraph 12 above) had to be examined and approved by the national CTP. On the same day the Tirana Construction Police enforced the Minister's order by suspending the work again.
18. On 26 January 2000 the applicant company unsuccessfully filed an application with the Director of the national Construction Police to have the suspension order lifted.
19. On 9 February 2000 the national CTP decided that a legal interpretation of the validity of the building permit was needed, stating that the permit had been adopted on the basis of the Urban Planning Act 1993, which had been repealed at the material time. It did not revoke the suspension order. Nor did the decision explicitly indicate the body that was to be responsible for the legal interpretation. However, it appears that the decision was addressed to the Municipality, requesting it to issue a new urban plan of the area and to inform the national CTP accordingly.
20. On 13 March 2000 and 3 May 2000 the Ministry of Public Works requested the Tirana Municipality to comply with the national CTP's decision.
21. According to the individual applicants and the applicant company, on an unspecified date in 2000 the Municipality confirmed the validity of its decisions of 23 October 1998 and 22 December 1998. However, no substantiating document was produced.
2. The judicial proceedings concerning the lawfulness of the Minister's order and the action of the Construction Police of 22 January 2000
22. On an unspecified date in 2000 the applicant company challenged the validity of the above acts (see paragraph 17 above).
23. On 11 July 2000 the District Court dismissed their application. In its reasoning it found that the building permit was null and void as it had been issued on the basis of the Urban Planning Act 1993, which was not in force at the material time. The operative part of the judgment did not state that the building permit was null and void.
24. On 4 January 2001 the Tirana Court of Appeal (“the Court of Appeal”) quashed the District Court's judgment. It upheld the applicant company's grounds of appeal and annulled the Minister's order and the action of the Construction Police.
25. On 29 March 2001, following an appeal by the Construction Police, the Supreme Court quashed the Court of Appeal's judgment and upheld that of the District Court. The Supreme Court found that the prefect's decision of 12 January 2000 was ultra vires in so far as the proceedings were pending before the national CTP. Given the circumstances, the Minister and the Tirana Construction Police had suspended the work on 22 January 2000. The judgment stated the following:
“(...) The court notes that the national CTP's decision is not final. It does not determine the merits of the case at issue, but it implies that they will be determined once the tasks emanating from the decision have been completed. Point (a) of the national CTP's decision [the legal interpretation of the municipal CTP decision of
22 December 1998] questions the lawfulness of the building permit issued by the municipal CTP. It does not, however, take a final decision on the matter, even though it should have done so. It is not clear as to who is to make the legal interpretation of the municipal CTP decision. (...)
The contents of points (b) [the preparation of a new urban plan of the area] and (c) [the Municipality's obligation to comply with the national CTP decision and inform it accordingly] of the national CTP decision reinforce the conclusion that the decision is not final.
The final decision shall be taken after the municipal CTP issues a new urban plan of the area, which shall be subject to examination by the national CTP.
(...)
It is incumbent upon the national CTP to fully, unequivocally and finally address the above issues. Only after the administrative remedies have been exhausted, with the help of the national CTP (...), can the matter be referred to the courts for the protection of property rights and other rights in rem of parties bordering on the plot of land (...).
The prefect represents the Council of Ministers [the Central Government] to the local government. He has been invested with powers by law. However, when an issue has been transferred to the Central Government, even by his own motion, he cannot exercise any other right. Otherwise, that would be considered an excess of powers.”
26. However, in the same judgment the Supreme Court went on to declare the building permit null and void for the following reasons:
“(...) It results that at the time the building permit was granted, the Urban Planning Act 1993, which redefined the composition of the municipal CTP, had been repealed. Article 19 of the new [Urban Planning] Act of 1998 establishes the new composition of the municipal CTP, made up of 21 members, stipulating the respective functions and tasks to be carried out.
(...) The new [1998] Act entered into force on 25 October 1998.
Given that the new Act does not contain any transitional provisions which would render legitimate the continuation of the municipal CTP's work on the basis of the 1993 Act, the new [municipal] CTP should have been established in compliance with the composition and selection criteria of its members laid down in the new [1998] Act.
Consequently, any decision taken by the previous CTP [on the basis of the Urban Planning Act 1993] is considered null. A decision taken by an organ which has been revoked by law and on the basis of a repealed law is null and, as such, cannot yield any legal consequences.
That being so, the [applicant company's] building permit of 22 December 1998 is considered null and void.
In view of the foregoing, the Civil Bench of the Supreme Court concludes that the District Court's judgment was not ultra vires when it considered the building permit null and void, even though this was not part of the object of those proceedings.
[The District Court] did not examine the [applicant company's] right to continue the building work as this would have been beyond the scope of the examination of the administrative dispute before it.”
27. The operative part of the Supreme Court's ruling did not contain any mention of the invalidity of the building permit. The judgment became final on the same day as none of the parties filed a complaint with the Constitutional Court.
C. The judicial proceedings initiated by the Swiss Embassy in Tirana (“the Embassy”)
28. On 19 March 2001 the Embassy, whose premises are adjacent to the construction site, challenged the validity of the building permit. The individual applicants intervened in the proceedings as third parties (ndërhyrës dytësor).
29. On 28 May 2002 the District Court declared the building permit null and void. Without explicitly referring to the Supreme Court's ruling of 29 March 2001 (see paragraph 26 above), the reasoning of the District Court stated that the building permit had been issued on the strength of the Urban Planning Act 1993, which had been repealed at the material time.
30. The individual applicants and the applicant company appealed. On 3 March 2003 the Court of Appeal requested the national CTP to rule on the validity of the building permit in the light of the Supreme Court's finding of 29 March 2001 that all administrative remedies had to be exhausted (see paragraph 25 above).
31. On 18 June 2003 the national CTP upheld the validity of the building permit issued by the Municipality. In its letter to the Court of Appeal the Minister of Territorial Planning, acting as the deputy chairman of the national CTP, indicated that the judicial proceedings pending before the Court of Appeal would examine and finally resolve the dispute (është procesi gjyqësor që do të bëjë vlerësimin dhe do të zgjidhë përfundimisht konfliktin e paraqitur në lidhje me këtë objekt).
32. On 3 October 2003 the Court of Appeal quashed the District Court's judgment and dismissed the case. In its reasoning, it stated that the Embassy had lodged its action outside the time-limits prescribed by the Code of Civil Procedure. It appears that the building permit was declared lawful, although no mention of this was made in the operative part of the judgment. The Court of Appeal did not make any reference to the reasoning of the Supreme Court's judgment of 29 March 2001, which had declared the building permit null and void (see paragraph 26 above). There was no order in the judgment for the construction work to be resumed.
1. Developments following the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003
33. On 15 September 2003 the applicant company requested the Construction Police to cancel the order for the suspension of building work on the strength of the national CTP's decision of 18 June 2003 (see paragraph 31 above).
34. The Construction Police requested the applicant company to update the file relating to the work by presenting ex novo the necessary documents in order for them to consider the request. The applicant company submitted the documents as requested. No response from the police was received.
35. On 29 December 2004, following the applicant company's request for intervention, the Albanian Ombudsperson (Avokati i Popullit) acknowledged that the building permit had been declared null and void by the Supreme Court's judgment of 29 March 2001 and refused to intervene.
2. Proceedings before the Supreme Court
36. On 20 April 2005, following an appeal by the Embassy, the Supreme Court upheld the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003. It found that the Embassy did not have locus standi to challenge the impugned building permit and reasoned, in so far as relevant, as follows.
“The building permit relates to an administrative-legal relationship between the construction company [the applicant company] and the national CTP. The action filed by the plaintiff [the Embassy] cannot pertain outside the context of an action concerning the cessation of interference with its property rights (...)
Article 32 (a) of the Code of Civil Procedure stipulates: “A civil legal action is lodged in order to seek the restoration of a right or legitimate interest that has been violated.” (...)
In the instant case, no legitimate interest within the meaning of the provision cited above has been invoked. [The Embassy] has not argued any violation or denial of a right directly caused to it by the defendant's building permit. Since the lodging of the civil action and throughout the [court] proceedings, [the Embassy] has merely set out some procedural violations associated with the granting of the building permit. The existence or otherwise of these violations cannot impinge upon a claimant's subjective right. The claimant would have locus standi if it alleged that the company's construction work resulted in an infringement of its property rights. Even though [the Embassy] initially introduced such a claim, it subsequently withdrew it and did not refer it to the court.
(...) the court concludes that [the Embassy] lacks a legal interest and therefore lacks locus standi to lodge the civil action.
(...)
The claimant argued that the Court of Appeal had been wrong to accept that the national CTP had ruled on the validity of the building permit as no decision had been issued by that authority. This complaint relates to the determination of the merits of the case, on which the court deems it inappropriate to rule one way or the other.
In the light of the above conclusions, there are no other legal grounds to challenge the Court of Appeal's judgment.”
37. In its ruling, the Supreme Court did not examine the lawfulness of the building permit. The judgment became final on the same day, as none of the parties filed a complaint with the Constitutional Court.
3. Developments following the Supreme Court's judgment of 20 April 2005
38. On 22 June 2005 the applicant company, considering that the lawfulness of the building permit had been upheld by the Supreme Court's judgment of 20 April 2005, and given the inactivity of the Construction Police, informed the Municipality that it had decided to resume the construction notwithstanding the fact that a suspending order was still in force.
39. On 23 June 2005 the Municipal Police (Policia Bashkiake) inspected the construction site and ordered the suspension of work until such time as security measures were properly observed.
40. On 29 June 2005 the Municipal Police extended the suspension order on account of some breaches of urban planning rules. In a letter of 4 July 2005 the applicant company provided explanations concerning the alleged breaches.
41. On 30 November 2005, following the applicant company's request for permission to resume the building work, the Construction Police informed them that the request concerning the dispute between the applicant company and the Municipal Police was outside their jurisdiction.
D. The second set of judicial proceedings initiated by the Embassy
42. On an unspecified date in 2005 the Embassy initiated another set of proceedings with the District Court alleging that the new construction breached its property rights.
43. On 14 December 2005 the District Court delivered its judgment finding that the new building would not comply with urban planning distances and therefore breached the Embassy's property rights. The District Court ordered the suspension of construction work until the final determination of the dispute. It relied on the Supreme Court's judgment of 29 March 2001, which had declared the building permit null and void.
44. On an unspecified date between 2005 and 2006 the applicant company challenged the lawfulness of the District Court's judgment before the Court of Appeal, arguing that the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003, which had become final, confirmed the validity of the building permit (see paragraph 32 above). The District Court's judgment of 14 December 2005 had quashed that final ruling, thereby contravening the principle of legal certainty.
45. Two months later, the District Court's judgment had not yet been served on the applicant company. On 15 March 2006, following complaints by the applicant company, the High Council of Justice informed them that the case had been sent to the Ministry of Justice for the appropriate disciplinary proceedings to be taken against the District Court judges who had failed to deliver the judgment. In a letter of 5 April 2006 the applicant company complained to the Court of Appeal that they had not yet been served with a copy of the District Court's judgment. The case file indicates that the judgment was served on them at some point after 5 April 2006.
46. On 13 June 2007 the Court of Appeal quashed the District Court's judgment. It found that there had been no interference with the Embassy's property rights since the construction had barely started, so there was no building to comply with urban planning distances. It further held that as the Supreme Court had found in its judgment of 29 March 2001 that the building permit was not valid, there could be no interference with the Embassy's property rights. It finally dismissed the case.
47. On an unspecified date in 2007 the Embassy appealed to the Supreme Court. On 14 July 2009 the Supreme Court declared the appeal inadmissible in accordance with Article 472 of the Code of Civil Procedure (no valid grounds of appeal).
1. Developments following the Court of Appeal's judgment of 13 June 2007
48. On 1 August 2007 the Tirana Construction Police informed the Embassy and the Ministry of Public Works that they would comply with the Court of Appeal's judgment of 13 June 2007, which, in their opinion, had confirmed the lawfulness of the applicant company's building permit.
49. On 21 August 2007, at the applicant company's request, the District Court issued a writ of execution in respect of the Court of Appeal's judgment of 13 June 2007.
50. On an unspecified date in 2007 the applicant company resumed the construction work, which was subsequently suspended by the Construction Police on 11 September 2007 with the cooperation of the police.
51. On 13 September 2007 the Municipal Construction Inspectorate (“MCI”) requested the applicant company to provide some missing technical documents.
52. On 19 September 2007, at the applicant company's request, the Tirana prosecutor's office enquired about the lawfulness of the action of the Construction Police of 11 September 2007 in the absence of any written notice of the suspension of construction work. The applicant company maintained that the validity of the building permit had been acknowledged by the national CTP and confirmed by the judgments of the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of 3 October 2003 and 20 April 2005, respectively.
53. On 24 September 2007 the MCI ordered the suspension of the construction work because certain technical documents were missing from the file. On 1 October 2007 the applicant company appealed to the National Construction Inspectorate (“the NCI”). On 30 October 2007 the NCI informed the applicant company that they should submit their concerns to the MCI.
54. On 5 January 2008, noting that some technical documents were missing, the MCI decided to suspend the work. There is no indication that an appeal was filed against that decision. On 16 January 2008 the MCI extended the suspension order for a period of sixty days.
55. On 18 March 2008 the MCI decided to stop the construction work altogether and demolish what had already been built. There is no indication that an appeal was filed against that decision. Nor is there any information that the existing construction has been demolished.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitution
56. The Albanian Constitution, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
Article 131
“The Constitutional Court shall decide: ... (f) final complaints by individuals alleging a violation of their constitutional rights to a fair hearing, after all legal remedies for the protection of those rights have been exhausted.”
B. The Urban Planning Act 1998 (Law no. 8405 of 17 September 1998 as amended by Law no. 8501 of 16 June 1999, Law no. 8991 of 23 January 2003 and, more recently, Law no. 9843 of 17 December 2007) (“The 1998 Act”)
57. The 1998 Act defines the general rules governing the location and architecture of constructions in Albania. The Act entered into force on 25 October 1998. Section 7 provides for the establishment of the national CTP, presided over by the Prime Minister. Its composition is determined by decision of the Council of Ministers (section 8). The Ministry responsible for territorial planning coordinates the work of the national CTP (section 12). Section 14 provides for the establishment of municipal CTPs.
58. The 1998 Act instituted a two-tier procedure for obtaining the necessary permits. An application for planning permission (kërkesa për shesh ndërtimi) should initially be submitted for examination and approval by the Municipal CTP pursuant to section 39. A building permit (leje ndërtimi) should then be obtained pursuant to section 45. This is the sole legal document on the basis of which construction work may start.
59. Section 9 of the 1998 Act empowered the national CTP, amongst other things, to approve the urban study and building permits in respect of constructions located in city centres. Under section 10 of the 1998 Act the national CTP was empowered to quash decisions adopted by the municipal CTPs. By decision no. 29 of 21 December 2006 the Constitutional Court declared unconstitutional these parts of section 9 and section 10, since they breached the constitutional principle of decentralisation and local government autonomy.
C. The Construction Police Act 1998 (“the 1998 Police Act”) as amended by the Construction Inspection Act 2007 (“the 2007 Police Act”) (Law no 8408 of 25 September 1998 as repealed by Law no. 9780 of 16 July 2007)
60. The 1998 Police Act established the Construction Police, responsible for supervising compliance with urban planning legislation. The Construction Police were empowered to impose fines, decide on the suspension of construction work and order the demolition of unlawful constructions.
61. The 2007 Police Act repealed the 1998 Police Act and introduced the Construction and Urban Planning Inspectorate, which operates at municipal/communal level (“Municipal Construction Inspectorate – the MCI”), at district (qark) level and at national level (“National Construction Inspectorate – the NCI”) (sections 3, 7 and 8).
62. The duties of the MCI include the imposition of fees, the suspension of construction work and the demolition of unlawful constructions (section 5). The inspectors have the right to access and inspect construction sites (section 12 and Council of Minister's decision no. 862 of 5 December 2007).
63. MCI decisions are open to appeal before the NCI. An interested party may take court action against a decision of the NCI. The court action does not have suspensive effect on the execution of the impugned administrative decision (section 14).
D. The Act on the Organisation and Operation of the Municipal and Commune Police (“The Municipal Police Act”) (Law no. 8224 of 15 May 1997 as amended by Law no. 8335 of 23 April 1998)
64. The Municipal Police Act provides for the establishment of the Municipal Police, who answer to the Mayor and operate under the supervision of the Prefect. Under section 8, the Municipal Police ensure the effective implementation of acts and decisions of the Mayor and the city council which relate to public order and maintenance of public infrastructure. They prevent, stop or demolish unlawful constructions, and prevent the unlawful occupation of plots of land, buildings and property belonging to the municipality and ensure their immediate evacuation (section 8 § 6).
E. Code of Civil Procedure
65. Articles 189-201 govern the participation of third parties in civil proceedings. Article 195 provides that a third party has the right to undertake all the same procedural steps as the main parties to the proceedings, save for steps that concern the disposal of the object of the civil action. Article 196 provides that the effect of a decision taken after a third party's intervention extends equally to the relationship between the third party and the claimant or the defendant.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
66. The applicants alleged a number of violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, including failure to enforce the Court of Appeal's final judgment of 3 October 2003, a breach of the principle of legal certainty as a result of the quashing of that final judgment and the excessive length of the proceedings.
Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, in so far as relevant, reads:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing within a reasonable time ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties' submissions
67. The applicants complained about the non-enforcement of the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003, which they alleged had established that the building permit was valid and that the building work should continue.
68. The Government submitted that the applicants had not complained before the domestic courts about the non-enforcement of a final court judgment, and that there had been no violation on account of the authorities' failure to enforce a final court judgment.
69. The applicants argued that the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003 was a final judgment but had been quashed by the District Court's judgment of 14 December 2005, violating the principle of legal certainty.
70. The Government contended that the object of the second and third sets of proceedings differed. The validity of the building permit had been finally determined by the Supreme Court's judgment of 29 March 2001. The second set of proceedings had been dismissed by the domestic courts because the Embassy did not have locus standi.
71. In the applicants' view, the domestic proceedings had exceeded the reasonable time requirement within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
72. The Government did not raise any objections concerning the admissibility of this complaint.
2. The Court's assessment
a. The lack of legal certainty as regards domestic courts' decisions
73. The Court reiterates that it is master of the characterisation to be given in law to the facts of the case. It does not consider itself bound by the characterisation given by an applicant or a government (see Guerra and Others v. Italy, 19 February 1998, § 44, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-I).
74. The Court notes that the parties did not dispute the applicability of Article 6 of the Convention. In the Court's view, having regard to the circumstances of the case, the applicants' complaints about the non-enforcement of the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003 and its alleged quashing are essentially linked to the lawfulness of the building permit, which constitutes the core issue of the complaints. It therefore considers that it is necessary to examine both complaints from the perspective of the principle of legal certainty, notably whether the domestic courts pursued a uniform line of reasoning concerning the lawfulness of the building permit.
75. The Court considers that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
b. The length of the proceedings
76. The Court considers that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. As regards the lack of legal certainty concerning domestic courts' decisions
a. The parties' submissions
77. The Government contended that the building permit had been declared null and void by the Supreme Court in its judgment of 29 March 2001, which had acquired the force of res judicata. They argued that the case was complex, as demonstrated by the need for three different sets of proceedings.
78. The applicants argued that the lawfulness of the building permit had been upheld by the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003, which had become final. They maintained that the case was not complex and that the authorities were to blame for having made the proceedings unnecessarily complicated.
b. The Court's assessment
79. The right to a fair hearing before a tribunal as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which, in its relevant part, declares the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States. One of the fundamental aspects of the rule of law is the principle of legal certainty, which requires, among other things, that where the courts have finally determined an issue, their ruling should not be called into question (see Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999-VII).
80. Turning to the present case, the Court must determine whether a final and binding decision was adopted as regards the lawfulness of the building permit. It reiterates that it is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law. It is not for the Court to assess the facts on the basis of which the national courts adopted their decision, provided that it is compatible with the articles of the Convention. The Court shall, within the framework of Article 6 of the Convention, examine applications which allege a breach of specific procedural guarantees or allege that the conduct of the procedure, as a whole, did not provide the guarantees of the right to a fair hearing to the applicant (see Schwarzkopf and Taussik v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 42162/02, 2 December 2008).
81. The Court notes that three sets of proceedings were conducted in the present application, spanning a period of almost ten years. Whereas the object of each set of proceedings was to some degree different, the essence of all of them, taking account of the domestic courts' judgments, was the lawfulness of the applicant company's building permit.
82. The first set of proceedings, which examined the lawfulness of the Minister's order and the action of the Construction Police, addressed the lawfulness of the building permit. The Court finds the reasoning in the Supreme Court's judgment of 29 March 2001 inconsistent. The Supreme Court declared that the prefect's decision of 12 January 2000 was ultra vires on account of non-exhaustion of domestic administrative remedies in respect of the validity of the building permit. In the same judgment, the Supreme Court overruled this finding and proceeded to declare the building permit null and void.
83. The Court considers that such inconsistencies within the same judgment of the Supreme Court are incompatible with its judicial function. The role of a higher court in a Contracting Party is precisely to resolve conflicts, avoid divergences and be consistent. In fact, in the present case, the Supreme Court itself became the source of uncertainty undermining public confidence in the judiciary and the rule of law (see, mutatis mutandis, Beian v. Romania (no. 1), no. 30658/05, §§ 37-39, ECHR 2007-...).
84. The ensuing judicial proceedings considerably added to that general climate of legal uncertainty. It was during those proceedings that the Embassy essentially sought to have the building permit revoked. The fact that the District Court examined the Embassy's action suggested that the validity of the building permit had not been definitively established in the first set of proceedings. Moreover, the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003 appeared to recognise the lawfulness of the building permit, whereas the Supreme Court's judgment of 20 May 2005 left the issue of its lawfulness unanswered (see paragraphs 32 and 36–37 above).
85. In the third set of judicial proceedings, the domestic courts recognised the invalidity of the building permit.
86. The Court notes that the Contracting States have the obligation to organise their legal system so as to allow the courts to identify related proceedings and, where necessary, avoid the adoption of discordant judgments. It considers that the underlying problem in the present case has resulted from the multiplicity of legal proceedings, which could have been better managed so as to contribute to the speedy clarification of the issues involved. For the Court, the existence of multiple parallel and interrelated proceedings raising substantially the same legal issue cannot be considered to be in compliance with the rule of law. By giving a number of contradictory decisions at several levels of jurisdiction the Albanian authorities demonstrated a shortcoming in the judicial system for which they are responsible (see, mutatis mutandis, Gjonbocari and Others v. Albania, no. 10508/02, §§ 66-67, 23 October 2007; Marini v. Albania, no. 3738/02, § 145, ECHR 2007-... (extracts); and Driza v. Albania, no. 33771/02, § 69, ECHR 2007-XII (extracts)).
87. Moreover, the manner in which the other domestic authorities proceeded was far from consistent with the State's obligation to deal with the applicants' situation in as clear and coherent a manner as possible and with utmost consistency (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 120, ECHR 2000-I). The domestic authorities' letters of 1 August and 19 September 2007 added further confusion to this continuous lack of clarity and certainty (see paragraphs 48 and 52 above). Furthermore, none of the suspension orders issued after 29 March 2001 mentioned the invalidity of the building permit as their main ground of justification (see paragraphs 39–40 and 53–55 above).
88. Having regard to the combination of the above reasons, the Court considers that there has accordingly been a breach of the principle of legal certainty as regards the lack of consistent reasoning in the domestic courts' decisions about the lawfulness of the building permit.
2. As regards the length of the proceedings
89. The Court considers that in the light of its finding of a violation under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention about the breach of the principle of legal certainty, it does not have to rule separately on the merits of the length of proceedings complaint.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
90. The individual applicants and the applicant company alleged that their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions had been breached. They further complained that they were unlawfully deprived of the use of their property for a long period of time.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties' submissions
91. The Government maintained that the applicant company did not have “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as the Supreme Court's decision of 29 March 2001 had declared the building permit null and void. They requested the Court to declare this complaint incompatible ratione materiae.
92. The Government submitted that the individual applicants' property rights were limited by the contractual agreement they had concluded with the applicant company. The individual applicants' complaint about a breach of their property rights should have been directed towards the applicant company within the framework of the agreement they had concluded with it. Consequently, in the Government's view, the seven individual applicants could not be considered victims within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. Furthermore, the individual applicants had not instituted any legal proceedings concerning the alleged violation of their property rights.
93. The individual applicants contended that they were “victims” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention. They recalled that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 entitled owners to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, which entailed, inter alia, the right to conclude agreements with third parties in order to freely dispose of their property by selling and renting it or constructing buildings on it in full compliance with the relevant domestic law provisions. The individual applicants had concluded an agreement with the applicant company as part of the requirements for obtaining a building permit. In the individual applicants' view, the fact that the municipality granted the building permit for the construction work on their property was not, in principle, sufficient to deprive them of victim status.
94. The applicant company argued that the building permit constituted a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. The Court's assessment
95. The first question that arises is whether the applicant company and the individual applicants had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
96. The Court recalls that the notion “possessions” in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is certainly not limited to ownership of physical goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law: certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights” and thus as “possessions”. The issue that needs to be examined in each case is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicants title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Beyeler [GC], cited above, § 100, ECHR 2000-I; Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 129, ECHR 2004-V; and Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 63, ECHR 2007-...).
97. In the case of non-physical assets, the Court has taken into consideration, in particular, whether the legal position in question gave rise to financial rights and interests and thus had an economic value (see, for example, Anheuser-Busch Inc., cited above, where intellectual property constituted possessions; Paeffgen GMBH v. Germany (dec.), no. 25379/04, 21688/05, 21722/05 and 21770/05, 18 September 2007, in which the right to use or dispose of internet domains constituted possessions; Pine Valley Developments Ltd and Others v. Ireland, 29 November 1991, Series A no. 222, where the granting of a commercial operating licence by the authorities constituted possessions; and Tre Traktörer AB v. Sweden, 7 July 1989, Series A no. 159, in which licences to serve alcoholic beverages constituted possessions).
98. The Court will examine whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant company and the individual applicants an interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In that connection, it notes that an application for a building permit cannot give rise to a well-defined proprietary interest. Such an interest would materialise if the application, after having been examined and found to satisfy the relevant formal and procedural conditions, was accepted by the relevant authority by issuing a building permit.
99. In the present case, the Court notes that a building permit was granted to the applicant company by the municipality of Tirana on 22 December 1998 to build on the individual applicants' plot of land. Consequently, the building permit constituted “possessions” for the applicant company. On that account, the Government's objection concerning the applicant company's lack of “possessions” should be dismissed.
100. In itself, the building permit also gave rise to the benefits of the contract negotiated between the applicant company and the individual applicants for the construction of the tower block. It therefore generated a capital asset and had a definite economic value for the individual applicants. It was on the strength of the building permit that the individual applicants' then existing three-storey villa was demolished. Moreover, it has not been disputed that the individual applicants continued to have property rights over the plot of land, which is an “existing possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Therefore, the Government's submission based on the lack of victim status of the individual applicants must be dismissed.
101. As regards the Government's submission that the individual applicants did not exhaust domestic remedies, the Court reiterates that in the context of the machinery for the protection of human rights the rule on exhaustion of domestic remedies must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. At the same time it requires in principle that the complaints intended to be made subsequently at international level should have been aired before [the appropriate domestic] courts, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law (see, among many other authorities, Azinas v. Cyprus [GC], no. 56679/00, § 38, ECHR 2004-III, and Fressoz and Roire v. France [GC], no. 29183/95, § 37, ECHR 1999-I).
102. The applicant company was a partner with whom the seven individual applicants agreed to make use of their proprietary interest. The applicant company was the main party to the domestic proceedings, with the individual applicants acting as interveners, notably in the first set of proceedings initiated by the Swiss Embassy, which, in their opinion, resulted in the acknowledgement of the building permit's validity. In the Court's view, the domestic proceedings must be regarded as an examination of the respective proprietary rights of the individual applicants and the applicant company, since the lawfulness of the building permit was interlinked with the individual applicants' enjoyment of their proprietary interest. Consequently, the Government's objection based on non-exhaustion of domestic remedies by the individual applicants must be dismissed.
103. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
104. The Government contended that the applicant company's behaviour prevented the authorities from examining the lawfulness of the building permit. They argued that in its decision no. 1 of 27 April 2004 the National CTP had envisaged the construction of buildings no higher than three storeys in the city centre.
105. The individual applicants and the applicant company maintained that the authorities had interfered with their possessions by preventing the applicant company from constructing a building on the individual applicants' plot of land.
106. The applicants submitted that the crux of their complaint concerned the non-enforcement of the Court of Appeal's judgment of 3 October 2003. They maintained that the legal uncertainty surrounding the reluctance of the executive authorities to comply with a valid building permit and the lack of any effective domestic remedy, combined with the absence of any compensation, meant that they had been made to bear an excessive burden.
107. Additionally, they claimed that the authorities' interference with the construction of a building adjacent to a foreign Embassy's property did not pursue a general interest, nor did it strike a fair balance. They also mentioned that high-rise buildings already existed in the immediate vicinity of their property.
2. The Court's assessment
a. Whether there was an interference
108. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules. The first rule, which is of a general nature, enounces the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property; it is set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph. The second rule covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions. The third rule recognises that the States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest, by enforcing such laws as they deem necessary for the purpose (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 61, Series A no. 52).
109. The Court notes that for many years the individual applicants and the applicant company have been unable to enjoy and freely dispose of their contractual benefits as a result of the suspension of the construction work arising out of the disputed lawfulness of the building permit. The multiplicity of legal proceedings has failed to remedy the situation. There has accordingly been an interference with their right of property.
110. In the Court's opinion there was no formal expropriation of the property in question, that is to say a transfer of ownership. Nor can it be said that there was a de facto deprivation. The impugned measures imposed limitations on the individual applicants' and the applicant company's enjoyment of their proprietary interests.
111. The Court finds that the interference must be considered as a control of the use of the applicants' property falling within the scope of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example, Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, §§ 62 – 64; Tre Traktörer AB, cited above, § 55; and Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 1), 25 October 1989, § 54, Series A no. 163).
b. Whether the interference was lawful
112. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of someone's possessions should be lawful (Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
113. The Court considers that when speaking of “law”, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 alludes to the same concept to be found elsewhere in the Convention, a concept which comprises statutory law as well as case-law. It refers to the quality of law in question, requiring that it be accessible to the persons concerned, precise and foreseeable (see Špaček, s.r.o., v. the Czech Republic, no. 26449/95, § 54, 9 November 1999; Carbonara and Ventura v. Italy, no. 24638/94, § 64, ECHR 2000-VI; Baklanov v. Russia, no. 68443/01, §§ 40-41, 9 June 2005).
114. The Court accepts that its power to review compliance with domestic law is limited as it is in the first place for the national authorities to interpret and apply that law. In the instant case, the Court is required to verify whether the way in which the domestic law was interpreted and applied produces consequences that are consistent with the principles of the Convention.
115. The Court notes that this complaint is closely linked to the complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in which it found a violation of the principle of legal certainty (see paragraphs 79–88 above). In that connection, the Court notes that the case-law of the domestic courts has led to inconsistent decisions on the lawfulness of the building permit. The case-law lacked the required precision to enable the applicant company and the individual applicants to foresee, to a degree that was reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences of their actions and the State's interference (see, mutatis mutandis, Sierpiński v. Poland, no. 38016/07, §§ 74-76, 3 November 2009 and Plechanow v. Poland, no. 22279/04, § 105-107, 7 July 2009). Such confusion and lack of foreseeability, leading to arbitrariness, continues to prevail even to date.
116. It follows that the interference with the applicant company's right and the proprietary rights of the individual applicants' who demolished their three-storey villa on the strength of the building permit issued by the authorities, cannot be considered lawful within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the applicants' fundamental rights (see Iatridis, cited above, § 62).
117. There has, accordingly, been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
118. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
119. The individual applicants claimed 1,547,037.4 euros in respect of pecuniary damage and 270,000 euros in respect of non-pecuniary damage. The applicant company claimed 10,297,947 euros in respect of pecuniary damage and 1,650,000 euros in respect of non-pecuniary damage. In support of their claim for pecuniary damage, they submitted an expert's valuation report.
120. The Government submitted that the individual applicants and the applicant company had not exhausted the domestic remedies in respect of their claims for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. However, the Court would point out that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies does not apply in connection with Article 41 claims (see Matache and Others v. Romania (just satisfaction), no. 38113/02, § 16, 17 June 2008).
121. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Albanian Government and the applicant company and the individual applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention as regards a breach of the principle of legal certainty;
3. Holds that it does not consider it necessary to examine the complaint about the length of the proceedings under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
5. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within the forthcoming three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 23 March 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; la soddisfazione Equa riservò
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA MULLAI ED ALTRI C. ALBANIA
(Richiesta n. 9074/07)
SENTENZA
(meriti)
STRASBOURG
23 marzo 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Mullai ed Altri c. Albania,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Nebojša Vučinić, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 2 marzo 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 9074/07) contro la Repubblica dell'Albania depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da sette cittadini albanesi, OMISSIS (“i richiedenti individuali”) e da T. sh.p.k. (“la società richiedente”), una società a responsabilità limitata, il 1 dicembre 2006.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. S. P., un avvocato che pratica a Tirana. Il Governo albanese (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dall’allora suo Agente, la Sig.ra S. Meneri.
3. I richiedenti addussero una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione a causa dell'annullamento di una sentenza definitiva, dell'insuccesso delle autorità nell’ eseguire una sentenza definitiva di corte e della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti.
4. Il 12 settembre 2007 il Presidente della Sezione al quale la causa fu assegnata decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, fu deciso di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità. Nella stessa data la richiesta fu resa prioritaria sotto l’Articolo 41 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
5. I richiedenti ed il Governo entrambi hanno registrato delle osservazioni scritte (Articolo 59 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti individuali nacquero rispettivamente nel 1938, 1938, 1926 1963, 1942 1970 e 1954 e vivono in Albania, negli Stati Uniti d’ America e in Italia.
7. La società richiedente è incorporata sotto la legge albanese ed è registrata a Tirana.
A. Procedimenti riguardo alla restituzione della proprietà
8. I richiedenti individuali sono gli eredi di un certo Sig. M. che, nel 1947, era il proprietario della villa di tre - piani e di un'area adiacente di terreno situato nel centro di Tirana. In una data non specificata nel 1947 le autorità confiscarono la proprietà che rimase in loro possesso sino al 1994.
9. Il 30 dicembre 1994, in seguito alla richiesta dei richiedenti individuali in conformità con l’Atto di Proprietà del 1993, la Commissione di Tirana sulla Restituzione ed il Risarcimento della Proprietà (“la Commissione”) accolse la loro rivendicazione sulla villa e su 1,100 metri quadrati di terreno. La Commissione rettificò questa decisione l’8 agosto 2002, riconoscendo i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti individuali si un'area di terreno che misurava 1,515 metri quadrati corrispondente alla proprietà originale. Il titolo di proprietà fu iscritto nel Registro Fondiario.
10. Dal 1996 al 1998 la proprietà riguardata fu affittata dai richiedenti individuali all'Ambasciata della Libia a Tirana.
B. Procedimenti riguardo al permesso di costruzione
1. Procedimenti amministrativi
11. 30 aprile 1998 i richiedenti individuali entrarono in un accordo con la società richiedente per la costruzione di un grattacielo sulla loro proprietà. Sotto questo accordo alla società richiedente fu data autorità per ottenere le autorizzazioni amministrative necessarie per la costruzione. Un contratto definitivo sarebbe stato concluso una volta ottenuta la licenza richiesta.
12. Il 23 ottobre 1998 e il 22 dicembre 1998 il Consiglio del Municipio di Tirana per la Pianificazione Territoriale (Këshilli i Rregullimit Territorit të Bashkisë së Tiranës -“il CTP municipale”) concesse alla società richiedente una licenza di pianificazione ed una licenza edileche l’autorizzava di licenza a costruire l'edificio di sedici - piani sulla proprietà. Di conseguenza,
il 15 luglio 1999 il Consiglio Tecnico del Municipio di Tirana (Këshilli Teknik i Bashkisë së Tiranës) autorizzò la società richiedente a demolire la villa di tre piano esistente e ad erigere la nuova costruzione al suo posto.
13. In una data non specificata nel 1999 la società richiedente demolì la villa e sviluppò il luogo secondo le licenze e piani approvati dal Municipio di Tirana (“il Municipio”).
14. Il 31 agosto 1999, mentre il lavoro di costruzione era in corso, il Prefetto di Tirana, (“il Prefetto”) emise un avviso di sospensione del lavoro. L'avviso affermava che la licenza edile avrebbe dovuto essere accordata dal Consiglio nazionale per la Pianificazione Territoriale (“il CTP nazionale”) e che il Municipio aveva ecceduto la sua competenza autorizzando la costruzione di tale grande edificio nel centro di Tirana (vedere paragrafo 59 sotto).
15. Il 6 settembre 1999 il Municipio informò il Prefetto che la licenza edile era in ordine ed era stata emessa sulla base delle disposizioni legali attinenti. Ciononostante questo, il 4 ottobre 1999, la Polizia Edile di Tirana Costruzione (Policia Ndërtimore) eseguì l’ordinanza del Prefetto e sospese i lavori sul luogo di costruzione.
16. Il 12 gennaio 2000, agendo su richiesta della società richiedente, il Prefetto annullò la sua precedente ordinanza ed fece riprendere i lavori di costruzione.
17. Il 22 gennaio 2000 il Ministro dei Lavori Pubblici (“il Ministro”) ordinò la sospensione dei lavori di costruzione sulla base che le decisioni del CTP municipale (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra) doveva essere esaminato ed approvato dal CTP nazionale. Lo stesso giorno la Polizia Edile di Tirana eseguì l'ordine del Ministro sospendendo di nuovo i lavori.
18. Il 26 gennaio 2000 la società richiedente inutilmente introdusse una richiesta presso il Direttore della Polizia nazionale edile per far togliere l'ordine di sospensione.
19. Il 9 febbraio 2000 il CTP nazionale decise che un'interpretazione legale della validità della licenza edile era necessaria, affermando che la licenza era stata adottata sulla base dell’ Atto di Pianificazione Urbana del 1993 che era stato abrogato al tempo attinente. Non revocò l'ordine di sospensione. Né la decisione indicò esplicitamente l’ente che doveva essere responsabile per l'interpretazione legale. Comunque, sembra che la decisione fu rivolta al Municipio, chiedendogli di emettere un nuovo piano urbano dell'area ed informare di conseguenza il CTP nazionale.
20. Il 13 marzo 2000 e il 3 maggio 2000 il Ministero dei Lavori Pubblici richiese al Municipio di Tirana di attenersi con la decisione del CTP nazionale.
21. Secondo cui i richiedenti individuali e la società richiedente in una data non specificata nel 2000 il Municipio confermò la validità delle sue decisioni del 23 ottobre 1998 e del 22 dicembre 1998. Comunque, nessun documento che prova fu prodotto.
2. I procedimenti giudiziali riguardo alla legalità dell'ordine del Ministro e l'azione della Polizia edile del 22 gennaio 2000
22. In una data non specificata nel 2000 la società richiedente impugnò la validità degli atti sopra (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra).
23. L’ 11 luglio 2000 la Corte distrettuale respinse la loro richiesta. Nel suo ragionamento trovò che la licenza edile era priva di valore legale siccome era stata emessa sulla base dell’Atto di Pianificazione Urbana del 1993 che non era in vigore al tempo attinente. La parte operativa della sentenza non affermava che la licenza edile era priva di valore legale.
24. Il 4 gennaio 2001 la Corte d'appello di Tirana (“la Corte d'appello”) annullò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale. Sostenne i motivi di ricorso della società richiedente ed annullò l'ordine del Ministro e l'azione della Polizia edile.
25. Il 29 marzo 2001, a seguito di un ricorso da parte della Polizia edile, la Corte Suprema annullò la sentenza della Corte d'appello e sostenne quella della Corte distrettuale. La Corte Suprema trovò che la decisione del prefetto del 12 gennaio 2000 era ultra vires nella misura che i procedimenti erano pendenti di fronte al CTP nazionale. Date le circostanze, il Ministro la Polizia edile di Tirana avevano sospeso i lavori il 22 gennaio 2000. La sentenza affermava ciò che segue:
“(...) La corte nota che la decisione del CTP nazionale non è definitiva. Non determina i meriti della causa in questione, ma implica che loro saranno determinati una volta che i compiti emanati dalla decisione sono stati completati. Punto (a) della decisione del CTP nazionale [l'interpretazione legale della decisione del CTP municipale del 22 dicembre 1998] discute la legalità della licenza edile emessa dal CTP municipale. Comunque, non prende una decisione definitiva sulla questione, anche se avrebbe dovuto fare così. Non è chiara in merito a chi deve fare l'interpretazione legale della decisione del CTP municipale. (...)
I contenuti dei punti (b) [la preparazione di un nuovo piano urbano dell'area] e (c) [l'obbligo del Municipio di attenersi alla decisione del CTP nazionale ed informarlo di conseguenza] della decisione del CTP nazionale rinforza la conclusione che la decisione non è definitiva.
La decisione definitiva sarà presa dopo che il CTP municipale ha emesso un nuovo piano urbano dell'area che sarà soggetto ad esame da parte del CTP nazionale.
(...)
Spetta pienamente al CTP nazionale ,alla fine rivolgersi inequivocabilmente ai problemi sopra. Solamente dopo che le vie di ricorso amministrative sono state esaurite, con l'aiuto del CTP nazionale (...),la questione può essere riferita alle corti per la protezione dei diritti di proprietà e gli altri diritti in rem delle parti che confinano con l'area di terreno (...).
Il prefetto rappresenta il Consiglio dei Ministri [il Governo centrale] presso il governo locale. Lui è stato investito di poteri tramite legge. Comunque, quando un problema è stato trasferito al Governo centrale, anche di sua propria istanza, non può esercitare qualsiasi altro diritto. Altrimenti, ciò sarebbe considerato un eccesso di potere.”
26. Nella stessa sentenza la Corte Suprema continuò comunque a dichiarare la licenza edile priva di valore legale per le seguenti ragioni:
“(...) Risulta che al tempo in cui la licenza edile fu accordata, l’Atto di Pianificazione Urbana del 1993 che ridefinì la composizione del CTP municipale era stato abrogato. L’Articolo 19 del nuovo Atto[di Pianificazione Urbana] del 1998 stabilisce la nuova composizione del CTP municipale, fatta di 21 membri stipulando le rispettive funzioni e compiti da eseguire.
(...) Il nuovo Atto [del 1998] entrò in vigore il 25 ottobre 1998.
Dato che il nuovo Atto non contiene alcuna disposizioni di transizione che renderebbe legittima la continuazione dei lavori del CTP municipale sulla base dell'Atto del 1993, il nuovo CTP [municipale] avrebbe dovuto essere stabilito in ottemperanza con la composizione e i criteri di selezione dei suoi membri stabiliti nel nuovo Atto [del 1998] .
Di conseguenza qualsiasi decisione presa dal precedente CTP [sulla base dell’Atto di Pianificazione Urbana del 1993] è considerata nulla. Una decisione presa da un organo che è stato revocato dalla legge e sulla base di una legge abrogata è nulla e, essendo così, non può produrre qualsiasi conseguenza legale.
Essendo così,il permesso edile della [società richiedente] del 22 dicembre 1998 è considerato privo di valore legale.
Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede, la Magistratura Civile della Corte Suprema conclude, che la sentenza della Corte distrettuale non era ultra vires quando considerava la licenza edile priva di valore legale, anche se questa non era parte dell'oggetto di quei procedimenti.
[La Corte distrettuale] non esaminò il diritto [della società richiedente] a continuare i lavori edili siccome ciò sarebbe stato al di là dello scopo dell'esame della controversia amministrativa di fronte a sé.”
27. La parte operativa della direttiva della Corte Suprema non contenne nessuna menzione dell'invalidamento della licenza edile. La sentenza divenne definitiva lo stesso giorno siccome nessuna delle parti introdusse un'azione di reclamo presso la Corte Costituzionale.
C. I procedimenti giudiziali iniziati dall'Ambasciata svizzera a Tirana (“l'Ambasciata”)
28. Il 19 marzo 2001 l'Ambasciata i cui locali sono adiacenti al luogo di costruzione, impugnò la validità della licenza edile. I richiedenti individuali intervennero nei procedimenti come terze parti (ndërhyrës dytësor).
29. Il 28 maggio 2002 la Corte distrettuale dichiarò la licenza edile priva di valore legale. Senza riferirsi esplicitamente alle decisioni della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra), il ragionamento della Corte distrettuale affermò che la licenza edile era stata emessa sulla base dell’Atto di Pianificazione Urbana del 1993 che era stato abrogato al tempo attinente.
30. I richiedenti individuali e la società richiedente fecero ricorso. Il 3 marzo 2003 la Corte d'appello richiese al CTP nazionale di decidere sulla validità della licenza edile alla luce delle decisioni della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 per cui tutte le vie di ricorso amministrative dovevano essere esaurite (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra).
31. Il 18 giugno 2003 il CTP nazionale sostenne la validità della licenza edile emessa dal Municipio. Nella sua lettera alla Corte d'appello il Ministro della Pianificazione Territoriale, comportandosi come presidente aggiunto del CTP nazionale, indicò che i procedimenti giudiziali pendenti di fronte alla Corte d'appello avrebbero esaminato ed infine chiarito la controversia (është procesi gjyqësor që do të bëjë vlerësimin dhe do të zgjidhë përfundimisht konfliktin e paraqitur në lidhje me këtë objekt).
32. Il 3 ottobre 2003 la Corte d'appello annullò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale ed archiviò la causa. Nel suo ragionamento, affermò, che l'Ambasciata aveva depositato la sua azione fuori dal tempo-limite prescritto dal Codice di Procedura Civile. Sembra che la licenza edile fu dichiarata legale, benché nessuna menzione di questo fosse stata fatta nella parte operativa della sentenza. La Corte d'appello non fece qualsiasi riferimento al ragionamento della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 che aveva dichiarato la licenza edile priva di valore legale (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). Non c'era ordine nella sentenza affinché venissero ripresi i lavori di costruzione.
1. Sviluppi in seguito alla sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003
33. Il 15 settembre 2003 la società richiedente richiese alla Polizia edile di annullare l'ordine per la sospensione dei lavori di costruzione sulla base della decisione del CTP nazionale del 18 giugno 2003 (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra).
34. La Polizia edile richiese alla società richiedente di aggiornare l'archivio relativo al lavoro presentando ex novo i documenti necessari in modo che potesse considerare la richiesta. La società richiedente presentò i documenti come richiesto. Non fu ricevuta nessuna risposta dalla polizia .
35. Il 29 dicembre 2004, in seguito alla richiesta della società richiedente per intervento, il difensore civico albanese (Avokati i Popullit) ammise che la licenza edile era stata dichiarata priva di valore legale con la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 e si rifiutò di intervenire.
2. Procedimenti di fronte alla Corte Suprema
36. Il 20 aprile 2005, a seguito di un ricorso da parte dell'Ambasciata, la Corte Suprema sostenne la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003. Trovò che l'Ambasciata non aveva locus standi per impugnare la licenza edile contestata licenza e ragionò, nella parte attinente, come segue.
“La licenza edile si riferisce ad una relazione amministrativo-legale fra la società edile [la società richiedente] ed il CTP nazionale. L'azione introdotta dal querelante [l'Ambasciata] non può essere pertinente al di fuori del contesto di un'azione riguardo alla cessazione di interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà (...)
L’Articolo 32 (un) del Codice di Procedura Civile stipula: “Un'azione legale civile è depositata per chiedere la riabilitazione di un diritto o di un interesse legittimo che è stato violato.” (...)
Nella presente causa, nessun interesse legittimo all'interno del significato della disposizione citata sopra è stato invocato. [L'Ambasciata] non ha dibattuto qualsiasi violazione o rifiuto di un diritto causato direttamente a sé dalla licenza edile dell'imputato. Dall’introduzione dell'azione civile ed per tutti i procedimenti [della corte] , [l'Ambasciata] ha esposto soltanto delle violazioni procedurali associate all'accordo della licenza edile. L'esistenza o meno di queste violazioni non può urtare il diritto soggettivo di un rivendicatore. Il rivendicatore avrebbe locus standi se adducesse che il lavoro di costruzione della società aveva dato luogo ad una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. Anche se [l'Ambasciata] inizialmente introdusse tale rivendicazione, la ritirò successivamente e non la riferì alla corte.
(...) la corte conclude che [all'Ambasciata] manca un interesse legale e perciò manca di locus standi per depositare l'azione civile.
(...)
Il rivendicatore dibatté che la Corte d'appello aveva sbagliato ad accettare che il CTP nazionale decidesse sulla validità della licenza edile siccome nessuna decisione era stata emesso da quell'autorità. Questa azione di reclamo si riferisce alla determinazione dei meriti della causa sui quali la corte ritiene improprio decidere in un modo o nell'altro.
Alla luce delle conclusioni sopra, non ci sono altri motivi legali per impugnare la sentenza della Corte d'appello.”
37. Nella sua direttiva, la Corte Suprema non esaminò la legalità della licenza edile. La sentenza divenne definitiva lo stesso giorno, siccome nessuna delle parti introdusse un'azione di reclamo presso la Corte Costituzionale.
3. Sviluppi a seguito della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 20 aprile 2005
38. Il 22 giugno 2005 la società richiedente, considerando che la legalità della licenza edile era stata sostenuta dalla sentenza della Corte Suprema del 20 aprile 2005, e data l'inattività della Polizia edile, informò il Municipio che aveva deciso di riprendere la costruzione nonostante il fatto che un ordine sospensivo fosse ancora in vigore.
39. Il 23 giugno 2005 la Polizia Municipale (Policia Bashkiake) ispezionò il luogo di costruzione ed ordinò la sospensione dei lavori fino al tempo in cui le misure di sicurezza sarebbero state osservate in modo appropriato.
40. Il 29 giugno 2005 la Polizia Municipale prolungò l'ordine di sospensione a causa delle violazioni delle norme di pianificazione urbane. In una lettera del 4 luglio 2005 la società richiedente offrì chiarimenti riguardo alle violazioni addotte.
41. Il 30 novembre 2005, a seguito della richiesta della società richiedente per avere il permesso di riprendere i lavori edili, la Polizia edile li informò che la richiesta riguardo alla controversia fra la società richiedente e la Polizia Municipale era fuori dalla loro giurisdizione.
D. Il secondo set di procedimenti giudiziali iniziato dall'Ambasciata
42. In una data non specificata nel 2005 l'Ambasciata iniziò un altro set di procedimenti presso la Corte distrettuale adducendo che la nuova costruzione violava i suoi diritti di proprietà.
43.Il 14 dicembre 2005 la Corte distrettuale consegnò la sua sentenza che trovava che il nuovo edificio non si sarebbe attenuto con le distanze di pianificazione urbane e perciò avrebbe violato i diritti di proprietà dell'Ambasciata. La Corte distrettuale ordinò la sospensione dei lavori di costruzione sino alla determinazione definitiva della controversia. Si appellò alla sentenza della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 che aveva dichiarato la licenza edile priva di valore legale.
44. In una data non specificata fra il 2005 ed il 2006 la società richiedente impugnò la legalità della sentenza della Corte distrettuale di fronte alla Corte d'appello, dibattendo che la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003 che era divenuta definitiva confermò la validità della licenza edile (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra). La sentenza della Corte distrettuale del 14 dicembre 2005 aveva annullato questa direttiva definitiva, contravvenendo con ciò al principio della certezza legale.
45. La sentenza della Corte distrettuale non era stata ancora notificata due mesi più tardi, alla società richiedente. Il 15 marzo 2006, a seguito delle azioni di reclamo della società richiedente, l’Alto Consiglio di Giustizia li informò che la causa era stata spedita al Ministero della Giustizia perché gli appropriati procedimenti disciplinari venissero presi contro i giudici di Corte distrettuale che non erano riusciti a consegnare la sentenza. In una lettera del 5 aprile 2006 la società richiedente si lamentò presso la Corte d'appello di non aver ricevuto ancora notifica tramite una copia della sentenza della Corte distrettuale. L'archivio della causa indica che la sentenza fu notificata loro ad un certo punto dopo il 5 aprile 2006.
46. Il 13 giugno 2007 la Corte d'appello annullò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale. Trovò che non c'era stata interferenza coi diritti di proprietà dell'Ambasciata poiché la costruzione era appena cominciata, così non c'era nessun edificio che doveva attenersi con le distanze di pianificazione urbane. Sostenne inoltre che siccome la Corte Suprema aveva trovato nella sua sentenza del 29 marzo 2001 che la licenza edile non era valida, non ci sarebbe potuto essere interferenza coi diritti di proprietà dell'Ambasciata. Infine archiviò la causa.
47. In una data non specificata nel 2007 l'Ambasciata fece ricorso alla Corte Suprema. Il 14 luglio 2009 la Corte Suprema dichiarò il ricorso inammissibile in conformità con l’Articolo 472 del Codice di Procedura Civile (nessuno motivo valido di ricorso).
1. Sviluppi in seguito alla sentenza della Corte d'appello del 13 giugno 2007
48. Il 1 agosto 2007 la Polizia edile di Tirana informò l'Ambasciata ed il Ministero dei Lavori Pubblici che si sarebbe attenuta con la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 13 giugno 2007 che, secondo lei, aveva confermato la legalità della licenza edile della società richiedente.
49. Il 21 agosto 2007 su richiesta della società richiedente, la Corte distrettuale emise un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza a riguardo della sentenza della Corte d'appello del 13 giugno 2007.
50. In una data non specificata nel 2007 la società richiedente riprese i lavori di costruzione che furono sospesi successivamente dalla Polizia edile l’11 settembre 2007 con la cooperazione della polizia.
51. Il 13 settembre 2007 l’Ispettorato Edile Municipale (“MCI”) richiese alla società richiedente pdi fornire alcuni documenti tecnici mancanti.
52. Il 19 settembre 2007 su richiesta della società richiedente, l'ufficio dell'accusatore di Tirana investigò sulla legalità dell'azione della Polizia edile dell’ 11 settembre 2007 in mancanza di qualsiasi avviso scritto della sospensione dei lavori di costruzione. La società richiedente sostenne che era stato dato credito alla validità della licenza edile da parte del CTP nazionale ed era stata confermata dalle sentenze della Corte d'appello e della Corte Suprema rispettivamente del 3 ottobre 2003 e del 20 aprile 2005.
53. Il 24 settembre 2007 il MCI ordinò la sospensione di lavori di costruzione perché certi documenti tecnici mancavano dall'archivio. Il 1 ottobre 2007 la società richiedente fece ricorso presso l’Ispettorato Edile Nazionale (“il NCI”). Il 30 ottobre 2007 il NCI informò la società richiedente che loro avrebbero dovuto presentare le loro questioni al MCI.
54. Il 5 gennaio 2008, notando che alcuni documenti tecnici erano stati persi, il MCI decise di sospendere i lavori. Non c'è nessuna indicazione che un ricorso è stato introdotto contro quella decisione. Il 16 gennaio 2008 il MCI prolungò l'ordine di sospensione per un periodo di sessanta giorni.
55. Il 18 marzo 2008 il MCI decise congiuntamente di fermare il lavoro di costruzione e demolire ciò che era già stato costruito. Non c'è nessuna indicazione che un ricorso è stato introdotto contro quella decisione. Né vi è qualsiasi informazione che la costruzione esistente è stata demolita.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. La Costituzione
56. La Costituzione albanese, nella parte attinente, si legge come segue:
Articolo 131
“La Corte Costituzionale deciderà: ... (f) azioni di reclamo definitive da parte di individui che adducono una violazione dei loro diritti costituzionali ad un'udienza corretta, dopo tutte le vie di ricorso legali per la protezione di quei diritti sono state esaurite.”
B. L’Atto di Pianificazione Urbana del 1998 (Legge n. 8405 del 17 settembre 1998 corretta dalla Legge n. 8501 del 16 giugno 1999, Legge n. 8991 del 23 gennaio 2003 e, più recentemente, Legge n. 9843 del 17 dicembre 2007) (“L'Atto del 1998”)
57. L'Atto del 1998 definisce gli articoli generali che disciplinano l'ubicazione e l’ architettura delle costruzioni in Albania. L'Atto entrò in vigore il 25 ottobre 1998. La Sezione 7 prevede la costituzione del CTP nazionale, presieduta dal Primo Ministro. La sua composizione è determinata tramite decisione del Consiglio dei Ministri (sezione 8). Il Ministero responsabile della pianificazione territoriale coordina il lavoro del CTP nazionale (sezione 12). La Sezione 14 prevede la costituzione dei CTP municipali.
58. L'Atto del 1998 avviò una procedura doppia per ottenere le licenze necessarie. Una richiesta per il permesso di progettazione (kërkesa për shesh ndërtimi) dovrebbe essere presentata inizialmente per un esame e l’ approvazione da parte del CTP Municipale facendo seguito alla sezione 39. Una licenza edile (leje ndërtimi) dovrebbe essere ottenuta poi facendo seguito alla sezione 45. Questo è il solo documento legale sulla base di cui si possono cominciare i lavori di costruzione.
59. La Sezione 9 dell'Atto del 1998 conferiva poteri al CTP nazionale, fra le altre cose di approvare la pianificazione urbana e le licenze edili a riguardo di costruzioni localizzate nel centro delle città. Sotto la sezione 10 dell'Atto del 1998 al CTP nazionale furono conferiti poteri per annullare le decisioni adottate dai CTP municipali. Con la decisione n. 29 del 21 dicembre 2006 la Corte Costituzionale ha dichiarato incostituzionale queste parti della sezione 9 e della sezione 10, poiché loro violavano il principio costituzionale di decentralizzazione e l'autonomia di governo locale.
C. L’Atto della Polizia edile del 1998 (“L’Atto della Polizia del 1998”) corretto dall’Atto dell’ispezione Edile del 2007 (“L’Atto della Polizia del 2007”) (la Legge numero 8408 del 25 settembre 1998 come abrogata dalla Legge n. 9780 16 luglio 2007)
60. L’ Atto di Polizia del 1998 costituì la Polizia edile, responsabile della sopraintendenza dell’ottemperanza con la legislazione di pianificazione urbana. Alla Polizia edile furono conferiti poteri per imporre multe, decidere sulla sospensione dei lavori di costruzione ed ordinare la demolizione di costruzioni illegali.
61. L’ Atto di Polizia del 2007 abrogò L’ Atto di Polizia del 1998 ed introdusse l’Ispettorato Edile e di Pianificazione Urbana che opera a livello municipale/comunale (“Ispettorato Municipale Edile - il MCI”), a livello distrettuale (qark) ed a livello nazionale (“Ispettorato Edile Nazionale -il NCI”) (sezioni 3, 7 e 8).
62. I doveri del MCI includono l'imposizione di imposte, la sospensione dei lavori edili e la demolizione di costruzioni illegali (sezione 5). Gli ispettori hanno diritto ad accedere ed ispezionare i siti edili (sezione 12 e decisione del Consiglio del Ministro n. 862 del 5 dicembre 2007).
63. Le decisioni del MCI sono aperte al ricorso di fronte al NCI. Una parte interessata può intentare causa di corte contro una decisione del NCI. L'azione di corte non ha effetto sospensivo sull'esecuzione della decisione amministrativa contestata (sezione 14).
D. L'Atto sull'Organizzazione e l’ Operazione della Polizia Municipale e Comunale (“L’ Atto della Polizia Municipale”) (Legge n. 8224 del 15 maggio 1997 corretta dalla Legge n. 8335 del 23 aprile 1998)
64. L’Atto di Polizia Municipale prevede la costituzione della Polizia Municipale che risponde al Sindaco ed opera sotto la soprintendenza del Prefetto. Sotto la sezione 8, la Polizia Municipale assicura l'attuazione effettiva di atti e di decisioni del Sindaco e del consiglio urbano che si riferiscono all’ordine pubblico e al mantenimento delle infrastrutture pubbliche. Ostacola, ferma o demolisce costruzioni illegali, ed ostacola l'occupazione illegale di aree di terreno, di edifici e di proprietà che appartengono al municipio ed assicura la loro evacuazione immediata (sezione 8 § 6).
E. Codice di Procedura Civile
65. Gli Articoli 189-201 disciplinano la partecipazione di terze parti a procedimenti civili. L’Articolo 195 prevede che una terza parte ha diritto ad intraprendere tutti gli stessi passi procedurali delle parti principali ai procedimenti, ad eccezione dei passi riguardanti la disposizione dell'oggetto dell'azione civile. L’Articolo 196 prevede che l'effetto di una decisione presa dopo l'intervento di una terza parte si estende ugualmente alla relazione fra la terza parte ed il rivendicatore o l'imputato.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
66. I richiedenti addussero un numero di violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, incluso l’insuccesso nell’esecuzione della sentenza definitiva della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003, una violazione del principio di certezza legale come risultato dell'annullamento di questa sentenza definitivo e la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti.
L’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, nella parte attinente, recita:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
67. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003 che addussero aveva stabilito che la licenza edile era valida e che il lavoro edile sarebbe dovuto continuare.
68. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non si erano lamentati di fronte alle corti nazionali della non-esecuzione di una sentenza definitiva di corte, e che non c'era stata violazione a causa dell'insuccesso delle autorità nell’esecuzione di una sentenza definitiva di corte.
69. I richiedenti dibatterono che la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003 era una sentenza definitiva ma era stata annullata dalla sentenza della Corte distrettuale del 14 dicembre 2005, violando il principio della certezza legale.
70. Il Governo contese che l'oggetto del secondo e del terzo set di procedimenti differivano. La validità della licenza edile era stata infine determinata dalla sentenza della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001. Il secondo set di procedimenti era stato respinto dalle corti nazionali perché l'Ambasciata non aveva locus standi.
71. Secondo i richiedenti, i procedimenti nazionali avevano superato il requisito del termine ragionevole all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
72. Il Governo non sollevò alcuna eccezione riguardo all'ammissibilità di questa azione di reclamo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
a. La mancanza di certezza legale riguardo le decisioni delle corti nazionali
73. La Corte reitera che è padrona della caratterizzazione da dare in legge ai fatti della causa. Non si considera legata alla caratterizzazione data da un richiedente o da un governo (vedere Guerra ed Altri c. Italia, 19 febbraio 1998, § 44 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-I).
74. La Corte nota che le parti non contestarono l'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Nella prospettiva della Corte, avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa, le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti in merito alla non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003 e del addotto annullamento sono essenzialmente collegate alla legalità della licenza edile che costituisce il problema centrale delle azioni di reclamo. Considera perciò che è necessario esaminare ambo le azioni di reclamo dalla prospettiva del principio della certezza legale, in particolare se le corti nazionali hanno intrapreso una linea uniforme di ragionamenti riguardo alla legalità della licenza edile.
75. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
b. La lunghezza dei procedimenti
76. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Riguardo alla mancanza di certezza legale concernente le decisioni delle corti nazionali
a. Le osservazioni delle parti
77. Il Governo contese che la licenza edile era stata dichiarata priva di valore legale dalla Corte Suprema nella sua sentenza del 29 marzo 2001 che aveva acquisito forza di res judicata. Dibatté che la causa era complessa, come dimostrato dalla necessità di tre set diversi di procedimenti.
78. I richiedenti dibatterono che la legalità della licenza edile era stata sostenuta dalla sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003 che era divenuta definitiva. Loro sostennero che la causa non era complessa e che le autorità erano da biasimare per avere reso inutilmente complicati i procedimenti.
b. La valutazione della Corte
79. Il diritto ad un'udienza equa di fronte ad un tribunale come garantito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione deve essere interpretato alla luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, dichiara la preminenza del diritto come parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti. Uno degli aspetti fondamentali della preminenza del diritto è il principio della certezza legale che richiede fra le altre cose che dove le corti infine hanno determinato una questione, la loro decisione non dovrebbe essere chiamata in questione (vedere Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61 ECHR 1999-VII).
80. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte deve determinare se una decisione definitiva e vincolante fu adottata riguardo alla legalità della licenza edile. Reitera che spetta primariamente alle autorità nazionali, in particolare le corti, interpretare ed applicare il diritto nazionale. Non spetta alla Corte valutare i fatti sulla base dei quali le corti nazionali hanno adottato la loro decisione, purché sia compatibile con gli articoli della Convenzione. La Corte può, all'interno della struttura dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, esaminare richieste che adducono una violazione di specifiche garanzie procedurali o addurre che la condotta della procedura, nell'insieme, non offra le garanzie del diritto ad un'udienza equa al richiedente (vedere Schwarzkopf e Taussik c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 42162/02, 2 dicembre 2008).
81. La Corte nota che i tre set di procedimenti furono condotti nella presente richiesta, coprendo un periodo di circa dieci anni. Mentre l'oggetto di ogni set di procedimenti era fino ad un certo punto diverso, l'essenza di tutti di loro, prendendo conto delle sentenze delle corti nazionali, era la legalità del permesso edile della società richiedente.
82. Il primo set di procedimenti che esaminò la legalità dell'ordine del Ministro e l'azione della Polizia edile si rivolse alla legalità della licenza edile. La Corte trova il ragionamento nella sentenza della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 incoerente. La Corte Suprema dichiarò che la decisione del prefetto del 12 gennaio 2000 era ultra vires a causa del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso amministrative nazionali a riguardo della validità della licenza edile. Nella stessa sentenza, la Corte Suprema annullò questa sentenza e procedette a dichiarare la licenza edile priva di valore legale.
83. La Corte considera che simile discordanze all'interno della stessa sentenza della Corte Suprema sono incompatibili con la sua funzione giudiziale. Il ruolo di una corte superire in una Parte Contraente deve precisamente risolvere i conflitti, evitare le divergenze ed essere coerente. Infatti, nella presente la causa, la Corte Suprema stessa è divenuta la fonte di incertezza che mina la fiducia pubblica nell'ordinamento giudiziario e nella preminenza del diritto (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Beian c. Romania (n. 1), n. 30658/05, §§ 37-39 ECHR 2007 -...).
84. I conseguenti procedimenti giudiziali si aggiunsero in particolare a quel clima generale d’incertezza legale. Fu durante quei procedimenti che l'Ambasciata ha cercato essenzialmente di far revocare la licenza edile. Il fatto che la Corte distrettuale esaminò l'azione dell'Ambasciata suggeriva che la validità della licenza edile non era stata stabilita definitivamente nel primo set di procedimenti. Inoltre, la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003 sembrò riconoscere la legalità della licenza edile, mentre la sentenza della Corte Suprema del20 maggio 2005 lasciò il problema della sua legalità senza risposta (vedere paragrafi 32 e 36–37 sopra).
85. Nel terzo set di procedimenti giudiziali, le corti nazionali riconobbero l'invalidamento della licenza edile.
86. La Corte nota che gli Stati Contraenti hanno l'obbligo di organizzare il loro ordinamento giuridico così da permettere alle corti di identificare i procedimenti relativi e, dove necessario, evitare l'adozione di sentenze discordi. Considera che il problema fondamentale nella presente causa è stato il risultato della molteplicità di procedimenti legali che avrebbero potuto essere gestiti meglio così da contribuire a velocizzare la chiarificazione dei problemi. Per la Corte non si può considerare che l'esistenza di multipli procedimenti paralleli collegati tra loro che sollevano sostanzialmente lo stesso problema legale sia in ottemperanza con la preminenza del diritto. Dando un numero di decisioni contraddittorie a molti livelli di giurisdizione le autorità albanesi hanno dimostrato un difetto nel sistema giudiziale per il quale loro sono responsabili (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Gjonbocari ed Altri c. Albania, n. 10508/02, §§ 66-67 23 ottobre 2007; Marini c. Albania, n. 3738/02, § 145 ECHR 2007 -... (gli estratti); e Driza c. Albania, n. 33771/02, § 69 ECHR 2007-XII (estratti)).
87. Il modo in cui procedettero le altre autorità nazionali era lontano inoltre, dalla coerenza con l'obbligo dello Stato di trattare la situazione dei richiedenti nel modo più chiaro e coerente possibile e con la massima coerenza (vedere Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 120 ECHR 2000-I). Le lettere delle autorità nazionali del 1 agosto e del19 settembre 2007 aggiunsero ulteriore confusione a questa mancanza continua di chiarezza e di certezza (vedere paragrafi 48 e 52 sopra). Inoltre, nessuno degli ordini di sospensione emessi dopo il 29 marzo 2001 menzionava l'invalidamento della licenza edile come loro base principale della giustificazione (vedere paragrafi 39–40 e 53–55 sopra).
88. Avendo riguardo alla combinazione delle ragioni sopra, la Corte considera, che c'è stata di conseguenza una violazione del principio della certezza legale riguardo alla mancanza di ragionamento coerente nelle decisioni delle corti nazionali sulla legalità della licenza edile.
2. Riguardo la lunghezza dei procedimenti
89. La Corte considera che alla luce della sua costatazione di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione della violazione del principio di certezza legale, non deve decidere separatamente sui meriti della lunghezza dell’ azione di reclamo dei procedimenti.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
90. I richiedenti individuali e la società richiedente addussero che il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era stato violato. Loro si lamentarono inoltre che di essere stati privati illegalmente dell'uso della loro proprietà per un periodo lungo di tempo.
L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione recita:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
91. Il Governo sostenne che la società richiedente non aveva “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 siccome la decisione della Corte Suprema del 29 marzo 2001 aveva dichiarato la licenza edile priva di valore legale. Loro richiesero alla Corte di dichiarare questa azione di reclamo incompatibile ratione materiae.
92. Il Governo presentò che i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti individuali furono limitati con l'accordo contrattuale che avevano concluso con la società richiedente. L'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti individuali di una violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà avrebbe dovuta essere diretta verso la società richiedente all'interno della struttura dell'accordo che loro avevano concluso con questa. Nella prospettiva del Governo, i sette richiedenti individuali non potevano essere considerati di conseguenza, vittime all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Inoltre, i richiedenti individuali non avevano avviato qualsiasi procedimento legale riguardo alla violazione addotta dei loro diritti di proprietà.
93. I richiedenti individuali contesero che loro erano “vittime” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Loro ricordarono che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 abilita i proprietari al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà che comprendono inter alia, il diritto a concludere accordi con terze parti per disporre liberamente della loro proprietà vendendola ed affittandola o costruendo edifici su questa nella piena ottemperanza con le disposizioni del diritto nazionale attinente. I richiedenti individuali avevano concluso un accordo con la società richiedente come parte dei requisiti per ottenere una licenza edile. Nella prospettiva dei richiedenti individuali, il fatto che il municipio accordò la licenza edile per il lavoro di costruzione sulla loro proprietà non era, in principio, sufficiente a spogliarli dello status di vittima.
94. La società richiedente dibatté che la licenza edile costituiva una proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. La valutazione della Corte
95. La prima questione che sorge è se la società richiedente ed i richiedenti individuali avevano una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
96. La Corte richiama che la nozione “proprietà” nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato certamente alla proprietà di beni fisici ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale: anche certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono dei beni possono essere riguardati come “diritti di proprietà” e così come “proprietà.” Il problema che deve essere esaminato in ogni causa è se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, conferiscono un titolo ai richiedenti su un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Beyeler [GC], citato sopra, § 100, ECHR 2000-I; Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 129 il 2004-V di ECHR; ed Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 63 ECHR 2007 -...).
97. Nella caso di beni non-fisici, la Corte ha preso in esame, in particolare, se la posizione legale in oggetto ha generato dei diritti finanziari e degli interessi e così aveva un valore economico (vedere, per esempio, Anheuser-Busch Inc., citata sopra, dove la proprietà intellettuale costituiva una proprietà; Paeffgen GMBH c. Germania (dec.), n. 25379/04, 21688/05, 21722/05 e 21770/05 del 18 settembre 2007 in cui il diritto ad usare o a disporre di domini internet costituiva una proprietà; Pine Valley Developments Ltd Ltd ed Altri c. Irlanda, 29 novembre 1991 Serie A n. 222, dove la concessione di una licenza operativa commerciale da parte delle autorità costituiva una proprietà; e Tre Traktörer Ab c. Svezia, 7 luglio 1989 Serie A n. 159 in cui delle licenze per servire bibite alcoliche costituivano una proprietà).
98. La Corte esaminerà se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, conferirono alla società richiedente ed ai richiedenti individuali un interesse protetti dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. In questo collegamento, nota che una richiesta per una licenza edile non può generare un interesse di proprietà riservato e ben definito. Tale interesse si materializzerebbe se la richiesta, dopo essere stata esaminato e trovata soddisfare le condizioni formali e procedurali attinenti, è stata accettata dall'autorità attinente emettendo una licenza edile.
99. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota che una licenza edile fu accordata alla società richiedente dal municipio di Tirana il 22 dicembre 1998 per costruire sull'area di terreno dei richiedenti individuali. Di conseguenza, la licenza edile costituiva “la proprietà” per la società richiedente. Per questo, l'eccezione del Governo riguardo alla mancanza della società richiedente di “proprietà” dovrebbe essere respinta.
100. La licenza edile generò anche di per sé , i benefici del contratto negoziati fra la società richiedente ed i richiedenti individuali per la costruzione del grattacielo. Generò perciò un capitale investito ed aveva un valore economico definito per i richiedenti individuali. Era sulla forza della licenza edile che l’allora villa esistente di tre piani dei richiedenti individuali fu demolita. Inoltre, non si è contestato che i richiedenti individuali continuarono ad avere diritti di proprietà sull'area di terreno che è un “proprietà esistente” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Perciò, l'osservazione del Governo basata sulla mancanza di status di vittima dei richiedenti individuali deve essere respinta.
101. Riguardo all'osservazione del Governo che i richiedenti individuali non esaurirono le vie di ricorso nazionali, la Corte reitera che nel contesto del sistema per la protezione dei diritti umani la norma sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere applicato con un grado di flessibilità e senza formalismo eccessivo. Allo stesso tempo richiede in principio che le azioni di reclamo che si intende portare successivamente a livello internazionale avrebbe dovuto essere presentate di fronte le corti [appropriate nazionali], almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e i tempo-limiti stabiliti in diritto nazionale (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Azinas c. Cipro [GC], n. 56679/00, § 38, ECHR 2004-III, e Fressoz e Roire c. Francia [GC], n. 29183/95, § 37 ECHR 1999-io).
102. La società richiedente era un partner che si accordò con i sette richiedenti individuali di avvalersi del loro interesse di proprietà. La società richiedente era la parte principale ai procedimenti nazionali, coi richiedenti individuali che si comportavano come intervenuti in particolare nel primo set di procedimenti iniziato dall'Ambasciata svizzera che, nella loro opinione, diede luogo al riconoscimento della validità della licenza edile. Nella prospettiva della Corte, i procedimenti nazionali devono essere considerati un esame dei rispettivi diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti individuali e della società richiedente, poiché la legalità della licenza edile era collegata col godimento dei richiedenti individuali del loro interesse di proprietà. Di conseguenza, l'eccezione del Governo basata sul non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali da parte dei richiedenti individuali deve essere respinta.
103. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
104. Il Governo contese che il comportamento della società richiedente impedì alle autorità di esaminare la legalità della licenza edile. Dibatté che nella sua decisione n. 1 del 27 aprile 2004 il CTP Nazionale aveva previsto la costruzione di edifici non più alti di tre piani nel centro urbano.
105. I richiedenti individuali e la società richiedente sostennero che le autorità avevano interferito con le loro proprietà impedendo alla società richiedente di costruire un edificio sull'area di terreno dei richiedenti individuali.
106. I richiedenti presentarono che il punto cruciale della loro azione di reclamo riguardava la non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte d'appello del 3 ottobre 2003. Loro sostennero che l'incertezza legale che circondava la riluttanza delle autorità esecutive ad attenersi con una licenza edile valida e la mancanza di qualsiasi via di ricorso nazionale effettiva, combinata con l'assenza di qualsiasi risarcimento, significava aver fatto sopportare loro un carico eccessivo.
107. Inoltre, dissero che l'interferenza delle autorità con la costruzione di un edificio adiacente alla proprietà di una Ambasciata estera non perseguiva un interesse generale, né ha previsto un equilibrio equo. Loro menzionarono anche che già esistevano edifici alti nel vicinato immediato della loro proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
a. Se c'era un'interferenza
108. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti. Il primo articolo che è di una natura generale enuncia il principio di godimento tranquillo della proprietà; è esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo. Il secondo articolo prevede la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni. Il terzo articolo riconosce che agli Stati viene concesso, fra le altre cose, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale, legiferando come ritengono necessario per questo fine (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 61 Serie A n. 52).
109. La Corte nota che per molti anni i richiedenti individuali e la società richiedente non sono stati in grado di godere e di disporre liberamente dei loro benefici contrattuali come risultato della sospensione dei lavori di costruzione nata dalla legalità contestata della licenza edile. La molteplicità dei procedimenti legali è andata a vuoto nel rimediare alla situazione. C'è stata di conseguenza un'interferenza col loro diritto di proprietà.
110. Nell'opinione della Corte non c’ era nessuna espropriazione formale della proprietà in oggetto, vale a dire un trapasso di proprietà. Né si può dire che c'era stata una privazione de facto. Le misure contestate imposero limitazioni sul godimento dei richiedenti individuali e della società richiedente dei loro interessi di proprietà.
111. La Corte che l'interferenza deve essere considerata come un controllo dell'uso della proprietà dei richiedenti che rientra all'interno della sfera del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, per esempio, Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, §§ 62-64; Tre Traktörer Ab, citata sopra, § 55; ed Allan Jacobsson c. la Svezia (n. 1), 25 ottobre 1989, § 54 Serie A n. 163).
b. Se l'interferenza era legale
112. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà di qualcuno dovrebbe ssere legale (Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
113. La Corte considera che parlando di “legge”, l’Articolo 1 deò Protocollo N.ro 1 allude allo stesso concetto che si può trovare altrove nella Convenzione, un concetto che comprende la legge legale così come la giurisprudenza. Si riferisce alla qualità della legge in oggetto, richiedendo che sia accessibile alle persone riguardate, precisa e prevedibile (vedere Špaček, s.r.o., c. Repubblica ceca, n. 26449/95, § 54 del 9 novembre 1999; Carbonara e Ventura c. Italia, n. 24638/94, § 64 ECHR 2000-VI; Baklanov c. Russia, n. 68443/01, §§ 40-41 9 giugno 2005).
114. La Corte accetta che il suo potere di revisionare l’ ottemperanza con il diritto nazionale è limitato siccome spetta al primo posto alle autorità nazionali interpretare ed applicare quella legge. Nella presente causa, la Corte è costretta a verificare se il modo in cui il diritto nazionale fu interpretato e fu applicato ha prodotto delle conseguenze che sono coerenti coi principi della Convenzione.
115. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata da vicino all'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione nella quale ha trovati una violazione del principio della certezza legale (vedere paragrafi 79–88 sopra). In questo collegamento, la Corte nota che la giurisprudenza delle corti nazionali ha condotto a decisioni incoerenti sulla legalità della licenza edile. La giurisprudenza mancò della precisione richiesta per permettere alla società richiedente ed ai richiedenti individuali di prevedere, ad un grado che fosse ragionevole nelle circostanze, le conseguenze delle loro azioni e l'interferenza dello Stato (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Sierpiński c. Polonia, n. 38016/07, §§ 74-76, 3 novembre 2009 e Plechanow c. Polonia, n. 22279/04, § 105-107 7 luglio 2009). Simile confusione e mancanza di prevedibilità, conducendo all'arbitrarietà, continua a prevalere anche ad oggi.
116. Ne segue che l'interferenza col diritto della società richiedente ed i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti individuali che demolirono la loro villa a tre - piani sulla base della licenza edile emessa dalle autorità, non può essere considerata legale all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa conclusione non rende necessario accertare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dei richiedenti (vedere Iatridis, citata sopra, § 62).
117. C’è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
118. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
119. I richiedenti individuali chiesero 1,547,037.4 euro a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e 270,000 euro a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale. La società richiedente chiese 10,297,947 euro a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e 1,650,000 euro a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale. In appoggio ala loro rivendicazione per danno patrimoniale, loro presentarono il rapporto di valutazione di un esperto.
120. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti individuali e la società richiedente non avevano esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali a riguardo delle loro rivendicazioni per danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale. Comunque, la Corte indicherebbe che la norma dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali non si applica in collegamento con le rivendicazioni dell’Articolo 41 (vedere Matache ed Altri c. Romania (soddisfazione equa), n. 38113/02, § 16 del 17 giugno 2008).
121. La Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e l'ulteriore procedimento fissato con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo a cui potrebbero giungere il Governo albanese e la società richiedente ed i richiedenti individuali.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo ad una violazione del principio della certezza legale;
3. Sostiene che non considera necessario esaminare l'azione di reclamo della lunghezza dei procedimenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione per intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro i tre mesi imminenti dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte di qualsiasi accordo al quale possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 23 marzo 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.