Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF PEŠKOVÁ v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 34, P1-1

NUMERO: 22186/03/2010
STATO: Repubblica Ceca
DATA: 26/11/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary damage - award
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF PEŠKOVÁ v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC
(Application no. 22186/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
26 November 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Pešková v. the Czech Republic,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Mark Villiger,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 November 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 22186/03) against the Czech Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Czech national, Ms E. P. (“the applicant”), on 14 July 2003.
2. The Czech Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V.A. Schorm, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicant alleged, inter alia, that she had been deprived of her property in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 8 November 2005 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
I. Restitution proceedings
5. In 1979 the applicant purchased a one-third share in certain real estate in Neštěnice which had been donated to the State by the original owners in 1966. The purchase price of 25,326 Czech korunas (CZK) (950 euros (EUR)1) for the whole property was fixed by an expert in September 1978.
6. At the time the application was lodged the property was being used by the applicant’s daughter and her family.
7. On 25 August 1992, after the entry into force of Act no. 229/1991 (“the Land Ownership Act”), a certain M. instituted restitution proceedings in the Benešov District Court (okresní soud) against five co-owners, including the applicant, seeking recovery of the property in issue by virtue of section 8 (1) of the Land Ownership Act. M. alleged that the acquisition of the property by the applicant and the other co-owners had been vitiated by a breach of the regulations in force at the time, that they had enjoyed an unlawful advantage, and that the price they had been required to pay had been lower than the real value of the property.
8. On 29 September 2000, after the case had been examined by the courts at three levels of jurisdiction between 1995 and 2000, the District Court ruled against the applicant and the other co-owners and transferred the title to the property to P., the daughter of the original plaintiff who had died in the meantime. In the course of the proceedings, several expert reports assessing the value of the disputed property at the time of its acquisition by the applicant had been produced at the request of the District Court: an expert report valuating the property at CZK 31,012 (EUR 1,165), an audit report by a company, S., fixing the price at CZK 29,889 (EUR 1,123) and an amendment to the audit report setting the price at CZK 69,347 (EUR 2,606). It emerged from this amendment that when valuing the property the earlier reports had been based on the correct price regulation but certain interpretative directives (směrnice a pokyny) issued by the Ministry of Finance had been disregarded. The court found on the one hand that the defendants had acquired the property at a lower price than that required by the law in force at the material time. On the other hand, the plaintiff had failed to establish that they had enjoyed an unlawful advantage when acquiring the property, in that the father of one of them was a member of the communist party.
9. On 11 April 2001 the Prague Regional Court (krajský soud) upheld the judgment of the first-instance court. It accepted the conclusions set out in the amendment to the audit report, as the reasons for the difference in prices had been satisfactorily explained. Thus, it considered a new audit, as suggested by the applicant, to be superfluous. The Regional Court’s judgment became final on 8 August 2001.
10. On 24 September 2002 the Supreme Court (Nejvyšší soud), without holding a public hearing, dismissed the applicant’s appeal on points of law (dovolání) of 20 August 2001, stating, inter alia, as follows:
“The court of cassation finds well-founded [the applicant’s] arguments challenging the legal conclusions of the audit report. ... There was no reason to apply ... the particular provision of section 12 (2) of the Price Regulations, which only concerned expropriation and was intended to protect persons from whom real estate was taken ...
Despite this interpretation ..., the court of cassation could not grant the applicant’s request to quash as incorrect the judgment of the appellate court. Even if the wear and tear [to the property] had not been calculated at 70%, as applied by the amendment to the audit report, but at 80%, as applied in the previous expert reports, the price ... fixed under the Price Regulations would have been higher than the purchase price agreed between the parties ... The difference in the prices is thus not based on the subjective valuation of the expert or his interpretation of the Price Regulations, but also on the smaller surface area considered by the original expert ... [as well as] the wrong classification of the construction ... In these circumstances, the finding of the appellate court that the defendants had acquired the disputed property at a price lower than that established by the Price Regulations is correct ...”.
11. On 28 January 2003 the Constitutional Court (Ústavní soud) dismissed a constitutional appeal by the applicant (ústavní stížnost) in which she alleged, in particular, a violation of Articles 11 (right to property) and 36 § 1 (right to judicial protection) of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms (Listina základních práv a svobod).
12. In December 2004 the applicant was reimbursed by the Ministry of Agriculture her share of the purchase price of the property, corresponding to CZK 6,493 (EUR 244). Moreover, the Ministry proposed the applicant and the other co-owners a sum of CZK 554,421 (EUR 20,833) in compensation for the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property. That sum was fixed by an expert and the applicant was ready to accept it. However, due to an objection by P., the new owner of the property, against whom the Ministry of Agriculture would have had a counterclaim, that sum was not paid out. In a letter of 4 November 2005, the Ministry of Justice advised the applicant to seek that compensation by means of a civil action against the Ministry. The applicant failed to do so however.
II. Inheritance proceedings
13. In an expert report produced for the purposes of inheritance proceedings after the applicant’s father (one of the co-owners) had died on 23 November 2000, the disputed property was valued at CZK 1,779,580 (EUR 66,868). According to a resolution of the Prague 4 District Court of 28 August 2001, the one-third share left by the deceased was acquired by the applicant. The resolution became final on 13 October 2001.
III. Proceedings for damages
14. In a letter of 11 December 2006 the Ministry of Justice informed the applicant that it had found that her right to a determination of her civil claim within a reasonable time had been violated and that she had been awarded CZK 67,500 (EUR 2,536) in non-pecuniary damages for the length of the restitution proceedings. In a letter of 20 February 2007 the applicant informed the Court that she did not wish to pursue her claim before the domestic courts.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
15. The relevant domestic law and practice in matter of restitution are set out in the Court’s judgment Zvolský and Zvolská v. the Czech Republic (no. 46129/99, § 25, ECHR 2002-IX). The relevant domestic law and practice concerning remedies for excessive length of judicial proceedings are set out in the Court’s decision in the case of Vokurka v. the Czech Republic, no. 40552/02 (dec.), §§ 11-24, 16 October 2007).
16. Under section 243a of the Code of Civil Procedure, the court of cassation decides on an appeal on points of law without holding a hearing. The court holds a hearing if it considers it appropriate or if it has to review evidence.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
17. The applicant complained that she had been deprived of her possessions on the basis of a mere interpretative directive, not on the basis of a law or a price regulation. Relying on the same provision, she alleged that the purchase price reimbursed by the Ministry of Agriculture was not sufficient to enable the acquisition of an equivalent dwelling.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
18. The Government argued that the arguments submitted by the applicant in her constitutional appeal had not been aimed at a challenge to the amount of the reimbursed purchase price, nor to the valuation of the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property, in respect of which the applicant could have been compensated under section 8(3) of the Land Ownership Act. While the purchase price had been reimbursed to the applicant by the Ministry of Agriculture, the former had failed to institute court proceedings against the latter in so far as the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property were concerned. The Government therefore proposed that this complaint be declared inadmissible for non-exhaustion of available domestic remedies.
19. The applicant contended that the possibility to seek the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property did not represent compensation for deprivation of property.
20. The Court reiterates that the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies referred to in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is based on the assumption that the domestic system provides an effective remedy in respect of the alleged breach. The burden of proof is on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that an effective remedy was available in theory and in practice at the relevant time, that is to say that the remedy was accessible, capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant’s complaints and offered reasonable prospects of success (see V. v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 24888/94, § 57, ECHR 1999-IX).
21. In the present case, the Court notes that under section 8(3) of the Land Ownership Act, the applicant could have been reimbursed the purchase price of the property and the costs reasonably incurred for its upkeep. This act, however, did not envisage the possibility of taking into account, for the purposes of compensation, the value of the property at the time of deprivation.
22. Given the rise of the real estate prices between 1979, when the applicant acquired the disputed property, and 2001, when she was relieved of it, the Court considers that the applicant did not have the opportunity to request adequate compensation for the disputed property. Should the applicant be required to claim an adequate amount, she would have to seek higher compensation than that guaranteed under the legislation in force at the material time (see Dymáček and Dymáčková v. the Czech Republic (dec.), No. 35098/03, 29 October 2003).
23. The Court therefore considers that the opportunity to initiate proceedings under section 8(3) of the Land Ownership Act did not represent an effective remedy in the instant case. However, in the event that a violation of the applicant’s rights is found, the applicant’s failure to seek compensation in respect of the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property (see § 12 above) would have to be taken into consideration under Article 41 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99, 48380/99, 51362/99, 53367/99, 60036/00, 73465/01 and 194/02, § 227, 15 March 2007).
24. In view of the above, the Government’s objection must be dismissed.
25. The Court considers that the applicant’s complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and finds no other ground to declare it inadmissible. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ observations
26. The applicant argued that she had been deprived of her possessions on the basis of a mere interpretative directive, which had been applied when the amendment to the audit report had been produced, not on the basis of a law or a price regulation. The price regulation then in force significantly increased the valuation of the real estate but set out that the price established was the maximum price. According to the applicant, where the Land Ownership Act referred to the price established according to the price regulations then in force, it should have been interpreted as referring to the usual price, not to the maximum established according to the price regulations.
27. The Government maintained that the applicant had been deprived of her possessions on the basis of the Land Ownership Act and the interpretative directives applied when the amendment to the audit report had been drawn up had merely been used as an instruction on the methodology for the valuation of the property.
2. The Court’s assessment
28. In the present case the Court finds, and it is not disputed by the parties, that the applicant suffered an interference with her right of property which amounted to a “deprivation” of possessions within the meaning of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court must therefore examine the justification for that interference in the light of the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
29. It reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Pincová and Pinc v. the Czech Republic, no. 36548/97, § 45, ECHR 2002-III).
30. The Court observes that the deprivation of the applicant’s possessions was based on the Land Ownership Act, which made it possible for persons satisfying the relevant conditions to recover certain types of property and therefore authorised the dispossession of the persons in possession of the property concerned. The price regulation and interpretative directives were applied for the purpose of the valuation of the property. The Court finds that the requirement of lawfulness was met.
31. The Court must now ascertain whether this deprivation of possessions pursued a legitimate aim, that is whether there was a “public interest” within the meaning of the second rule set forth in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It considers in that connection that, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment of the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures of deprivation of property. They accordingly enjoy in this sphere a certain margin of appreciation, as in other areas to which the Convention guarantees extend (see Pincová and Pinc, cited above, § 47).
32. Furthermore, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws expropriating property will commonly involve consideration of political, economic and social issues. The Court, finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment be manifestly without reasonable foundation (ibid., § 48).
33. The Court notes that the aim pursued by the Land Ownership Act is to attenuate the effects of the infringements of property rights that occurred under the communist regime and understands why the Czech State should have considered it necessary to resolve this problem, which it considered damaging to its democratic regime. The general purpose of that Act is therefore “in the public interest” (see Pincová and Pinc, cited above, § 51).
34. The Court observes that any measure which interferes with the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions must strike a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole, including therefore the second sentence, which is to be read in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first sentence. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measure depriving a person of his possessions. Thus, the balance to be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of fundamental rights is upset if the person concerned has had to bear a “disproportionate burden” (see Pincová and Pinc, cited above, §§ 52-53).
35. Consequently, the Court has held that the person deprived of his property must in principle obtain compensation “reasonably related to its value”, even though “legitimate objectives of ‘public interest’ may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value” (ibid.). It follows that the balance mentioned above is generally achieved where the compensation paid to the person whose property has been taken is reasonably related to its “market” value, as determined at the time of the expropriation.
36. In the present case, the applicant asserted that while she and other co-owners had invested more than CZK 1,000,000 (EUR 37,595) in the upkeep and reconstruction of the property, she had been reimbursed by the Ministry of Agriculture her share of the original 1979 purchase price. The Ministry had offered her and other co-owners another CZK 554,421 (EUR 20,844) in compensation for the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property (see paragraph 12 above). According to the applicant, such compensation was not sufficient to buy even a one-room flat. The disputed property was valuated at about CZK 1,800,000 (EUR 67,672) for the needs of the inheritance proceedings in 2000 and the new owner put the house on the market for CZK 2,500,000 (EUR 93,989).
37. The Government asserted that the Land Ownership Act maintained a reasonably proportionate relationship between the means employed and the aim pursued, since it required, in addition to the illegal transfer of the property concerned to the State, a further element of illegality vitiating the transfer of the same property from the State to a natural person. At the same time, it entitled the latter to reimbursement of the purchase price and the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property. They further stated that the applicant had agreed with the amount offered by the Ministry of Agriculture in compensation of the costs reasonably incurred for the maintenance of the property. Therefore, and also taking into consideration the prices of building materials before 1990, the applicant’s allegations that she and other co-owners had invested more than CZK 1,000,000 (EUR 37,595) in the disputed property did not appear to be convincing.
38. The Government further pointed out that that in 2000 the value of the property had been established within a different set of proceedings and according to different price regulations from those applied in the restitution proceedings.
39. Finally, the Government stressed that the disputed property had not been used by the applicant as her permanent residence. Accordingly, the burden to be borne by the applicant was not excessive and the balance between the demands of the general interest and the protection of the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions was maintained.
40. The Court observes that the purchase price of the property in issue was initially fixed by the expert in 1978 at CZK 25,326 (EUR 952). In the course of the restitution proceedings, the newly appointed experts fixed the price at CZK 31,012 (EUR 1,166), then at CZK 29,889 (EUR 1,124) and finally at CZK 69,347 (EUR 2,607) (see paragraph 8 above). It is true that the Supreme Court’s judgment of 24 September 2002 explained those differences and stressed that when producing the first two reports, the experts had wrongly classified the property and had taken into consideration only smaller surface area. Nonetheless, given those divergences, in particular the difference between the last two prices set by the same expert, the applicant could hardly be aware at the time of the purchase of the property that the purchase price was lower than that required by the law then in force.
41. The Court also observes that no unlawful advantage on the part of the applicant when acquiring the property was either established in the domestic proceedings, or alleged by the Government.
42. It can be, therefore, concluded that the applicant acquired the property in good faith and could not influence the purchase price.
43. The Court further notes that the original purchase price reimbursed to the applicant together with the proposed amount of compensation for costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property cannot be regarded as reasonably related to the market value of the property established in 2000 in the context of inheritance proceedings. Even assuming that this expert report was based on price regulations different from those applied in restitution proceedings, the Government failed to show that it does not reasonably reflect the value of the property at the time when the applicant was dispossessed of it. Moreover, the applicant would have had to institute another set of court proceedings against the Ministry of Agriculture should she wish to obtain compensation in respect of the above-mentioned costs.
44. The Court notes that the property in issue did not constitute the applicant’s permanent residence, however, it was used by her daughter and other members of her family.
45. The above suffices, in the Court’s view, to conclude that the applicant has had to bear an individual and excessive burden which has upset the fair balance that should be maintained between the demands of the general interest on the one hand and protection of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions on the other. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE LENGTH OF THE RESTITUTION PROCEEDINGS
46. The applicant also complained that the length of the restitution proceedings had been in breach of the “reasonable time” requirement within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which provides, in so far as relevant:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal.”
47. The Government objected that the applicant could have resorted to the compensatory remedy provided for in Act no. 82/1998, as amended.
48. The Court reiterates that an applicant’s status as a “victim” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention depends on whether the domestic authorities acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, the alleged infringement of the Convention and, if necessary, provided appropriate redress (see Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, § 71, ECHR 2006-V).
49. Bearing in mind that the Ministry of Justice acknowledged the unreasonable length of the restitution proceedings in awarding the applicant non-pecuniary damages on this ground, the Court considers that the first condition laid down in its case-law has been satisfied.
50. As regards the second condition, that is appropriate redress from the authorities for the wrong suffered, the Court must determine whether the sum awarded can be considered sufficient to make good the alleged damage and breach (see Dubjaková v. Slovakia (dec.), no. 67299/01, 19 October 2004).
51. In the light of the material in the case file and having regard to the particular circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the sum awarded to the applicant in respect of non-pecuniary damage she might have sustained in the restitution proceedings can be considered sufficient and appropriate redress for the violation suffered. The Court thus considers that the decision of the Ministry of Justice was consistent with the Court’s case-law. It therefore concludes that the applicant can no longer claim to be a “victim” within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention of the alleged violation of her right to a hearing within a reasonable time.
52. It follows that this part of the application must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF UNFAIRNESS OF THE RESTITUTION PROCEEDINGS
53. The applicant complained that the Supreme Court, having found errors in the amendment to the audit report, had reached its own legal conclusions without holding a public hearing which the parties and experts could have attended. She also alleged that, although the amendment to the audit report had increased the purchase price by 230%, the national courts had not accepted her suggestion that a new expert opinion be drawn up. The relevant part of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
54. The Court reiterates that, according to Article 19 of the Convention, its duty is to ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the Contracting Parties to the Convention. In particular, it is not its function to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by a national court unless and in so far as they may have infringed rights and freedoms protected by the Convention. Moreover, while Article 6 of the Convention guarantees the right to a fair hearing, it does not lay down any rules on the admissibility of evidence or the way it should be assessed, which are therefore primarily matters for regulation by national law and the national courts (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 28, ECHR 1999-I).
55. In the present case the Court observes that the Supreme Court limited itself to reassessment of evidence that had been reviewed by the lower courts earlier in the proceedings, on the basis of which it held that the applicant and the other co-owners had acquired the disputed property at a price lower than that established by the Price Regulations. It partly endorsed the conclusions of the lower courts and stated sufficient reasons why it had refrained from quashing the previous judgments.
56. The Court further notes that in the judgment of 11 April 2001 the Prague Regional Court addressed the differences in the valuation of the disputed property and had found that the amendment to the audit report explained them sufficiently. That court also responded to the applicant’s request to order another expert report but held that such a report would have been superfluous. In its judgment of 24 September 2002 the Supreme Court again addressed the issue of valuation and reached the same conclusion as the lower courts.
57. The Court thus considers that the domestic courts stated sufficient reasons for their conclusions and did not omit to respond to the applicant’s request.
58. In the light of these considerations the Court finds that the applicant was not deprived of a fair hearing within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
59. It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
60. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
61. In respect of pecuniary damage the applicant claimed CZK 1,779,580 (EUR 66,904), which sum represented the value of the property fixed by an expert report in 2000.
62. The Government stated that as of the date on which the ultimate decision in the restitution proceedings had become final, the applicant had been a one-third owner of the disputed property. The subsequent decision in the inheritance proceedings that had granted the one-third share left by the applicant’s father to the applicant had not taken into consideration the outcome of the restitution proceedings.
63. They also submitted that the applicant had been reimbursed her share of the purchase price and that the domestic legislation had allowed her to seek reimbursement of the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property, which she had failed to do.
64. The Court considers that it is not required to decide whether or not the applicant became the owner of the one-third share of the property left by her father according to the Czech legislation. For the purposes of Article 41 of the Convention, it will consider the situation which would have existed should the interference with the applicant’s property rights not have occurred. Accordingly, it will consider the applicant a two-thirds owner of the disputed property.
65. The Court must however accept the Government’s argument that the applicant was reimbursed a part of the purchase price and that she could have sought reimbursement of the costs reasonably incurred for the upkeep of the property at domestic level.
66. Accordingly, ruling on an equitable basis and in the light of its case-law, the Court considers it appropriate to award the applicant EUR 30,000 for pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
67. The applicant claimed CZK 12,957 (EUR 487) as translation fees and submitted an invoice to that end.
68. The Government submitted that it was not clear which translation the invoice covered and considered a sum of EUR 200 to be sufficient.
69. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
70. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria as well as to the fact that the application has been partly declared inadmissible, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 240 covering costs of the proceedings.
C. Default interest
71. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the applicant’s property rights admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Czech korunas at the rate applicable on the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 30,000 (thirty thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 240 (two hundred and forty euros) in respect of the costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 26 November 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President
1 1 EUR = 26.70 CZK

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1; danno Patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA PEŠKOVÁ C. REPUBBLICA CECA
(Richiesta n. 22186/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
26 novembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Pešková c. Repubblica ceca,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste il Mark Villiger, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 novembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 22186/03) contro la Repubblica ceca depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da una cittadina ceca, la Sig.ra E. P. (“la richiedente”), il 14 luglio 2003.
2. Il Governo ceco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. V.A. Schorm, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. La richiedente addusse, inter alia di essere stata privata della sua proprietà in violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. L’ 8 novembre 2005 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
I. Procedimenti di restituzione
5. Nel 1979 la richiedente acquistò una quota di un terzo in certi beni immobili a Neštěnice che erano stati donati allo Stato dai proprietari originali nel 1966. Il prezzo di acquisto di 25,326 koruna ceche (CZK) (950 euro (EUR)1) per l’ intera proprietà fu fissato da un esperto nel settembre 1978.
6. Al tempo in cui la richiesta fu depositata la proprietà era usata dalla figlia della richiedente e dalla sua famiglia.
7. Il 25 agosto 1992, dopo l'entrata in vigore dell’ Atto n. 229/1991 (“l'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria”), un certo M. avviò procedimenti di restituzione presso la Corte distrettuale di Benešov (okresní soud) contro cinque comproprietari, incluso la richiedente chiedendo il recupero della proprietà in oggetto in virtù della sezione 8 (1) dell'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria. M. addusse che l'acquisizione della proprietà da parte della richiedente e degli altri comproprietari era stata viziata da una violazione delle regolamentazioni in vigore al tempo, che loro avevano goduto di un vantaggio illegale, e che il prezzo che erano stati costretti a pagare era i inferiore al vero valore della proprietà.
8. Il 29 settembre 2000, dopo che la causa era stata esaminata dalle corti a tre livelli di giurisdizione fra il 1995 ed il 2000, la Corte distrettuale decise contro la richiedente e gli altri comproprietari e trasferì il titolo di proprietà a P., la figlia del querelante originale che era morto nel frattempo. Nel corso dei procedimenti, molti rapporti competenti che valutavano il valore della proprietà contestata al tempo della sua acquisizione da parte della richiedente erano stati prodotti su richiesta della Corte distrettuale: un rapporto competente che valutava la proprietà a CZK 31,012 (EUR 1,165), un rendiconto di certificazione da parte di una società, S., che fissava il prezzo a CZK 29,889 (EUR 1,123) ed un emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione che stabiliva il prezzo a CZK 69,347 (EUR 2,606). Emerse da questo emendamento che nel valutare la proprietà i primi rapporti erano basati sulla regolamentazione del prezzo corretta ma certe direttive interpretative (směrnice a pokyny) emesse dal Ministero delle Finanze erano state trascurate. La corte trovò da una parte che gli imputati avevano acquisito la proprietà ad un prezzo più basso di quello richiesto dal diritto vigente al tempo attinente. D'altra parte il querelante era andato a vuoto nello stabilire che loro avevano goduto di un vantaggio illegale acquisendo la proprietà, in quanto il padre di uno di loro era un membro del partito comunista.
9. L’11 aprile 2001 la Corte Regionale di Praga (krajský soud) sostenne la sentenza della corte di prima - istanza. Accettò le conclusioni esposte nell'emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione, in quanto le ragioni per la differenza nei prezzi erano state spiegate soddisfacentemente. Così, considerò una revisione nuova, come suggerito dalla richiedente, come superflua. La sentenza della Corte Regionale divenne definitiva l’ 8 agosto 2001.
10. Il 24 settembre 2002 la Corte Suprema (Nejvyšší soud), senza sostenere un'udienza pubblica, respinse il ricorso della richiedente per questioni di diritto (dovolání) del 20 agosto 2001, affermando, inter alia, come segue:
“La corte di cassazione trova ben fondati gli argomenti [della richiedente] che impugnano le conclusioni legali del rendiconto di certificazione. ... Non c'era nessuna ragione di applicare... la particolare disposizione della sezione 12 (2) delle Regolamentazioni sui Prezzi che riguardava solamente l’espropriazione ed era tesa a proteggere le persone da cui beni immobili sono stati presi...
Nonostante questa interpretazione..., la corte di cassazione non poteva ammettere la richiesta della richiedente di annullare come incorretta la sentenza della corte di appello. Anche se il deterioramento [della proprietà] non era stato calcolato al 70%, come applicato dall'emendamento nel rendiconto di certificazione, ma all’ 80%, come applicato nei precedenti rapporti competenti, il prezzo... fissato sotto le Regolamentazioni dei Prezzi sarebbe stato più alto del prezzo di acquisto concordato fra le parti... La differenza nei prezzi non è basata così sulla valutazione soggettiva dell'esperto o sulla sua interpretazione delle Regolamentazioni dei Prezzi, ma anche sulla più piccola area di superficie considerata dall'esperto originale... [così come] la classificazione sbagliata della costruzione... In queste circostanze, la sentenza della corte di appello che gli imputati avevano acquisito la proprietà contestata ad un prezzo inferiore di quello stabilito dalle Regolamentazioni dei Prezzi ha ragione....”
11. Il 28 gennaio 2003 la Corte Costituzionale (Ústavní soud) respinse un ricorso costituzionale da parte della richiedente (ústavní stížnost) nella misura in cui adduceva, in particolare, una violazione degli Articoli 11 (diritto alla proprietà) e 36 § 1 (diritto alla protezione giudiziale) dello Statuto dei Diritti essenziali e dellle Libertà (Listina základních práv a svobod).
12. Nel dicembre 2004 la richiedente fu rimborsato dal Ministero dell'Agricoltura della sua quota del prezzo di acquisto della proprietà, corrispondente a CZK 6,493 (EUR 244). Inoltre, il Ministero propose una somma di CZK 554,421 alla richiedente e agli altri comproprietari (EUR 20,833) per risarcimento per i costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà. Questa somma fu fissata da un esperto e la richiedente era pronta ad accettarla. Comunque, a causa di un'eccezione di P., il nuovo proprietario della proprietà, contro cui il Ministero dell'Agricoltura avrebbe avuto un'eccezione riconvenzionale , questa somma non è stata mai pagata. In una lettera del 4 novembre 2005, il Ministero della Giustizia consigliò alla richiedente di chiedere questo risarcimento tramite un'azione civile contro il Ministero. La richiedente non riuscì a fare così comunque.
II. Procedimenti di eredità
13. In un rapporto competente prodotto ai fini dei procedimenti di eredità dopo che il padre della richiedente (uno dei comproprietari) era morto il 23 novembre 2000, la proprietà contestata fu valutata a CZK 1,779,580 (EUR 66,868). Secondo una decisione della Corte del 4 Distretto di Praga del 28 agosto 2001, la quota di un terzo lasciata dal defunto fu acquisita dalla richiedente. La decisione divenne definitiva il 13 ottobre 2001.
III. Procedimenti per danni
14. In una lettera dell’ 11 dicembre 2006 il Ministero della Giustizia informò la richiedente che aveva trovato che il suo diritto ad una determinazione della sua rivendicazione civile all'interno di un termine ragionevole era stato violato e che le erano stati assegnati CZK 67,500 (EUR 2,536) per danni non-patrimoniali per la lunghezza dei procedimenti di restituzione. In una lettera del 20 febbraio 2007 la richiedente informò la Corte che lei non desiderava proseguire la sua rivendicazione di fronte alle corti nazionali.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
15. Il diritto nazionale attinente e la pratica nella questione della restituzione sono esposti nella sentenza della Corte Zvolský e Zvolská c. Repubblica ceca (n. 46129/99, § 25 ECHR 2002-IX). Il diritto nazionale attinente e la pratica riguardo alle vie di ricorso per lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti giudiziali sono esposti nella decisione della Corte nella causa Vokurka c. Repubblica ceca, n. 40552/02 (dec.), §§ 11-24, 16 ottobre 2007).
16. Sotto la sezione 243a del Codice di Procedura Civile, la corte di cassazione decide su un ricorso su questioni di diritto senza sostenere un'udienza. La corte contiene un'udienza se lo considera appropriato o se deve revisionare le prove.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
17. La richiedente si lamentò di essere stata privata delle sue proprietà sulla base di una direttiva meramente interpretativa , non sulla base di una legge o di una regolamentazione dei prezzo. Appellandosi alla stessa disposizione, lei addusse che il prezzo di acquisto rimborsato dal Ministero dell'Agricoltura non era sufficiente da permettere l'acquisto di un'abitazione equivalente.
L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
18. Il Governo dibatté che gli argomenti presentati dalla richiedente nel suo ricorso costituzionale non erano tesi ad impugnare l'importo del prezzo di acquisto rimborsato, né la valutazione dei costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà, a riguardo dei quali la richiedente avrebbe potuto essere compensata sotto la sezione 8(3) dell'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria. Mentre il prezzo di acquisto era stato rimborsato alla richiedente dal Ministero dell'Agricoltura, la prima era andata a vuoto nell’ avviare procedimenti contro quest’ultimo nella misura in cui erano riguardati i costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà. Il Governo propose perciò che questa azione di reclamo venisse dichiarata inammissibile per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili.
19. La richiedente contese che la possibilità di chiedere i costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà non rappresenta il risarcimento per la privazione della proprietà.
20. La Corte reitera che la norma dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali a cui si fa riferimento nell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione è basata sulla presunzione che il sistema nazionale offra una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo della violazione addotta. Il carico delle prove è sul Governo che rivendica il non-esaurimento per soddisfare la Corte che una via di ricorso effettiva era disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente il che vale a dire che la via di ricorso era accessibile, capace di offrire compensazione a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo della richiedente e offrire prospettive ragionevoli di successo (vedere V. c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 24888/94, § 57 ECHR 1999-IX).
21. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota che sotto la sezione 8(3) dell'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria, alla richiedente si sarebbe potuto rimborsare il prezzo di acquisto della proprietà ed i costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il suo mantenimento. Comunque, questo atto non prevedeva la possibilità di prendere in considerazione, ai fini del risarcimento il valore della proprietà al tempo della privazione.
22. Dato l'aumento dei prezzi dei beni immobili fra il 1979, quando la richiedente acquisì la proprietà contestata, e il 2001, quando lei fu ne spossessata, la Corte considera che la richiedente non aveva l'opportunità di richiedere il risarcimento adeguato per la proprietà contestata. Se la richiedente dovesse essere costretta a chiedere un importo adeguato, lei dovrebbe chiedere il risarcimento più alto di quello garantito sotto la legislazione vigente al tempo attinente (vedere Dymáček e Dymáčková c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), N.ro 35098/03, 29 ottobre 2003).
23. La Corte considera perciò che l'opportunità di iniziare procedimenti sotto la sezione 8(3) dell'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria non rappresentava una via di ricorso effettiva nella presente causa. Comunque, nel caso in cui una violazione dei diritti della richiedente venisse trovata, dovrebbe essere preso in esame l'insuccesso della richiedente nel chiedere il risarcimento a riguardo dei costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà (vedere § 12 sopra) sotto l’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Velikovi ed Altri c. Bulgaria, N. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99 48380/99, 51362/99 53367/99, 60036/00 73465/01 e 194/02, § 227 15 marzo 2007).
24. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, l'eccezione del Governo deve essere respinta.
25. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo della richiedente non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e non constata nessuna altra base per dichiararla inammissibile. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
26. La richiedente dibatté di essere stata privata delle sue proprietà sulla base di una mera direttiva interpretativa e che era stata applicata quando l'emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione era stato prodotto, non sulla base di una legge o di una regolamentazione dei prezzi. La regolamentazione dei prezzo allora in vigore aumentava significativamente la valutazione dei beni immobili ma stabiliva che quello era il prezzo di massimo. Secondo la richiedente, dove l'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria si riferiva al prezzo stabilito secondo le regolamentazioni dei prezzi allora in vigore, avrebbe dovuto essere interpretato come riferendosi al prezzo usuale, non al massimo stabilito secondo le regolamentazioni dei prezzo.
27. Il Governo sostenne che la richiedente era stata privata delle sue proprietà sulla base dell'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria e che le direttive interpretative applicate quando l'emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione era stato configurato erano state usate soltanto come un'istruzione sulla metodologia per la valutazione della proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
28. Nella presente causa la Corte trova, e non è contestato dalle parti, che la richiedente soffrì di un'interferenza col suo diritto di proprietà che corrispose ad una “privazione” di proprietà all'interno del significato della seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte deve esaminare perciò la giustificazione per questa interferenza alla luce dei requisiti dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
29. Reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione di proprietà solamente “soggetto a condizioni previste dalla legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso della proprietà implementando “leggi.” Inoltre, la preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Pincová e Pinc c. Repubblica ceca, n. 36548/97, § 45 ECHR 2002-III).
30. La Corte osserva che la privazione delle proprietà della richiedente fu basata sull'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria che rese possibile per le persone che soddisfacevano le condizioni attinenti per recuperare certi tipi di proprietà e perciò autorizzava l'espropriazione delle persone in possesso delle proprietà riguardate. La regolamentazione dei prezzo e le direttive interpretative furono applicati al fine della valutazione della proprietà. La Corte costata che il requisito della legalità è stato soddisfatto.
31. La Corte ora deve accertare se questa privazione di proprietà intraprese uno scopo legittimo cioè se c'era un “interesse pubblico” all'interno del significato della seconda norma esposta nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Considera in questo collegamento che, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio meglio collocate del giudice internazionale per valutare ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta così alle autorità nazionali fare la valutazione iniziale dell'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisce delle misure di privazione della proprietà. Loro godono di conseguenza in questa sfera un certo margine di valutazione, come in altre aree a cui si estendo le garanzie della Convenzione (vedere Pincová e Pinc, citata sopra, § 47).
32. Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è ampia. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi che espropriano proprietà coinvolgerà comunemente la considerazione di problemi politici, economici e sociali. La Corte, trovandolo naturale che il margine di valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio, rispetterà il giudizio della legislatura riguardo a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno questo giudizio non sia manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (ibid., § 48).
33. La Corte nota che lo scopo perseguito dall'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria è attenuare gli effetti delle violazioni di diritti di proprietà che sono accaduti sotto il regime comunista e comprende perché lo Stato ceco avrebbe dovuto considerare necessario risolvere questo problema che considerava danneggiare il suo regime democratico. Lo scopo generale di questo Atto è perciò “nell'interesse pubblico” (vedere Pincová e Pinc, citata sopra, § 51).
34. La Corte osserva che qualsiasi misura che interferisce col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. La preoccupazione di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nell'insieme, incluso perciò la seconda frase che sarà letta alla luce del principio generale enunciato nella prima frase. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo perseguito da qualsiasi misura che spoglia una persona delle sue proprietà. Così, l'equilibrio da predisporre fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti dei diritti essenziali si sconvolge se la persona riguardata ha dovuto sopportare un “carico sproporzionato” (vedere Pincová e Pinc, citata sopra, §§ 52-53).
35. Di conseguenza, la Corte ha sostenuto che la persona privata della sua proprietà debba in principio ottenere un risarcimento “ragionevolmente riferito al suo valore”, anche se degli “obiettivi legittimi di ‘interesse pubblico ' possono richiedere un rimborso inferiore del pieno valore di mercato” (ibid.). Ne segue che l'equilibrio menzionato sopra viene generalmente realizzato dove il risarcimento pagato alla persona la cui proprietà è stata presa è riferito ragionevolmente al suo “valore di mercato”, come determinato al tempo dell'espropriazione.
36. Nella presente causa, la richiedente asserì che mentre lei e gli altri comproprietari avevano investito più di CZK 1,000,000 (EUR 37,595) nel mantenimento e nella ricostruzione della proprietà, le era stata rimborsata dal Ministero dell'Agricoltura la sua quota del prezzo di acquisto originale del 1979. Il Ministero aveva offerto a lei e agli altri comproprietari altri CZK 554,421 (EUR 20,844) per risarcimento per i costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra). Secondo la richiedente, simile risarcimento non era neanche sufficiente per comprare un appartamento di una -stanza. La proprietà contestata fu valutata a di CZK 1,800,000 (EUR 67,672) per le necessità dei procedimenti di eredità nel 2000 ed il nuovo proprietario ha messo l'alloggio sul mercato a CZK 2,500,000 (EUR 93,989).
37. Il Governo asserì che l'Atto della Proprietà Fondiaria manteneva una relazione ragionevolmente proporzionata fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo perseguiti, poiché richiedeva, oltre al trasferimento illegale della proprietà riguardata allo Stato, un ulteriore elemento di illegalità che viziasse il trasferimento della stessa proprietà dallo Stato ad una persona fisica. Allo stesso tempo, diede ragionevolmente diritto a quest’ultima a rimborso del prezzo di acquisto e dei costi incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà. Affermò inoltre che la richiedente era d’accordo con l'importo offerto dal Ministero dell'Agricoltura per risarcimento dei costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà. Perciò, e prendendo anche in esame i prezzi dei materiali edili prima del 1990, le dichiarazioni della richiedente per cui lei e gli altri comproprietari avevano investito più di CZK 1,000,000 (EUR 37,595) nella proprietà contestata non sembrano essere convincenti.
38. Il Governo indicò inoltre che nel 2000 il valore della proprietà era stato stabilito all'interno di un set diverso di procedimenti e secondo regolamentazioni dei prezzi diverse da quelle applicate nei procedimenti di restituzione.
39. Infine, il Governo sottolineò che la proprietà contestata non era usata dalla richiedente come sua residenza permanente. Di conseguenza, il carico da sopportare da parte della richiedente non era eccessivo e quindi fu mantenuto l'equilibrio fra le richieste dell'interesse generale e la protezione del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà.
40. La Corte osserva che il prezzo di acquisto della proprietà in questione fu fissato inizialmente dall'esperto nel 1978 a CZK 25,326 (EUR 952). Nel corso dei procedimenti di restituzione, gli esperti di recente nominati fissarono il prezzo a CZK 31,012 (EUR 1,166), poi a CZK 29,889 (EUR 1,124) ed infine a CZK 69,347 (EUR 2,607) (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra). È vero che la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 24 settembre 2002 spiegò quelle differenze e sottolineò che producendo i primi due rapporti, gli esperti avevano classificato erroneamente la proprietà ed avevano preso in esame solamente l’area di superficie più piccola. Nondimeno, a causa di quelle divergenze, in particolare la differenza fra gli ultimi due prezzi esposti dallo stesso esperto, la richiedente non avrebbe potuto essere proprio consapevole al tempo dell'acquisto della proprietà che il prezzo di acquisto era inferiore di quello applicato poi dalla legge in vigore.
41. La Corte osserva anche che nessun vantaggio illegale da parte della richiedente acquisendo la proprietà fu stabilito né nei procedimenti nazionali, né addotto dal Governo.
42. Si può, perciò, concludere che la richiedente acquisì la proprietà in buona fede e non poteva influenzare il prezzo di acquisto.
43. La Corte nota inoltre che il prezzo di acquisto originale rimborsato alla richiedente insieme con l'importo proposto del risarcimento per costi ragionevolmente incorsi per il mantenimento della proprietà non può essere riguardato come ragionevolmente in riferimento al valore di mercato della proprietà stabilito nel 2000 nel contesto di procedimenti di eredità. Presumendo anche che questo rapporto competente fosse basato su regolamentazioni dei prezzi diverse da quelle applicate nei procedimenti di restituzione, il Governo andò a vuoto nel mostrare che non rifletteva ragionevolmente il valore della proprietà al tempo in cui la richiedente ne fu spossessata. La richiedente avrebbe dovuto inoltre, avviare un altro set di atti contro il Ministero dell'Agricoltura se lei avesse desiderato ottenere il risarcimento a riguardo dei costi summenzionati.
44. La Corte nota che la proprietà in questione non costituiva la residenza permanente della richiedente, comunque veniva usata da sua figlia e dagli altri membri della sua famiglia.
45. Quanto sopra basta, nella prospettiva della Corte, a concludere che la richiedente ha dovuto sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo che ha sconvolto l'equilibrio equo che dovrebbe essere predisposto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale da una parte e la protezione del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà dall’altra. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE A CAUSA DELLA LUNGHEZZA DEI PROCEDIMENTI DI RESTITUZIONE
46. La richiedente si lamentò anche che la lunghezza dei procedimenti di restituzione era stata in violazione del requisito del “termine ragionevole” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che prevede, nella parte attinente:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale...”
47. Il Governo obiettò che la richiedente avrebbe potuto ricorrere alla via di ricorso compensativa prevista nell’ Atto n. 82/1998, come da emendamento.
48. La Corte reitera che lo status di un richiedente come “vittima” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 34 della Convenzione dipende da se le autorità nazionali ammisero, espressamente o in sostanza, la violazione addotta della Convenzione e, se necessario, hanno previsto compensazione appropriata (vedere Cocchiarella c. l'Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, § 71 il 2006-V di ECHR).
49. Tenendo presente che il Ministero della Giustizia diede credito alla lunghezza irragionevole dei procedimenti di restituzione nell'assegnare danni non-patrimoniali alla richiedente su questa base, la Corte considera che la prima condizione stabilita nella sua giurisprudenza è stata soddisfatta.
50. Riguardo alla seconda condizione cioè la compensazione appropriata dalle autorità per il danno subito, la Corte deve determinare se la somma assegnata può essere considerata sufficiente per compensare il danno addotto e la violazione (vedere Dubjaková c. Slovacchia (dec.), n. 67299/01, 19 ottobre 2004).
51. Alla luce del materiale nell'archivio della causa ed avendo riguardo alle particolari circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la somma assegnata alla richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale che probabilmente avrebbe subito nei procedimenti di restituzione può essere considerata come una compensazione sufficiente ed appropriata per la violazione subita. La Corte considera così che la decisione del Ministero della Giustizia era coerente con la giurisprudenza della Corte. Conclude perciò che la richiedente non può più pretendere di essere una “vittima” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 34 della Convenzione della violazione addotta del suo diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole.
52. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere respinta in conformità con l’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE A CAUSA DELL'INIQUITÀ DEI PROCEDIMENTI DI RESTITUZIONE
53. La richiedente si lamentò che la Corte Suprema, avendo trovato errori nell'emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione, era giunta alle sue proprie conclusioni legali senza sostenere un'udienza pubblica che avrebbe potuto essere frequentata dalle parti e dagli esperti. Lei addusse anche che, benché l'emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione avesse aumentato il prezzo di acquisto del 230%, le corti nazionali non avevano accettato il suo suggerimento per cui venisse predisposta una nuova opinione competente. La parte attinente dell’ Articolo che 6 § 1 della Convenzione recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale...”
54. La Corte reitera che, secondo l’Articolo 19 della Convenzione, il suo dovere è assicurare l'osservanza degli impegni assunti dalle Parti Contraenti alla Convenzione. In particolare, non è una sua funzione trattare con errori di fatto o di diritto commessi presumibilmente da una corte nazionale a meno che e nella misura in cui loro possono aver violato i diritti e le libertà protetti dalla Convenzione. Inoltre, mentre l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione garantisce il diritto ad un'udienza corretta, non stabilisce nessuna norma sull'ammissibilità delle prove o il modo in cui dovrebbero essere valutate che sono perciò primariamente delle questioni per regolamentazione da parte della legge nazionale e delle corti nazionali (vedere García Ruiz c. Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 28 ECHR 1999-I).
55. Nella presente causa la Corte osserva che la Corte Suprema si limitò alla rivalutazione delle prove che erano state revisionate dalle corti inferiori nel corso dei precedenti procedimenti, sulla base della quale sostenne che la richiedente e gli altri comproprietari avevano acquisito la proprietà contestata ad un prezzo inferiore di quello stabilito dalle Regolamentazioni dei Prezzi. Sottoscrisse in parte le conclusioni delle corti inferiori ed enunciò ragioni sufficienti perché si era astenne dall'annullamento le sentenze precedenti.
56. La Corte nota inoltre che nella sentenza dell’ 11 aprile 2001 la Corte Regionale di Praga si dedicò alle differenze nella valutazione della proprietà contestata ed aveva trovato che l'emendamento al rendiconto di certificazione le spiegava sufficientemente. Questa corte rispose anche alla richiesta della richiedente di ordinare un altro rapporto competente ma sostenne che tale rapporto sarebbe stato superfluo. Nella sua sentenza del 24 settembre 2002 la Corte Suprema si rivolse di nuovo al problema di valutazione e giunse alla stessa conclusione delle corti inferiori.
57. La Corte considera così che le corti nazionali enunciarono delle ragioni sufficienti per le loro conclusioni e non omisero di rispondere alla richiesta della richiedente.
58. Alla luce di queste considerazioni la Corte costata che la richiedente non è stata privata di un'udienza corretta all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
59. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
60. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
61. A riguardo del danno patrimoniale la richiedente chiese CZK 1,779,580 (EUR 66,904) questa somma rappresentante il valore della proprietà fissata da un rapporto competente nel 2000.
62. Il Governo affermò che in data in cui l'ultima decisione nei procedimenti di restituzione era divenuta definitiva, la richiedente era stata una proprietaria di un terzo della proprietà contestata. La decisione susseguente nei procedimenti di eredità che avevano accordato la quota di un terzo lasciato dal padre della richiedente alla richiedente non aveva preso in esame il risultato dei procedimenti di restituzione.
63. Presentò anche che alla richiedente era stata rimborsata la sua quota del prezzo di acquisto e che la legislazione nazionale le aveva concesso di chiedere il rimborso dei costi incorsi ragionevolmente per il mantenimento della proprietà il che lei non era riuscita a fare.
64. La Corte considera che non è costretta a decidere se la richiedente divenne la proprietaria o meno della quota di un terzo della proprietà lasciata da suo padre secondo la legislazione ceca. Ai fini dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, considererà, la situazione che sarebbe esistita se l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente non si fosse verificata. Di conseguenza, considererà la richiedente proprietaria di due terzi della proprietà contestata.
65. La Corte comunque deve accettare l'argomento del Governo per cui alla richiedente fu rimborsata una parte del prezzo di acquisto e che lei avrebbe potuto chiedere il rimborso dei costi ragionevolmente incorso per il mantenimento della proprietà a livello nazionale.
66. Di conseguenza, decidendo su una base equa e alla luce della sua giurisprudenza, la Corte considera appropriato assegnare EUR 30,000 alla richiedente per danno patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
67. La richiedente chiese CZK 12,957 (EUR 487) come parcella di traduzione e presentò una fattura a questo fine.
68. Il Governo presentò che non era chiaro quale traduzione la fattura coprisse e considerò che una somma di EUR 200 fosse sufficiente.
69. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum.
70. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra così come al fatto che la richiesta è stata dichiarata parzialmente inammissibile, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di 240 EUR per costi di copertura dei procedimenti.
C. Interesse di mora
71. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo ai diritti di proprietà della richiedente ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare la richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire in koruna ceche al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 30,000 (trenta mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 240 (duecento e quaranta euro) a riguardo dei costi e delle spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
4. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 26 novembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente
1 1 EUR = 26.70 CZK



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.