Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF WIECZOREK v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, 37, 38, P1-1

NUMERO: 18176/05/2009
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 08/12/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Government's request to strike the application out of the list rejected ; Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; No violation of P1-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF WIECZOREK v. POLAND
(Application no. 18176/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
8 December 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Wieczorek v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 17 November 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 18176/05) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Polish national, Ms K. W. (“the applicant”), on 16 April 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr Z. C., a lawyer practising in Cracow. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that she had been deprived of the right to a fair hearing because her request for legal aid for lodging a cassation appeal had been refused by the appellate court. She further complained that her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions had been breached as she had been divested of her disability pension which she had been receiving for fifteen years.
4. On 14 November 2006 the Court (Fourth Section) decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1952 and lives in Cracow.
6. In a letter of 18 September 2000 to the Social Insurance Authority (Zaklad Ubezpieczeń Spolecznych) in Cracow, the applicant's husband submitted that in his view the applicant, who had been receiving a disability pension since 1985, was in fact healthy and should no longer be receiving a pension. He suggested that she be re-examined by competent doctors. Apparently divorce proceedings involving the parties were pending at that time.
7. On 10 October 2000 the Social Insurance Authority, referring to the applicant's medical records, instituted proceedings in order to reassess the applicant's condition with a view to establishing whether she complied with the conditions governing entitlement to a disability pension.
8. In reply to a query from the applicant about the legal basis on which these proceedings were instituted, on 28 November 2000 the Social Insurance Authority informed her that the proceedings had been instituted under the provisions governing the internal supervision of physicians working for the Authority.
9. Eventually, on 4 December 2000 the Social Insurance Authority gave a decision by which the applicant's right to receive a disability pension was extinguished as she was no longer unfit to work.
10. On 12 January 2001 the applicant appealed, submitting that the Social Insurance Authority had failed to assess properly the medical evidence concerning her condition. She also submitted that her condition had been reassessed in 1994, 1995 and 1997. On each of these occasions decisions had been given confirming that she was permanently unfit to work.
11. In her pleadings submitted on 18 May and 3 December 2001 the applicant submitted that there was no legal basis for conducting medical examinations in order to reassess her condition. She referred to the 1983 Ordinance, which prohibited reassessment of the medical condition of persons who had been receiving a disability pension for longer than ten years (see paragraph 25 below). The Ordinance provided that no medical examination could be conducted in respect of such persons with a view to a reassessment of their condition. She further invoked the case-law of the Supreme Court which, in the applicant's submission, supported the conclusion that no medical reassessment of a condition which had served as the basis for granting a disability pension could be ordered once ten years had elapsed from the date on which the decision awarding the entitlement to a pension became final (II URN 8/94, see paragraph 28 below).
12. The Cracow Regional Court, by a judgment of 24 September 2002, partly amended the decision of the Social Insurance Authority by granting the applicant the disability pension for a fixed period, namely from 1 January 2001 until 1 January 2003.
13. The applicant appealed, claiming that in view of her condition she was entitled to a permanent disability pension. She complained about the assessment of the medical evidence by the first-instance court. In her additional pleadings submitted to the Court of Appeal on 6 September 2004, she reiterated her arguments about the lack of legal basis for the reassessment of her condition and concluded that the first-instance judgment was therefore in breach of substantive law.
14. On 8 September 2004 the Cracow Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal. The court examined the complaint concerning the allegedly incorrect assessment of the evidence and concluded that the first-instance court had been thorough in the assessment it had carried out. It also noted that during the appellate proceedings and in view of doubts the appellate court had harboured as to the applicant's condition, it had ordered that, in addition to the evidence available in the applicant's medical records, a medical opinion should be obtained from the local centre for occupational medicine and further examinations should be carried out by specialists in cardiology, nephrology, endocrinology and gynaecology. The applicant had refused to undergo these examinations.
15. The court further observed that the first-instance judgment had maintained the applicant's pension for the period from 1 January 2001 until 1 January 2003. When that period expired, the applicant had failed to submit to the Social Insurance Authority a request to have her entitlement to the pension prolonged.
16. In response to the applicant's argument based on the 1983 Ordinance and the prohibition it imposed on the medical re-examination of persons in receipt of a disability pension for longer than ten years, the court observed:
“It should be borne in mind that the proceedings concerning the applicant's case had been instituted [by the Social Insurance Authority] under the legal provisions governing the internal supervision by the principal physician of doctors working for that Authority and assessing the medical condition of persons seeking a disability pension (see Article 11 of the 1997 Ordinance of the Minister of Labour and Social Policy). Accordingly, it was of no legal relevance to the applicant's case that she had been declared permanently unfit to work in 1985. Neither was the length of time for which she had been receiving her pension of any significance for the present case.”
17. On 13 October 2004 the Cracow Court of Appeal refused to grant the applicant legal aid to lodge a cassation appeal. The written grounds for the refusal read as follows:
“Under Article 117 § 1 of the Code of Civil Procedure a party to proceedings who has been exempted, fully or in part, from the obligation to pay court fees can request that a legal-aid lawyer be assigned to represent him or her in the case. The court shall allow such a request if it decides that the participation of a lawyer in the case is necessary. A legal-aid lawyer shall be so assigned where the party is unable to argue the case competently or the case is complex as to the facts or law.
The crucial issue in the present case was the assessment of the [applicant's] condition and, consequently, it cannot be regarded as so complex as to warrant legal assistance. The court therefore considers that legal assistance would be unnecessary and, accordingly, dismisses the applicant's request.
The mere fact that a party cannot afford to pay legal fees does not justify the granting of legal assistance; this also applies to cases where legal representation is mandatory for the preparation of the cassation appeal.”
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
1. Legal aid
18. At the material time Article 113 § 1 of the Code of Civil Procedure provided that parties to proceedings could ask the court competent to deal with the case to grant them an exemption from court fees provided that they submitted a declaration to the effect that the fees required would entail a substantial reduction in their standard of living and that of their family.
19. Parties to proceedings concerning social insurance allowances and pensions were exempted, under Article 463 § 1 of the Code of Civil Procedure, from the obligation to pay court fees.
20. Under Article 117 of the Code, persons exempted from court fees could request that legal aid be granted to them. This provision, in so far as relevant, provided:
“1. A party [to the proceedings] exempted partly or entirely from court fees may request that an advocate or a legal adviser be appointed for him or her. ... The court shall grant that request if it considers that the participation of an advocate or a legal adviser in the case is necessary. ...
2. The provisions of the preceding paragraph are also applicable to parties who benefit from a statutory exemption from court fees, provided that they demonstrate, by way of the declaration referred to in Article 113 § 1, that the fees of the advocate or legal adviser would entail a reduction in their standard of living and that of their family. The court shall refuse to assign a lawyer to the case if it considers that the party's action or appeal is manifestly ill-founded.”
2. Cassation appeals
21. At the material time a party to civil proceedings could lodge a cassation appeal with the Supreme Court against a final judicial decision of a second-instance court terminating the proceedings. Under Article 393 4 § 1 of the Code of Civil Procedure a cassation appeal had to be lodged with the court that had given the relevant decision within one month from the date on which the decision with its written grounds was served on the party concerned. Cassation appeals which were not lodged by an advocate or a legal adviser were to be dismissed.
22. Article 393 1 of the Code listed the grounds on which a cassation appeal could be lodged. It read as follows:
“The cassation appeal may be based on the following grounds:
(1) a breach of substantive law on account of its erroneous interpretation or wrongful application;
(2) a breach of procedural provisions if the defect in question could significantly affect the outcome of the case.”
3. Appeals against interlocutory decisions
23. Article 394 of the Code of Civil Procedure guarantees the parties to proceedings the right to appeal against a decision of the first-instance court terminating the proceedings. An interlocutory appeal (zażalenie) of this kind is also available against certain interlocutory decisions specified in this provision. An appeal lies against a refusal of exemption from court fees and likewise against a refusal of legal aid, where such decisions have been given by a first-instance court.
24. No appeal lies where such decisions are given by an appellate court.
4. Relevant provisions of social insurance law
25. Section 29(1)(a) of the 1983 Ordinance of the Minister of Labour and Social Policy of 5 August 1983 (Journal of Laws No. 47, item 214), as amended in 1990, provided that no medical examination could be organised with a view to reassessing the medical condition of persons who had been declared unfit to work and who had been in receipt of a disability pension for longer than ten years.
This Ordinance was repealed with effect from 1 September 1997.
26. Since 1 January 1999 the system of social insurance has been regulated by the Social Insurance System Act of 13 October 1998 (Ustawa o systemie ubezpieczeń społecznych) and a number of other acts applying to specific occupational groups or types of benefits. Social insurance benefits are essentially paid from a single fund financed by various compulsory contributions from employees and employers and managed by the Social Insurance Authority. Entitlement to a disability pension is based on the claimant's inability to continue paid employment on grounds of ill-health, confirmed by a medical certificate by doctors working for the Authority.
5. Case-law of the domestic courts
27. In a number of judgments the Courts of Appeal and the Supreme Court examined whether entitlement to a disability pension which had been paid to the insured person for longer than ten years could be redetermined following a fresh medical examination and reassessment of the person's condition.
28. In its judgment of 7 April 1994 the Supreme Court (II URN 8/94) quashed a judgment of the Cracow Court of Appeal in which the latter had accepted that a fresh medical examination could be ordered in respect of the appellant, who had been in receipt of a disability pension for nineteen years. The Supreme Court found that, despite the fact that it was contained in the Ordinance, the prohibition should be regarded as being of a statutory nature. In a judgment of 21 September 1995 (II URN 28/95) the Supreme Court reached the same conclusion and quashed a judgment of the appellate court. It observed that the decision that the appellant should undergo a medical examination to reassess his condition lacked any legal basis and that, accordingly, the result was of no legal relevance to the appellant's entitlement to a disability pension. In both judgments the Supreme Court referred to its judgment of 23 November 1987 (II URN 259/87). In a judgment of 17 July 1996 (II URN 13/96) the Supreme Court allowed an extraordinary appeal brought by the Ombudsman in the case of an appellant who had been in receipt of a disability pension for nineteen years. It reiterated the conclusions previously reached by the Supreme Court and held that the medical reassessment of a person's condition after that time had no legal basis as it was contrary to section 27 of the Ordinance 1983. It would have been possible only if, prior to issuing such an order, the Social Insurance Authority had obtained evidence showing that the person's condition no longer made him or her unfit to work. In the absence of such evidence, medical reassessment breached the principle of vested rights. On 26 May 1999 (II URN 13/96) the Supreme Court reiterated its previous conclusions as to the prohibition of medical reassessment after longer than ten years. In its judgment of 27 January 2000 the Gdańsk Court of Appeal shared the view of the Supreme Court and held that in such cases the disability should be presumed to be permanent.
In its judgment of 22 January 2002 ( II UKN 747/00) the Supreme Court held:
“The Social Insurance Authority cannot challenge the assessment that a person entitled to a disability pension is unfit to work if that person has been recognised as disabled for a period of over ten years. The change of legal situation in 1997 [when the 1983 Ordinance was repealed] is irrelevant in this respect.”
29. In a judgment of 5 September 2000 (II UKN 696/99) the Supreme Court held that the legal changes made to the social insurance system in 1998 did not affect existing disability entitlements in so far as the applicable provisions guaranteed the permanence of entitlements which had been paid for a period exceeding ten years.
30. In its judgments of 5 and 11 May 2005 (III UK 9/05 and II UK 29/05 respectively) the Supreme Court noted that the Ordinance had been repealed with effect from 1 September 1997. It further referred to the views expressed by the Supreme Court in the judgments referred to above and disagreed with them. It was of the opinion that section 29 of the 1983 Ordinance did not create a presumption of permanent entitlement to a disability pension which had been paid for longer than ten years. It observed that the temporal scope of the application of that Ordinance and the principle stated in section 29 thereof were unclear; in particular, it was not clear whether after the entry into force of the 1998 Act the prohibition on medical re-assessment remained valid. The court took the view that this was not the case and that the right to social insurance entitlements, including disability pensions, could not be seen as being irrevocable under all circumstances.
31. On 26 January 2005 (III UZP 2/05) the Supreme Court examined a request brought by the Ombudsman for a resolution by seven judges as to whether the Social Insurance Authority could challenge the entitlement to a disability pension of persons who prior to 1 September 1997, the date on which the 1983 Ordinance was repealed, had been receiving the pension for longer than ten years. The Ombudsman pointed to discrepancies in the case-law of the various appellate courts and in the Supreme Court's case-law. In its resolution the Court retraced the history of the relevant case-law and acknowledged that diverging views had been expressed by different benches of that court. It ultimately expressed the view that the prohibition on medical reassessment contained in the 1983 Ordinance was merely of a procedural nature and as such could not be applied after the Ordinance had been repealed. In consequence, nothing prevented the Social Insurance Authority from ordering a fresh medical examination with a view to reassessing whether the person concerned continued to be unfit for work.
THE LAW
I. THE CONTINUED EXAMINATION OF THE APPLICATION
32. On 3 October 2008 the Government submitted a unilateral declaration similar to that in the case of Tahsin Acar v. Turkey (preliminary objection) [GC], no. 26307/95, ECHR 2003-VI) and acknowledged that there had been a breach of the applicant's rights under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention as a result of the refusal of legal aid. They further submitted that the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention did not raise an issue under the Convention. In respect of non-pecuniary damage, the Government proposed a payment to the applicant of EUR 2,000. They invited the Court to strike out the application in accordance with Article 37 of the Convention.
33. The applicant considered that the amount proposed did not constitute sufficient just satisfaction for the damage she had sustained. She further requested the Court to continue its examination of the application.
34. The Court takes note of the complex nature of the complaint made in the present case regarding the alleged interference with the applicant's right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions. It is further of the view that this part of the case raises an important issue of general interest in connection with the legal review of entitlement to disability pensions. Accordingly, the Court does not find it appropriate to strike the application out of its list of cases. It considers that there are special circumstances regarding respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and its Protocols which require the further examination of the application on its merits (Articles 37 § 1 in fine and 38 § 1(b) of the Convention).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION CONCERNING THE REFUSAL OF LEGAL AID
35. The applicant complained that the refusal to grant her legal assistance in connection with the cassation proceedings had infringed her right to a fair hearing guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which, in so far as relevant, reads:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal...”
A. Admissibility
36. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
37. The Court points out at the outset that there is no obligation under the Convention to make legal aid available for disputes (contestations) in civil proceedings, as there is a clear distinction between the wording of Article 6 § 3 (c), which guarantees the right to free legal assistance under certain conditions in criminal proceedings, and of Article 6 § 1, which makes no reference to legal assistance (see Del Sol v. France, no. 46800/99, § 20, ECHR 2002-II, and Essaadi v. France, no. 49384/99, § 30, 26 February 2002). It may therefore be acceptable to impose conditions on the grant of legal aid based, inter alia, on the financial situation of the litigant or his or her prospects of success in the proceedings (see Steel and Morris v. the United Kingdom, no. 68416/01, § 62, ECHR 2005-II).
38. A requirement that an appellant be represented by a qualified lawyer before the court of cassation, as in the present case, cannot in itself be seen as contrary to Article 6. This requirement is clearly compatible with the characteristics of the Supreme Court as the highest court examining appeals on points of law and it is a common feature of the legal systems in several member States of the Council of Europe (see Gillow v. the United Kingdom, 24 November 1986, § 69, Series A no. 109; Vacher v. France, 17 December 1996, §§ 24 and 28, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI; Tabor v. Poland, no. 12825/02, § 42, 27 June 2006; Staroszczyk v. Poland, no. 59519/00, § 129, 22 March 2007; and Siałkowska v. Poland, no. 8932/05, § 106, 22 March 2007). It is for the Contracting States to decide how they should comply with the fair hearing obligations arising under the Convention. The Court must satisfy itself that the method chosen by the domestic authorities in a particular case is compatible with the Convention. In discharging its obligation to provide parties to proceedings with legal aid, where so provided by domestic law, the State must, moreover, display diligence so as to secure to those persons the genuine and effective enjoyment of the rights guaranteed under Article 6 (see Del Sol, cited above, § 21; Staroszczyk v.Poland, cited above, § 30; Siałkowska v. Poland, cited above, § 107; and, mutatis mutandis, R.D. v. Poland, nos. 29692/96 and 34612/97, § 44, 18 December 2001).
39. The key principle governing the application of Article 6 is fairness. It is important to ensure the appearance of the fair administration of justice and a party in civil proceedings must be able to participate effectively, inter alia, by being able to put forward matters in support of his or her claims (see Laskowska v. Poland, no. 77765/01, § 54, 13 March 2007).
40. Against this background, the Court will examine whether the applicant's right of access to a court was observed in connection with the refusal to provide her with legal assistance in cassation proceedings before the Supreme Court.
The Court first notes that in the instant case the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure made it possible for the applicant to apply for legal aid. The relevant decision was dependent on the court's assessment as to whether in the circumstances of the case legal representation was necessary (see paragraph 20 above). When examining whether the decisions on legal aid, seen as a whole, were in compliance with the fair hearing standards of the Convention, it is not the Court's task to take the place of the Polish courts, but to review whether those courts, when exercising their power of appreciation in respect of the assessment of evidence, acted in accordance with Article 6 § 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Kreuz v. Poland, no. 28249/95, § 64, ECHR 2001-VI).
41. The Court notes that in her application for legal aid the applicant duly substantiated her assertion that in her financial situation she could not afford professional legal assistance, by submitting a number of various official documents as required by law. In its refusal the court did not challenge the authenticity of the documents and did not contest the applicant's financial situation in any way.
42. The Court further observes that in its refusal the Court of Appeal briefly referred to the nature of the issues involved in the case. It stated that the crucial issues in the case concerned the assessment of the applicant's condition and whether it justified maintaining her entitlement to the disability pension. It was of the view that the case did not warrant professional legal assistance for the purposes of further appeal.
43. However, the Court observes that the applicant, as far back as her appeal against the first-instance decision given by the Social Insurance Authority, submitted two strands of argument. It is true that the first strand, as correctly noted by the Court of Appeal, was essentially concerned with the assessment of the medical evidence and the determination of her condition, on which her entitlement to the disability pension hinged. Nonetheless, the Court stresses that she also repeatedly submitted legal arguments based on the 1983 Ordinance. She stated, time after time, that under this Ordinance the reassessment of her condition lacked any legal basis.
44. The applicant also referred to the case-law of the Supreme Court which, in her view, supported the conclusion that no such reassessment was legally possible in her case. Her legal arguments were subsequently examined by the Court of Appeal. In its judgment of 8 September 2004 that court limited its reasoning to holding that the 1983 Ordinance was “of no relevance” to the applicant's case.
45. The Court observes that it was open to the applicant to lodge a cassation appeal against that judgment, based on an alleged breach of substantive law on account of its erroneous interpretation or wrongful application (see paragraph 22 above). The applicant therefore had the possibility of challenging, by way of a cassation appeal, the manner in which the appellate court interpreted the provisions of the Ordinance in her case and their significance for the maintenance of her disability benefits.
46. In that connection the Court notes that the issues related to the application of the 1983 Ordinance gave rise to a considerable body of case-law by the domestic courts. The Supreme Court, in a number of decisions given following cassation appeals against judgments of various appellate courts, examined whether the provisions of that Ordinance prohibited the Social Insurance Authority from divesting individuals of disability pensions they had been receiving for longer than ten years. Furthermore, the domestic courts, some of them assuming that such a prohibition existed, were not in agreement as to its nature, namely whether it was substantive or merely procedural. Importantly, it was unclear whether the entry into force of the Act of 13 October 1998 affected the applicability of the Ordinance to the situation of persons who had acquired rights to a disability pension prior to the Act's entry into force on 1 January 1999. It was only in 2005, after the applicant's case had already been decided, that the Supreme Court ultimately adopted a resolution designed to clarify the case-law and resolve the discrepancies which had arisen in the interpretation of whether the right to a disability pension was revocable or not.
47. The Court observes that the Court of Appeal in its refusal failed to make any reference to the legal arguments advanced by the applicant based on the 1983 Ordinance.
48. The Court is of the view that if legal representation was mandatory, the Court of Appeal's conclusion that legal assistance would be unnecessary, in particular in the absence of any analysis of whether in the circumstances of the case the cassation appeal offered reasonable prospects of success, does not seem to be justified.
49. The Court is therefore of the view that the court failed in its duty to give proper examination to the applicant's request for legal assistance (see Tabor v. Poland, no. 12825/02, § 46, 27 June 2006, mutatis mutandis).
50. Accordingly, having regard to the circumstances of the case seen as a whole, the Court is of the view that there has been a breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
51. The applicant further complained that she had been deprived of a disability pension after fifteen years of receiving such a pension. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
52. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' arguments
53. The applicant argued that the judicial decisions concerned had been in breach of a 1983 Ordinance and of the case-law of the Supreme Court. That court had consistently held that after ten years of receiving a disability pension the person concerned could not have his or her entitlement to such a pension reviewed and taken away. It was clear that the 1983 Ordinance prohibited the physicians working for the Social Insurance Authority from examining persons so entitled with a view to reassessing their medical condition and, ultimately, divesting them of their disability pension.
54. The applicant further submitted that the fact that in 1998 a reform of the social insurance system had been carried out had not removed this prohibition. This was highlighted by a number of judgments to that effect given by various courts, including the Supreme Court. As a result of the decisions given in her case, the applicant had been deprived, after nineteen years, of her only income, despite the fact that the applicable provisions had created a legitimate expectation that her entitlement to the pension would not be challenged by the Social Insurance Authority. In view of the circumstances of the case, the decisions given by the Authority and by the courts had been unjustified, breached the principle of legal certainty and imposed an excessive burden on the applicant.
55. The Government did not submit any observations in this regard.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) General principles
56. The Court first reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains three distinct rules. They have been described as follows (in James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98; see also Belvedere Alberghiera S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 31524/96, § 51, ECHR 2000-VI):
“The first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest ... The three rules are not, however, 'distinct' in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule.”
57. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention does not guarantee, as such, any right to a pension of a particular amount (see, for example, Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX, and Janković v. Croatia (dec.), no. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X). However, where an individual has an assertable right under domestic law to a contributory social insurance pension, such a benefit should be regarded as a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, ECHR 2005-X). Where the amount of a benefit is reduced or discontinued, this may constitute interference with possessions which requires to be justified (see Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 40 , and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, § 71, 28 April 2009). An important consideration in the assessment of such interference under this provision is whether the applicant's right to derive benefits from the social insurance scheme in question has been infringed in a manner resulting in the impairment of the essence of his pension rights (see Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V).
58. The Court reiterates that an essential condition for interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful. The rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
59. Any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 85, 17 October 2002, and Elia S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 37710/97, § 77, ECHR 2001-IX). The notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws concerning social insurance benefits will commonly involve consideration of economic and social issues. The Court finds it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one and will respect the legislature's judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see, mutatis mutandis, The former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 87, ECHR 2000-XII).
60. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that any interference be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81-94, ECHR 2005-VI). The requisite fair balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52).
(b) Application of the above principles in the present case
61. The Court notes that the applicant was divested of her entitlement to the disability pension which she had been receiving since 1985. It is of the view that this amounted to interference with her possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Styk v. Poland (dec.), no. 28356/95, 16 April 1998; Szumilas v. Poland (dec.), no 35187/97, 1 July 1998; Bieńkowski v. Poland (dec.), no. 33889/97, 9 September 1998; and, mutatis mutandis, Domalewski, cited above).
62. The Court must next determine whether the interference was lawful. The measure complained of was based on section 27(1) (a) of the 1983 Ordinance. The Court notes that the interpretation of this provision gave rise to serious difficulties and discrepancies between judgments given by various appellate courts and by different benches of the Supreme Court. These difficulties were acknowledged by the Supreme Court which ultimately, in 2005, issued a resolution designed to eliminate these divergences. In this respect, however, the Court reiterates that divergences in case-law are an inherent consequence of any judicial system which is based on a network of trial and appeal courts with authority over the area of their territorial jurisdiction, and that the role of a supreme court is precisely to resolve conflicts between decisions of the courts below (see Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others v. France [GC], nos. 24846/94 and 34165/96 to 34173/96, § 59, ECHR 1999-VII). It further affirms that its task is not to take the place of the domestic courts. It is in the first place for them to interpret domestic law (see, among other authorities, Tejedor García v. Spain, 16 December 1997, § 31, Reports 1997-VIII). Accordingly, it considers that the interference was prescribed by law.
63. The Court must next determine whether the interference pursued a legitimate aim, that is, whether it was “in the public interest”. The Court considers that it was intended to protect the financial stability of the social insurance system and ensure that it was not threatened by subsidising, without any temporal limitations, the pensions of recipients who with the passage of time had ceased to meet the relevant statutory requirements. The Court is satisfied that the interference pursued a legitimate aim in the general interest of the community
64. Lastly, the Court is called upon to determine whether the interference imposed an excessive individual burden on the applicant. In considering whether this is the case, the Court must have regard to the particular context in which the issue arises in the present case, namely that of a social security scheme. Such schemes are an expression of a society's solidarity with its vulnerable members (see Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands (dec.), no. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI).
65. The Court's approach to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 should reflect the reality of the way in which welfare provision is currently organised within the member States of the Council of Europe. It is clear that within those States, and within most individual States, there exists a wide range of social security benefits designed to confer entitlements which arise as of right. Benefits are funded in a large variety of ways: some are paid for by contributions to a specific fund; some depend on a claimant's contribution record; many are paid for out of general taxation on the basis of a statutorily defined status. In the modern, democratic State, many individuals are, for all or part of their lives, completely dependent for survival on social security and welfare benefits. Many domestic legal systems recognise that such individuals require a degree of certainty and security, and provide for benefits to be paid – subject to the fulfilment of the conditions of eligibility – as of right (see Stec and Others, cited above).
66. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 places no restriction on the Contracting Parties' freedom to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under social security schemes (see Stec and Others, cited above). The Court observes that the basic level of social insurance benefits in Poland, including disability pensions, is paid from a single fund financed by various compulsory contributions from employees and employers and managed by the Social Insurance Authority. It is based on the principle of solidarity and operates on a pay-as-you-go basis. Individual entitlement to a disability pension has been based, both before 1998 and since, on the statutory provisions specifying the particular conditions which must be met by claimants. The decisions of the Social Insurance Authority must comply with the applicable statutes.
67. Entitlement to a disability pension is based essentially on the claimant's inability to continue paid employment on grounds of ill-health. It is in the nature of things that various conditions which initially make it impossible for persons afflicted with them to work can evolve over time, leading to either deterioration or improvement of the person's health. The Court cannot accept the suggestion made by the applicant that her pension entitlements, based as they were on contributions to the general fund from which all social insurance benefits are paid, should remain unaltered once they had been granted, regardless of any changes in her condition. There is no authority in its case-law for so categorical a statement; in actual fact, the Court has accepted the possibility of reductions in social security entitlements in certain circumstances (see, as a recent authority, Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 45, with further case-law references; see also Hoogendijk v. the Netherlands, (dec.), no. 58641/00, 6 January 2005). In particular, the Court has noted the significance which the passage of time can have for the legal existence and character of social insurance benefits (see, mutatis mutandis, Goudswaard-Van der Lans, cited above). This applies both to amendments to legislation which may be adopted in response to societal changes and evolving views on the categories of persons who need social assistance, and also to the evolution of individual situations. The Court considers that it is permissible for States to take measures to reassess the medical condition of persons receiving disability pensions with a view to establishing whether they continue to be unfit to work, provided that such reassessment is in conformity with the law and attended by sufficient procedural guarantees.
Indeed, had entitlements to disability pensions been maintained in situations where their recipients ceased over time to comply with the applicable legal requirements, it would result in their unjust enrichment. Moreover, it would have been unfair on persons contributing to the Social Insurance system, in particular those denied benefits as they did not meet the relevant requirements. In more general terms, it would also sanction an improper allocation of public funds; an allocation in disregard of the objectives that disability pensions were purported to meet.
68. The Court notes that the applicant had been receiving her disability pension since 1985, on the basis of a decision by the Social Insurance Authority. The applicable legislation, both before the reform of the social insurance system in 1998 and afterwards, made the granting of a disability pension dependent, inter alia, on the condition of being unfit to work on health grounds and this fact being officially recognised by a competent medical panel.
69. In 1985 the applicant was found to satisfy that requirement. Subsequently, her condition was reassessed in 1994, 1995 and 1997. On each of these occasions the fact that she continued to be unfit to work was confirmed and her entitlement to the pension was maintained. The Court notes that it has not been argued or shown that on any of these occasions the applicant challenged the lawfulness of the reassessment of her condition, despite the fact that the 1983 Ordinance remained in force until 1 September 1997. It was only in the proceedings instituted in 2000 that she raised doubts as to the existence of a legal basis for such reassessment.
It is further noted that during the proceedings conducted before the appellate court that court ordered that the evidence on the basis of which the first-instance court had given its judgment of 24 September 2002 be supplemented by medical examinations by various specialists (see paragraph 14 above). However, the applicant refused to comply with that order.
70. The Court observes that the decisions of the Social Insurance Authority were subject to judicial review before two instances of the special social insurance courts, assisted by full procedural guarantees. The applicant had recourse to that procedure. There is no indication that during the proceedings she was unable to present her arguments to the courts.
71. It is also of relevance for the assessment of the case that the applicant was not completely divested of her entitlement to the disability pension. Indeed, the Regional Court granted the applicant the pension for a fixed period of two years (see paragraph 12 above). Moreover, it has not been shown or argued that the amount of that temporary pension was lower than that which the applicant had been receiving before. It cannot therefore be said that the applicant was totally divested of her only means of subsistence (compare and contrast Kjartan Ásmundsson, cited above, § 44, and the case-law cited therein).
72. The Court further notes that the applicant was not obliged to pay back any amounts which she had been receiving prior to the date when she was found to no longer meet the applicable legal requirements (see Chroust v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 4295/03, 20 November 2006). Moreover, the domestic law did not create any assumption that persons found to no longer satisfy the requirements for disability pensions had been acting fraudulently or in a manner open to criticism. Nor was such a suggestion made in the proceedings in relation to the applicant.
73. Having regard to the circumstances of the case seen as a whole, the Court concludes that a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights and that the burden on the applicant was neither disproportionate nor excessive.
74. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
IV. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
75. The applicant complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention about the outcome and unfairness of the proceedings. She submitted that the proceedings had lasted too long and that the court had not shown the necessary expedition in taking the evidence and had refused to hear evidence from witnesses. She maintained that the court had wrongly assessed the evidence, reached untenable conclusions as to the facts and, as a result, had given erroneous decisions.
76. In so far as the applicant complained about the establishment of the facts by the domestic courts, the Court reiterates that, in accordance with Article 19 of the Convention, its duty is to ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the Contracting Parties to the Convention. In particular, it is not its function to deal with errors of fact or law allegedly committed by a national court unless and in so far as they may have infringed rights and freedoms protected by the Convention. Moreover, while Article 6 of the Convention guarantees the right to a fair hearing, it does not lay down any rules on the admissibility of evidence or the way it should be assessed, which are therefore primarily matters for regulation by national law and the national courts (see García Ruiz v. Spain [GC], no. 30544/96, § 28, ECHR 1999-I, with further references). In the present case, apart from her complaint examined above, the applicant did not allege any particular failure on the part of the relevant courts to respect her right to a fair hearing. Assessing the circumstances of the case as a whole, the Court finds no indication that the impugned proceedings were conducted unfairly.
77. As regards the applicant's complaint about the unreasonable length of the impugned proceedings, the Court notes that the applicant did not lodge a complaint with the relevant domestic court under the 2004 Act, thus failing to avail herself of the available domestic remedy. The Court has already examined that remedy for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention and found it effective in respect of complaints about the excessive length of judicial proceedings in Poland. In particular, the Court considered that the remedy was capable both of preventing the alleged violation of the right to a hearing within a reasonable time or its continuation, and of providing adequate redress for any violation that had already occurred (see Charzyński v. Poland (dec.), no. 15212/03, §§ 36-42).
78. It follows that this part of the application must be declared inadmissible in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
79. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
80. The applicant claimed PLN 51,000 in respect of the non-pecuniary damage she had suffered in connection with the case and PLN 32,965 for the pecuniary damage resulting from the loss of her disability pension. The applicant, who was granted legal aid for the purposes of the proceedings before the Court, further claimed EUR 3,500 for the costs incurred in connection with the domestic proceedings and the proceedings before the Court.
81. The Government contested the applicant's submissions.
82. The Court does not discern any causal link between the violation found and the pecuniary damage alleged; it therefore rejects this claim. On the other hand, it awards the applicant EUR 2,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
83. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, the Court rejects the claim for costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
84. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the applicant's complaint concerning the examination of her request for legal assistance and the taking away of her disability pension admissible;
2. Declares the remainder of the application inadmissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in that the Court of Appeal failed to give proper examination to the applicant's request for legal assistance;
4. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into Polish zlotys at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 December 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Richiesta del governo di cancellare la richiesta dal ruolo respinta; Resto inammissibile; Violazione dll’ Art. 6-1; nessuna violazione di P1-1; danno Non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA WIECZOREK C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 18176/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
8 dicembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Wieczorek c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 17 novembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 18176/05) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino polacco, la Sig.ra K. W. (“la richiedente”), il 16 aprile 2005.
2. La richiedente fu rappresentata dal Sig. Z. C., un avvocato che pratica a Crocovia. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. La richiedente addusse, in particolare, di essere stata privata del diritto ad un'udienza corretta perché la sua richiesta per il patrocinio gratuito per depositare un ricorso di cassazione era stata rifiutata dalla corte di appello. Lei si lamentò inoltre che il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà era stato violato siccome lei era stata spossessata della sua pensione di invalidità che lei riceveva da quindici anni.
4. Il 14 novembre 2006 la Corte (quarta Sezione) decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Decise anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. La richiedente nacque nel 1952 e vive a Crocovia.
6. In una lettera del 18 settembre 2000 all'Autorità di Previdenza Sociale (Zaklad Ubezpieczeñ Spolecznych) a Cracovia, il marito della richiedente presentò, che nella sua prospettiva la richiedente che riceveva una pensione di invalidità dal 1985 era difatti sana e non avrebbe dovuto più ricevere una pensione. Lui suggerì che lei venisse esaminata da dottori competenti. Apparentemente dei procedimenti di divorzio che coinvolgevano le parti erano pendenti a quel il tempo.
7. Il 10 ottobre 2000 l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale, riferendosi all'archivio medico della richiedente avviò dei procedimenti per rivalutare la condizione della richiedente nella prospettiva di stabilire se lei si atteneva alle condizioni che disciplinavano il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità.
8. Il 28 novembre 2000 l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale l'informò in replica ad una consultazione da parte della richiedente in merito alla base legale cu cui questi procedimenti furono avviati, che i procedimenti erano stati avviati sotto le disposizioni che disciplinavano la soprintendenza interna dei medici che lavoravano per l'Autorità.
9. Il 4 dicembre 2000 l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale diede infine, una decisione con cui il diritto della richiedente a ricevere una pensione di invalidità si estinse siccome lei non era più inadatta al lavoro.
10. Il 12 gennaio 2001 la richiedente fece appello, presentando che l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale era andata a vuoto nel valutare in modo appropriato le prove mediche concernenti la sua condizione. Lei presentò anche che la sua condizione era stata riesaminata nel 1994, 1995 e nel 1997. In ognuna di queste occasioni erano state rese delle decisioni che avevano confermato che lei era permanentemente inadatta a lavorare.
11. Nelle sue note presentate il 18 maggio e il 3 dicembre 2001 la richiedente ha presentato che non c'era base legale per condurre degli esami medici per rivalutare la sua condizione. Lei si riferì all'Ordinanza del 1983 che proibiva la rivalutazione della condizione medica di persone che stavano ricevendo una pensione di invalidità per più di dieci anni (vedere paragrafo 25 sotto). L'Ordinanza prevedeva che nessun esame medico avrebbe potuto essere condotto a riguardo di simili persone con la prospettiva di una rivalutazione della loro condizione. Lei invocò inoltre la giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema che, nell'osservazione della richiedente, sosteneva la conclusione che nessuna rivalutazione medica di una condizione che era servita come base per accordare una pensione di invalidità avrebbe potuto essere ordinata una volta che erano passati dieci anni dalla data in cui la decisione che assegnava il diritto ad una pensione è divenuta definitiva (II URN 8/94, vedere paragrafo 28 sotto).
12. La Corte Regionale di Cracovia, con una sentenza del 24 settembre 2002 corresse parzialmente la decisione dell’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale accordando alla richiedente la pensione di invalidità per un periodo fisso, vale a dire dal 1 gennaio 2001 fino al 1 gennaio 2003.
13. La richiedente fece appello, chiedendo che nella prospettiva della sua condizione le fu concessa una pensione di invalidità permanente. Lei si lamentò della valutazione delle prove mediche da parte della corte di prima - istanza. Nelle sue note supplementari presentate alla Corte d'appello il 6 settembre 2004, lei reiterò i suoi argomenti della mancanza di base legale per la rivalutazione della sua condizione e concluse che la sentenza di prima - istanza era perciò in violazione di un diritto sostanziale.
14. L’ 8 settembre 2004 la Corte d'appello di Cracovia respinse il ricorso. La corte esaminò l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla valutazione presumibilmente incorretta delle prove e concluse che la corte di prima - istanza era stata completa nella valutazione che aveva eseguito. Notò anche che durante i procedimenti di appello e nella prospettiva dei dubbi la corte di appello aveva meditato molto sulla condizione della richiedente, aveva ordinato che, oltre alle prove disponibili nell'archivio medico della richiedente, un'opinione medica avrebbe dovuto essere ottenuta dal centro locale per la medicina professionale e che degli ulteriori esami avrebbero dovuto essere eseguiti da specialisti di cardiologia, nefrologia, endocrinologia e ginecologia. La richiedente aveva rifiutato di subire questi esami.
15. La corte osservò inoltre che la sentenza di prima - istanza manteneva la pensione della richiedente per il periodo dal 1 gennaio 2001 sino al 1 gennaio 2003. Quando questo periodo scadde, la richiedente non era riuscita a presentare all’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale una richiesta per far prolungare il suo diritto alla pensione.
16. In risposta all'argomento della richiedente basato sull'Ordinanza del 1983 e la proibizione che ha imposto sul riesame medico di persone che ricevevano una pensione di invalidità da più di dieci anni, la corte osservò,:
“Dovrebbe essere tenuto presente che i procedimenti riguardanti la causa della richiedente sono stati istruiti [dall’ Autorità di Previdenza Sociale] sotto le disposizioni legali che disciplinano la soprintendenza interna da parte del medico principale dei dottori che lavorano per questa Autorità e che valutano la condizione medica delle persone che chiedono una pensione di invalidità (vedere Articolo 11 dell'Ordinanza del 1997 del Ministro di Lavori e Politica Sociale). Di conseguenza, non era di nessuna attinenza legale alla causa della richiedente che lei era stata dichiarata permanentemente inadatta a lavorare nel 1985. Nemmeno la lunghezza di tempo durante il quale lei stava ricevendo la sua pensione aveva alcun significato per la causa presente.”
17. Il 13 ottobre 2004 la Corte d'appello di Cracovia rifiutò di accordare il patrocinio gratuito alla richiedente per depositare un ricorso di cassazione. I motivi scritti per il rifiuto recitano come segue:
“Sotto l’Articolo 117 § 1 del Codice di Procedura Civile una parte a procedimenti che è stata esentata, pienamente o in parte, dall'obbligo di pagare le parcelle di corte può richiedere che un avvocato di patrocinio gratuito venga assegnato per rappresentarla nella sua causa. La corte concederà tale richiesta se decide che la partecipazione di un avvocato nella causa è necessaria. Un avvocato di patrocinio gratuito verrà assegnato nel caso in cui la parte non fosse in grado di dibattere competentemente la causa o la causa fosse complessa relativamente ai fatti o alla legge.
Il problema cruciale nella presente causa era la valutazione della condizione [della richiedente] e, di conseguenza, non può essere riguardata così complesso da garantire l’ assistenza legale. La corte considera perciò che l’assistenza legale non sia necessaria e, di conseguenza, respinge la richiesta della richiedente.
Il mero fatto che una parte non può permettersi di pagare delle parcelle legali non giustifica la concessione dell’assistenza legale; questo si applica anche a cause in cui è obbligatori ala rappresentanza legale per la preparazione del ricorso in cassazione.”
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
1. Patrocinio gratuito
18. All'Articolo 113 § 1 del Codice di Procedura Civile del periodo attinte era previsto che le parti a procedimenti potrebbero chiedere alla corte competente di trattare con la causa per accordare loro un'esenzione da parcelle di corte ammesso che presentassero una dichiarazione all'effetto che le parcelle richieste avrebbero provocato una riduzione sostanziale nel loro standard di vita e della loro famiglia.
19. Le parti a procedimenti riguardanti l’assegnazione di assicurazioni sociali e pensioni furono esentate, sotto l’Articolo 463 § 1 del Codice di Procedura Civile, dall'obbligo di pagare parcelle di corte.
20. Sotto l’Articolo 117 del Codice, le persone esentate da parcelle di corte potrebbero richiedere che venga accordato loro il patrocinio gratuito. Questa disposizione, nella parte attinente, prevede:
“1. Una parte [ai procedimenti] esentata in parte o completamente da parcelle di corte può richiedere che un difensore o un consulente legale vengano nominati per lei. ... La corte accorderà questa richiesta se considera che è necessaria la partecipazione di un difensore o un consulente legale nella causa. ...
2. Le disposizioni del paragrafo precedente sono anche applicabili a parti che traggono profitto da un'esenzione legale da parcelle di corte, ammesso che dimostrino, tramite dichiarazione a cui si fa riferimento nell' Articolo 113 § 1, che le parcelle del difensore o consulente legale comporterebbero una riduzione nel loro standard di vita e in quello della loro famiglia. La corte rifiuterà di assegnare un avvocato alla causa se considera che l'azione della parte o il ricorso è manifestamente mal-fondato.”
2. Ricorsi in cassazione
21. Al tempo attinente una parte a procedimenti civili potrebbe depositare un ricorso in cassazione presso la Corte Suprema contro una decisione giudiziale definitiva di una corte di seconda - istanza che termina i procedimenti. Sotto l'Articolo 393 4 § 1 del Codice di Procedura Civile un ricorso in cassazione doveva essere depositato presso la corte che aveva reso la decisione attinente entro un mese dalla data in cui la decisione coi suoi motivi scritti era stata notificata alla parte riguardata. I ricorsi in cassazione non depositati da un difensore o da un consulente legale dovevano essere respinti.
22. L’Articolo 393 1 del Codice elencava i motivi sui quali avrebbe potuto essere depositato un ricorso in cassazione. Recita come segue:
“Il ricorso di cassazione può essere basato sui seguenti motivi:
(1) una violazione del diritto sostanziale a causa della sua interpretazione erronea o applicazione sbagliata;
(2) una violazione di disposizioni procedurali se il difetto in oggetto potrebbe colpire significativamente il risultato della causa.”
3. Ricorsi contro decisioni interlocutorie
23. L’Articolo 394 del Codice di Procedura Civile garantisce alle parti a procedimenti il diritto di fare appello contro una decisione della corte di prima - istanza che termina i procedimenti. Un ricorso interlocutorio ( zażalenie) di qualche genere è anche disponibile contro certe decisioni interlocutorie specificate in questa disposizione. Un ricorso è richiesti contro un rifiuto di esenzione da parcelle di corte e similmente contro un rifiuto di patrocinio gratuito, dove simili decisioni sono state date da una corte di prima - istanza.
24. Nessun ricorso è richiesto dove simili decisioni sono date da una corte di appello.
4. Disposizioni attinenti di diritto di preidenza sociale
25. La Sezione 29(1)(a) dell'Ordinanza del 1983 del Ministro dei Lavori e delle Politiche Sociali del 5 agosto 1983 (Giorale delle Leggi N.ro 47, articolo 214), corretto nel 1990, prevedeva che nessun esame medico avrebbe potuto essere organizzato nella prospettiva di riesaminare la condizione medica di persone che erano state dichiarate inadatte a lavorare e che ristavano ricevendo una pensione di invalidità per più di dieci anni.
Questa Ordinanza fu abrogata con effetto dal 1 settembre 1997.
26. Dal 1 gennaio 1999 il sistema di previdenza sociale è regolato dall'Atto del Sistema della Previdenza Sociale del 13 ottobre 1998 (Ustawa o systemie ubezpieczeń społecznych) ed un numero di altri atti che si applicano ai specifici gruppi professionali o tipi di benefici. I benefici della previdenza sociale essenzialmente sono pagati da un solo fondo finanziato dai vari contributi obbligatori da impiegati e datori di lavoro e gestito dall’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. Il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità è basato sull'incapacità del rivendicatore di continuare il lavoro pagato per motivi di cattiva salute, confermato con un certificato medico da dottori che lavorano per l'Autorità.
5. Giurisprudenza delle corti nazionali
27. In un numero di sentenze la Corte d'appello e la Corte Suprema hanno esaminato se il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità che era stata pagata alla persona assicurata per più di dieci anni potesse essere rideterminata in seguito ad un nuovo esame medico e rivalutazione della condizione della persona.
28. Nella sua sentenza del 7 aprile 1994 la Corte Suprema (II URN 8/94) annullò una sentenza della Corte d'appello di Cracovia nella quale quest’ultima aveva accettato che un nuovo esame medico avrebbe potuto essere ordinato a riguardo dell'appellante che stava ricevendo di una pensione di invalidità da diciannove anni. La Corte Suprema trovò che, nonostante il fatto che fu sostenuta nell'Ordinanza, la proibizione doveva essere considerata come di natura legale . In una sentenza del 21 settembre 1995 (II URN 28/95) la Corte Suprema giunse alla stessa conclusione ed annullò una sentenza della corte di appello. Osservò che la decisione che l'appellante avrebbe dovuto subire un esame medico per rivalutare la sua condizione mancava qualsiasi base legale e che, di conseguenza, il risultato non era di nessuna attinenza legale al diritto dell'appellante ad una pensione di invalidità. In entrambe le sentenze la Corte Suprema si riferì alla sua sentenza edl 23 novembre 1987 (II URN 259/87). In una sentenza del 17 luglio 1996 (II URN 13/96) la Corte Suprema accolse un ricorso straordinario introdotto dal Difensore civile nella causa di un appellante che era stava ricevendo una pensione di invalidità da diciannove anni. Prima reiterò le conclusioni a cui era giunta la Corte Suprema e sostenne che la rivalutazione medica della condizione di una persona dopo quel tempo non aveva base legale siccome era contraria alla sezione 27 dell'Ordinanza 1983. Sarebbe stata possibile solamente se, prima di emettere tale ordine, l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale avesse ottenuto prova che mostrasse che la condizione della persona non la rendeva più inadatta a lavorare. In assenza di simile prova, la rivalutazione medica violava il principio dei diritti acquisiti. Il 26 maggio 1999 (II URN 13/96) la Corte Suprema reiterò le sue precedenti conclusioni in merito alla proibizione della rivalutazione medica dopo più di dieci anni. Nella sua sentenza del 27 gennaio 2000 la Corte d'appello di Gdańsk condivise la prospettiva della Corte Suprema e sostenne che in simili casi si dovrebbe presumere l'invalidità come permanente.
Nella sua sentenza del 22 gennaio 2002 (II UKN 747/00) la Corte Suprema sostenne:
“L’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale non può impugnare la valutazione che una persona ha concesso ad una pensione di invalidità è disadatta per lavorare se che persona è stata riconosciuta come disabilitato per un periodo di più di dieci anni. Il cambio di situazione legale nel 1997 [quando l'Ordinanza del 1983 fu abrogata] è irrilevante in questo riguardo.”
29. In una sentenza del 5 settembre 2000 (II UKN 696/99) la Corte Suprema sostenne che i cambi legali fatti al sistema di previdenza sociale nel 1998 non colpivano i diritti di invalidità finora esistenti in quanto le disposizioni applicabili garantivano la permanenza dei diritti che erano pagati per un periodo che eccedeva i dieci anni.
30. Nelle sue sentenze del 5 e dell’11 maggio 2005 (rispettivamente III UK 9/05 ed II UK 29/05) la Corte Suprema notò che l'Ordinanza era abrogata con effetto dal 1 settembre 1997. Si riferì inoltre alle prospettive espresse dalla Corte Suprema nelle sentenze a cui si fa riferimento sopra e non fu d'accordo con loro. Era dell'opinione che la sezione 29 dell'Ordinanza del 1983 non creava una presunzione di diritto permanente ad una pensione di invalidità che era stata pagata per più di dieci anni. Osservò che la sfera temporale dell’applicazione di questa Ordinanza ed il principio affermato a riguardo nella sezione 29 era poco chiaro; in particolare, non era chiaro se dopo l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto del 1998 la proibizione sulla rivalutazione medica era rimasta valida. La corte prese la posizione che questa non era il caso e che il diritto a diritti di previdenza sociali, incluso pensioni di invalidità non poteva essere visto come irrevocabile sotto tutte le circostanze.
31. Il 26 gennaio 2005 (III UZP 2/05) la Corte Suprema esaminò una richiesta introdotta dal Difensore civile per una decisione da parte di sette giudici riguardo a se l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale avrebbe potuto impugnare il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità di persone che prima del 1 settembre 1997, la data in cui fu abrogata l'Ordinanza del 1983, stava ricevendo la pensione da più di dieci anni. Il Difensore civile sottolineò delle discrepanze nella giurisprudenza delle varie corti di appello e nella giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema. Nella sua decisione la Corte riconsiderò la storia della giurisprudenza attinente ed ammise che prospettive divergenti erano state espresse da panche diverse di quella corte. Espresse infine la prospettiva che la proibizione sulla rivalutazione medica contenuta nell'Ordinanza del 1983 era soltanto di natura procedurale e come tale non poteva essere applicata dopo che l'Ordinanza era stata abrogata. Di conseguenza, nulla impediva all’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale dell'ordinare un nuovo esame medico nella prospettiva di rivalutare se la persona riguardata continuava ad essere inadatta al lavoro.
LA LEGGE
I. L'ESAME CONTINUATO DELLA RICHIESTA
32. Il 3 ottobre 2008 il Governo presentò una dichiarazione unilaterale simile a quella nella causa Tahsin Acar c. Turchia (eccezione preliminare) [GC], n. 26307/95, ECHR 2003-VI) ed ammise che c'era stata una violazione dei diritti della richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione come risultato del rifiuto del patrocinio gratuito. Presentò inoltre che l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non sollevava un problema sotto la Convenzione. A riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, il Governo propose un pagamento alla richiedente di EUR 2,000. Invitò la Corte a cancellare la richiesta in conformità con l’Articolo 37 della Convenzione.
33. La richiedente considerò che l'importo proposto non costituiva la soddisfazione equa sufficiente per il danno che lei aveva subito. Lei richiese inoltre alla Corte di continuare il suo esame della richiesta.
34. La Corte prende nota della natura complessa dell'azione di reclamo resa nella causa presente riguardo all'interferenza addotta col diritto della richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. È inoltre dell’opinione che questa parte della causa solleva un importante problema di interesse generale in collegamento con la revisione legale del diritto a pensioni di invalidità. Di conseguenza, la Corte non trova appropriato cancellare la richiesta del suo ruolo di cause. Considera che ci sono circostanze speciali riguardo ad aspetti dei diritti umani come definiti nella Convenzione e nei suoi Protocolli che richiedono l'ulteriore esame della richiesta sui suoi meriti (Articoli 37 § 1 in fine e 38 § 1(b) della Convenzione).
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE RIGUARDO AL RIFIUTO DEL PATROCINIO GRATUITO
35. La richiedente si lamentò che il rifiuto di accordarle l’ assistenza legale in collegamento coi procedimenti di cassazione aveva infranto il suo diritto ad un'udienza corretta garantito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, nella parte attinente, recita:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
A. Ammissibilità
36. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
37. La Corte indica all'inizio che non c'è obbligo sotto la Convenzione di rendere disponibile il patrocinio gratuito per le controversie (contestazioni) in procedimenti civili siccome c’è una distinzione chiara fra l'enunciazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 3, (c) che garantisce il diritto all’ assistenza legale gratutita sotto certe condizioni in procedimenti penali e dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 che non fa riferimento all’ assistenza legale (vedere Del Sol c. Francia, n. 46800/99, § 20, ECHR 2002-II, ed Essaadi c. Francia, n. 49384/99, § 30 26 febbraio 2002). Può essere perciò accettabile imporre delle condizioni sulla concessione del patrocinio gratuito basato, inter alia, sulla situazione finanziaria del contendente o sulle sue prospettive di successo nei procedimenti (vedere Steel and Morris c. Regno Unito, n. 68416/01, § 62 ECHR 2005-II).
38. Un requisito che un appellante venga rappresentato da un avvocato qualificato di fronte alla corte di cassazione, come nella presente causa, non può essere considerato di per sè contrario all’Articolo 6. Questo requisito è chiaramente compatibile con le caratteristiche della Corte Suprema siccome la corte più alta ricorsi che esamina delle questioni di diritto è una caratteristica comune degli ordinamenti giuridici in molti Stati membri del Consiglio dell'Europa (vedere Gillow c. Regno Unito, 24 novembre 1986, § 69 Serie A n. 109; Vacher c. Francia, 17 dicembre 1996 §§ 24 e 28, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI; Tabor c. Polonia, n. 12825/02, § 42 del 27 giugno 2006; Staroszczyk c. Polonia, n. 59519/00, § 129 del 22 marzo 2007; e Siałkowska c. Polonia, n. 8932/05, § 106 del 22 marzo 2007). Spetta agli Stati Contraenti decidere il modo in cui dovrebbero attenersi con gli obblighi di udienza corretta derivanti sotto la Convenzione. La Corte deve essere soddisfatta che il metodo scelto dalle autorità nazionali in una particolare causa sia compatibile con la Convenzione. Nell'assolvere il suo obbligo di fornire a parti a procedimenti il patrocinio gratuito, dove così è previsto dal diritto nazionale, lo Stato deve, inoltre, mostrare diligenza così da garantire a quelle persone il genuino ed effettivo godimento dei diritti garantiti sotto l’Articolo 6 (vedere Del Sol, citata sopra, § 21; Staroszczyk v.Poland, citato sopra, § 30; Siałkowska c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 107; e, mutatis mutandis, R.D. c. Polonia, N. 29692/96 e 34612/97, § 44 del 18 dicembre 2001).
39. Il principio chiave che governa l’applicazione dell’ Articolo 6 è l'equità. È importante per assicurare l’apparenza dell'amministrazione equa della giustizia ed una parte in procedimenti civili deve essere in grado di esporre efficacemente, inter alia, le questioni in appoggio alle sue rivendicazioni (vedere Laskowska c. Polonia, n. 77765/01, § 54 del 13 marzo 2007).
40. Contro questo background, la Corte esaminerà, se il diritto della richiedente al’ accesso ad una corte fu osservato in collegamento col rifiuto di offrirle l’ assistenza legale in procedimenti in cassazione di fronte alla Corte Suprema.
La Corte prima nota che nella presente causa le disposizioni del Codice di Procedura Civile rendevano possibile alla richiedente richiedere il patrocinio gratuito. La decisione attinente dipendeva dalla valutazione della corte in merito a se nelle circostanze della causa la rappresentanza legale era necessaria (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Nell’esaminare se le decisioni sul patrocinio gratuito, viste nell'insieme, erano in ottemperanza con gli standard dell’ udienza equa della Convenzione, non è il compito della Corte sostituirsi alle corti polacche , ma fare una revisione se quelle corti, nell’esercitare il loro potere di valutazione a riguardo della valutazione delle prove, agirono in conformità con l’Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kreuz c. Polonia, n. 28249/95, § 64 ECHR 2001-VI).
41. La Corte nota che nella sua richiesta di patrocinio gratuito la richiedente provò debitamente la sua asserzione che nella sua situazione finanziaria non poteva permettersi l’ assistenza legale e professionale, presentando un numero di vari documenti ufficiali come richiesto dalla legge. Nel suo rifiuto la corte non impugnò l'autenticità dei documenti e non contestò la situazione finanziaria della richiedente in qualsiasi modo.
42. La Corte osserva inoltre che nel suo rifiuto la Corte d'appello si riferì brevemente alla natura dei problemi coinvolti nella causa. Affermò che i problemi cruciali nella causa riguardavano la valutazione della condizione della richiedente e se era giustificato mantenere il suo diritto alla pensione di invalidità. Era della prospettiva che la causa non garantiva l’ assistenza legale e professionale ai fini di un’ulteriore ricorso.
43. Comunque, la Corte osserva che la richiedente, riferendosi al suo ricorso contro la decisione di prima - istanza data dall’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale, ha presentato due margini di argomento. È vero che il primo margine, come notato correttamente dalla Corte d'appello, essenzialmente concerneva la valutazione delle prove mediche e la determinazione della sua condizione sulle quali il suo diritto alla pensione di invalidità si basava. Nondimeno, la Corte sottolinea che lei presentò anche ripetutamente argomenti legali basati sull'Ordinanza del 1983. Lei affermò, spesso, che sotto questa Ordinanza la rivalutazione della sua condizione mancava di qualsiasi base legale.
44. La richiedente si riferì anche alla giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema che, nella sua prospettiva, sosteneva la conclusione che nessuna rivalutazione di questo tipo era giuridicamente possibile nel suo causo. I suoi argomenti legali furono esaminati successivamente dalla Corte d'appello. Nella sua sentenza dell’ 8 settembre 2004 questa corte limitò il suo ragionamento a sostenere che l'Ordinanza del 1983 non fosse “di nessuna attinenza” alla causa della richiedente.
45. La Corte osserva che era aperto alla richiedente depositare un ricorso in cassazione contro questa sentenza, basato su una violazione addotta di un diritto sostanziale a causa della sua interpretazione erronea o applicazione sbagliata (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). La richiedente aveva perciò la possibilità di impugnare, tramite un ricorso in cassazione il modo in cui la corte di appello interpretò le disposizioni dell'Ordinanza nella sua causa ed il loro significato per il mantenimento dei suoi benefici di invalidità.
46. In questo collegamento la Corte nota che i problemi che si riferivano all’applicazione dell'Ordinanza del 1983 hanno generato un corpo considerevole di giurisprudenza da parte delle corti nazionali. La Corte Suprema, in numerose decisioni rese in seguito a ricorsi in cassazioni contro sentenze di varie corti di appello, esaminò se le disposizioni di quell’ Ordinanza proibivano all’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale di togliere ad individui delle pensioni di invalidità che stavano ricevendo da più di dieci anni. Inoltre, le corti nazionali, alcuni delle quali presumendo che tale proibizione esisteva, non concordavano in merito alla sua natura, vale a dire se era effettiva o soltanto procedurale. Più importante, era poco chiaro se l'entrata in vigore dell'Atto del 13 ottobre 1998 aveva colpito l'applicabilità dell'Ordinanza alla situazione di persone che avevano acquisito diritti ad una pensione di invalidità prima dell'entrata in vigore dell'Atto del 1 gennaio 1999. Era solamente nel 2005, dopo che la causa della richiedente era già stata decisa, che la Corte Suprema adottò infine una decisione disegnata per chiarire la giurisprudenza e chiarire le discrepanze che erano sorte nell'interpretazione se il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità fosse revocabile o meno.
47. La Corte osserva che la Corte d'appello nel suo rifiuto non è riuscita a rendere qualsiasi riferimento agli argomenti legali avanzato dalla richiedente basati sull'Ordinanza del 1983.
48. La Corte è della prospettiva che se una rappresentanza legale fosse obbligatoria, la conclusione della Corte d'appello che l’assistenza legale non sarebbe necessaria, in particolare in assenza di qualsiasi analisi del fatto se nelle circostanze della causa il ricorso di cassazione offriva prospettive ragionevoli di successo, non sembra essere giustificata.
49. La Corte è perciò della prospettiva che la corte è andata a vuoto nel suo dovere di esaminare correttamente la richiesta della richiedente per assistenza legale (vedere mutatis mutandis Tabor c. Polonia, n. 12825/02, § 46, 27 giugno 2006).
50. Di conseguenza, avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa viste nell'insieme, la Corte è della prospettiva che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
51. La richiedente si lamentò inoltre di essere stata privata di una pensione di invalidità dopo che riceveva da quindici anni tale pensione. Lei si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
52. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Gli argomenti delle parti
53. La richiedente dibatté che le decisioni giudiziali riguardate erano state rese in violazione di una Ordinanza del 1983 e della giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema. Questa corte aveva sostenuto costantemente che dopo dieci anni di ricevimento di una pensione di invalidità la persona riguardata non poteva subire una revisione del suo diritto a tale pensione e non poteva esserle tolto. Era chiaro che l'Ordinanza del 1983 proibiva ai medici che lavorano per l’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale di esaminare delle persone a cui era concesso tale diritto nella prospettiva di riesaminare la loro condizione medica e, infine, di togliere loro la pensione di invalidità.
54. La richiedente presentò inoltre che il fatto che nel 1998 una riforma del sistema di previdenza sociale era stata eseguita non aveva rimosso questa proibizione. Questo fu accentuato da un numero di sentenze a questo effetto rese da varie corti, inclusa la Corte Suprema. Come risultato delle decisioni rese nella sua causa, la richiedente era stata privata, dopo diciannove anni, del suo solo reddito nonostante il fatto che le disposizioni applicabili avevano creato un'aspettativa legittima che il suo diritto alla pensione non sarebbe stato impugnato dall’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. Nella prospettiva delle circostanze della causa, le decisioni rese dall'Autorità e dalle corti erano state ingiustificate, avevano violato il principio della certezza legale ed avevano imposto un carico eccessivo sulla richiedente.
55. Il Governo non presentò alcuna osservazione questo riguardo .
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Principi generali
56. La Corte prima reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 contiene tre articoli distinti. Sono stati descritti come segue (in James ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37 Serie A n. 98; vedere anche Belvedere Alberghiera S.r.l. c. Italia, n. 31524/96, § 51 ECHR 2000-VI):
“Il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo riguarda la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti è concesso, fra le altre cose, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale... Comunque, i tre articoli non sono 'distinti' nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari casi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo.”
57. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non garantisce, così qualsiasi diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo (vedere, per esempio, Kjartan Ásmundsson c. Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 39, ECHR 2004-IX, e Janković c. Croatia (dec.), n. 43440/98, ECHR 2000-X). Comunque, dove un individuo ha un diritto rivendicabile sotto il diritto nazionale ad una pensione di previdenza sociale e di contributi , tale beneficio dovrebbe essere considerato un interesse di proprietà che rientra all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito (dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, ECHR 2005-X). Dove l'importo di un beneficio viene ridotto o viene sospeso, questo può costituire un’interferenza con la proprietà che deve essere giustificata (vedere Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 40, e Rasmussen c. Polonia, n. 38886/05, § 71 del 28 aprile 2009). Un'importante considerazione nella valutazione di simile interferenza sotto questa disposizione è se il diritto della richiedente a trarre benefici dal piano di previdenza sociale in oggetto è stato infranto in modo da dar luogo al danneggiamento dell'essenza dei suoi diritti alla pensione (vedere Domalewski c. Polonia (dec.), n. 34610/97, il 1999-V di ECHR).
58. La Corte reitera che una condizione essenziale perché l’ interferenza venga ritenuta compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale. La preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
59. Qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se serve un interesse pubblico legittimo (o generale). A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio meglio collocate rispetto al giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta così alle autorità nazionali per fare la valutazione iniziale in merito all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che richiede misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c.'Italia, n. 27265/95, § 85, 17 ottobre 2002, ed Elia S.r.l. c. Italia, n. 37710/97, § 77 ECHR 2001-IX). La nozione di “interesse pubblico” è necessariamente esteso. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi riguardo a benefici di previdenza sociali comporterà comunemente la considerazione di problemi economici e sociali. La Corte trova naturale che il margine di valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare le politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio e rispetterà il giudizio della legislatura riguardo a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che questo giudizio non sia manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Il Re precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. la Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 87 ECHR 2000-XII).
60. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che qualsiasi interferenza sia ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo perseguito (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81-94 ECHR 2005-VI). L'equilibrio equo richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardata sopporta un carico individuale eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 Serie A n. 52).
(b) L’applicazione dei principi sopra nella presente causa
61. La Corte nota che la richiedente fu spossessato del suo diritto alla pensione di invalidità che lei riceveva dal 1985. È della prospettiva che questo ha corrisposto ad interferenza con le sue proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere Styk c. Polonia (dec.), n. 28356/95, 16 aprile 1998; Szumilas c. Polonia (dec.), numero 35187/97, 1 luglio 1998; Bieńkowski c. Polonia (dec.), n. 33889/97, 9 settembre 1998; e, mutatis mutandis, Domalewski citata sopra).
62. La Corte deve determinare se se l'interferenza era legale. La misura di cui ci si lamentava era basata sulla sezione 27(1) (a) dell'Ordinanza del 1983. La Corte nota che l'interpretazione di questa disposizione generò difficoltà serie e discrepanze fra le sentenze rese dalle varie corti di appello e da panche diverse della Corte Suprema. Queste difficoltà furono riconosciute dalla Corte Suprema che infine, nel 2005, emise una decisione configurata per eliminare queste divergenze. A questo riguardo, comunque la Corte reitera che le divergenze nella giurisprudenza sono una conseguenza inerente a qualsiasi sistema giudiziale che è basato su una rete di processi e di corti di ricorso con autorità sull'area della loro giurisdizione territoriale, e che il ruolo di una corte suprema deve chiarire precisamente i conflitti fra decisioni delle corti sotto (vedere Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri c. Francia [GC], N. 24846/94 e 34165/96 a 34173/96, § 59 ECHR 1999-VII). Afferma inoltre che il suo compito non è prendere il posto dei tribunali nazionali. Spetta a loro in primo luogo interpretare il diritto nazionale (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Tejedor García c. Spagna, 16 dicembre 1997, § 31 Relazioni 1997-VIII). Di conseguenza, considera che l'interferenza era prevista dalla legge.
63. La Corte deve determinare se l'interferenza perseguiva un scopo legittimo cioè se era “nell'interesse pubblico.” La Corte considera che era tesa a proteggere la stabilità finanziaria del sistema di previdenza sociale ed assicurare che non fosse minacciato dalla continua concessione di sussidi senza nessuna limitazione temporale, ai destinatari delle pensioni che col passaggio del tempo avevano cessato di soddisfare i requisiti legali attinenti. La Corte si soddisfa che l'interferenza intraprese uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse generale della comunità
64. Infine, la Corte è chiamata a determinare se l'interferenza impose un carico individuale ed eccessivo sul richiedente. Nel considerare se questo è il caso, la Corte deve avere riguardo al particolare contesto nel quale il problema sorge nella presente causa, vale a dire quello di un schema di previdenza sociale. Simili schemi sono un'espressione della solidarietà di una società nei confronti dei suoi membri vulnerabili (vedere Goudswaard-Van der Lans v. the Netherlands c. Paesi Bassi (dec.), n. 75255/01, ECHR 2005-XI).
65. L'approccio della Corte all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 dovrebbe riflettere la realtà del modo in cui la disposizione di welfare è organizzata attualmente all'interno degli Stati membro del Consiglio dell'Europa. È chiaro che all'interno di quegli Stati, ed all'interno di più Stati individuali, esiste una serie ampia di benefici di previdenza sociale progettati per conferire dei diritti che sorgono di pieno diritto. I benefici vengono finanziati in una grande varietà di modi: alcuni sono pagati tramite con contributi ad un specifico fondo; alcuni dipendono dal documento di contributo di un rivendicatore; molti sono pagati tramite tassazione generale sulla base di uno status definito statutariamente. Nello Stato moderno e democratico molti individui sono, per tutta o parte delle loro vite, completamente dipendenti per la sopravvivenza dalla previdenza sociale e dai benefici di welfare. Molti ordinamenti giuridici nazionali riconoscono che simili individui richiedono un grado di certezza e di sicurezza, e prevedono che i benefici vengano pagato-previo adempimento delle condizioni di eleggibilità-di pieno diritto (vedere Stec ed Altri, citata sopra).
66. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non pone nessuna restrizione sulla libertà delle Parti Contraenti per scegliere il tipo o l’ importo di benefici da prevedere sotto schemi di previdenza sociale (vedere Stec ed Altri, citata sopra). La Corte osserva che il livello di base dei benefici della previdenza sociale in Polonia, incluse le pensioni di invalidità vengono pagati tramite un solo finanziamento finanziato tramite i vari contributi obbligatori da impiegati e datori di lavoro e gestito dall’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. È basato sul principio della solidarietà ed opera su una base pay-as-you-go. Il diritto individuale ad una pensione di invalidità è stato basato, sia prima del 1998 e da allora, sulle disposizioni legali che specificano le particolari condizioni che devono essere soddisfatte dai rivendicatori. Le decisioni dell’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale devono attenersi con gli statuti applicabili.
67. Il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità essenzialmente è basato sull'incapacità del rivendicatore di continuare il lavoro pagato per motivi di cattiva salute. È nella natura delle cose che varie condizioni che inizialmente rendono impossibile alle persone afflitte da queste lavorare possono evolversi col tempo, conducendo al deterioramento o al miglioramento della salute della persona. La Corte non può accettare il suggerimento fatto dal richiedente che i suoi diritti di pensione, basati come erano sui contributi al fondo generale dal quale sono pagati tutti i benefici di previdenza sociale, dovrebbe rimanere inalterato una volta che era stato accordato loro nonostante qualsiasi cambiamento nella loro condizione. Non c'è autorità nella sua giurisprudenza per una dichiarazione così categorico; in effetti, la Corte ha accettato la possibilità di riduzioni dei diritti di previdenza sociale in certe circostanze (vedere, come recente autorità, Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 45, con ulteriori riferimenti di giurisprudenza; vedere anche Hoogendijk c. Paesi Bassi, (dec.), n. 58641/00, 6 gennaio 2005). In particolare, la Corte ha notato il significato che lo trascorrere del tempo può avere per l'esistenza ed il carattere legale dei benefici di previdenza sociale (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Goudswaard-Van der Lans, citata sopra). Questo si applica sia agli emendamenti che alla legislazione che possono essere adottati in risposta a cambi della società e alle prospettive che evolvono sulle categorie di persone che hanno bisogno di assistenza sociale, ed anche all'evoluzione di situazioni individuali. La Corte considera che è lecito agli Stati prendere misure per revisionare la condizione medica di persone che ricevono pensioni di invalidità nella prospettiva di stabilire se loro continuano ad essere inadatti a lavorare, purché simile rivalutazione sia in conformità con la legge e effettuata con garanzie procedurali sufficienti.
Effettivamente, se i diritti a pensioni di invalidità fossero mantenuti in situazioni in cui i loro destinatari cessarono col tempo di attenersi coi requisiti giuridici applicabili, ciò darebbe luogo al loro arricchimento indebito. Inoltre, sarebbe stato ingiusto nei confronti di persone che contribuiscono al sistema di Previdenza Sociale, in particolare di coloro a cui furono negati i benefici siccome loro non soddisfacevano i requisiti attinenti. In termini più generali, sanzionerebbe anche un'allocazione impropria di finanziamenti pubblici; un'allocazione nella noncuranza degli obiettivi per cui si era stabilito che le pensioni di invalidità dovevano soddisfare.
68. La Corte nota che la richiedente riceveva la sua pensione di invalidità dal 1985, sulla base di una decisione da parte dell’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale. La legislazione applicabile, sia prima della riforma del sistema di previdenza sociale nel 1998 che dopo, garantiva una pensione di invalidità dipendente, inter alia, dalla condizione di essere inadatto a lavorare sulla base della salute e del fatto che ciò sia riconosciuto ufficialmente da un team medico competente.
69. Nel 1985 si trovò che la richiedente soddisfaceva quel requisito. Successivamente, la sua condizione fu revisionata nel 1994, 1995 e nel 1997. In ognuna di queste occasioni il fatto che lei continuava ad essere inadatta a lavorare fu confermato ed il suo diritto alla pensione fu sostenuto. La Corte nota che non è stato dibattuto o non è stato mostrato che in qualsiasi di queste occasioni la richiedente impugnò la legalità della rivalutazione della sua condizione, nonostante il fatto che l'Ordinanza del 1983 rimase in vigore sino al 1 settembre 1997. E’ stato solamente nei procedimenti avviati nel 2000 che lei sollevò dei dubbi a riguardo dell'esistenza di una base legale per simile rivalutazione.
E’ stato notato inoltre che durante i procedimenti condotti di fronte alla corte di appello quella corte ordinò che le prove sulla base delle quali la corte di prima - istanza aveva reso la sua sentenza del 24 settembre 2002 venissero completate con esami medici da parte di vari specialisti (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). Comunque, la richiedente rifiutò di attenersi con quell'ordine.
70. La Corte osserva che le decisioni dell’Autorità di Previdenza Sociale erano soggette a controllo giurisdizionale di fronte a due istanze delle corti speciali della previdenza sociale, assistite da piene garanzie procedurali. La richiedente aveva ricorso a quella procedura. Non c'è indicazione che durante i procedimenti lei non fosse stata in grado di presentare i suoi argomenti alle corti.
71. È anche di attinenza per la valutazione della causa che la richiedente non è stato spossessata completamente del suo diritto alla pensione di invalidità. Effettivamente, la Corte Regionale accordò alla richiedente la pensione per un periodo fisso di due anni (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra). Inoltre, non è stato mostrato e non è stato dibattuto che l'importo di quella pensione provvisoria fosse più basso di quello che la richiedente stava ricevendo prima. Non può essere detto perciò che la richiedente fosse totalmente spossessata del suo solo mezzo di sopravvivenza (confronta e per contrasto Kjartan Ásmundsson, citata sopra, § 44, e la giurisprudenza citata in questa).
72. La Corte nota inoltre che la richiedente non era obbligata a pagare di nuovo qualsiasi importo che stava ricevendo prima della data in cui fu trovata non soddisfare più i requisiti giuridici applicabili (vedere Chroust c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 4295/03, 20 novembre 2006). Inoltre, il diritto nazionale non creò qualsiasi presunzione che le persone trovate non soddisfare più i requisiti per delle pensioni di invalidità stavano agendo dolosamente o in un modo che si prestava a critica. Né tale suggerimento fu reso nei procedimenti in relazione alla richiedente.
73. Avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa viste nell'insieme, la Corte conclude, che un equilibrio equo fu previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed il requisito della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo e che il carico sulla richiedente non era né sproporzionato né eccessivo.
74. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
IV. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
75. La richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione del risultato e dell'iniquità dei procedimenti. Lei presentò che i procedimenti erano durati troppo e che la corte non aveva mostrato la velocità necessaria nel raccogliere le prove ed aveva rifiutato di ascoltare le prove da testimoni. Lei sostenne che la corte aveva valutato erroneamente le prove, era giunta a conclusioni indifendibili e riguardo ai fatti e, di conseguenza, aveva reso decisioni erronee.
76. Nella misura in cui la richiedente si lamentava del modo in cui furono stabiliti i fatti da parte dei tribunali nazionali, la Corte reitera che, in conformità con l’Articolo 19 della Convenzione, il suo dovere è assicurare l'osservanza degli impegni presi dalle Parti Contraenti alla Convenzione. In particolare, non è una sua funzione trattare con errori di fatto o di diritto commessi presumibilmente da una corte nazionale a meno che non abbiano protetto o abbiano infranto i diritti e le libertà della Convenzione. Inoltre, mentre l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione garantisce il diritto ad un'udienza corretta, non pone nessuna norma sull'ammissibilità delle prove o il modo in cui si dovrebbero valutare che sono perciò questioni primarie per la regolamentazione tramite la legge nazionale e le corti nazionali (vedere García Ruiz c. Spagna [GC], n. 30544/96, § 28 ECHR 1999-I, con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Nella presente causa, a parte la sua azione di reclamo esaminata sopra, la richiedente non addusse qualsiasi particolare insuccesso da parte delle corti attinenti nel rispetto del suo diritto ad un'udienza corretta. Valutando le circostanze della causa nell'insieme, la Corte non trova nessuna indicazione che i procedimenti contestati siano stati condotti ingiustamente.
77. Riguardo all'azione di reclamo della richiedente della lunghezza irragionevole dei procedimenti contestati, la Corte nota che la richiedente non presentò un reclamo presso la corte nazionale attinente sotto l'Atto del 2004, non riuscendo così a giovarsi della via di ricorso nazionale disponibile. La Corte ha già esaminato questa via di ricorso ai fini dell’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ha trovata effettiva a riguardo di azioni di reclamo della lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti giudiziali in Polonia. In particolare, la Corte considerò che la via di ricorso era in grado sia di prevenire la violazione addotta del diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole o la sua continuazione, sia di offrire compensazione adeguata per qualsiasi violazione che era già accaduta (vedere Charzyński c. la Polonia (dec.), n. 15212/03, §§ 36-42).
78. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta deve essere dichiarata inammissibile in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
C. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
79. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”

A. Danno
80. La richiedente chiese PLN 51,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale del quale lei aveva sofferto in collegamento con la causa e PLN 32,965 per il danno patrimoniale che è il risultato della perdita della sua pensione di invalidità. La richiedente, a cui fu accordato il patrocinio gratuito ai fini dei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, chiese inoltre EUR 3,500 per i costi incorsi in collegamento coi procedimenti nazionali ed i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte.
81. Il Governo contestò le osservazioni della richiedente.
82. La Corte non trova qualsiasi collegamento causale fra la violazione trovata ed il danno patrimoniale addotto; respinge perciò questa rivendicazione. D'altra parte assegna EUR 2,000 alla richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
B. Costi e spese
83. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente é è stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli in merito al quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte respinge la rivendicazione per costi e spese.
C. Interesse di mora
84. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo della richiedente riguardo all'esame della sua richiesta per assistenza legale e la presa della sua pensione di invalidità ammissibile;
2. Dichiara il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in quanto la Corte d'appello andò a vuoto nel fare un esame corretto della richiesta della richiedente per assistenza legale;
4. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare la richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 2,000 (due mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale da convertire in zloty polacchi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l’ 8 dicembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.