Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MALYSH AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 30280/03/2010
STATO: Russia
DATA: 11/02/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION
CASE OF MALYSH AND OTHERS v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 30280/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
11 February 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Malysh and Others v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 21 January 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the last-mentioned date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 30280/03) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by six Russian nationals listed in paragraph 6 below (“the applicants”) on 26 June 2003.
2. The first applicant, Mr N. M., represented the other applicants before the Court. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were initially represented by Mr P. Laptev, Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights, and subsequently by their new Representative, Mr G. Matyushkin.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the failure on the part of the Russian Government to implement the procedure for redemption of Urozhay-90 bonds had been in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. By a decision of 19 June 2008 the Court declared the application admissible.
5. The Government, but not the applicants, filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants are:
(1) Mr Nikolay Ivanovich Malysh, born in 1949,
(2) Mr Vasiliy Aleksandrovich Bogomolov, born in 1944,
(3) Mr Sergey Stepanovich Iglin, born in 1949,
(4) Ms Zinaïda Aleksandrovna Sannikova, born in 1954,
(5) Ms Lyubov Vasilyevna Nazarenko, born in 1953, and
(6) Mr Sergey Nikolaevich Malysh, born in 1979.
7. All the applicants are Russian nationals living in the Amur Region. They are all holders of Urozhay-90 bonds.
A. Background information on Urozhay-90 bonds
8. In 1987 the General Secretary of the USSR Communist Party Mikhail Gorbachev presented his “basic theses”, which laid the political foundation for economic reform heralding the transition to a market economy. Several laws were enacted which opened up the State-dominated planned economy to private enterprise. However, the Government preferred to keep control over consumer prices rather than leaving them to be determined by the free market.
9. By 1990 Government spending increased sharply as a growing number of unprofitable enterprises required State support, whereas more resources were diverted to subsidise consumer prices. At the same time, the elimination of central control over production decisions, especially in the consumer-goods sector, led to a breakdown in traditional supply-demand relationships. This resulted in pervasive shortages of food and basic consumer goods. The Government reacted by introducing ration stamps for food and certain hygiene articles.
10. In addition to ration stamps, the Government of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic (RSFSR)1 put into circulation several types of so-called “commodity bonds” (товарные чеки) which gave their bearers the right to purchase consumer goods, such as refrigerators, washing machines, tape recorders and passenger cars. The Urozhay-90 (“Harvest-90”) bonds were one of many types of bonds; they were distributed among agricultural workers and companies which had sold grain and other agricultural produce to the State in 1990 and 1991. Those bonds were designed to encourage agricultural workers to sell produce to the State in exchange for the right to priority purchasing of goods in high demand (see paragraph 43 below). The State paid workers for the produce at fixed prices and also gave them bonds in amounts proportionate to the value of the produce sold.
11. The Urozhay-90 bonds were not legal tender, but they had a certain nominal value indicated on their face. That value determined the maximum purchase price of consumer goods which could be sold on production of the bonds. The bonds were not intended for payment but merely for certification of the right to purchase specific goods; the sale of goods was conditional on payment of the full purchase price by the bond-holder and production of the bonds for the same amount. The bonds were not registered in the person’s name or otherwise personalised and the Government Resolution did not prevent them from being transferred among individuals and legal entities.
12. On 2 January 1992 the Russian Government decided to put an end to the regulation of retail prices. Shops began to fill up with merchandise but prices increased at a staggering speed (the inflation rate in 1992 was 2,600%). In March 1992, the Government established that goods available under the bonds would be sold at the prices fixed before 2 January 1992 (see paragraph 44 below).
13. In August 1992 the Government introduced the possibility of buying out the bonds with a coefficient of 10. In 1994, the coefficient was raised to 70 (see paragraphs 45 and 46 below). It appears that a significant number of bonds were bought out by the State before the buyout operations were stopped in 1996 (see paragraph 48 below).
14. In 1995 the status of the commodity bonds was codified in the Commodity Bonds Act passed by Parliament (see paragraph 47 below). Its text was very laconic, shorter than one page, but it purported to cover every type of commodities bonds issued in previous years. Section 1 recognised the commodity bonds as part of the internal debt of the Russian Federation; section 2 fixed at ten years the limitation period for the obligations arising out of commodity bonds (the starting date was not specified); section 3 required the Government to adopt a programme for settlement of the internal debt.
15. In 2000 the Government presented the programme for settlement of the internal debt (see paragraph 50 below). It covered every type of commodity bond, save for the Urozhay-90 bonds. A few months before the Commodity Bonds Act was amended so as to provide that the settlement of the debt under the Urozhay-90 bonds would be regulated by a special federal law (see paragraph 49 below).
16. Between 2003 and 2009 the application of section 1 of the Commodity Bonds Act was suspended in the part concerning the Urozhay-90 bonds, in accordance with the laws on the federal budget for each successive year (see paragraph 51 below).
17. In 2009 Parliament passed a law on the buyout of the Urozhay-90 bonds and the Government issued implementing regulations which set out a detailed procedure for buyout of the bonds (see paragraphs 52 and 53 below).
B. Mr N. M. (first set of proceedings) and Mr B.
18. The applicants Mr N. M. and Mr V. B. are holders of Urozhay-90 bonds with a total nominal value of 30,110 and 30,000 non-denominated Russian roubles (RUR) respectively.
19. In 2001 Mr N. M. and Mr B. brought an action against the Russian Government and the Ministry of Finance, seeking compensation for the damage incurred through the State’s continued failure to effect payment under the bonds.
20. After several rounds of judicial proceedings, on 13 January 2003 the Tambovskiy District Court of the Amur Region refused their claim for the following reasons:
“At present the State programme for settlement of the internal debt in the period 2001 to 2004 has been developed and is being implemented. The Commodity Bonds Act described the debt arising out the Urozhay-90 bonds as a medium-term debt. Accordingly, pursuant to Article 98 § 2 of the Budget Code of the Russian Federation, the maturity date has not yet occurred. It follows that the executive bodies of the Russian Federation are now taking measures for the settlement of the debt to the plaintiffs. In these circumstances, the court cannot find that any acts or failures to act on the part of the defendant have caused any damage to the plaintiffs.”
21. On 19 February 2003 the Amur Regional Court upheld that judgment on appeal.
C. Mr N. M. (second set of proceedings)
22. The applicant Mr N. M. also holds Urozhay-90 bonds with a total nominal value of RUR 582,665.
23. On 5 December 2002 he sued the Russian Government and the Ministry of Finance for the damage incurred through the State’s continued failure to effect payment under these bonds.
24. On 4 March 2003 the Tambovskiy District Court of the Amur Region refused his claim for the same reasons as those given in the above-quoted judgment of 13 January 2003.
25. On 23 April 2003 the Amur Regional Court upheld the judgment on appeal.
D. Mr I.
26. The applicant Mr S. I. is the holder of Urozhay-90 bonds with a total nominal value of RUR 152,200.
27. On 5 December 2002 he sued the Russian Government and the Ministry of Finance for the damage incurred through the State’s continued failure to effect payment under these bonds.
28. On 20 February 2003 the Tambovskiy District Court of the Amur Region refused his claim for the same reasons as those given in the above-quoted judgment of 13 January 2003.
29. On 28 March 2003 the Amur Regional Court upheld the judgment on appeal.
E. Ms S.
30. The applicant Ms Z. S. is the holder of Urozhay-90 bonds with a total nominal value of RUR 223,170.
31. On 5 December 2002 she sued the Russian Government and the Ministry of Finance for the damage incurred through the State’s continued failure to effect payment under these bonds.
32. After several rounds of judicial proceedings, on 1 July 2003 the Blagoveshchensk Town Court of the Amur Region refused her claim because a federal law governing the procedure for the settlement of the debt arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds had not yet been adopted and because the law on the 2003 federal budget had suspended the application of the Commodity Bonds Act in the part concerning Urozhay-90 bonds.
33. On 6 August 2003 the Amur Regional Court upheld the judgment on appeal.
F. Ms N.
34. The applicant Ms L. N. is the holder of Urozhay-90 bonds with a total nominal value of RUR 271,855.
35. On 5 December 2002 she sued the Russian Government and the Ministry of Finance for the damage incurred through the State’s continued failure to effect payment under these bonds.
36. On 19 March 2003 the Blagoveshchensk Town Court of the Amur Region refused her claim because a federal law governing the procedure for the settlement of the debt arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds had not yet been passed and because the law on the 2003 federal budget had suspended the application of the Commodity Bonds Act in the part concerning Urozhay-90 bonds.
37. On 18 April 2003 the Amur Regional Court upheld the judgment on appeal.
G. Mr S. M.
38. The applicant Mr S. M. is the holder of Urozhay-90 bonds with a total nominal value of RUR 222,820.
39. On 5 December 2002 he sued the Russian Government and the Ministry of Finance for the damage incurred through the State’s continued failure to effect payment under these bonds.
40. After several rounds of judicial proceedings, on 27 March 2003 the Blagoveshchensk Town Court of the Amur Region refused his claim. It referred to the case-law of the Constitutional Court to the effect that:
“...the balance between the rights and lawful interests of persons who are creditors of the State, on the one hand, and all other persons, on the other hand, may only be fixed in the form of an act of the federal legislature.” (decision of 21 December 2000)
41. As no such act had yet been passed, the court dismissed Mr Sergey Malysh’s action.
42. On 7 May 2003 the Amur Regional Court upheld the judgment on appeal.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
43. On 26 July 1990 the RSFSR Council of Ministers adopted Resolution no. 259 on urgent measures for increasing the purchase of agricultural products harvested in 1990 and for ensuring their safe keeping. Its relevant parts resolved as follows:
I. Measures to increase the independence of decision-making by collective and Soviet farms concerning the sale of the harvest
“1. To authorise all manufacturers of agricultural produce to sell the surplus of such produce that remains after delivery under existing agreements ... to procurers or other consumers at negotiated prices...
2. To declare inadmissible any restrictions on the sale or shipment of agricultural produce to consumers in autonomous districts or regions of the RSFSR under paragraph 1 of the present resolution... Should local councils introduce such restrictions in their territories, the RSFSR Council of Ministers may stop issuing Urozhay-90 bonds or delivering goods on the basis of them in those territories...”
II. Measures to encourage the sale of agricultural produce to the State through the reciprocal sale of goods in high demand
“7. To begin issuing, in 1990, Urozhay-90 bonds to employees of collective and Soviet farms, other agro-industrial enterprises and organisations, peasants’ farms and owners of personal subsidiary land plots in respect of agricultural produce sold to the State.
To determine that the bonds certify the right to purchase goods in high demand at retail prices in trade outlets. The said bonds are not legal tender.
8. The RSFSR Ministry of Finance and the RSFSR Ministry of Agriculture and Food will, until 1 September 1990, print and put into circulation through the branches of the RSFSR State Bank Urozhay-90 bonds for a total amount of 10 billion roubles. The bonds are to be used before 1 October 1991.
9. To establish that Urozhay-90 bonds are issued by the branches of the RSFSR State Bank:
- to all producers who sold standard products to the State between 1 July 1990 and 30 June 1991 ... in an amount equivalent to 10% of the value of the products sold...
...
13. The Russian Consumers’ Association is to submit to the RSFSR Ministry for Foreign Economic Relations requests for those goods in high demand which are to be sold on production of the Urozhay-90 bonds, and organise their sale, on advance orders by citizens and organisations, at regional fairs and exhibitions and in specialised trade outlets. The Consumers’ Associations is to deliver goods to the consumers on the basis of the Urozhay-90 bonds no later than 1 January 1990 [sic]. In 1991 orders under the said bonds will be executed within two months.”
44. On 15 March 1992 the Russian Government issued Resolution no. 161, intended to compensate the owners of Urozhay-90 bonds for an increase in retail prices. It resolved, in particular:
“1. To establish that passenger cars and other consumer goods which are made available to citizens as a reward for the grain and other agricultural produce that was sold to the State in 1990 and 1991 are to be sold at the retail prices that prevailed before 2 January 1992...
2. To extend the period of validity of the Urozhay-90 bonds until the end of 1992...”
45. On 10 August 1992 the Government adopted Resolution no. 1442-r. It required the Russian ministries to allocate substantial amounts for the purchase of goods that were to be sold on production of the Urozhay-90 bonds. It further provided:
“4. The Ministry for Trade and Material Resources, in cooperation with the Central Consumers’ Union, shall define, within two weeks, the list of goods intended for the implementation of the Urozhay-90 bonds...
5. The Prices Committee of the Ministry of the Economy shall determine the increase in prices of domestic and imported goods since 1990... The price difference shall be reimbursed from the republican budget.
6. The Ministry of Agriculture shall carry out an inventory of bonds held by agricultural enterprises and organisations and private individuals as on 1 September.
7. The Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Agriculture shall, within two weeks, lay down the procedure for the buyout of the Urozhay-90 bonds through the branches of the Savings Bank. It is to be taken into account that these bonds may be either used for purchasing goods or bought out by the State with a coefficient of 10.”
46. On 16 April 1994 the Government approved Regulation no. 344 on State commodity bonds, which provided as follows:
“With a view to redeeming the State commodity bonds and preventing accrual of the State’s liability to compensate for price differences, the Government of the Russian Federation resolves:
1. The Ministry of Finance of the Russian Federation –
– will buy out ... the Urozhay-90 bonds at a price equivalent to their nominal value multiplied by 70 and credit that amount into a bank account...”
47. On 1 June 1995 the Commodity Bonds Act (no. 86-FZ, ФЗ «О государственных долговых товарных обязательствах») was enacted. It provided that State commodity bonds, including Urozhay-90 bonds, would be recognised as part of the internal State debt of the Russian Federation (section 1). The obligations arising out of the commodity bonds would be settled in accordance with the general principles of the Russian Civil Code, the limitation period being set at ten years (section 2). The original wording of section 3 provided:
“The Government of the Russian Federation shall draft, in 1995-1997, the State Programme for settlement of the internal debt of the Russian Federation described in section 1, based on the principle of full compensation. The Programme shall provide for redemption terms ... convenient for citizens, including, according to their choice: provision of goods designated in ... the State bonds issued to agricultural suppliers ...; redemption of State commodity bonds at consumer prices prevailing at the time of the redemption ...; conversion of the debt into State securities...”
48. On 16 January 1996 the Government adopted Resolution no. 33, by which it annulled Regulation no. 344 and instructed the Ministry of Finance to redeem the State commodity bonds within the amounts allocated for that purpose in the federal budget.
49. On 2 June 2000, section 3 of the Commodity Bonds Act was amended to provide that the procedure for implementation of the State’s obligations to holders of the Urozhay-90 bonds would be determined in a special federal law.
50. On 27 December 2000 the Government adopted the State Programme for settlement of the internal debt of the Russian Federation. Paragraph 14 of the Programme provided that the procedure for payments in respect of the Urozhay-90 bonds would be determined in a special federal law.
51. In 2003 the application of section 1 of the Commodity Bonds Act was for the first time suspended in the part concerning the Urozhay-90 bonds. The suspension clause was maintained in the following years (Federal Law no. 176-FZ of 24 December 2002; no. 186-FZ of 23 December 2003; no. 173-FZ of 23 December 2004; no. 189-FZ of 26 December 2005; no. 238-FZ of 19 December 2006; and no. 198-FZ of 24 July 2007).
52. On 19 July 2009 a federal law governing the procedure for the buyout of the Urozhay-90 bonds was adopted (no. 200-FZ – “the Buyout Act”). It established that holders of the bonds would be paid, in the period between 15 December 2009 and 31 December 2010, an amount equivalent to the nominal value of the bonds divided by 1,000 (section 2). The law also amended the Commodity Bonds Act by removing the reference to the Urozhay-90 bonds from section 1 of that Act.
53. On 15 September 2009 the Government issued Resolution no. 749, setting out the detailed procedure for payments in exchange for the production of Urozhay-90 bonds.
54. On 15 December 2000 the Constitutional Court gave a decision on an application lodged by the Parliament of the Sakha (Yakutiya) Republic, which had claimed that the amendments of 2 June 2000 (see above) had indefinitely delayed the implementation of the State’s obligations towards the bearers of the Urozhay-90 bonds. The Constitutional Court declared the application inadmissible for the following reasons:
“In its [previous decisions] the Constitutional Court has already determined that a unilateral change in the scope of the State’s obligations towards individuals, including the obligation to sell goods in exchange for commodity bonds, is impermissible. This does not exclude, however, the possibility of imposing restrictions on the property rights of individuals – in an established form and within the constitutional limits – in the matter of State obligations, which is compatible with Article 55 § 3 of the Constitution.
In particular, it follows from the case-law of the Constitutional Court ... that implementation of the rights and lawful interests of individual citizens or groups of citizens should not excessively and adversely affect the budgetary resources allocated for satisfying the rights and interests of society as a whole. This principle becomes particularly relevant in a situation where budgetary resources are insufficient to resolve many social problems relating to the exercise of the rights to life and personal dignity. It follows that the balance between the rights and lawful interests of the individuals who act as creditors for the State in property relationships, on the one hand, and everyone else, on the other hand, may, in principle, be struck only in the form of an act of Parliament.
Hence, given that the legislature may restrict individual rights and freedoms (including property rights) for the purpose of the protection of the rights and lawful interests of others, a review of the federal law amending section 3 of the Commodity Bonds Act by the Constitutional Court would imply an assessment of the financial and economic justification for the legislative decision on the procedure for settlement of State commodity bonds, which ... falls outside the jurisdiction of the Constitutional Court.
When examining claims relating to settlement of the State commodity bonds, courts of general jurisdiction have the right and duty to interpret the legislative provisions in the light of the interests of the individual (Articles 2 and 18 of the Constitution) and be guided, in particular, by section 2 of the Commodity Bonds Act, which establishes that State commodity bonds are to be settled in an appropriate form and in accordance with the Civil Code of the Russian Federation.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
55. The applicants complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 about the continued failure of the domestic authorities to discharge their obligations arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds, which had been recognised as part of Russia’s internal debt. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Submissions by the parties
1. The applicants
56. The applicants submitted that the Urozhay-90 bonds had an economic value and could be considered “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. A substantial part of the bonds had been exchanged for goods in high demand before 1994 or bought out by the Ministry of Finance before 1995 at their nominal value multiplied by 70. The remaining part of the bonds had been recognised as part of the internal debt of the Russian Federation under the Commodity Bonds Act. Since that recognition, the applicants claimed that they had had a legitimate expectation that the State would repay the nominal value of the bonds.
57. The applicants claimed that the State’s failure to effect payments under the Urozhay-90 bonds amounted to an interference with their property rights. The laws enacted by the State had not furnished legal and practical possibilities for enforcing the obligations arising out of the bonds. Moreover, by enacting successive laws which had suspended the application of the relevant provision of the Commodity Bonds Act, the State had elevated itself to a privileged position and thereby breached the constitutional principle of equality before the law.
58. The applicants accepted that the radical reform of the country’s political and economic system, as well as the state of the country’s finances, might have justified stringent limitations on compensation for Urozhay-90 bond-holders. However, there were no satisfactory grounds justifying the extent to which the State had continuously failed over many years to give effect to the entitlement conferred on Urozhay-90 holders. Since 2001 the revenues of the Russian federal budget had constantly exceeded expenditure and multi-billion amounts had been transferred into the Stabilisation Fund. Thus, the Government’s claim of insufficient budgetary funds was obviously unfounded. In these circumstances, it was incumbent on the domestic courts to strike a fair balance between the public and individual interests and to determine whether the country’s financial situation had been so dire as to require postponement of the obligations arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds.
59. The applicants finally submitted that, by imposing successive limitations on the exercise of their right to recover the debts and by applying practices that made their right unusable in practice, the authorities had destroyed its very essence. They had to bear a disproportionate and excessive individual burden which could not be justified in terms of the legitimate general community interest pursued by the authorities.
2. The Government
60. The Government claimed that the Urozhay-90 bonds did not constitute “property rights” or “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They distinguished the present case from the Broniowski v. Poland case ([GC], no. 31443/96, ECHR 2004-V), in which the obligation of the Polish authorities to compensate repatriated persons for abandoned property had not been disputed. In the Government’s view, the present case had similarities with the situation obtaining in the Grishchenko v. Russia case ((dec.), no. 75907/01, 8 July 2004), in which the Court had found that the applicant’s claim under a commodity bond for the purchase of a Russian-made car had not been sufficiently established to be enforceable.
61. The Government emphasised the specific legal nature of the Urozhay-90 bonds. The bonds were not legal tender; they could not be exchanged for goods or money. They merely certified the holder’s right to purchase goods in high demand, but he or she could only do so at his or her own expense. The bonds were distributed in addition to payment for agricultural produce as an incentive for farmers to sell produce to the State. Thus, the face value of a bond did not represent the amount the State owed to the holder but rather the scope of the holder’s entitlement to purchase goods which had not been otherwise available for purchase in the early 1990s.
62. The Government pointed out that the bonds had been issued as an individual incentive and that the applicable regulations did not provide for a possibility of their sale or purchase. There is no evidence that all of the applicants had been farmers themselves: for example, the applicant Mr S. M., born in 1979, had been eleven years old at the time the bonds had been issued. In the Government’s view, the applicants could not be said to have suffered an “individual and excessive burden”, because they had not submitted any information on the price at which they had purchased the bonds from third parties.
63. According to the Government’s position, the obligations arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds could not described as a “debt” because the holders had not given their money to the State and because the State had paid for the agricultural produce. Their recognition in the Commodity Bonds Act as internal debt was “mistaken”. The application of the Act had been suspended by successive laws on the federal budget. The interference therefore had a lawful basis and the domestic courts had taken reasoned and justified decisions to dismiss the applicants’ claims. It was also in the public interest since, in a situation where the budgetary resources were insufficient to satisfy pressing social needs, the State had a duty to protect the budget from excessive spending.
64. Finally, the Government indicated that at the time of submission of their memorandum a draft law governing the procedure for buyout of the Urozhay-90 bonds had been prepared and submitted to Parliament for a vote. The law would regulate all aspects of redemption of the bonds.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
65. The concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to the ownership of material goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law. In the same way as material goods, certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights”, and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision. In each case the issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Broniowski, cited above, § 129; Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999-II; and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I).
66. When declaring the application admissible, the Court examined the issue of applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It found that the scope of the entitlement conferred by the Urozhay-90 bonds on their holders had not been identical throughout their lifetime. In the initial period following their introduction and until early 1992, the bonds had had no independent value, being merely an administrative instrument for the distribution of consumer goods in high demand. In the subsequent period the right the bonds had originally certified – the right to purchase goods in high demand – lost its value and relevance on transition to the market economy. However, the legal regulations governing the bonds evolved in line with the changing economic conditions in Russia, with the result that the bonds were firstly treated as equivalent to discount coupons, later gave access to monetary compensation and, eventually, were recognised as part of the internal debt by the Commodity Bonds Act.
67. The Court further noted that by enacting the Commodity Bonds Act in 1995, the Russian State had taken upon itself an obligation to settle the debt arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds. Since that time the applicants had continuously held against the Russian State a claim which had existed both on the date of the ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Russia (5 May 1998) and on the date of the submission of the present application to the Court. Although the application of the relevant provision of the Commodity Bonds Act had been suspended for many years, it had not been revoked or annulled. Moreover, despite the discrepancy in the grounds invoked by the domestic courts which had rejected the applicants’ claims, all the decisions had acknowledged the existence of a debt arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds under the Commodity Bonds Act and chargeable to the State.
68. In sum, the Court found that the applicants had a proprietary interest which was both recognised under Russian law and acknowledged by Russian courts and which qualified for protection under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It finds nothing in the Government’s present arguments to change the conclusion that, as has already been established in the decision on admissibility, the applicants’ right to obtain redemption of the debt arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds constitutes a “possession” within the meaning of that Convention provision.
69. Following the decision on the admissibility of the application, the Russian Parliament amended the Commodity Bonds Act by removing the reference to the Urozhay-90 bonds, and also passed a law governing the buyout of those bonds. This welcome development has put an end to the situation of legal uncertainty which was the main subject of the applicants’ complaint. However, the Court reiterates that the issue must be seen from the perspective of what “possessions” the applicants had on the date of the Protocol’s entry into force and, critically, on the date on which they submitted the complaint to the Court (see Broniowski, cited above, § 132). As noted above, on both those dates the debt arising out of the bonds had been recognised but the implementing regulations had not been adopted, making redemption of the bonds impossible.
70. The fact that the applicants complained about the lack of legal regulation of their entitlement distinguishes the present case from the situation obtaining in the Grishchenko case, to which the Government referred above. Ms G. possessed a different type of a commodity bond, one that originally certified her right to purchase a passenger car. She lodged a complaint with the Court after the Government had defined the procedure for redemption of bonds of that type, because she was dissatisfied with the Government’s decision to grant an allegedly insufficient sum of money instead of a real car. The thrust of her complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was therefore not the lack of regulation of her entitlement but rather the adequacy of compensation, a matter which is not in issue in the instant case.
71. Having regard to the above, the Court finds that for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the applicants’ “possessions” comprised the entitlement to obtain some form of compensation for, or redemption of, the Urozhay-90 bonds. While that right was created in a kind of inchoate form, as its materialisation was conditional on the enactment of implementing legislation, at the material time section 1 of the Commodity Bonds Act clearly constituted a legal basis for the State’s obligation to implement it (compare Broniowski, cited above, § 133).
2. The applicable rule and the nature of the alleged violation
72. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see Broniowski, § 134; Iatridis, § 55; and Beyeler, § 98, all cited above).
73. The parties did not take a clear position on the question under which rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 the case should be examined. Having regard to the complexity of the legal and factual issues involved, the Court considers that the alleged violation of the applicants’ property rights cannot be classified in a precise category. In any event, the situation mentioned in the second sentence of the first paragraph is only a particular instance of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property as guaranteed by the general rule laid down in the first sentence (see Beyeler, cited above, § 106). The case should therefore more appropriately be examined in the light of that general rule (compare Broniowski, cited above, §§ 135-136).
74. The Court further reiterates that the boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition. The applicable principles are nonetheless similar. Whether the case is analysed in terms of a positive duty of the State or in terms of an interference by a public authority which needs to be justified, the criteria to be applied do not differ in substance. In both contexts regard must be had to the fair balance to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole. It also holds true that the aims mentioned in that provision may be of some relevance in assessing whether a balance between the demands of the public interest involved and the applicant’s fundamental right of property has been struck. In both contexts the State enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in determining the steps to be taken to ensure compliance with the Convention (see Broniowski, cited above, § 144, and Hatton and Others v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 36022/97, §§ 98 et seq., ECHR 2003-VIII).
75. In the present case the applicants’ submission under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that the Russian State, having conferred on them an entitlement to seek redemption of the Urozhay-90 bonds, made it impossible to benefit from that entitlement by failing for years to adopt the implementing regulations. That situation may well be examined in terms of a hindrance to the effective exercise of the right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 or in terms of a failure to secure the implementation of that right (compare Broniowski, cited above, § 146).
76. The Court will determine whether the conduct of the Russian State was justifiable in the light of the principles of lawfulness, pursuance of a legitimate aim in the public interest and striking of a fair balance between the general interest of the community and the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions (see, for a detailed description of those principles, Broniowski, cited above, §§ 147-151).
3. Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) Respect for the principle of lawfulness
77. The Court notes that the application of section 1 of the Commodity Bonds Act in the part concerning the Urozhay-90 bonds was repeatedly suspended through the laws on the federal budget for each successive year (see paragraph 51 above).
78. It is therefore satisfied that an interference with, or a restriction on, the exercise of the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions was “provided for by law” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) Existence of a legitimate aim in the public interest
79. The Government indicated that the restriction on the implementation of the bond-holders’ entitlement sought to prevent excessive expenditure from the federal budget. This position was reflected in the decision of the Russian Constitutional Court, which held that the necessity to restrict property rights could arise “in a situation where budgetary resources [were] insufficient to resolve many social problems relating to the exercise of the rights to life and personal dignity” (see paragraph 54 above).
80. The Court observes that in the 1990s the Russian State went through a tumultuous transition from a State-controlled to a market economy. Its economic well-being was further jeopardised by the financial crisis of 1998 and the sharp devaluation of the national currency. Even though it has achieved relative prosperity and wealth in recent years, the Court agrees that defining budgetary priorities in terms of favouring expenditure on pressing social issues to the detriment of claims with a purely pecuniary nature was a legitimate aim in the public interest.
(c) Striking of a fair balance between the general interest and the applicants’ rights
81. The Court notes at the outset that, by contrast with the situation obtaining in the above-mentioned Broniowski case and other similar cases, for instance, Ramadhi and Others v. Albania (no. 38222/02, 13 November 2007) and Deneş and Others v. Romania (no. 25862/03, 3 March 2009), the applicants had not suffered an initial taking or loss of property which the State had undertaken to compensate for. The bonds of which the applicants were the holders were given to agricultural workers as an additional incentive to encourage them to sell their produce to the State, which had paid for it at fixed prices. Nor could these bonds be used as legal tender or a money substitute: they certified the bearer’s right to purchase goods in high demand but the buyer still had to pay the full purchase price in cash or otherwise. These particular features of the bonds may be relevant for an assessment of the level of compensation which was eventually offered to the bond-holders, since the Court has already considered that a substantially reduced amount of compensation may be acceptable in a situation in which the compensatory entitlement does not arise from any previous taking of individual property by the respondent State but is designed to mitigate the effects of a taking or loss of property not attributable to the State (see Broniowski, cited above, §§ 182 and 186). However, the Court reiterates that the applicants’ complaints in the instant case do not concern the amount of compensation recoverable under the Buyout Act passed in 2009; their grievances stemmed from the fact that, in passing the Commodity Bonds Act, the Russian State had voluntarily taken upon itself an obligation towards bearers of the bonds that had not been discharged for many years owing to the absence of a legislative framework for its implementation.
82. The rule of law underlying the Convention and the principle of lawfulness in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 require States not only to respect and apply, in a foreseeable and consistent manner, the laws they have enacted, but also, as a corollary of this duty, to ensure the legal and practical conditions for their implementation (see Broniowski, cited above, §§ 147 and 184). In the context of the present case, those principles required the Russian State to fulfil in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner, the legislative promises it had made in respect of claims arising out of the Urozhay-90 bonds. In particular, it was incumbent on the authorities to legislate on the conditions for implementation of the bond-bearers’ entitlement with a view to satisfying the undertaking that had been created through the enactment of the Commodity Bonds Act. The Court is not persuaded by the Government’s submission that the recognition of the bonds as part of the State’s internal debt had been “mistaken”. Even if this were so, no explanation was offered as to why that alleged mistake had not been promptly identified and corrected through an appropriate amendment of the Commodity Bonds Act. It could not have been due to a mere oversight or oblivion because the application of section 1 of the Commodity Bonds Act in the part concerning the Urozhay-90 bonds had been explicitly and repeatedly suspended for many years in the successive laws on the federal budget.
83. During the entire period between the enactment of the Commodity Bonds Act in 1995 and the approval of the Buyout Act in 2009, the conduct of the Russian authorities appears to have been passive vis-à-vis the implementation of the entitlement of the bond-bearers which had been continuously recognised as part of the State’s internal debt. The information available to the Court does not allow it to find that the Russian Government took any measures in that period with a view to satisfying the claims arising out of the bonds. No draft legislation governing the State’s obligations under the bonds had been proposed or discussed in Parliament. The preparatory work which was essential for drafting such legislation had not been carried out. The inventory of the bonds, which had already been decided upon in the Government’s Resolution of 10 August 1992 (see paragraph 45 above), had never been completed and, accordingly, the exact number and amount of the outstanding bonds could not have been known. The Court therefore finds that the Government’s argument that the restrictions on redemption of the bonds had been necessary to prevent excessive expenditure from the federal budget is hardly persuasive. An appropriate balancing exercise determining the exact amount that would be required to settle the debt under the bonds in relation to other priority expenses could not have been possible in the absence of crucial figures, such as the quantity and total valuation of the remaining bonds. While the Court agrees that the radical reform of Russia’s political and economic system, as well as the state of the country’s finances, may have justified stringent financial limitations on rights of a purely pecuniary nature, it finds that the Russian Government were not able to adduce satisfactory grounds justifying, in terms of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the continuous failure over many years to implement an entitlement conferred on the applicants by Russian legislation.
84. As regards the conduct of the applicants, the Court reiterates that following the enactment of the Commodity Bonds Act they had a legitimate expectation of obtaining some form of compensation for, or redemption of, the Urozhay-90 bonds. They did not remain passive but rather displayed an active attitude by filing individual and collective actions with the domestic courts and, following the rejection of their claims at first instance, making use of the appeals procedure. The Government did not suggest that any other effective domestic remedies were available to them. In these circumstances, it cannot be said that the applicants were responsible for, or culpably contributed to, the state of affairs which they complained about (compare Broniowski, cited above, § 181). Rather, as the Court has found on the strength of the evidence before it, the hindrance to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions was solely attributable to the respondent State.
85. On balance, the Court considers that the Russian authorities, by imposing successive limitations on the application of the legislative provision establishing the basis for the applicants’ right to redemption of the Urozhay-90 bonds and by failing for years to legislate on the procedure for implementation of that entitlement, kept the applicants in a state of uncertainty, which was incompatible in itself with the obligation arising under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to secure the peaceful enjoyment of possessions, notably with the duty to act in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner where an issue of general interest is at stake (see Broniowski, cited above, §§ 151 and 185).
86. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
87. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
88. The applicants claimed compensation in respect of pecuniary damage in an amount equal to the nominal value of the bonds, divided by 1,000 to take account of the redenomination of the Russian rouble and multiplied by a coefficient of 48,222, representing the increase in consumer prices in the period from March 1991 to March 2006. They further claimed compensation in respect of non-pecuniary damage, ranging from 5,000 to 10,000 euros (EUR) for each applicant.
89. The Government objected to an award of just satisfaction, claiming that the applicants had not suffered any damage because they had bought the bonds in question from third parties. The purchased bonds had no real value because they had originally certified the bearer’s right to buy goods in high demand, whereas at the time of their purchase those same goods had already been available in all shops.
90. As regards pecuniary damage, the Court notes that, following the enactment of the Buyout Act in 2009 and the Government’s Resolution governing the buyout procedure (see paragraphs 52 and 53 above), it is now open to the applicants to apply to the competent domestic authorities for redemption of their bonds.
91. The Court further considers that the applicants must have suffered anxiety and frustration on account of the authorities’ prolonged failure to devise the procedure for settlement of their entitlement. However, it considers the amounts claimed in respect of non-pecuniary damage excessive. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards each applicant EUR 1,800 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on it.
B. Costs and expenses
92. The applicants also claimed 88,599.58 Russian roubles (RUB) in respect of legal costs and postal and travel expenses. The Government did not make specific comments on this claim.
93. Having regard to the material in its possession, the Court considers it reasonable to award EUR 2,000 to all the applicants jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants on that amount.
C. Default interest
94. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
2. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 1,800 (one thousand eight hundred euros) to each applicant, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros) to all the applicants jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
3. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 11 February 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President
1. The RSFSR adopted the Declaration on State Sovereignty on 12 June 1990.

TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA MALYSH ED ALTRI C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 30280/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
11 febbraio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Malysh ed Altri c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 21 gennaio 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata nell’ultima data menzionata:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 30280/03) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da sei cittadini russi elencati nel paragrafo 6 sotto (“i richiedenti”) il 26 giugno 2003.
2. Il primo richiedente, il Sig. N. M. rappresentò gli altri richiedenti di fronte alla Corte. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato inizialmente dal Sig. P. Laptev, Rappresentante della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani e successivamente dal suo nuovo Rappresentante, il Sig. G. Matyushkin.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che l'insuccesso da parte del Governo russo di implementare la procedura per riscatto delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 era stato in violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. Con una decisione dek 19 giugno 2008 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta ammissibile.
5. Il Governo, ma non i richiedenti, registrò inoltre osservazioni scritte (Articolo 59 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti sono:
(1) Sig. N. I. M., nato nel 1949,
(2) Sig. V. A. B., nato nel 1944,
(3) Sig. S. S. I., nato nel 1949,
(4) Sig.ra Z.A. S., nato nel 1954,
(5) Sig.ra L. V.Na., nato nel 1953, e
(6) Sig. S. N. M., nato nel 1979.
7. Tutti i richiedenti sono cittadini russi che vivono nella Regione di Amur. Loro sono tutti i possessori delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90.
A. Informazioni di fondo sulle obbligazioni Urozhay-90
8. Nel 1987 il Segretario Generale del Partito comunista dell’URSS Mikhail Gorbachev presentò le sue “tesi di base” che posero il fondamento politico per la riforma economica che annuncia la transizione ad un'economia di mercato. Furono decretate molte leggi che aprirono l'economia dominata dal progetti di Stato all’ impresa privata. Il Governo preferì comunque mantenere il controllo sui prezzi al consumo , piuttosto che lasciarli determinare dal libero mercato.
9. Dal drastico aumento della spesa statale del 1990 siccome un numero crescente di imprese che non davano profitto richiesero un appoggio Statale, più risorse furono deviate per sovvenzionare i prezzi di consumatore. Allo stesso tempo, l'eliminazione del controllo centrale sulle decisioni di produzione, specialmente nel settore dei beni di consumo condussero ad un guasto nelle tradizionali relazioni di domanda - richiesta. Questo diede luogo a pesanti scarsità di cibo e di beni al consumo di base. Il Governo reagì introducendo razioni timbri per cibo e per certi articoli di igiene.
10. Oltre alle razione timbro , il Governo della Repubblica Federativa Socialista russa (RSFSR)1 mise in circolazione molti tipi di così definito “obbligazioni delle merci” (товарные чеки) che diede ai loro portatori il diritto di acquistare beni di consumo, come frigoriferi, lavatrici, registratori e automobili. Le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 (“Raccolto-90”) erano uno dei tanti tipi di obbligazioni; loro furono distribuiti fra i lavoratori agricoli e le società che avevano venduto grano e altre produzioni agricole allo Stato nel 1990 e 1991. Quelle obbligazioni furono progettate per incoraggiare i lavoratori agricoli a vendere i prodotti allo Stato in cambio del diritto alla priorità sull’acquisto di beni di elevata richiesta (vedere paragrafo 43 sotto). Lo Stato pagò i lavoratori per la produzione a prezzi fissi e diede loro anche obbligazioni per importi proporzionati al valore della produzione venduta.
11. Le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 non erano denaro, ma loro indicavano un certo valore nominale sulla loro facciata. Questo valore determinava il prezzo di acquisto massimo di beni al consumo che avrebbero potuto essere venduti sulla produzione delle obbligazioni. Le obbligazioni non furono intese per il pagamento ma soltanto per la certificazione del diritto ad acquistare dei beni specifici; la vendita dei beni era condizionale al pagamento del pieno prezzo di acquisto da parte del possessore dell'obbligazione e dalla produzione delle obbligazioni per lo stesso importo. Le obbligazioni non furono registrate a nome della persona o altrimenti personalizzate e la Risoluzione Statale non impedì loro dall'essere trasferiti fra individui e persone giuridiche.
12. Il 2 gennaio 1992 il Governo russo decise di porre fine alla regolamentazione dei prezzi al dettaglio. I negozi cominciarono a riempirsi di merci ma prezzi aumentarono ad una velocità impressionante(il tasso di inflazione nel 1992 era 2,600%). Nel marzo 1992 il Governo stabilì, che i beni disponibili sotto le obbligazioni sarebbe stati venduti ai prezzi fissati prima del 2 gennaio 1992 (vedere paragrafo 44 sotto).
13. Nell’ agosto 1992 il Governo introdusse la possibilità di comprare le obbligazioni con un coefficiente di 10. Nel 1994, il coefficiente fu alzato a 70 (vedere paragrafi 45 e 46 sotto). Sembra che un numero significativo di obbligazioni fu comprato dallo Stato prima che le operazioni di buyout furono fermate nel 1996 (vedere paragrafo 48 sotto).
14. Nel 1995 lo status delle obbligazioni di merce fu codificato nell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce passato dal Parlamento (vedere paragrafo 47 sotto). Il suo testo era molto laconico, più breve di una pagina, ma stabilì di coprire ogni tipo di obbligazione di merci emessa negli anni precedenti. La sezione 1 riconobbe le obbligazioni di merce come parte del debito interno della Federazione russa; la sezione 2 fisso a dieci anni il termine di prescrizione per gli obblighi che nascevano dalle obbligazioni di merce (la data iniziale non fu specificata); la sezione 3 richiese al Governo di adottare un programma per sistemare il debito interno.
15. Nel 2000 il Governo presentò il programma per la sistemazione del debito interno (vedere paragrafo 50 sotto). Coprì ogni tipo di obbligazione di merce, salvo le obbligazioni Urozhay-90. Alcuni mesi prima l'Atto delle Obbligazioni delle Merci fu emendato così da prevedere che la sistemazione del debito sotto le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 sarebbe stata regolata da una legge federale speciale (vedere paragrafo 49 sotto).
16. Fra il 2003 ed il 2009 l’applicazione della sezione 1 dell’Atto delle Obbligazioni di Merce fu sospeso nella parte riguardo ai bond Urozhay-90, in conformità con le leggi sul bilancio federale per ogni anno successivo (vedere paragrafo 51 sotto).
17. Nel 2009 il Parlamento ha varato una legge sul buyout dei bond Urozhay-90 ed il Governo emise delle regolamentazioni di implementazione che stabilivano una procedura particolareggiata per il buyout delle obbligazioni (vedere paragrafi 52 e 53 sotto).
B. Il Sig. N. M. (prima set di procedimenti) ed il Sig. B.
18. I richiedenti il Sig. N. M. ed il Sig. V.B. sono possessori delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 con un valore nominale e totale rispettivamente di 30,110 e 30,000 rubli russi non-denominati (RUR).
19. Nel 2001 Sig. N. M. ed il Sig. B. introdussero un'azione contro il Governo russo ed il Ministero delle Finanze, chiedendo il risarcimento per il danno incorse nell'insuccesso continuato dello Stato nell’ effettuare il pagamento sotto le obbligazioni.
20. Il 13 gennaio 2003 la Corte distrettuale di Tambovskiy della Regione di Amur rifiutò la loro rivendicazione per le seguenti ragioni dopo molti round di procedimenti giudiziali,:
“Attualmente il programma Statale per la sistemazione del debito interno del periodo 2001 a 2004 è stato sviluppato e implementato. L'Atto delle Obbligazioni delle Merci descriveva il debito sorto dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 come debito a medio termine. Di conseguenza, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 98 § 2 del Codice di Bilancio della Federazione russa, non è ancora intervenuta la data di scadenza. Ne segue che i corpi esecutivi della Federazione russa ora stanno introducendo delle misure per il saldo del debito ai querelanti. In queste circostanze, la corte non può trovare, che una qualsiasi atto od omissione di azione da parte dell'imputato abbia causato qualsiasi danno ai querelanti.”
21. Il 19 febbraio 2003 la Corte Regionale di Amur ha sostenuto questa sentenza su ricorso.
C. il Sig. N. M. (secondo set di procedimenti)
22. Il richiedente il Sig. N. M. detiene anche le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 con un valore nominale e totale di RUR 582,665.
23. Il 5 dicembre 2002 lui citò in giudizio il Governo russo ed il Ministero delle Finanze per il danno arrecato dall'insuccesso continuato dello Stato nell’ effettuare il pagamento sotto queste obbligazioni.
24. Il 4 marzo 2003 la Corte distrettuale di Tambovskiy della Regione di Amur rifiutò la sua rivendicazione per le stesse ragioni di quelle determinate nella sentenza sopra-citata del 13 gennaio 2003.
25. Il 23 aprile 2003 la Corte Regionale di Amur sostenne la sentenza su ricorso.
D. Il Sig. I.
26. Il richiedente il Sig. S. I. è il possessore delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 con un valore nominale e totale di RUR 152,200.
27. Il 5 dicembre 2002 lui citò in giudizio il Governo russo ed il Ministero delle Finanze per il danno arrecato per l'insuccesso continuato dello Stato nell’ effettuare il pagamento sotto queste obbligazioni.
28. Il 20 febbraio 2003 la Corte distrettuale di Tambovskiy della Regione di Amur rifiutò la sua rivendicazione per le stesse ragioni di quelle determinato nella sentenza sopra-citata del 13 gennaio 2003.
29. Il 28 marzo 2003 la Corte Regionale di Amur sostenne la sentenza su ricorso.
E. La Sig.ra S.
30. La richiedente la Sig.ra Z. S. è il possessore delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 con un valore nominale e totale di RUR 223,170.
31. Il 5 dicembre 2002 lei citò in giudizio il Governo russo ed il Ministero delle Finanza per il danno arrecatole per l'insuccesso continuato dello Stato nell’ effettuare il pagamento sotto queste obbligazioni.
32. Il 1 luglio 2003 la Corte della Città di Blagoveshchensk della Regione di Amur rifiutò la sua rivendicazione dopo molti round di procedimenti giudiziali, perché non era stata ancora adottata una legge federale che governava la procedura per il saldo del debito che nasceva dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 e perché la legge sul bilancio federale del 2003 aveva sospeso l’applicazione dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce nella parte riguardo alle obbligazioni Urozhay-90.
33. Il 6 agosto 2003 la Corte Regionale di Amur sostenne la sentenza su ricorso.
F. il Sig.ra N.
34. La richiedente la Sig.ra L. N. è il possessore delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 con un valore nominale e totale di RUR 271,855.
35. Il 5 dicembre 2002 lei citò in giudizio il Governo russo ed il Ministero delle Finanze per il danno arrecatole per l'insuccesso continuato dello Stato nell’ effettuare il pagamento sotto queste obbligazioni.
36. Il 19 marzo 2003 la Corte della Città di Blagoveshchensk della Regione di Amur rifiutò la sua rivendicazione perché una non era ancora passata una legge federale che disciplinava la procedura per il saldo del debito generato dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 e perché la legge del 2003 sul bilancio federale aveva sospeso l’applicazione dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce nella parte riguardo alle obbligazioni Urozhay-90.
37. Il 18 aprile 2003 la Corte Regionale di Amur sostenne la sentenza su ricorso.
G. il Sig. S. M.
38. Il richiedente il Sig. S. M. è il possessore delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 con un valore nominale e totale di RUR 222,820.
39. Il 5 dicembre 2002 citò in giudizio il Governo russo ed il Ministero delle Finanze per il danno arrecatogli per l'insuccesso continuato dello Stato nell’ effettuare il pagamento sotto queste obbligazioni.
40. Il 27 marzo 2003 la Corte della Città di Blagoveshchensk della Regione di Amur rifiutò la sua rivendicazione dopo molti round di procedimenti giudiziali. Si riferì alla giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale all'effetto che:
“... l'equilibrio fra i diritti e gli interessi legali delle persone che sono creditrici dello Stato, da una parte, e di tutte le altre persone, d'altra parte può essere fissato solamente nella forma di un atto della legislatura federale.” (decisione del 21 dicembre 2000)
41. Siccome nessuna simile legge era stata ancora approvata, la corte respinse l'azione del Sig. S. M..
42. Il 7 maggio 2003 la Corte Regionale di Amur sostenne la sentenza su ricorso.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
43. Il 26 luglio 1990 il Consiglio dei Ministri della RSFSR adottò la Decisione n. 259 sulle misure urgenti per aumentare l'acquisto di prodotti agricoli raccolti nel 1990 e per assicurare la loro custodia sicura. Le sue parti attinenti recitavano come segue:
I. Misure per aumentare l'indipendenza decisionale tramite fattorie collettive sovietiche riguardo alla vendita del raccolto
“1. Autorizzare che tutti i fabbricanti di produzione agricola vendano l'eccedenza di simile produzione rimanente dopo la consegna sotto gli accordi esistenti... a procacciatori o ad altri consumatori a prezzi negoziati...
2. Dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi restrizioni sulla vendita o spedizione di produzione agricola a consumatori in distretti autonomi o regioni della RSFSR sotto il paragrafo 1 della presente decisione... Se le giunte comunali dovessero introdurre simile restrizioni nei loro territori, il Consiglio dei Ministri della RSFSR può smettere di emettere bond Urozhay-90 o di consegnare beni sulla base di questi in quei territori...”
II. Misure per incoraggiare la vendita della produzione agricola allo Stato per la vendita reciproca di beni ad elevata richiesta
“7. Cominciare ad emettere, nel 1990, bond Urozhay-90 ad impiegati di fattorie sovietiche collettive , altre imprese agro-industriali ed organizzazioni, fattorie di contadini e proprietari di aree di terreno sussidiarie personali a riguardo della produzione agricola venduta allo Stato.
Determinare che le obbligazioni certifichino il diritto di acquistare dei beni ad elevata richiesta a prezzi al dettaglio in outlet commerciali. Le dette obbligazioni non sono denaro.
8. Il Ministero delle Finanze della RSFSR ed il Ministero dell'Agricoltura e degli Alimenti della RSFSR, sino a 1 settembre 1990, stamperanno e metteranno in circolazione attraverso le filiali della Banca Statale della RSFSR bond Urozhay-90 per un importo totale di 10 miliardi rubli. Le obbligazioni saranno usate prima del 1 ottobre 1991.
9. Stabilire che le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 vengano emesse dai rami della Banca Statale della RSFSR:
- a tutti i produttori che venderono prodotti standard allo Stato fra il 1 luglio 1990 e il 30 giugno 1991... pari ad un importo equivalente al 10% del valore dei prodotti venduti...
...
13. L’Associazione dei Consumatori russi deve presentare al Ministero delle Relazioni Economiche Estere della RSFSR delle richieste per quei beni ad elevata richiesta che saranno venduti sulla produzione dei bond Urozhay-90, ed organizza la loro vendita, su ordini di anticipo da parte dei cittadini ed organizzazioni a fiere regionali e ad esposizioni ed in outlet commerciali specializzati. L’Associazione dei Consumatori deve consegnare i beni ai consumatori sulla base dei bond Urozhay-90 non più tardi del 1 gennaio 1990 [sic]. Nel 1991 gli ordini sotto le dette obbligazioni saranno eseguiti entro due mesi.”
44. Il 15 marzo 1992 Il Governo russo emise la Decisione n. 161, tesa a compensare i proprietari delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 per un aumento dei prezzi al dettaglio. Risolse, in particolare:
“1. Stabilire che le vetture passeggeri e gli altri beni al consumo che sono resi disponibili a cittadini come ricompensa del grano e di altra produzione agricola che sono stati venduti allo Stato nel 1990 e nel 1991 saranno venduti a prezzi al dettaglio che hanno prevalso prima del 2 gennaio 1992...
2. Prolungare il periodo della validità dei bond Urozhay-90 sino alla fine del 1992...”
45. Il 10 agosto 1992 il Governo adottò la Decisione n. 1442-r. Costrinse i ministeri russi ad assegnare importi sostanziali per l'acquisto di beni che sarebbero stati venduti sulla produzione delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. Prevedeva inoltre:
“4. Il Ministero per il Lavoro e le Risorse Materiali, nella cooperazione con l’Unione Centrale dei Consumatori, definirà, entro due settimane, il ruolo di beni proposti per l’implementazione dei bond Urozhay-90,...
5. Il Comitato dei Prezzi del Ministero dell'Economia determinerà gli aumenti dei prezzi dei beni nazionali ed importati dal 1990... La differenza di prezzo sarà rimborsata dal bilancio pubblico.
6. Il Ministero dell'Agricoltura eseguirà un inventario delle obbligazioni tenuto da imprese agricole ed organizzazioni ed individui privati al 1 settembre.
7. Il Ministero delle Finanze ed il Ministero dell'Agricoltura possono, entro due settimane, stabilire la procedura per il buyout dei bond Urozhay-90 tramite le filiali della Banca di Risparmio. Si deve anche prendere in considerazione che queste obbligazioni possono essere usate o per acquistare beni o possono essere comprate dallo Stato con un coefficiente di 10.”
46. Il 16 aprile 1994 il Governo approvò la Regolamentazione n. 344 sulle obbligazioni di merce Statali che prevedeva come segue:
“Nella prospettiva di riscattare i bond di merce statali e di ostacolando l'accumulo della responsabilità dello Stato per la compensazione delle differenze di prezzo, il Governo della Federazione russa risolve:
1. Il Ministero delle Finanze della Federazione russa-
-comprerà... bond Urozhay-90 ad un prezzo equivalente al loro valore nominale moltiplicato per 70 e accrediterà questo importo in un conto bancario...”
47. Il 1 giugno 1995 l'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce (n. 86-FZ, ФЗ «О государственных долговых товарных обязательствах») fu decretato. Questo prevedeva che i bond di merce Statali , incluse le obbligazioni Urozhay-90, sarebbero stati riconosciuti come parte del debito Statale interno della Federazione russa (sezione 1). Gli obblighi che sorgono dalle obbligazioni di merce sarebbero stati stabiliti in conformità coi principi generali del Codice civile russo, essendo il termine di prescrizione stabilito a dieci anni (sezione 2). L'enunciazione originale della sezione 3 prevedeva:
“Il Governo della Federazione russa redigerà, nel 1995-1997, il Programma Statale per il saldo del debito interno della Federazione russa descritto nella sezione 1, basato sul principio del pieno risarcimento. Il programma prevedrà per termini di rimborso... conveniente per i cittadini, incluso, secondo la loro scelta: approvvigionamenti di beni designati nelle... obbligazioni Statali emesse a fornitori agricoli...; rimborso delle obbligazioni di merce Statali a prezzi al consumo che prevalgono al tempo della rimborso...; conversione del debito in security Statali...”
48. Il 16 gennaio 1996 il Governo adottò la Decisione n. 33 con cui annullò la Regolamentazione n. 344 ed istruì il Ministero delle Finanze a riscattare le obbligazioni di merce Statali all'interno degli importi assegnati a questo fine nel bilancio federale.
49. Il 2 giugno 2000 la sezione 3 dell’Atto sui bond di Merce, fu corretto per prevedere che la procedura per l’attuazione degli obblighi dello Stato verso possessori delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 sarebbe stata determinata in una legge federale speciale.
50. Il 27 dicembre 2000 il Governo adottò il Programma Statale per il saldo del debito interno della Federazione russa. Nel paragrafo 14 del Programma era previsto che la procedura per i pagamenti a riguardo delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 sarebbe stata determinata in una legge federale speciale.
51. Nel 2003 l’applicazione della sezione 1 dell’Atto sui bond di Merce fu per la prima volta sospesa nella parte riguardo alle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. La clausola di sospensione fu mantenuta per gli anni seguenti (Legge Federale n. 176-FZ del 24 dicembre 2002; n. 186-FZ del 23 dicembre 2003; n. 173-FZ del 23 dicembre 2004; n. 189-FZ del 26 dicembre 2005; n. 238-FZ del 19 dicembre 2006; e n. 198-FZ del 24 luglio 2007).
52. Il 19 luglio 2009 fu adottata una legge federale che disciplinava la procedura per il buyout delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 (n. 200-FZ-“il Buyout Act”). Stabilì che ai possessori delle obbligazioni sarebbe stato pagato, nel periodo fra il 15 dicembre 2009 e il 31 dicembre 2010, un importo equivalente al valore nominale delle obbligazioni diviso per 1,000 (sezione 2). La legge emendò anche l'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce rimuovendo il riferimento ai bond Urozhay-90 dalla sezione 1 di quell'Atto.
53. Il 15 settembre 2009 Il Governo emise la Decisione n. 749, esponendo la procedura particolareggiata per i pagamenti in cambio della produzione delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90.
54. Il 15 dicembre 2000 la Corte Costituzionale rese una decisione su una richiesta depositata dal Parlamento della Repubblica di Sakha (Yakutiya) che aveva chiesto che gli emendamenti del 2 giugno 2000 (vedere sopra) rimandassero indefinitamente l'attuazione degli obblighi dello Stato verso i portatori delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. La Corte Costituzionale dichiarò la richiesta inammissibile per le ragioni seguenti:
“Nelle sue [precedenti decisioni] la Corte Costituzionale ha già determinato che un cambio unilaterale nella sfera degli obblighi dello Stato verso individui, incluso l'obbligo di vendere i beni in cambio i bond di merce, è non permissibile. Comunque, questo non esclude la possibilità di restrizioni imponenti sui diritti di proprietà di individui-in una forma stabilita ed all'interno dei limiti costituzionali- nella questione di obblighi Statali che sono compatibili con l’Articolo 55 § 3 della Costituzione.
In particolare, segue dalla giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale... che l’attuazione dei diritti e degli interessi legali di cittadini individuali o gruppi di cittadini non deve smodatamente ed avversamente colpire le risorse budgetarie assegnate per soddisfare i diritti e gli interessi della società nell'insieme. Questo principio diviene particolarmente attinente in una situazione dove le risorse budgetarie sono insufficienti per risolvere molti problemi sociali relativi all'esercizio dei diritti alla vita e alla dignità personale. Ne segue che l'equilibrio fra i diritti e gli interessi legali degli individui che si comportano come creditori per lo Stato in relazioni di proprietà, da una parte e qualsiasi altro, d'altra parte, in principio, venga previsto solamente nella forma di un atto del Parlamento.
Quindi, dato che la legislatura può restringere i diritti individuali e le libertà (incluso i diritti di proprietà) al fine della protezione dei diritti e degli interessi legali altrui, una revisione della legge federale che emenda la sezione 3 dell’Atto dei Bond di Merce da parte della Corte Costituzionale implicherebbe una valutazione della giustificazione finanziaria ed economica per la decisione legislativa sulla procedura per il saldo dei bond Statali di merce che... esce della giurisdizione della Corte Costituzionale.
Nell’esaminare le rivendicazioni relative al saldo dei bond Statali di merce Statale,le corti di giurisdizione generale hanno il diritto ed il dovere di interpretare le disposizioni legislative alla luce degli interessi dell'individuo (Articoli 2 e 18 della Costituzione) e di essere guidate, in particolare, dalla sezione 2 dell’Atto sui bond di Merce che stabilisce che le obbligazioni di merce Statali saranno saldate in una forma appropriata e in conformità col Codice civile della Federazione russa.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
55. I richiedenti si lamentarono sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 dell'insuccesso continuato delle autorità nazionali nell’ assolvere i loro obblighi generati dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 che erano state riconosciute come parte del debito interno della Russia. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Osservazioni delle parti
1. I richiedenti
56. I richiedenti presentarono che le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 avevano un valore economico e avrebbero potuto essere considerate “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Una parte sostanziale delle obbligazioni era stata scambiata prima del 1994 con beni ad elevata richiesta o era stata comprata dal Ministero delle Finanze prima del 1995 al loro valore nominale moltiplicato per 70. La parte rimanente delle obbligazioni era stata riconosciuta come parte del debito interno della Federazione russa sotto l'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce. Da questo riconoscimento, i richiedenti affermarono che loro avevano avuto un'aspettativa legittima che lo Stato avrebbe rimborsato il valore nominale delle obbligazioni.
57. I richiedenti affermarono che l'insuccesso dello Stato nell’ effettuare pagamenti sotto le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 corrispose ad un'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà. Le leggi decretate dallo Stato non avevano fornito le possibilità legali e pratiche di eseguire gli obblighi generati dalle obbligazioni. Decretando leggi successive che avevano sospeso l’applicazione della disposizione attinente dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce, lo Stato si era elevato inoltre, in una posizione privilegiata e con ciò aveva violato il principio costituzionale dell'uguaglianza di fronte alla legge.
58. I richiedenti accettarono che la riforma integrale del sistema politico ed economico del paese, così come lo stato delle finanze del paese, avrebbe giustificato delle limitazioni severe sul risarcimento per i possessori delle obbligazione Urozhay-90. Non c’era comunque, alcun motivo soddisfacente per giustificare la misura in cui lo Stato era andato a vuoto continuamente per molti anni a dare effetto al diritto conferito ai possessori dei Urozhay-90. Dal 2001 le entrate degli uffici delle imposte del bilancio federale russo continuamente eccedevano la spesa e importi multi miliardari erano stati trasferiti nel Fondo di Stabilizzazione . La rivendicazione del Governo di finanziamenti budgetari insufficienti era evidentemente così, infondata. In queste circostanze, spettava alle corti nazionali prevedere un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi pubblici ed individuali e determinare se la situazione finanziaria del paese era stata così atroce da richiedere una proroga degli obblighi generati dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90.
59. I richiedenti infine presentarono che, imponendo limitazioni successive sull'esercizio del loro diritto a recuperare i debiti e applicando pratiche che hanno reso il loro diritti inutili in pratica, le autorità avevano distrutto la sua stessa essenza. Loro dovevano sopportare un carico individuale e sproporzionato eccessivo che non poteva essere giustificato in termini del legittimo interesse della comunità generale perseguito dalle autorità.
2. Il Governo
60. Il Governo affermò che le obbligazioni Urozhay-90 non costituivano un “diritto di proprietà” o “una proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Distinse la presente causa dalla causa Broniowski c. Polonia ([GC], n. 31443/96, il 2004-V di ECHR) in cui non era stato contestato l'obbligo delle autorità polacche a compensare delle persone rimpatriate per le proprietà abbandonate. Nella prospettiva del Governo, la presente causa aveva somiglianze con la situazione verificatasi nella causa Grishchenko c. Russia ((dec.), n. 75907/01, 8 luglio 2004) in cui la Corte aveva trovato che la rivendicazione del richiedente sotto un'obbligazione di merce per l'acquisto di una macchina di fabbricazione Russa non era stata sufficientemente stabilita da essere esecutiva.
61. Il Governo enfatizzò la specifica natura legale delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. Le obbligazioni non erano denaro; loro non potevano essere scambiate per beni o soldi. Loro certificarono soltanto il diritto del possessore ad acquistare dei beni ad elevata richiesta, ma avrebbe potuto solamente fare così a sua propria spesa. Le obbligazioni furono distribuite oltre al pagamento per la produzione agricola come un incentivo per i coltivatori a vendere il prodotto allo Stato. Così, il valore nominale di un'obbligazione non rappresentava l'importo dovuto dallo Stato al possessore ma piuttosto la sfera del diritto del possessore per acquistare beni che non erano altrimenti disponibili per l’acquisto nei primi anni ‘90.
62. Il Governo indicò che le obbligazioni erano state emesse come un incentivo individuale e che le regolamentazioni applicabili non prevedevano la possibilità della loro vendita o del loro acquisto. Non c'è prova che tutti i richiedenti erano stati coltivatori loro stessi: per esempio, il richiedente il Sig. S. M., nato nel 1979, aveva undici anni al tempo in cui le obbligazioni erano state emesse. Non si poteva dire che i richiedenti abbiano subito, nella prospettiva del Governo, un “carico individuale eccessivo”, perché non avevano presentato qualsiasi informazione sul prezzo a cui avevano acquistato le obbligazioni da terze parti.
63. Secondo la posizione del Governo, gli obblighi che sorgono dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 non potevano essere descritti come un “debito” perché i possessori non avevano dato i loro soldi allo Stato e perché lo Stato aveva pagato per la produzione agricola. Il loro riconoscimento nell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce come debito interno era “sbagliato.” L’Applicazione dell'Atto era stata sospesa da leggi successive sul bilancio federale. L'interferenza aveva perciò una base legale e le corti nazionali avevano preso decisioni ragionate e giustificate di respingere le rivendicazione dei richiedenti . Era anche quindi nell'interesse pubblico, in una situazione in cui le risorse budgetarie erano insufficienti per soddisfare le pressanti necessità sociali, lo Stato aveva il dovere di proteggere il bilancio da una spesa eccessiva.
64. Infine, il Governo indicò che al tempo della sottomissione del loro memorandum una bozza di legge che disciplinava la procedura per il buyout delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 era stata preparata ed presentata al Parlamento per un voto. La legge avrebbe regolato tutti gli aspetti del rimborso delle obbligazioni.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. L'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
65. Il concetto di “proprietà” nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni materiale ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale. Allo stesso modo dei beni materiali, certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono dei beni possono essere riguardati anche come “diritti di proprietà”, e così come “proprietà” ai fini di questa disposizione. In ogni caso il problema che occorre esaminare è se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, hanno conferito al richiedente un titolo ad un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, § 129; Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 1999-II; e Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 100 ECHR 2000-I).
66. Dichiarando la richiesta ammissibile, la Corte esaminò la questione dell'applicabilità dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Trovò che la sfera del diritto conferito dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 sui loro possessori non era stato identico in tutta la loro vita. Nel periodo iniziale a seguito della loro introduzione e sino al primo 1992, le obbligazioni non avevano avuto valore indipendente, essendo soltanto uno strumento amministrativo per la distribuzione di beni al consumo ad elevata richiesta. Nel periodo susseguente il diritto che le obbligazioni avevano originalmente certificato - il diritto ad acquistare dei beni ad elevata richiesta –aveva perduto il suo valore e la sua attinenza nel momento della transizione all'economia di mercato. Comunque, le regolamentazioni legali che disciplinavano le obbligazioni evolsero in linea col cambio delle condizioni economiche in Russia, col risultato che le obbligazioni sono state trattate in primo luogo come equivalenti a buoni di sconto, più tardi diedero accesso al risarcimento valutario e, infine, furono riconosciute come parte del debito interno dall'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce.
67. La Corte notò inoltre che decretando l'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce nel 1995, lo Stato russo aveva preso su di sé l’ obbligo di stabilire il debito generato dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. Da quel tempo i richiedenti possedevano contro lo Stato russo una rivendicazione che era esistita continuamente sia nella data della ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Russia (5 maggio 1998) che nella data della sottomissione della presente richiesta alla Corte. Benché l’applicazione della disposizione attinente dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce fosse sospesa dal molti anni, non era stata revocata o annullata. Inoltre, nonostante la discrepanza nei motivi invocati dalle corti nazionali che avevano respinto la richiesta dei richiedenti, tutte le decisioni avevano dato credito all'esistenza di un debito generato dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 sotto l'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce ed a carico dello Stato.
68. Insomma, la Corte trovato, che i richiedenti avevano un interesse di proprietà riservato che era stato riconosciuto sia sotto la legge russa ed ammesso dalle corti russe e che era qualificato per la protezione sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Non trova niente nei presenti argomenti del Governo per cambiare la conclusione che, siccome già è stato stabilito nella decisione su ammissibilità, il diritto dei richiedenti ad ottenere il rimborso del debito generato dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 costituisce una “proprietà” all'interno del significato di quella disposizione della Convenzione.
69. In seguito alla decisione sull'ammissibilità della richiesta, il Parlamento russo corresse l'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce rimuovendo il riferimento ai bond Urozhay-90, ed varò anche una legge che disciplinava il buyout di quelle obbligazioni. Questo sviluppo benvenuto ha posto fine alla situazione di incertezza legale che era la materia principale dell’azione di reclamo dei richiedenti . Comunque, la Corte reitera che il problema deve essere visto nella prospettiva di quali “proprietà” i richiedenti avevano in data dell'entrata in vigore del Protocollo e, criticamente, nella data in cui loro presentarono l'azione di reclamo alla Corte (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, § 132). Come notato sopra, in entrambe quelle date il debito generato dalle obbligazioni era stato riconosciuto ma le regolamentazioni per l’implementazione non erano state adottate, rendendo il rimborso delle obbligazioni impossibile.
70. Il fatto che i richiedenti si lamentassero della mancanza di regolamentazione legale del loro diritto distingue la presente causa dalla situazione verificatasi nella causa Grishchenko a cui il Governo ha fatto riferimento sopra, la Sig.ra G. possedeva un tipo diverso di obbligazione di merce, che originalmente aveva certificato il suo diritto ad acquistare una macchina per passeggeri. Lei presentò un reclamo presso la Corte dopo che il Governo aveva definito la procedura per il rimborso di obbligazioni di questo tipo, perché lei era scontentata della decisione del Governo di accordare un somma di soldi presumibilmente insufficiente invece di una vera macchina. La spinta della sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non era perciò la mancanza di regolamentazione del suo diritto ma piuttosto l'adeguatezza del risarcimento, una questione che non è in causa nella presente causa.
71. Avendo riguardo a quanto sopra, la Corte costata che ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, “la proprietà” dei richiedenti comprendeva il diritto ad ottenere una forma di risarcimento, o rimborso, per le obbligazioni Urozhay-90. Mentre questo diritto fu creato in qualche tipo di forma non completa, siccome la sua materializzazione era condizionale alla promulgazione di una legislazione implementare, al tempo attinente la sezione 1 dell’Atto sui bond di Merce chiaramente costituiva una base legale per l'obbligo dello Stato per implementarlo (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, § 133).
2. L'articolo applicabile e la natura della violazione addotta
72. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo della proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti è concesso, inter alia, il controllo dell'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo (vedere Broniowski, § 134; Iatridis, § 55; e Beyeler, § 98 tutti citate sopra).
73. Le parti non presero una posizione chiara sulla questione sotto quale articolo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 la causa avrebbe dovuto essere esaminata. Avendo riguardo alla complessità delle questioni legali e riguardanti i fatti coinvolti, la Corte considera, che la violazione addotta dei diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti non può essere classificata in una categoria precisa. In qualsiasi caso, la situazione menzionata nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo è solamente un particolare caso di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà come garantito dall'articolo generale esposto nella prima frase (vedere Beyeler, citata sopra, § 106). La causa dovrebbe essere esaminata perciò più propriamente alla luce di questo articolo generale (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 135-136).
74. La Corte reitera inoltre che i confini fra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non si presta a definizione precisa. I principi applicabili sono nondimeno simili. Se la causa viene analizzata in termini di un dovere positivo dello Stato o in termini di un'interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica che ha bisogno di essere giustificata, il criterio da applicare non differisce in sostanza. In ambo i contesti bisogna avere riguardo all'equilibrio equo che deve essere previsto fra gli interessi in competizione dell'individuo e della comunità nell'insieme. Sostiene anche vero che gli scopi menzionati in questa disposizione possono essere di qualche attinenza nel valutare se un equilibrio fra le richieste dell'interesse pubblico coinvolte ed il diritto essenziale del richiedente alla proprietà è stato previsto. In ambo i contesti lo Stato gode di un certo margine di valutazione nel determinare i passi da prendere per assicurare l’ottemperanza con la Convenzione (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, § 144, e Hatton ed Altri c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 36022/97, §§ 98 et seq., ECHR 2003-VIII).
75. Nella presente causa la sottomissione dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che lo Stato russo, avendo conferito su loro un diritto per chiedere il rimborso dei bond Urozhay-90, , rese impossibile trarre profitto da questo diritto fallendo per anni nell’ adottare le regolamentazioni di implementazione . Questa situazione può essere esaminata sia in termini di un ostacolo all'esercizio effettivo del diritto protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sia in termini di un insuccesso nel garantire l'attuazione di questo diritto (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, § 146).
76. La Corte determinerà se la condotta dello Stato russo era giustificabile alla luce dei principi della legalità, dell'adempimento di un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico e se prevedeva un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale della comunità ed il diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà (vedere, per una descrizione particolareggiata di quei principi, Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 147-151).
3. Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
(a) Riguardo al principio della legalità
77. La Corte nota che l’applicazione della sezione 1 dell’Atto sui bond di Merce nella parte riguardo alle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 fu sospesa ripetutamente tramite le leggi sul bilancio federale per ogni anno successivo (vedere paragrafo 51 sopra).
78. È soddisfatto perciò che un'interferenza con, o una restrizione su, l'esercizio del diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era “previsto dalla legge” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Esistenza di un scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico
79. Il Governo indicò che la restrizione sull'attuazione del diritto dei possessori delle obbligazione cercò di impedire la spesa eccessiva del bilancio federale. Questa posizione fu riflessa nella decisione della Corte Costituzionale russa che sostenne che la necessità di restringere i diritti di proprietà potesse sorgere “in una situazione in cui le risorse budgetarie [erano] insufficienti per risolvere i molti problemi sociali relativi all'esercizio dei diritti alla vita e alla dignità personale” (vedere paragrafo 54 sopra).
80. La Corte osserva che negli anni novanta lo Stato russo superò una transizione tumultuosa da un’economia controllata dallo Stato ad un'economia di mercato. Il suo benessere economico fu messo in pericolo inoltre dalla crisi finanziaria del 1998 e dalla svalutazione acuta della valuta nazionale. Anche se ha realizzato una relativa prosperità e ricchezza nei recenti anni, la Corte concorda che definendo le priorità budgetarie in termini di spesa a favore di pressanti problemi sociali a danno di rivendicazioni di natura puramente patrimoniale era uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico.
(c) Prevedere un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse generale ed i diritti dei richiedenti
81. La Corte nota all'inizio che, in contrasto con la situazione verificatasi nella causa Broniowski summenzionata e altre cause simili, per esempio Ramadhi ed Altri c. Albania (n. 38222/02, 13 novembre 2007) e Deneş ed Altri c. la Romania (n. 25862/03, 3 marzo 2009), i richiedenti non avevano sofferto di una presa iniziale o perdita di proprietà che lo Stato si era impegnato a compensare. Le obbligazioni di cui i richiedenti erano i possessori furono date ai lavoratori agricoli come un incentivo supplementare per incoraggiarli a vendere la loro produzione allo Stato che pagava a prezzi fissi. Né queste obbligazioni potrebbero essere usate come denaro o un sostituto dei soldi: loro certificarono il diritto del portatore ad acquistare beni ancora ad elevata richiesta ma l'acquirente doveva pagare il pieno prezzo di acquisto in contanti o altrimenti. Queste particolari caratteristiche delle obbligazioni possono essere attinenti per una valutazione del livello di risarcimento che fu proposto infine ai possessori delle obbligazione, poiché la Corte ha già considerato che un importo sostanzialmente ridotto del risarcimento può essere accettabile in una situazione in cui non sorge il diritto compensativo da una qualsiasi presa precedente di proprietà individuale da parte dello Stato rispondente ma è progettato per attenuare gli effetti di una presa o perdita di proprietà non attribuibile allo Stato (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 182 e 186). Comunque, la Corte reitera che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti nella presente causa non riguardavano l'importo del risarcimento recuperabile sotto l'Atto di Buyout passato nel 2009; i loro danni scaturirono dal fatto che, nell'approvare la Legge delle Obbligazioni della Merce, lo Stato russo aveva preso volontariamente su sé un obbligo verso portatori delle obbligazioni che non veniva assolto da molti anni a causa dell'assenza di una struttura legislativa per la sua attuazione.
82. La preminenza del diritto che è posta sotto la Convenzione ed il principio della legalità nell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non solo costringe gli Stati a rispettare ed applicare, in una maniera prevedibile e coerente le leggi che loro hanno decretato, ma anche, come corollario di questo dovere, devono assicurare le condizioni legali e pratiche per la loro attuazione (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 147 e 184). Nel contesto della presente causa, quei principi costrinsero lo Stato russo ad adempiere in dovuto tempo, in una maniera appropriata e coerente le promesse legislative che aveva reso a riguardo delle rivendicazioni generate dalle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. In particolare, spettava alle autorità legiferare sulle condizioni per l’ attuazione del diritto dei portatori dei bond nella prospettiva di soddisfare l’impegno che era stato creato tramite la promulgazione dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce. La Corte non è persuasa dell'osservazione del Governo per cui il riconoscimento delle obbligazioni come parte del debito interno dello Stato era “sbagliato.” Anche se fosse stato così, nessun chiarimento fu offerto riguardo a perché questo errore addotto non era stato identificato prontamente e non era stato corretto tramite un emendamento appropriato dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce. Non poteva essere dovuto ad una mera svista o ad una dimenticanza perché l’applicazione della sezione 1 dell’Atto dei bond di Merce nella parte riguardo alle obbligazioni Urozhay-90 era stata sospesa esplicitamente e ripetutamente per molti anni nelle leggi successive sul bilancio federale.
83. Durante l’intero periodo fra la promulgazione dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce nel 1995 e l'approvazione dell'Atto di Buyout nel 2009, la condotta delle autorità russe sembra essere stata passiva vis-à-vis all'attuazione del diritto dei portatori di obbligazioni che erano state continuamente riconosciute come parte del debito interno dello Stato. Le informazioni disponibili alla Corte non le concedono di trovare che il Governo russo prese qualsiasi misura in quel periodo nella prospettiva di soddisfare le rivendicazioni generate dalle obbligazioni. Nessuna bozza di legislazione che disciplinava gli obblighi dello Stato sotto le obbligazioni era stata proposta o discussa in Parlamento. Il lavoro preparatorio che era essenziale per redigere simile legislazione non era stato eseguito. L'inventario delle obbligazioni che era già stato deciso nella Decisione del Governo del 10 agosto 1992 (vedere paragrafo 45 sopra), non era stato mai completato e, di conseguenza, il numero esatto e l’importo delle obbligazioni insolute non poteva essere conosciuto. La Corte perciò costata che l'argomento del Governo per cui le restrizioni sul rimborso delle obbligazioni erano state necessarie ad impedire la spesa eccessiva del bilancio federale non è proprio persuasivo. Un esercizio di bilanciamento appropriato che avrebbe determino l'importo richiesti per saldare il debito sotto le obbligazioni in relazione alle altre spese prioritarie non poteva essere possibile in assenza di cifre cruciali, come la quantità e la valutazione totale delle obbligazioni rimanenti. Mentre la Corte concorda che la riforma integrale del sistema politico ed economico della Russia, così come lo stato delle finanze del paese, ha potuto giustificare severe limitazioni finanziarie sui diritti di natura puramente patrimoniale, trova che il Governo russo non sia stato in grado di addurre dei motivi che giustificassero in modo soddisfacente, in termini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, l'insuccesso continuo nel corso di molti anni per implementare un diritto conferito ai richiedenti dalla legislazione russa.
84. Riguardo alla condotta dei richiedenti, la Corte reitera che a seguito della promulgazione dell'Atto delle Obbligazioni della Merce loro avevano un'aspettativa legittima di ottenere una forma di risarcimento, o di rimborso, delle obbligazioni Urozhay-90. Loro non rimasero passivi ma piuttosto mostrarono un atteggiamento attivo introducendo azioni individuali e collettive presso le corti nazionali e, a seguito del rifiuto delle loro rivendicazioni in prima istanza, avvalendosi della procedura di ricorso. Il Governo non suggerì che qualsiasi altra via di ricorso nazionale effettiva era disponibile a loro. In queste circostanze, non può essere detto, che i richiedenti fossero responsabili per, o colpevolmente avessero contribuito allo stato degli affari di cui si lamentarono (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, § 181). Piuttosto, come la Corte ha trovato sulla forza delle prove di fronte a sé, l'ostacolo al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era solamente attribuibile allo Stato rispondente.
85. Inoltre, la Corte considera, che le autorità russe, imponendo limitazioni successive sull’applicazione della disposizione legislativa che stabiliva la base per il diritto al rimborso dei richiedenti dei bond Urozhay-90 e fallendo per anni nel legiferare sulla procedura per l’attuazione di questo diritto, ha tenuto i richiedenti in un stato di incertezza che era di per sé incompatibile con l'obbligo derivante sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per garantire il godimento tranquillo di proprietà, in particolare col dovere di agire in dovuto tempo in modo appropriato e coerente dove è in pericolo un problema di interesse generale (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 151 e 185).
86. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
87. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
88. I richiedenti chiesero il risarcimento a riguardo del danno patrimoniale in un importo uguale al valore nominale delle obbligazioni, divise per 1,000 per prendere i conto la ridenominazione del rublo russo e moltiplicato per un coefficiente di 48,222, rappresentante l'aumento dei prezzi al consumo del periodo dal marzo 1991 al marzo 2006. Chiesero inoltre il risarcimento a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, che varava da 5,000 a 10,000 euro (EUR) per ogni richiedente.
89. Il Governo si oppose ad un'assegnazione della soddisfazione equa, sostenendo che i richiedenti non avevano subito alcun danno perché loro avevano comprato le obbligazioni in oggetto da terze parti. Le obbligazioni acquistate non avevano vero valore perché loro avevano certificato originalmente il diritto del portatore a comprare dei beni ad elevata richiesta, mentre al tempo del loro acquisto quegli stessi beni erano già disponibili in tutti i negozi.
90. Riguardo al danno patrimoniale, la Corte nota che, in seguito alla promulgazione dell'Atto di Buyout nel 2009 e alla Decisione del Governo che disciplinava la procedura di buyout (vedere paragrafi 52 e 53 sopra), ora è aperto ai richiedenti richiedere alle autorità nazionali competenti il rimborso delle loro obbligazioni.
91. La Corte considera inoltre che i richiedenti hanno dovuto soffrire dell'ansia e la frustrazione a causa del prolungato insuccesso delle autorità nel concepire la procedura per il rimborso del loro diritto. Comunque, considera gli importi chiesti a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale eccessivi. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 1,800 ad ogni richiedente a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo.
B. Costi e spese
92. I richiedenti chiesero anche 88,599.58 rubli russi (RUB) a riguardo delle spese processuali e postali e di viaggio. Il Governo non fece specifici commenti su questa rivendicazione.
93. Avendo riguardo al materiale in suo possesso, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare congiuntamente EUR 2,000 a tutti i richiedenti, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti su quell'importo.
C. Interesse di mora
94. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
2. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 1,800 (mille ottocento euro) ad ogni richiedente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 2,000 (due mila euro) a tutti i richiedenti congiuntamente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
3. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto l’11 febbraio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente
1. La RSFSR adottò la Dichiarazione sulla Sovranità Statale il 12 giugno 1990.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.