Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF JAFAROV v. AZERBAIJAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 17276/07/2010
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 11/02/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION
CASE OF JAFAROV v. AZERBAIJAN
(Application no. 17276/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
11 February 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Jafarov v. Azerbaijan,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 21 January 2010,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 17276/07) against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Azerbaijani national, Mr J. J. (“the applicant”), on 27 March 2007.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr N. I. and Mr M M., lawyers practising in Baku. The Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. Asgarov.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the failure to enforce the judgment of 21 July 2003 had violated his right to a fair trial and his property rights, as guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 3 September 2008 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1959 and lives in Baku.
6. On 1 December 1998 the applicant was issued with an occupancy voucher (yaşayış orderi) for a flat in a recently constructed residential building in Baku on the basis of an order of the Baku City Executive Authority of 20 November 1998.
7. At the same time, the applicant became aware that the flat had been occupied since 1 January 1998 by M. and his family, who were internally displaced persons (“IDP”) from Shusha, a region under the occupation of the Armenian military forces following the Armenian-Azerbaijan conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh.
8. According to the applicant, despite numerous demands, M. refused to vacate the flat, pointing out that he was an IDP and had no other place to live.
9. On an unspecified date in 2003 the applicant lodged an action with the Yasamal District Court asking the court to order the eviction of M. and his family from the flat.
10. On 21 July 2003 the Yasamal District Court granted the applicant’s claim and ordered that M. and his family be evicted from the flat. The court held that the applicant was the sole lawful tenant of the flat on the basis of the occupancy voucher of 1 December 1998 and therefore that the flat was being unlawfully occupied by M. and his family.
11. No appeals were lodged against this judgment and, pursuant to the domestic law, it became enforceable within one month of its delivery. However, M. and his family refused to comply with the judgment and, despite the applicant’s complaints to various authorities, it was not enforced.
12. On an unspecified date in 2006, the applicant and a group of other persons who were in the same situation lodged an action with the Yasamal District Court complaining that the Yasamal District Department of Judicial Observers and Enforcement Officers (“the Department of Enforcement Officers”) had not taken measures to enforce the judgments.
13. On 27 December 2006 the Yasamal District Court dismissed that complaint as unsubstantiated. The applicant appealed against this judgment. On 2 May 2007 the Court of Appeal quashed the first-instance court’s judgment and delivered a new judgment on the merits in the applicant’s favour. The Court of Appeal held that the Department of Enforcement Officers’ inaction had been unlawful and that the judgment of 21 July 2003 should be enforced.
14. On an unspecified date in 2008 the applicant lodged an action against different authorities, seeking compensation for non-enforcement of the judgment of 21 July 2003. On 19 December 2008 the Yasamal District Court dismissed the applicant’s claim as unsubstantiated. On 3 March 2009 the Baku Court of Appeal and on 3 July 2009 the Supreme Court upheld the first-instance court’s judgment.
15. It appears from the case file that, after the lodging of the present application with the Court, M. lodged a request with the Yasamal District Court asking for postponement of the execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003. He alleged that, as he was an IDP, he had no other place to live but the flat in question.
16. On 2 July 2008 the Yasamal District Court granted M.’s request and ordered the postponement of the execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003 until M. could move to one of the houses recently constructed for temporary settlement of IDPs. The court relied on the Presidential Order of 1 July 2004 on Approval of the State Programme for Improvement of Living Conditions and Increase of Employment of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (“the Presidential Order of 1 July 2004”), according to which the relevant State organs were instructed that until the return of the IDPs to their native lands or until their temporary settlement in new houses, IDPs should not be evicted from public apartments, flats, land and other premises, regardless of ownership, they had settled in between 1992 and 1998. Following a series of appeals by the applicant, on 15 March 2009 the Baku Court of Appeal upheld the first-instance court’s decision. It appears from the case file that on 12 May 2009 the applicant appealed against this decision to the Supreme Court and that the proceedings before the latter court are still pending.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Housing Code of 8 July 1982
17. Azerbaijani citizens are entitled to obtain the right of use of apartments owned by the State or other public bodies under the terms of a tenancy agreement (Articles 10 and 28). A decision to grant an apartment is implemented by way of issuing the citizen with an occupancy voucher (yaşayış sahəsi orderi) from the local executive authority (Article 48). The voucher serves as the sole legal basis for taking possession of the apartment designated therein (Article 48) and for concluding a tenancy agreement (yaşayış sahəsini icarə müqaviləsi) between the tenant and the housing maintenance authority (Article 51). The right of use of apartments is granted for an indefinite term (Article 10).
B. Law on Privatisation of Housing of 26 January 1993
18. Individuals residing, pursuant to a tenancy agreement, in apartments owned by the State and other public bodies have a right to transfer those apartments into their private ownership (Article 1). Such privatisation is voluntary and free of charge (Article 2). The right to privatise a State-owned apartment free of charge may be exercised only once (Article 7).
C. Law on Social Protection of Internally Displaced Persons and Equivalent Individuals of 21 May 1999
19. IDPs are defined as “persons displaced from their places of permanent residence in the territory of the Republic of Azerbaijan to other places within the territory of the country as a result of foreign military aggression, occupation of certain territories or continuous gunfire” (Article 2). The IDPs may be allowed to temporarily settle on their own only if the rights and lawful interests of other persons are not infringed. Otherwise, the relevant executive authority must ensure that the internally displaced persons are resettled in other accommodation (Article 5).
D. Regulations on Settlement of Internally Displaced Persons in Residential, Administrative and Other Buildings Fit for Residence or Feasible to make to Fit for Residence, adopted by the Cabinet of Ministers, Resolution No. 200 of 24 December 1999 (“the IDP Settlement Regulations”)
20. Article 4 of the IDP Settlement Regulations provides as follows:
“In order to prevent the eviction of internally displaced persons from dwellings in which they settled between 1992 and 1994, the legal force of the occupancy vouchers issued by the relevant authorities to individual citizens in respect of those dwellings shall be temporarily suspended...”
E. Regulations on Resettlement of Internally Displaced Persons in Other Accommodation, adopted by the Cabinet of Ministers Resolution No. 200 of 24 December 1999 (“the IDP Resettlement Regulations”)
21. Article 4 of the IDP Resettlement Regulations provides as follows:
“In cases where the temporary settling of internally displaced persons breaches the housing rights of other individuals, the former must be provided with other suitable accommodation”
F. Order of the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan of 1 July 2004 on Approval of the State Programme for Improvement of Living Conditions and Increase of Employment of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons
22. In the order, inter alia, the relevant State organs of the Republic of Azerbaijan are instructed that until the return of the IDPs to their native lands or until their temporary settlement in new houses, IDPs should not be evicted from public apartments, flats, land and other premises, regardless of ownership, they had settled in between 1992 and 1998.
G. Code of Civil Procedure of 1 September 2000 (“the CCP”)
23. A judge examining a civil case may, at the request of a party to the case, decide to postpone or suspend the execution of the judgment or change the manner of its execution because of the parties’ property situation or other circumstances (Article 231).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 AND ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
24. Relying on Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the applicant complained about the non-enforcement of the Yasamal District Court’s judgment of 21 July 2003. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention reads as follows:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 13 of the Convention reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
25. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies. In particular, the Government noted that, by a decision of 2 July 2008 of the Yasamal District Court, the execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003 had been postponed and that an appeal against this postponement was still pending before the domestic courts.
26. The applicant disagreed with the Government and maintained that the remedies suggested by the Government were not appropriate in the circumstances of the present case.
27. The Court reiterates that Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, which sets out the rule on exhaustion of domestic remedies, provides for a distribution of the burden of proof. It is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one available in theory and in practice at the relevant time, that is to say that it was accessible, was one which was capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant’s complaints and offered reasonable prospects of success (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 68, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV, and Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 76, ECHR 1999-V). The Court further emphasises that the domestic remedies must be “effective” in the sense either of preventing the alleged violation or its continuation, or of providing adequate redress for any violation that has already occurred (see Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 158, ECHR 2000-XI).
28. The Court observes that in the instant case the proceedings concerning the postponement of the execution of the judgment were instituted after the present application had been lodged with the Court at the request of M. and the purpose of the institution of these proceedings was not to ensure or to accelerate the execution of the judgment, but on the contrary to deprive it of its binding force for an indefinite period. The Court notes that the Government failed to provide any explanation as to how the proceedings concerning the postponement of the execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003 could have put an end to the continued situation of non-execution or as to the kind of redress which the applicant could have been afforded as a result of these proceedings. In any event, the Court observes that the applicant did not complain about the outcome of the proceedings concerning the postponement of the execution of the judgment in question but rather about the fact that the judgment was not enforced. Even if the domestic courts had ruled in favour of the applicant in the postponement proceedings and decided that the execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003 should not be postponed, such a decision would only have produced the same results, the only outcome being confirmation of the judgment’s enforceability enabling the enforcement officers to proceed with the enforcement proceedings (see, mutatis mutandis, Tarverdiyev v. Azerbaijan, no. 33343/03, § 47, 26 July 2007, and Yavorivskaya v. Russia (dec.), no. 34687/02, 13 May 2004).
29. In view of the above, the Court rejects the Government’s objection concerning the non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. The Court further considers that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention or inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
30. The Government submitted that, due to the large number of IDPs in Azerbaijan as a result of the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh, there was a serious problem with housing for IDPs in Azerbaijan. The Government noted that, despite the fact that the judgment of 21 July 2003 had ordered the eviction of M. from the flat, this judgment could not be enforced because there was no other accommodation available for the IDPs settled in the flat in question. The Government further argued that, due to the postponement of the judgment of 21 July 2003, it was no longer enforceable. Moreover, relying on different provisions of the domestic law (see Relevant Domestic Law above), the Government alleged that IDPs should not be evicted from their temporary places of residence until their return to their native lands or their resettlement in other accommodation. The Government also submitted that the solution of the IDPs’ housing problem was one of the priorities of the Government’s policy and that the relevant measures were being implemented in this respect.
31. The applicant reiterated his complaint.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention
32. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal; in this way it embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect. However, that right would be illusory if a Contracting State’s domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. It would be inconceivable that Article 6 § 1 should describe in detail procedural guarantees afforded to litigants, namely to have proceedings that are fair, public and expeditious, without protecting the implementation of judicial decisions; to construe Article 6 as being concerned exclusively with access to a court and the conduct of proceedings would be likely to lead to situations incompatible with the principle of the rule of law which the Contracting States undertook to respect when they ratified the Convention. Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 (see Hornsby v. Greece, 19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II).
33. The Court notes that a delay in the execution of a judgment may be justified in particular circumstances. But the delay may not be such as to impair the essence of the right protected under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 35, ECHR 2002-III). The Court also reiterates that State responsibility for enforcement of a judgment against a private party extends no further than the involvement of State bodies in the enforcement procedures. When the authorities are obliged to act in order to enforce a judgment and they fail to do so, their failure to take action can engage the State’s responsibility under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Cebotari and Others v. Moldova, nos. 37763/04, 37712/04, 35247/04, 35178/04 and 34350/04, § 39, 27 January 2009).
34. At the outset, the Court observes that the judgment of 21 July 2003 in favour of the applicant remained unenforced for almost six years, thus preventing the applicant from benefiting from the success of the litigation which concerned his property rights. The Court notes that the dispute in the present case was between private parties. However, in so far as the judgment of 21 July 2003 ordered the eviction of the IDPs from the applicant’s flat, the situation at hand necessitated action by the State in order to assist the applicant with the enforcement of the judgment when the IDPs, as a private party, refused to comply with it. In the instant case, it is undisputed by the parties that the judgment of 21 July 2003 had been enforceable under the domestic law at least until the delivery of the decision of 2 July 2008 by the Yasamal District Court concerning the postponement of the enforcement proceedings. It appears from the case file that, despite the fact that the enforcement proceedings had been instituted one month after the delivery of the judgment of 21 July 2003, the Government had taken no action in this connection and had not advanced any justification for non-enforcement of the judgment in question during this period.
35. As for the order on postponement of the execution, the Court notes that it has already examined a similar case, in which the execution of the judgment on eviction was postponed by the court which delivered the judgment (see Akimova v. Azerbaijan, no. 19853/03, §§ 45-50, 27 September 2007). The Court found in that case that the order on the postponement of the judgment’s execution without any lawful basis and justification was in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention; the Court further found that it was not necessary to examine the same complaint under Article 6 in that case. Unlike that case, in the present case the order on the postponement of the execution of the judgment was taken approximately five years after the judgment became final and enforceable. The Court notes that in the instant case the postponement of the execution of the judgment was based on the Presidential Order of 1 July 2004. The Court notes, however, that this Presidential Order did not contain any specific provisions on civil procedure vesting the domestic courts with the competence to postpone indefinitely the execution of judicial eviction orders, which is what happened in the present case. Moreover, the Law of 21 May 1999 provided that if the settlement of the IDPs of their own accord infringed the rights and lawful interests of other persons, the domestic authorities must ensure the resettlement of the IDPs in other accommodation. Accordingly, the relevant presidential order appeared to be contradictory to the legislative act possessing superior force; in such circumstances, a question arises as to the lawfulness of the postponement order based on this Presidential Order. However, from the standpoint of Article 6 of the Convention, the Court is not concerned with the question whether such postponement was “lawful” under the domestic law. The Court reiterates that the rights guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention would be illusory if the Contracting State’s domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party (see § 32 above). Moreover, a formal postponement of execution of a final judgment for an indefinite period of time without compelling reasons is incompatible with the principle of legal certainty.
36. The Court is prepared to accept that, in the instant case, the existence of a large number of IDPs in Azerbaijan created certain difficulties in the execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003. Nevertheless, the judgment remained in force, but for more than six years no adequate measures were taken by the authorities to comply with it. It has not been shown that the authorities had continuously and diligently taken the measures for the enforcement of the judgment in question. In such circumstances the Court considers that no reasonable justification was advanced by the Government for the significant delay in the enforcement of the judgment.
37. The Court considers that by failing to take necessary measures to comply with the final judgment in the instant case, the authorities deprived the provisions of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention of all useful effect (see Burdov, cited above, § 37). There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
38. In view of the above finding, the Court does not consider it necessary to rule on the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention because Article 6 is lex specialis in regard to this part of the application (see, for example, Efendiyeva v. Azerbaijan, no. 31556/03, § 59, 25 October 2007, and Jasiūnienė v. Lithuania, no. 41510/98, § 32, 6 March 2003).
(b) Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
39. The Court reiterates that a “claim” can constitute a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 if it is sufficiently established to be enforceable (see Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301-B).
40. The Court observes that in the instant case the applicant did not own the flat in question, but had only tenancy rights to it pursuant to the occupancy voucher issued by the local executive authority. However, the Court has found that a claim to a flat based on such an occupancy voucher constitutes a “possession” falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Akimova, cited above, §§ 39-41). In the present case, the applicant’s tenancy right to the flat was recognised by the judgment of 21 July 2003. Moreover, the judgment ordered the eviction of the IDPs from the flat, thus granting the applicant an enforceable claim to recover the use of the flat in question.
41. The judgment had become final and enforcement proceedings had been instituted, giving the applicant a right that he would recover the use of the flat. It follows that the impossibility for the applicant to obtain the execution of this judgment for more than six years constituted an interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court has previously dealt with similar issues in the case of Radanovic v. Croatia. For the reasons set out in that judgment, as well as those in paragraph 36 above, the Court finds that no acceptable justification for this interference has been advanced by the Government (see, mutatis mutandis, Radanović v. Croatia, no. 9056/02, §§ 48-50, 21 December 2006).
42. Accordingly, there has also been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
43. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. Pecuniary damage
44. The applicant claimed 68,809 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage. He argued that, owing to the non-enforcement of the judgment, he had to rent another place to live with his family. The amount claimed covered the rent and the alleged current market value of his flat.
45. The Government argued that the applicant could not claim any compensation for the market value of the flat. The Government further noted that they had checked the grounds for the remainder of the claim corresponding to the rental expenses and indicated their willingness to accept the part of the applicant’s claim in respect of the rent up to a maximum of EUR 8,695.
46. As for the part of the claim relating to the market value of the flat, the Court rejects this part as it does not find any causal link between the violation found and this part of the claim.
47. As for the part of the claim relating to the rental expenses, the Court notes that there is a causal link between this part of the claim and the violation found. However, the Court observes that the applicant did not submit any evidence supporting this claim or any basis for calculation of the amount claimed. In particular, he has not submitted any rental contracts or other documents certifying payment of rent. However, taking into account that the Government agreed to compensate the applicant for the pecuniary damage in an amount of EUR 8,695, the Court awards the applicant the sum of EUR 8,695 in respect of pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
2. Non-pecuniary damage
48. The applicant claimed EUR 20,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
49. The Government indicated their willingness to accept the applicant’s claim for non-pecuniary damage up to a maximum of EUR 1,000.
50. The Court considers that the applicant must have sustained some non-pecuniary damage as a result of the lengthy non-enforcement of the final judgment in his favour. However, the amount claimed is excessive. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicant the sum of EUR 4,800 under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount.
51. Moreover, the Court considers that, in so far as the judgment of 21 July 2003 remains in force, the State’s outstanding obligation to enforce it cannot be disputed. Accordingly, the applicant is still entitled to enforcement of that judgment. The Court reiterates that the most appropriate form of redress in respect of a violation of Article 6 is to ensure that the applicant as far as possible is put in the position he would have been in had the requirements of Article 6 not been disregarded (see Piersack v. Belgium (Article 50), 26 October 1984, § 12, Series A no. 85). Having regard to the violation found, the Court finds that this principle also applies in the present case. It therefore considers that the Government shall secure, by appropriate means, the enforcement of the judgment of 21 July 2003.
B. Costs and expenses
52. The applicant also claimed EUR 1,500 for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. This claim was not itemised or supported by any documents.
53. The Government considered the claim to be unjustified.
54. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, having regard to the fact that the applicant failed to produce any supporting documents, the Court dismisses the claim for costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
55. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
5. Holds that the respondent State, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final according to Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, shall secure, by appropriate means, the enforcement of the domestic court’s judgment of 21 July 2003;
6. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months of the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 8,695 (eight thousand six hundred and ninety-five euros) in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 4,800 (four thousand eight hundred euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, to be converted into New Azerbaijani manats at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
7. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 11 February 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the concurring opinion of Judge Malinverni joined by Judge Spielmann is annexed to this judgment.
C.L.R.
S.N.


CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE MALINVERNI, JOINED BY JUDGE SPIELMANN
(Translation)
I voted without hesitation for the finding that there had been a violation of Article 6. I am not convinced, however, that in the present case the authorities’ refusal to enforce the judgment of 21 July 2003 also entailed a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.1
I note first of all that the applicant was issued with an occupancy voucher for a flat in a recently constructed residential building on 1 December 1998. It transpired, however, that the flat had been occupied since 1 January 1998 – for eleven months – by a family whose members were internally displaced persons (“IDPs” – see paragraphs 6 and 7). This situation inevitably gives rise to a question which was in fact the root cause of the dispute: how could the competent authorities allocate a flat to the applicant when they knew – or at least should have known – that the flat was already occupied by an internally displaced family? Should they not have made sure beforehand that the flat was unoccupied?
I further observe that, in the present case, the applicant did not own the flat in question, but had only tenancy rights to it pursuant to the occupancy voucher (see paragraph 40). Notwithstanding the finding that a claim to a flat based on such an occupancy voucher constituted a “possession” falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the applicant was not actually the owner (idem).
It is correct to say, as the Court found, that the impossibility for the applicant to obtain the execution of the judgment in his favour for more than six years constituted an interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 41).
However, I have greater difficulty agreeing with my colleagues when they state that, for the reasons set out in paragraph 36, the Court finds that no acceptable justification for this interference has been advanced by the Government (see paragraph 41, last sentence).
In other words, the reasons that led to a finding of a violation of Article 6 are said to be equally valid for a finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Is this reasoning correct? I personally do not find it convincing.
Whilst Article 6 does not give rise to a balancing of interests, such an exercise is required by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In the present case, the two interests at stake were, on the one hand, the applicant’s interest, protected as it was by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, in occupying the flat allocated to him, and on the other, the right of M. and his family to their home, as protected by Article 8, which covered the right not to be evicted.
Faced with these conflicting rights, which one should prevail? I am not persuaded that it should necessarily be the right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In its judgment of 21 July 2003 the Yasamal District Court does not seem to have carried out this balancing of interests (see paragraph 10). However, in its decision of 2 July 2008 that same court seems to have taken into account the right of M. and his family not to be evicted, because it granted M.’s request and ordered a stay of execution of the judgment of 21 July 2003 until M. could move into one of the houses recently constructed for temporary settlement of IDPs (paragraph 16).
I regret, for my part, that the judgment did not balance the two competing interests before concluding that there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Instead of confining itself to finding that this Article had been breached, the Court should have taken into consideration the internally displaced family’s right to their home, and should have ensured that the family could be rehoused elsewhere.
1 The same question arose in a case that was decided very recently, unanimously, by Section I (Mirzayev v Azerbaijan, no. 50187/06, 3 December 2009), but I had overlooked the issue that is the object of this separate opinion. For that reason, and to avoid contradicting myself, I have chosen to draft a concurring rather than a dissenting opinion.

TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA JAFAROV C. AZERBAIJAN
(Richiesta n. 17276/07)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
11 febbraio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Jafarov c. Azerbaijan,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 21 gennaio 2010,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 17276/07) contro la Repubblica dell’ Azerbaijan depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino dell’ Azerbaijani, il Sig. J. J.(“il richiedente”), 27 marzo 2007.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. N. I. e dal Sig. M M., avvocati che praticano a Baku. Il Governo dell’ Azerbaijani (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Ç. Asgarov.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che l'insuccesso nell’esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 aveva violato il suo diritto ad un processo equo ed i suoi diritti di proprietà, come garantiti dall’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
4. Il 3 settembre 2008 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1959 e vive a Baku.
6. Il 1 dicembre 1998 al richiedente fu emessa una ricevuta di occupazione (yaşayış orderi) per un appartamento in un edificio residenziale recentemente costruito a Baku sulla base di un ordine dell’Autorità Esecutiva della Città di Baku del 20 novembre 1998.
7. Allo stesso tempo, il richiedente divenne consapevole che l'appartamento era occupato dal 1 gennaio 1998 da M. e dalla sua famiglia che erano internamente deportati (“IDP”) da Shusha, una regione sotto l'occupazione delle forze militari Armene in seguito al conflitto Armeno -Azerbaijan su Nagorno-Karabakh.
8. Secondo il richiedente, nonostante le numerose richieste M. rifiutò di sgombrare l'appartamento, indicando che lui era un IDP e non aveva nessun altro posto dove vivere.
9. In una data non specificata nel 2003 il richiedente depositò un'azione presso la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal chiedendo alla corte di ordinare lo sfratto di M. e della sua famiglia dall'appartamento.
10. Il 21 luglio 2003 la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal accolse il ricorso del richiedente ed ordinò che M. e la sua famiglia venissero sfrattati dall'appartamento. La corte sostenne che il richiedente era il solo inquilino legale dell'appartamento sulla base della ricevuta dell’ occupazione del 1 dicembre 1998 e perciò che l'appartamento era occupato illegalmente da M. e dalla sua famiglia.
11. Nessuno ricorso fu depositato contro questa sentenza e, facendo seguito al diritto nazionale, divenne esecutiva entro un mese della sua consegna. Comunque, M. e la sua famiglia si rifiutarono di attenersi con la sentenza e, nonostante le azioni di reclamo del richiedente presso varie autorità, non fu eseguito.
12. In una data non specificata nel 2006, il richiedente ed un gruppo di altre persone che erano nella stessa situazione un'azione depositò presso la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal lamentandosi che il Dipartimento degli Osservatori Giudiziali e degli Ufficiali di Esecuzione del Distretto Yasamal (“il Dipartimento degli Ufficiali d’ Esecuzione”) non aveva preso delle misure per eseguire le sentenze.
13. Il 27 dicembre 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal respinse questa azione di reclamo come non comprovata. Il richiedente fece appello contro questa sentenza. Il 2 maggio 2007 la Corte d'appello annullò la sentenza della corte di prima - istanza e consegnò una nuova sentenza sui meriti a favore del richiedente. La Corte d'appello sostenne che l'inazione del Dipartimento degli Ufficiali d’ Esecuzione era stata illegale e che la sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 avrebbe dovuto essere eseguita.
14. In una data non specificata nel 2008 il richiedente depositò un'azione contro diverse autorità, chiedendo il risarcimento per la non-esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003. Il 19 dicembre 2008 la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente come non comprovata. Il 3 marzo 2009 la Corte d'appello di Baku e il 3 luglio 2009 la Corte Suprema sostenne la sentenza della corte di prima - istanza.
15. Sembra dall'archivio della causa che, dopo il deposito della presente richiesta presso la Corte, M. depositò una richiesta presso la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal chiedendo una proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003. Lui addusse che, siccome lui era un IDP, lui non aveva nessun altro posto dove vivere se non l'appartamento in oggetto.
16. Il 2 luglio 2008 la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal accolse la richiesta di M ed ordinò la proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 finché M. potesse traslocare ad uno degli alloggi costruito recentemente per sistemazione provvisoria degli IDP. La corte si appellò all'Ordine Presidenziale del 1 luglio 2004 sull’ Approvazione del Programma Statale per Miglioramento delle Condizioni di vita ed Aumento del Lavoro dei Rifugiati e dei Deportati Internamente (“Ordine Presidenziale del 1 luglio 2004”) secondo cui furono istruiti gli organi Statali attinenti che sino al ritorno degli IDP alle loro terre natie o sino alla loro sistemazione provvisoria in nuovi alloggi, gli IDP non avrebbero dovuto essere sfrattati dagli appartamenti pubblici, appartamenti, terreni ed altri locali, a prescindere dalla proprietà in cui si erano stabiliti tra il 1992 e il 1998. A seguito di una serie di ricorsi da parte del richiedente, il 15 marzo 2009 la Corte d'appello di Baku sostenne la decisione della corte di prima -istanza. Sembra dall'archivio di causa che nel 12 maggio 2009 il richiedente fece appello contro questa decisione presso la Corte Suprema e che i procedimenti di fronte a quest’ultima corte sono ancora pendenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Codice sull’Alloggio dell’ 8 luglio 1982
17. Ai cittadini dell’ Azerbaijani viene concessi di ottenere il diritto di uso di appartamenti posseduti dagli organi pubblici Statali o da altri sotto i termini di un accordo di affitto (Articoli 10 e 28). Una decisione di accordare un appartamento viene implementata emettendo al cittadino una ricevuta di occupazione (yaşayış sahəsi orderi) da parte dell’autorità esecutiva locale (Articolo 48). La ricevuta serve come sola base legale per prendere possesso dell'appartamento designato in questa (Articolo 48) e per concludere un accordo di affitto (yaşayış sahsini əicar müqavilsi) fra l'inquilino e l'autorità di mantenimento dell’ alloggio (Articolo 51). Il diritto all’ uso degli appartamenti viene accordato per un termine indefinito (Articolo 10).
B. Legge sulla Privatizzazione degli Alloggi del 26 gennaio 1993
18. Gli individui che risiedono , facendo seguito ad un accordo di affitto, in appartamenti posseduti dagli organi pubblici Statali ed altri hanno un diritto al trasferimento di quegli appartamenti nella loro proprietà privata (Articolo 1). Simile privatizzazione è volontaria ed esente da spese (Articolo 2). Il diritto a privatizzare un appartamento Statale esente da spese può essere esercitato solamente una volta (Articolo 7).
C. Legge sulla Protezione Sociale dei Deportati Internamente ed Individui Equivalenti del 21 maggio 1999
19. Gli IDP sono definiti come “persone deportate dai loro luoghi di residenza permanente nel territorio della Repubblica dell’ Azerbaijan ad altri posti all'interno del territorio del paese come un risultato di un’aggressione militare straniera, occupazione di certi territori o fuoco continuo” (Articolo 2). Agli IDP può essere permesso di stabilirsi temporaneamente da soli solamente se i diritti e gli interessi legali di altre persone non vengono infranti. Altrimenti, l'autorità esecutiva attinente deve assicurare che i deportati internamente vengono ristabiliti in un altro alloggio (Articolo 5).
D. Regolamentazioni sulla sistemazioni dei Deportati Internamente in Edifici Residenziali, Amministrativi ed Altri Adatti alla Residenza o Fattibili di essere resi atti per la Residenza, adottate dak Gabinetto dei Ministri , Decisione N.ro 200 del 24 dicembre 1999 (“Regolamentazioni sulla Sistemazione degli IDP”)
20. L’Articolo 4 delle Regolamentazioni sulla Sistemazione degli IDP prevede ciò che segue:
“Per impedire lo sfratto di deportati internamente da abitazioni in cui si sono stabiliti fra il 1992 ed il 1994 il potere legale delle ricevute di occupazione emesse dalle autorità attinenti a cittadini individuali a riguardo di quelle abitazioni sarà temporaneamente sospeso...”
E. Regolamentazioni sulla Risistemazione dei Deportati Internamene in Altri Alloggi, adottate dal Gabinetto dei Ministri, Decisione N.ro 200 del 24 dicembre 1999 (“Le Regolamentazioni sulla Risistemazione degli IDP”)
21. L’Articolo 4 delle Regolamentazioni sulla Risistemazione degli IDP prevede ciò che segue:
“In casi in cui la sistemazione provvisoria di deportati internamente violi i diritti di alloggio di altri individui, ai primi deve essere offerto un altro alloggio appropriato”
F. Ordine del Presidente della Repubblica dell’ Azerbaijan del 1 luglio 2004 sull’ Approvazione del Programma Statale per ilMiglioramento delle Condizioni di Vita e l’ Aumento del Lavoro dei Rifugiati Internamente Deportati
22. Nell'ordine, inter alia, vengono istruiti gli organi Statali attinenti della Repubblica di Azerbaijan affinché sino al ritorno degli IDP alle loro terre natie o sino alla loro sistemazione provvisoria in nuovi alloggi, gli IDP non dovrebbero essere sfrattati da appartamenti pubblici, appartamenti, terreni e altri locali, a prescindere dalla proprietà, se vi fossero stati stabilititi tra il 1992 e il 1998.
G. Codice di Procedura Civile del 1 settembre 2000 (“CCP”)
23. Un giudice che esamina un giudizio civile può, su richiesta di una parte alla causa, decidere di posticipare o sospendere l'esecuzione della sentenza o cambiare il metodo della sua esecuzione a causa delle situazione della proprietà delle parti o di altre circostanze (Articolo 231).
LA LEGGE
IO. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 E DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
24. Appellandosi agli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione e all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, il richiedente si lamentò della non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Yasamal del 21 luglio 2003. L’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione recita come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
L’Articolo 13 della Convenzione recita come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
25. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali. In particolare, il Governo notò che, con una decisione del 2 luglio 2008 della Corte distrettuale di Yasamal, l'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 era stata posticipata, e che un ricorso contro questa proroga era ancora pendente di fronte alle corti nazionali.
26. Il richiedente non fu d'accordo col Governo e sostenne che le vie di ricorso suggerite dal Governo non erano appropriate nelle circostanze della causa presente.
27. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione che stabilisce la norma sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali prevede una distribuzione dell'onere delle prove. Incombe sullo Stato rivendicare il non-esaurimento per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso era effettiva e disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente vale a dire che era accessibile, capace di offrire compensazione a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e di offrire prospettive ragionevoli di successo (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. Turchia, 16 settembre 1996 § 68, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV e Selmouni c. Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 76 il 1999-V dell’ ECHR). La Corte enfatizza inoltre che le vie di ricorso nazionali devono essere “effettive” sia nel senso che devono prevenire la violazione addotta o la sua continuazione, che di offrire compensazione adeguata per qualsiasi violazione che già è accaduta (vedere Kudła c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 158 ECHR 2000-XI).
28. La Corte osserva che nella presente causa i procedimenti riguardo alla proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza furono avviati dopo che la presente richiesta era stata depositata presso la Corte su richiesta di M. ed il fine dell'istituzione di questi procedimenti non era di assicurare o accelerare l'esecuzione della sentenza, ma al contrario di spogliarla del suo potere vincolante per un periodo indefinito. La Corte nota che il Governo andò a vuoto nel fornire qualsiasi chiarimento riguardo a come i procedimenti riguardo alla proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 avrebbero potuto porre fine alla situazione continuata di non-esecuzione o riguardo a qualche genere di compensazione che avrebbe potuto essere riconosciuto al richiedente come risultato di questi procedimenti. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte osserva che il richiedente non si lamentò del risultato dei procedimenti riguardo alla proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza in oggetto ma piuttosto del fatto che la sentenza non fu eseguita. Anche se le corti nazionali avevano deciso a favore del richiedente nei procedimenti di proroga ed avevano deciso che l'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 non avrebbe dovuto essere posticipata, tale decisione avrebbe prodotto solamente gli stessi risultati, essendo il solo risultato la conferma dell'esecutorietà della sentenza che abilita gli ufficiali di esecuzione a procedere coi procedimenti di esecuzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Tarverdiyev c. Azerbaijan, n. 33343/03, § 47, 26 luglio 2007, e Yavorivskaya c. Russia (dec.), n. 34687/02, 13 maggio 2004).
29. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte respinge l'eccezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. La Corte considera inoltre che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione o inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
30. Il Governo presentò che, a causa del grande numero di IDP nell’ Azerbaijan come risultato del conflitto Armeno- Azerbaijani su Nagorno-Karabakh, c'era un problema serio con gli alloggio per gli IDP nell’ Azerbaijan. Il Governo notò che, nonostante il fatto che la sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 avesse ordinato lo sfratto di M. dall'appartamento, questa sentenza non poteva essere eseguita perché non c'era altro alloggio disponibile per gli IDP stabilitisi nell'appartamento in oggetto. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che, a causa della proroga della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003, non era più esecutivo. Inoltre, appellandosi a diverse disposizioni del diritto nazionale (vedere Diritto nazionale Attinente sopra), il Governo addusse che gli IDP non avrebbero dovuto essere sfrattati dalle loro residenze provvisorie sino al loro ritorno alle loro terre natie o la loro risistemazione in altri alloggi. Il Governo presentò anche che la soluzione del problema degli alloggi degli IDP era una delle priorità della politica del Governo e che venivano implementate delle misure attinenti a questo riguardo.
31. Il richiedente reiterò la sua azione di reclamo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione
32. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto di introdurre qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi di fronte ad una corte o ad un tribunale; così questo incarna il “diritto ad una corte” di cui il diritto di accesso è il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte a corti in questioni civili costituisce un aspetto. Comunque, questo diritto sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di un Stato Contraente concedesse ad una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante di rimanere non operante a danno di una parte. Sarebbe inconcepibile che l’Articolo 6 § 1 descrivesse in dettaglio garanzie procedurali riconosciute a contendenti, vale a dire avere procedimenti che sono equi, pubblici e veloci senza proteggere l'attuazione delle decisioni giudiziali; costruire l’Articolo 6 preoccupandosi esclusivamente dell’ accesso ad una corte e della condotta dei procedimenti probabilmente condurrebbe a situazioni incompatibili col principio della preminenza del diritto che gli Stati Contraenti si impegnarono a rispettare quando ratificarono la Convenzione. L’esecuzione di una sentenza resa da qualsiasi corte deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, 19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II).
33. La Corte nota che un ritardo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza può essere giustificato in particolari circostanze. Ma il ritardo non può danneggiare l'essenza del diritto protetto sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 35 ECHR 2002-III). La Corte reitera anche che la responsabilità Statale per l’esecuzione di una sentenza contro una parte privata non si estende oltre nessun ulteriore coinvolgimento dei corpi Statali nelle procedure di esecuzione. Quando le autorità sono obbligate ad agire per eseguire una sentenza e loro non riescono a fare così, il loro insuccesso nell’agire può impegnare la responsabilità dello Stato sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Cebotari ed Altri c. Moldavia, N. 37763/04, 37712/04, 35247/04 35178/04 e 34350/04, § 39 del 27 gennaio 2009).
34. All'inizio, la Corte osserva, che la sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 a favore del richiedente rimase non eseguita per pressoché sei anni, impedendo così al richiedente del trarre beneficio dal successo della causa che riguardava i suoi diritti di proprietà. La Corte nota che la controversia nella presente causa era fra parti private. Comunque, nella misura in cui la sentenza di 21 luglio 2003 ordinò lo sfratto degli IDP dall'appartamento del richiedente, la situazione in oggetto rese necessaria l’azione da parte dello Stato per assistere il richiedente nell'esecuzione della sentenza quando gli IDP, come parte privata si rifiutarono di attenersi a questa. Nella presente causa, è incontrastato dalle parti che la sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 era stata esecutiva sotto il diritto nazionale almeno sino alla consegna della decisione del 2 luglio 2008 da parte della Corte distrettuale di Yasamal riguardo alla proroga dei procedimenti di esecuzione. Sembra dall'archivio di causa che, nonostante il fatto che i procedimenti di esecuzione fossero stati avviati un mese dopo la consegna della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003, il Governo non aveva preso alcuna azione in questo collegamento e non aveva avanzato qualsiasi giustificazione per non-esecuzione della sentenza in oggetto durante questo periodo.
35. Riguardo all’ordine sulla proroga dell'esecuzione, la Corte nota, che ha già esaminato una causa simile nella quale l'esecuzione della sentenza di sfratto fu posticipata dalla corte che consegnò la sentenza (vedere Akimova c. Azerbaijan, n. 19853/03, §§ 45-50 del 27 settembre 2007). La Corte trovò in questa causa che l'ordine sulla proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza senza qualsiasi base legale e giustificazione era in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione; la Corte trovò inoltre che non era necessario esaminare la stessa azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 in quella causa. Diversamente da quella causa, nella presente causa l'ordine sulla proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza fu preso approssimativamente cinque anni dopo che la sentenza divenne definitiva ed esecutiva. La Corte nota che nella presente causa la proroga dell'esecuzione della sentenza fu basata sull'Ordine Presidenziale del 1 luglio 2004. Comunque, la Corte nota che questo Ordine Presidenziale non conteneva nessuna specifica disposizione sulla procedura civile che investiva le corti nazionali della competenza per posticipare indefinitamente l'esecuzione degli ordini di sfratto giudiziali che è ciò che accadde nella presente causa. Inoltre, la Legge del 21 maggio 1999 prevedeva che se la sistemazione degli IDP di loro proprio accordo avesse infranto i diritti e gli interessi legali di altre persone, le autorità nazionali avrebbero dovuto assicurare la risistemazione degli IDP in altri alloggi. Di conseguenza, l'ordine presidenziale attinente sembrò essere contraddittorio all'atto legislativo che possedeva forza superiore; in simile circostanze, una questione sorge riguardo alla legalità dell'ordine di proroga basato su questo Ordine Presidenziale. Dal posto d'osservazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, la Corte non è comunque coinvolta, nella questione se simile proroga era “legale” sotto il diritto nazionale. La Corte reitera che i diritti garantiti dall’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione sarebbero illusori se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale dello Stato Contraente concedesse ad una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante di rimanere non operante a danno di una parte (vedere § 32 sopra). Inoltre, una proroga formale di esecuzione di una sentenza definitiva per un periodo indefinito di tempo senza ragioni irresistibili è incompatibile col principio della certezza legale.
36. La Corte è pronta ad accettare che, nella presente causa, l'esistenza di un gran numero di IDP in Azerbaijan creò certe difficoltà nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003. Ciononostante, la sentenza rimase in vigore, ma per più di sei anni nessuna misura adeguata fu presa dalle autorità per attenersi a questa. Non è stato mostrato che le autorità avessero preso delle misure per l'esecuzione della sentenza in oggetto continuamente e diligentemente. In simili circostanze la Corte considera che nessuna giustificazione ragionevole fu proposta dal Governo per il ritardo significativo nell'esecuzione della sentenza.
37. La Corte considera che non riuscendo a prendere delle misure necessarie per attenersi con la sentenza definitiva nella presente causa, le autorità spogliarono le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione di ogni effetto utile (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, § 37). C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
38. Nella prospettiva della costatazione sopra, la Corte non considera necessario decidere sull'azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione perché l’Articolo 6 è lex specialis in riguardo a questa parte della richiesta (vedere, per esempio, Efendiyeva c. Azerbaijan, n. 31556/03, § 59, 25 ottobre 2007, e Jasiūnienė c. Lituania, n. 41510/98, § 32 del 6 marzo 2003).
(b) Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
39. La Corte reitera che una “rivendicazione” può costituire una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 se è sufficientemente stabilitao per essere esecutiva (vedere Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 Serie A n. 301-B).
40. La Corte osserva che nella presente causa il richiedente non possedeva l'appartamento in oggetto, ma aveva solamente dei diritti di affitto nei suoi confronti facendo seguito alla ricevuta di occupazione emessa dall'autorità esecutiva locale. Comunque, la Corte ha trovato che una rivendicazione su un appartamento basata su tale ricevuta di occupazione costituisce una “proprietà” che rientra all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Akimova, citata sopra, §§ 39-41). Nella presente causa, il diritto di affitto del richiedente sull'appartamento fu riconosciuto dalla sentenza del 21 luglio 2003. Inoltre, la sentenza ordinò lo sfratto degli IDP dall'appartamento, accordando così al richiedente una rivendicazione esecutiva per recuperare l'uso dell'appartamento in oggetto.
41. La sentenza era divenuta definitiva e i procedimenti di esecuzione erano stati avviati, dando al richiedente il diritto di recuperare l'uso dell'appartamento. Ne segue che l'impossibilità per il richiedente di ottenere l'esecuzione di questa sentenza per più di sei anni costituì un'interferenza con il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, come esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte ha trattato già con problemi simili nella causa Radanovic c. Croatia. Per le ragioni esposte in questa sentenza, così come quelle nel paragrafo 36 sopra, la Corte costata che nessuna giustificazione accettabile per questa interferenza è stata avanzata dal Governo (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Radanović c. Croatia, n. 9056/02, §§ 48-50 21 dicembre 2006).
42. C'è stata di conseguenza anche una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
43. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
1. Danno patrimoniale
44. Il richiedente chiese 68,809 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale. Lui dibatté che, a causa della non-esecuzione della sentenza, aveva dovuto affittare un altro posto per vivere con la sua famiglia. L'importo chiesto copriva l'affitto ed il valore di mercato corrente addotto del suo appartamento.
45. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non poteva chiedere qualsiasi risarcimento per il valore di mercato dell'appartamento. Il Governo notò inoltre che aveva controllato le basi per il resto della rivendicazione corrispondenti alle spese di affitto ed avevano indicato la loro buona volontà di accettare la parte della rivendicazione del richiedente a riguardo dell'affitto fino ad un massimo di EUR 8,695.
46. Riguardo alla parte della rivendicazione relativa al valore di mercato dell'appartamento, la Corte respinge questa parte siccome non trova qualsiasi collegamento causale fra la violazione trovata e questa parte della rivendicazione.
47. Riguardo alla parte della rivendicazione relativo alle spese di affitto, la Corte nota, che c'è un collegamento causale fra questa parte della rivendicazione e la violazione trovata. Comunque, la Corte osserva che il richiedente non presentò qualsiasi prova a sostegno di questa rivendicazione o qualsiasi base per il calcolo dell'importo chiesto. In particolare, lui non ha presentato qualsiasi contratto di affitto o altro documento che certificassero il pagamento di affitto. Comunque, prendendo in considerazione che il Governo è d'accordo a compensare il richiedente per il danno patrimoniale in un importo di EUR 8,695, la Corte assegna la somma di EUR 8,695 al richiedente a riguardo del danno patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile.
2. Danno non-patrimoniale
48. Il richiedente chiese EUR 20,000 a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale.
49. Il Governo indicò la sua buona volontà ad accettare la rivendicazione del richiedente per danno non-patrimoniale fino ad un massimo di EUR 1,000.
50. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha dovuto subire un danno non-patrimoniale come risultato della lungo non-esecuzione della sentenza definitiva a suo favore. Comunque, l'importo chiesto è eccessivo. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna la somma di EUR 4,800 al richiedente sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo.
51. Inoltre, la Corte considera che, nella misura in cui la sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 resta in vigore, l'obbligo insoluto dello Stato di eseguirla non può essere contestato. Il richiedente ha ancora di conseguenza diritto, all’esecuzione di quella sentenza. La Corte reitera che la forma più appropriata di compensazione a riguardo di una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 è assicurare che il richiedente venga posto il più possibile nella posizione in cui sarebbe stato se requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 non fossero stati trascurati (vedere Piersack c. Belgio (Articolo 50), 26 ottobre 1984, § 12 Serie A n. 85). Avendo riguardo alla violazione trovata, la Corte costata che questo principio si applica anche nella presente causa. Considera perciò che il Governo garantirà, con appropriati mezzi, l'esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003.
B. Costi e spese
52. Il richiedente chiese anche EUR 1,500 per i costi e le spese incorsi in di fronte alla Corte. Questa rivendicazione non fu particolareggiata o sostenuta da qualsiasi documento.
53. Il Governo considerò che la rivendicazione fosse ingiustificata.
54. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se viene dimostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati incorsi e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, avendo riguardo al fatto che il richiedente non riuscì a produrre nessun documento a sostegno , la Corte respinge la rivendicazione per costi e spese.
C. Interesse di mora
55. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunto tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva secondo l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione garantirà, tramite mezzi appropriati, l'esecuzione della sentenza della corte nazionale del 21 luglio 2003;
6. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 8,695 (otto mila seicento e novanta-cinque euro) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale ed EUR 4,800 (quattro mila ottocento euro) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, da convertire in Nuovi manat dell’ Azerbaijani al tasso applicabile in data dell’accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
7. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l’11 febbraio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione concordante del Giudice Malinverni insieme al Giudice Spielmann è annessa a questa sentenza.
C.L.R.
S.N.
OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE MALINVERNI, INSIEME AL GIUDICE SPIELMANN
(traduzione)
Votai senza esitazione per la costatazione che c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6. Comunque, io non sono convinto che nella presente causa il rifiuto delle autorità di eseguire anche la sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 abbia comportato una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.1
Noto prima di tutto che al richiedente è stata emessa una ricevuta di occupazione per un appartamento in un edificio residenziale recentemente costruito il 1 dicembre 1998. Comunque, pare che l'appartamento fosse occupato dal 1 gennaio 1998-da undici mesi -da una famiglia i cui membri erano internamente deportati (“IDP”-vedere paragrafi 6 e 7). Questa situazione genera inevitabilmente una questione che era infatti la causa della radice della controversia: come si avrebbero potuto assegnare un appartamento al richiedente le autorità competenti pur sapendo -o almeno avrebbe dovuto sapere-che l'appartamento era già occupato da una famiglia internamente deportata? Non avrebbero dovuto assicurarsi in anticipo che l'appartamento non era occupato?
Osservo inoltre che, nella presente causa, il richiedente non possedeva l'appartamento in oggetto, ma aveva solamente dei diritti di affitto su questo facendo seguito alla ricevuta di occupazione (vedere paragrafo 40). Nonostante la costatazione che una rivendicazione su un appartamento sulla base di ricevuta di occupazione costituiva una “proprietà” rientrando all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, il richiedente non ne era davvero il proprietario (idem).
Ha ragione, come trovò la Corte, che l'impossibilità per il richiedente di ottenere l'esecuzione della sentenza a suo favore per più di sei anni costituì un'interferenza con il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà, come esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 41).
Comunque, ho una difficoltà più grande a concordare coi miei colleghi quando loro affermano che, per le ragioni esposte nel paragrafo 36, la Corte costata che nessuna giustificazione accettabile per questa interferenza è stata avanzata dal Governo (vedere paragrafo 41, ultima frase).
Si dice, in altre parole, che le ragioni che hanno condotto ad una costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 siano ugualmente valide per una costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Questo ragionamento funziona? Io non lo trovo personalmente convincente.
Mentre l’Articolo 6 non genera un bilanciamento di interessi, tale esercizio viene richiesto dall’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Nella presente causa, i due interessi in pericolo erano, da una parte, l'interesse del richiedente, protetto come’era dall’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, di occupare l'appartamento assegnato a lui e dall’altra, il diritto di M. e della sua famiglia alla loro casa, come protetto dall’ Articolo 8 che copre il diritto ad non essere sfrattato.
Di fronte a questi diritti contraddittori, quale dovrebbe prevalere? Non sono persuaso che necessariamente dovrebbe essere il diritto sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Nella sua sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 la Corte distrettuale di Yasamal non sembra avere eseguito questo bilanciamento di interessi (vedere paragrafo 10). Comunque, nella sua decisione del 2 luglio 2008 la stessa corte sembra avere preso in considerazione il diritto di M. e della sua famiglia ad non essere sfrattati, perché accolse la richiesta di M. ed ordinò una sospensione dell’ esecuzione della sentenza del 21 luglio 2003 affinché M. potesse traslocare ad uno degli alloggi recentemente costruiti come sistemazione provvisoria degli IDP (paragrafo 16).
Mi rammarico, da parte mia, che la sentenza non bilanciò i due interessi in competizione prima di concludere che c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Invece di limitarsi a trovare che questo Articolo era stato violato, la Corte avrebbe dovuto prendere in esame il diritto della famiglia internamente deportata alla loro casa, ed avrebbe dovuto assicurare che la famiglia potesse essere rialloggiata altrove.
1 la stessa questione sorse in una causa che è stata decisa molto recentemente, all’unanimità dalla Sezione I (Mirzayev v Azerbaijan, n. 50187/06, 3 dicembre 2009), ma avevo trascurato il problema che è l'oggetto di questa opinione separata. Per questa ragione, ed evitare contraddizioni , ho scelto di redigere un’opinione concordante piuttosto che un'opinione dissidente.



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.