Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KAYRIAKOVI v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 30945/04/2010
STATO:
DATA: 07/01/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF KAYRIAKOVI v. BULGARIA
(Application no. 30945/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
7 January 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Kayriakovi v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Mark Villiger,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, judges,
Pavlina Panova, ad hoc judge,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 December 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 30945/04) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three Bulgarian nationals, Mr I. K. K., Mrs M. K. K. and Mrs E. I. K. (“the applicants”). The first and second applicants lodged an application on 16 August 2004. On 15 December 2007 the third applicant expressed her wish to join the application.
2. The applicants were represented by Mrs S. M.-V. and Mr Y. D., lawyers practising in Sofia. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs M. Dimova, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that in having been ordered to pay damages to their apartment’s former owners the first and second applicants had been deprived of their property in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 19 May 2008 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
5. Judge Kalaydjieva, the judge elected in respect of Bulgaria, withdrew from sitting in the case. On 30 January 2009 the Government appointed in her stead Mrs Pavlina Panova as an ad hoc judge (Article 27 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 29 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1944, 1946 and 1973 respectively and live in Sofia.
7. The first and the second applicants are husband and wife and the third applicant is their daughter.
8. In 1974 the first and the second applicants bought from the Sofia municipality an apartment of 95 square metres, which had become State property by virtue of the nationalisations carried out by the communist regime in Bulgaria in 1947 and the following years.
9. In the beginning of 1993 the heirs of the former pre-nationalisation owner of the property brought proceedings against the first and the second applicants under section 7 of the Restitution Law.
10. The proceedings ended by a final judgment of the Supreme Court of Cassation of 8 January 2001. The courts restored the former owners’ title, finding that the first and the second applicants’ title had been null and void ab initio on three grounds: 1) the sale contract had not been signed by the mayor, as required by law, but by another official of the municipality. Although the mayor had been authorised to delegate the power to sign contracts, he had not made a valid delegation in the case at hand; 2) the initial decision to sell the property had not been signed by the mayor of the region, as required by law, but by another official; and 3) the disputed apartment had been a part of a bigger apartment, which had on an unspecified date before 1974 been divided into two smaller ones; this division had not been carried out in accordance with the respective construction rules.
11. The first and the second applicants could apply, within two months following the judgment of the Supreme Court of Cassation of 8 January 2001, for compensation bonds from the State. Those bonds could be used in privatisation tenders or sold to brokers. The first and second applicants did not avail themselves of this opportunity.
12. By 2001 the three applicants were living in the apartment. In May 2001 they vacated the property.
13. In June 2001 the heirs of the former owner brought an action for damages against them for having used the apartment unlawfully, as they had not been its owners. The claim concerned the period from 1996 to 2001 as for the preceding years it was barred by the general five-year statutory limitation.
14. In a judgment of 31 May 2004 the Sofia District Court allowed the claim accepting that as the first and second applicants’ title had never been valid, the former owners’ title had been restored as of the date of entry into force of the Restitution Law in 1992. After that date, the applicants had had no right to use the apartment.
15. On 7 March 2006 the Sofia City Court upheld that judgment. The applicants did not submit a cassation appeal considering that it would stand no chances of success.
16. In June 2007 the first and second applicants paid to the former owners of the apartment 31,265 Bulgarian levs (BGN), the equivalent of approximately EUR 16,000, and the third applicant paid BGN 15,632, the equivalent of EUR 8,000.
II. RELEVANT BACKGROUND, DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
17. The relevant background facts and domestic law and practice concerning the effect on third parties of the denationalisation legislation adopted in Bulgaria in the 1990s have been summarised in the Court’s judgment in the case of Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99, 48380/99, 51362/99, 53367/99, 60036/00, 73465/01, and 194/02, 15 March 2007.
18. In a judgment of 10 July 2003 (judgment no. 1127 in case no. 891/2002) the Supreme Court of Cassation dismissed an appeal by defendants whose title to an apartment had been found to be null and void under the terms of section 7 of the Restitution Law and who had been ordered by the lower courts to pay damages to the property’s former owners, for having used it on an invalid ground. The Supreme Court of Cassation rejected an objection by the defendants that prior to the final judgment under section 7 they had lawfully possessed the apartment at issue pointing out that their title had been null and void ab initio. It held that
“[a]s a legal category, the nullity of a legal action results in its complete incapability of producing the legal consequences sought. This incapability exists from the beginning, in other words, the contract, which has been subject to the action under section 7 [of the Restitution Law], was null and void, irrespective of when this nullity was declared by the courts.”
The Supreme Court of Cassation went on to conclude:
“... as from the date of entry of the [Restitution Law] into force, [the defendants] possessed the property on no valid legal ground and that is why this date has rightly been accepted as a starting date of [their] liability for damages.”
THE LAW
I. COMPLAINTS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND APPLICANTS
A. Alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the loss of the first and second applicants’ apartment
19. The first and second applicants complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and under Articles 13 and 14 of the Convention, that they had been deprived of their property arbitrarily and through no fault of their own.
20. The Court considers that the complaint falls to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
21. The Government argued that the first and second applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies because they had not sought compensation bonds. Furthermore, the Government contended that the complaint had to be dismissed for failure to comply with the six-month rule under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, since the final judgment whereby the first and second applicants’ title had been found to be null and void had been given on 8 January 2001, more than six months before they had lodged the present application.
22. The first and second applicants contested these arguments.
Admissibility
23. The Government argued, in the first place, that the complaint was inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies as the first and second applicants had not applied for compensation bonds. The Court refers to its detailed reasoning in Velikovi and Others, where it found that at the relevant time the bonds compensation scheme did not secure adequate compensation with any degree of certainty (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, § 227). Furthermore, the Court has already examined an identical objection in a similar case and has rejected it (see Dimitar and Anka Dimitrovi v. Bulgaria, no. 56753/00, § 23, 12 February 2009). It does not see a reason to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
24. In these circumstances, the question arises as to whether the complaint under examination was submitted to the Court within six months of the final domestic decision, as required by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, and in particular as to the starting date of the six-month period in the present case.
25. In cases similar to Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, cited above, in situations where the applicants had been in possession of compensation bonds, the Court found that the relevant events should be viewed as a continuing situation as they concerned not only deprivation of property but also the ensuing right to compensation which was the subject of legislative developments and changes of practice at least until 2007 (see Shoilekovi and Others v. Bulgaria (dec.), nos. 61330/00, 66840/01 and 69155/01, 18 September 2007). In another case similar to Velikovi and Others, where the applicants had not received bonds, they were provided with the tenancy of a municipal apartment which they purchased subsequently and also brought proceedings for damages against the State. These events took place following the final judgment whereby the applicants had been deprived of their property. Again, the Court held that, as there had been relevant developments concerning compensation, the events should be viewed as a continuing situation until the compensation issue was settled (see Vladimirova and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 42617/02, § 30, 26 February 2009).
26. In the present case the Court notes that the first and second applicants failed to seek compensation bonds within the relevant time-limit which in their case expired on 8 March 2001, two-months after the final judgment of the Supreme Court of Cassation (see paragraph 11 above).
27. The Court observes, in addition, that after March 2001 all legislative developments in the matter of compensation for persons who had lost their property pursuant to section 7 of the Restitution Law were related to the compensation bonds’ modalities of use and their value (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, §§ 133-39). The first and second applicants, who had forfeited their right to seek bonds in March 2001, were not affected by these developments. In particular, the legislative changes of June 2006 did not give rise to a new entitlement to bonds for persons who had missed the relevant time-limit (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, § 139; Panayotova v. Bulgaria, no. 27636/04, § 11, 2 July 2009; and Gyuleva and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 76963/01, § 26, 25 June 2009).
28. Furthermore, unlike the case of Vladimirova and Others v. Bulgaria, cited above, in the present case there were no other relevant developments. In particular, the 2001-2006 proceedings for damages against the applicants (see paragraphs 13-14 above) did not relate to any possible compensation from the State for the property taken from the first and second applicants. There is thus no reason to view the events in the case as a continuing situation.
29. The Court thus concludes that the six-month period in the case started running from 8 March 2001 when the time-limit for the first and second applicants to seek bonds expired. The present complaint was introduced on 16 August 2004. It follows that it has been introduced out of time and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
B. Alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the first and second applicants’ liability for damages
30. The first and second applicants also complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that they had been ordered retroactively by the courts to pay damages to the former owners of the flat, for a period preceding the judgment declaring their title null and void.
31. The Government urged the Court to reject the complaint as inadmissible for failure to exhaust domestic remedies since the first and second applicants had not lodged a cassation appeal against the judgment of the Sofia City Court of 7 March 2006 (see paragraph 15 above). In any event, the Government considered that the first and second applicants were rightly ordered to pay damages as they had used the apartment on invalid legal grounds.
32. The first and second applicants disputed these arguments. In respect of the alleged failure to exhaust domestic remedies, they contended that in view of the constant practice of the national courts a cassation appeal against the judgment of 7 March 2006 would have had no prospects of success. In their view, therefore, the remedy at issue had been ineffective and its exhaustion had not been necessary. They also argued that by having been ordered to pay damages they had had to bear a disproportionate burden.
1. Admissibility
33. The Court observes that the Bulgarian Supreme Court of Cassation, the highest national court, has examined and dismissed arguments identical to the ones that the first and second applicants could have raised in a cassation appeal in their case. In a judgment of 10 July 2003 it took the view that persons in the position of the first and second applicants were automatically liable in damages, as from the date of entry into force of the Restitution Law, for continuing to live in their flats, regardless of the fact that the proceedings concerning the validity of their title had taken place years later (see paragraph 18 above). On the other hand, the Government have not presented a single decision or judgment where the domestic courts have departed from this approach which was, apparently, rooted in the Bulgarian courts’ established practice concerning the legal consequences of nullity (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, § 122).
34. There is little doubt, therefore, that with regard to the issue complained of, that is, “retroactive” liability for damages, there existed a practice of the domestic courts which deprived of prospects of success any cassation appeal by the first and second applicants.
35. The Court reiterates that an applicant will be absolved from using a particular domestic remedy if he establishes that it had no prospect of success and was therefore inadequate or ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case (see, among others, Merger and Cros v. France (dec.), no. 68864/01, 11 March 2004).
36. In the present case the Court considers that the first and second applicants were not obliged to employ the remedy at issue, which would have been ineffective in their case. It follows that the present complaint cannot be dismissed for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
37. Furthermore, the Court finds that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
38. The Court observes that the implementation, in the case of the first and second applicants, of the Restitution Law of 1992, in conjunction with the relevant provisions on nullity of contracts, resulted in their being retrospectively liable to pay damages to the pre-nationalisation owners of their flat for having continued to use it after the entry into force of the Restitution Law (see paragraphs 13-16 above). The Government did not object to the applicants’ position that the above constituted State interference with their property rights. The Court sees no reason to hold otherwise, noting, in particular, that the impugned retrospective liability was the consequence of the entry into force of the Restitution Law of 1992, which operated in a period of exceptional transformation of the legal regime of real property in Bulgaria (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, §§ 166 and 172).
39. The Court further notes that the liability incurred by the first and second applicants had a legal basis in domestic law. Each of the relevant provisions of domestic law applied against them served its own legitimate purpose, namely, the provisions on validity of contracts sought to regulate civil transactions, and the Restitution Law of 1992 sought to accommodate difficult issues of restitution of nationalised property in a period of social and legal transformation (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, §§ 168-176).
40. The Court must examine, therefore, whether the relevant legal rules and practice, as applied in the present case, maintained the fair balance between the legitimate goals pursued and the individual rights required under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
41. The impugned law and practice on nullity of contracts and the decisions of the domestic courts in the applicants’ case were based on the theoretical postulate, embedded in Bulgarian civil law, that a contract which violates the law is null and void ab initio and can never give rise to any rights and obligations for the parties. As in 2001 the title of the first and second applicants was found to have been flawed, they were considered as having never become owners and, therefore, treated as persons who had unlawfully used others’ property (see paragraphs 13-14 above).
42. It is not the Court’s task to make general findings about the legal regulation of nullity of contracts and its consequences in Bulgarian law. The Court would not exclude that in certain circumstances retrospective liability for damages for having used property obtained under a void transaction may be a proportionate measure compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
43. The specific feature of the present case is, however, that the Restitution Law of 1992, applied in conjunction with the relevant law on contracts, had the effect of automatically exposing the applicants to retrospective liability for continuing to live in the flat.
44. As the Court noted in its judgment in the case of Velikovi and Others, cited above, §§ 122 and 165, the Restitution Law of 1992 was a novelty in Bulgarian law and was subject to highly uncertain interpretation for an initial period of several years. The uncertainty concerned, inter alia, the type of omissions that engendered nullity.
45. Despite the above context, the applicants were placed in a situation where, with hindsight, they could only avoid liability for damages by abandoning their flat immediately after the adoption of the Restitution Law in 1992. In the Court’s view, the applicants could not be reasonably required to do so either in 1992 or after 1993, when an action was brought against them under the Restitution Law. At that time and until the final judgment of January 2001 their title was considered valid for all legal purposes and they were entitled to use the relevant legal means of defence before the domestic court, as they did.
46. Furthermore, as it was noted by the Court in Velikovi and Others, cited above, and other relevant judgments against Bulgaria, the Restitution Law of 1992, as applied by the Bulgarian courts, treated as null and void ab initio not only real property transactions which involved material breaches of substantive legal rules, but also transactions in which minor omissions imputable to the State administration, not the individual concerned, had been uncovered (see Velikovi and Others, cited above, §§ 79, 90 and 98-99; Peshevi v. Bulgaria, no. 29722/04, § 9, 2 July 2009; and Panayotova v. Bulgaria, no. 27636/04, § 9, 2 July 2009). This extensively large interpretation adopted by the Bulgarian courts was criticised by the Court in Velikovi and Others, cited above, §§ 218-20, 223-4 and 229-30.
47. The Court cannot examine the grounds on which the title of the first and second applicants was declared null and void in 2001 as the relevant complaint was submitted outside the six months time-limit under Article 35 of the Convention (see paragraph 29 above). However, in the context of the issue under examination – the proportionality of the legislative and judicial approach which imposed retrospective liability on the applicants, the Court notes that such liability was automatically incurred in all cases of nullity and, therefore, in a wide range of substantially different circumstances, including where the State administration had been at the origin of the chain of events. The Court accepts that after the action under section 7 of the Restitution Law was brought against them in the beginning of 1993 (see paragraph 9 above), the first and second applicants must have been aware of the possibility that they might lose the apartment. Nevertheless, in the Court’s view, the automatic application of retrospective liability for damages to bona fides owners like them squares poorly with the requirements of proportionality, foreseeability and fair balance.
48. The Government have not advanced any argument demonstrating that some care has been taken by the authorities to maintain a fair balance between the legitimate goals pursued by each of the relevant domestic provisions taken on its own and the burden imposed on the first and second applicants as a result of those provisions’ combined and automatic application.
49. It is true that the first and second applicants were eventually ordered to pay damages for the period of 1996-2001 only, since the pre-nationalisation owners had not brought their action earlier and could not extend their claim to the period 1992-1996 as a result of the application of the five-year statutory limitation period (see paragraph 13 above). In the Court’s view this limitation cannot restore the requisite fair balance, as the applicants did have to pay a significant sum for having lived in the flat at a time when for all legal purposes it was considered theirs.
50. The Court finds, therefore, that interference with the applicants’ rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was disproportionate and thus not justified. It follows that there has been a violation of that provision.
II. COMPLAINTS OF THE THIRD APPLICANT
51. The third applicant complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 13 of the Convention that she had been ordered to pay damages to the former owners of her parents’ apartment, on the basis of the domestic courts’ arbitrary interpretation of the relevant law.
52. The Government pointed out that she had failed to appeal against the judgment of the Sofia City Court of 7 March 2006.
53. The Court reiterates its conclusion in paragraph 34 above that the applicants had no prospect for success in cassation proceedings and considers that the third applicant was not required to have recourse to this remedy. However, the Court notes that the judgment of 7 March 2006 was a final one as to her obligation to pay the sums at issue and that the third applicant’s complaints were submitted to the Court more than six months after that date, on 15 December 2007 (see paragraph 1 above). It follows that they have been introduced out of time and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
54. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
55. In respect of pecuniary damage, the first and second applicants claimed the sum they had paid to the property’s former owners. In respect of non-pecuniary damage, they claimed EUR 15,000.
56. The Government urged the Court to dismiss the claims.
57. The Court refers to its finding above that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that the first and second applicants were found to be liable for damages for having used the apartment before January 2001 (see paragraphs 38-50 above). The first and second applicants paid EUR 16,000 to the apartment’s former owners (see paragraph 16 above). Therefore, the Court is of the view that they suffered pecuniary damage as a result of the violation found and should be awarded a sum of money in respect of just satisfaction. As regards the amount to be awarded, the Court observes that part of the period for which the first and second applicants were found liable followed the final judgment whereby they lost their apartment (see paragraphs 10, 13 and 16 above). The Court’s finding of a violation in the case does not concern that period. Furthermore, as noted above (see paragraph 47), after 1993 the first and second applicants must have been aware of the possibility that they might lose the property. On the basis of these considerations, the Court awards them EUR 8,000 in pecuniary damage.
58. In respect of non-pecuniary damage, the Court finds that the first and second applicants must have suffered anguish and frustration as a result of the violation of their property rights. Judging on the basis of equity, the Court awards, jointly to the two of them, EUR 4,000.
B. Costs and expenses
59. The applicants claimed EUR 4,490 for legal work by their lawyers, Mrs S. M.-V.a and Mr Y. D.. In support of this claim they presented a contract for legal representation and a time-sheet. The applicants requested that out of that amount, EUR 3,900 be transferred directly into the bank account of their legal representative Mrs M.-V.. They also claimed 552.70 Bulgarian levs (BGN), the equivalent of approximately EUR 280, for postage and translation, presenting the relevant receipts.
60. The applicants claimed another BGN 2,937.15, the equivalent of EUR 1,500, for expenses incurred in the domestic proceedings for damages (2001-2006). In support of this claim they presented the relevant receipts.
61. The Government urged the Court to dismiss all claims for costs and expenses.
62. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
63. In respect of legal fees charged by Mrs M.-V. and Mr Y. D. and the other expenses for the present proceedings, the Court, having regard to the fact that part of the complaints have been rejected, awards the first and second applicants EUR 1,500, EUR 1,000 of which to be transferred directly into the bank account of the applicants’ representative, Mrs M.-V..
64. In respect of the expenses incurred in the domestic proceedings, the Court, having regard to the information in its possession, finds that they were actually and necessarily incurred. As to quantum, the Court, considering that the expenses at issue must have been made by the three applicants and that the complaints of the third applicant in respect of those proceedings were declared inadmissible, awards the first and second applicants EUR 1,000.
C. Default interest
65. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint of the first and second applicants under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that they were found to be liable to pay damages to their apartment’s former owners admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that, in respect of the first and second applicants, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in that they were found to be liable to pay damages to the apartment’s former owners;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the first and second applicants jointly, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Bulgarian levs at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 12,000 (twelve thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 2,500 (two thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the first and second applicants, in respect of costs and expenses, EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros) of which to be transferred directly into the bank account of the applicants’ representative, Mrs M.a-V.;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 7 January 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1; danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale - assegnazione
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA KAYRIAKOVI C. BULGARIA
(Richiesta n. 30945/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
7 gennaio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Kayriakovi c. Bulgaria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste il Mark Villiger, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre giudici, Pavlina Panova ad giudice di hoc,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Sezione Cancelliere
Avendo deliberato in privato 1 dicembre 2009,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 30945/04) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da tre cittadini bulgari, Sig. I. K. K., la Sig.ra M. K.. K. e Sig.ra Elena I. K. (“i richiedenti”). Il primo e il secondo richiedente depositarono una richiesta il 16 agosto 2004. Il 15 dicembre 2007 il terzo richiedente espresse il suo desiderio di unirsi alla richiesta.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dalla Sig.ra S. M.-V. e dal Sig. Y. D., avvocati che praticano a Sofia. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra M. Dimova, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che essendo stato ordinato loro di pagare i danni ai proprietari precedenti del loro appartamento il primo e il secondo richiedente erano stati privati della loro proprietà in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. Il 19 maggio 2008 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
5. Il giudice Kalaydjieva, giudice eletto a riguardo della Bulgaria, si astenne dal riunirsi nella causa. Il 30 gennaio 2009 il Governo nominò al suo posto la Sig.ra Pavlina Panova come giudice ad hoc (Articolo 27 § 2 della Convenzione e Articolo 29 § 1 degli Articoli di Corte).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1944, 1946 e 1973 e vivono a Sofia.
7. Il primo ed il secondo richiedente sono marito e moglie ed il terzo richiedente è loro figlia.
8. Nel 1974 il primo ed il secondo richiedente comprarono dal municipio di Sofia un appartamento di 95 metri quadrati che era divenuto proprietà Statale in virtù della nazionalizzazione eseguita dal regime comunista in Bulgaria nel 1947 e negli anni seguenti.
9. All'inizio del 1993 gli eredi del precedente proprietario della proprietà pre- nazionalizzazione introdussero procedimenti contro il primo ed il secondo richiedente sotto la sezione 7 della Legge sulla Restituzione.
10. I procedimenti terminarono con una sentenza definitiva della Corte Suprema di Cassazione dell’ 8 gennaio 2001. I tribunali ripristinarono il titolo dei precedenti proprietari, trovando che il titolo del primo e del secondo richiedente era stato ab initio privo di valore legale per tre motivi: 1) il contratto di vendita non era stato firmato dal sindaco, come richiesto dalla legge, ma da un altro ufficiale del municipio. Benché il sindaco fosse stato autorizzato a delegare il potere di firmare contratti, lui non aveva fatto una delega valida nel presente caso; 2) la decisione iniziale di vendere la proprietà non era stata firmata dal sindaco della regione, come richiesto dalla legge, ma da un altro ufficiale; e 3) l'appartamento contestato era stato una parte di un appartamento più grande che in una data non specificata prima del 1974 stato diviso in due più piccoli; questa divisione non era stata eseguita in conformità con le rispettive norme di costruzione.
11. Il primo ed il secondo richiedenti avrebbero potuto richiedere, entro i due mesi seguenti la sentenza della Corte Suprema di Cassazione dell’ 8 gennaio 2001, il risarcimento obbligazionario dallo Stato. Quelle obbligazioni avrebbero potuto essere usate in denaro di privatizzazione o vendute a mediatori. Il primo ed il secondo richiedente non si giovarono di questa opportunità.
12. Entro il 2001 i tre richiedenti vivevano nell'appartamento. Nel maggio 2001 loro sgombrarono la proprietà.
13. Nel giugno 2001 gli eredi del precedente proprietario introdussero un'azione per danni contro loro per avere usato illegalmente l'appartamento, siccome loro non erano i suoi proprietari. La rivendicazione riguardava il periodo dal 1996 al 2001 siccome per gli anni precedenti erano fuori tempo limite per la generale limitazione legale quinquennale.
14. In una sentenza del 31 maggio 2004 la Corte distrettuale di Sofia accolse la rivendicazione accettando che siccome il titolo del primo e del secondo richiedente non era mai stato valido, il titolo dei precedenti proprietari era stato ripristinato dalla data di entrata in vigore della Legge sulla Restituzione nel 1992. Dopo quella data, i richiedenti non avevano avuto nessuno diritto di usare l'appartamento.
15. Il 7 marzo 2006 la Corte della Città di Sofia sostenne quella sentenza. I richiedenti non presentarono un ricorso in cassazione considerando che non avrebbe avuto nessuno opportunità di successo.
16. Nel giugno 2007 il primo e il secondo richiedente pagarono ai precedenti proprietari dell'appartamento 31,265 lev bulgari (BGN), l'equivalente di circa EUR 16,000, ed il terzo richiedente pagò BGN 15,632, l'equivalente di EUR 8,000.
II. SFONDO ATTINENTE, DIRITTO NAZIONALE E PRATICA
17. I fatti di fondo attinenti e il diritto nazionale e la pratica riguardo all'effetto su terze parti della legislazione di denazionalizzazione adottata in Bulgaria negli anni novanta sono stati riassunti nella sentenza della Corte nella causa Velikovi ed Altri c. Bulgaria, N. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99, 48380/99, 51362/99, 53367/99, 60036/00, 73465/01, e 194/02, 15 marzo 2007.
18. In una sentenza del 10 luglio 2003 (la sentenza n. 1127 nella causa n. 891/2002) la Corte Suprema di Cassazione respinse un ricorso da parte di imputati il cui titolo su un appartamento era stata trovato privo di valore legale sotto i termini della sezione 7 della Legge sulla Restituzione e che era stato ordinato dai tribunali inferiori di pagare i danni ai precedenti proprietari della proprietà, per averla usato su una base nulla. La Corte Suprema di Cassazione respinse un'eccezione da parte degli imputati per cui prima della sentenza definitiva sotto la sezione 7 loro avevano posseduto legittimamente l'appartamento in questione indicando che il loro titolo era stato ab initio privo di valore legale. Contenne quel
“[come] una categoria legale, la nullità di un'azione legale dà luogo alla sua incapacità completa di produrre le conseguenze legali richieste. Questa incapacità esiste dall'inizio, in altre parole il contratto che è stato soggetto all'azione sotto la sezione 7 [della Legge sulla Restituzione ], era privo di valore legale, a prescindere di quando questa nullità fu dichiarata dai tribunali.”
La Corte Suprema di Cassazione proseguì e concluse:
“...dalla data di entrata in vigore della [Legge sulla Restituzione ], [gli imputati] possedevano la proprietà su nessuna base legale valida e ciò perché questa data è stata accettata esattamente come una data iniziale della [loro] responsabilità per danni.”
LA LEGGE
I. AZIONI DI RECLAMO DEL PRIMO E DEL SECONDO RICHIEDENTE
A. Addotta violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo della perdita dell’appartamento del primo e del secondo richiedente
19. Il primo e il secondo richiedente si lamentarono sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 e sotto gli Articoli 13 e 14 della Convenzione di essere stati privati arbitrariamente della loro proprietà e non per loro propria colpa.
20. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
““Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
21. Il Governo dibatté che il primo e il secondo richiedente non erano riusciti ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali perché loro non avevano chiesto il risarcimento obbligazionario. Inoltre, il Governo contese che l'azione di reclamo doveva essere respinta per inosservanza della norma dei sei -mesi sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, poiché la sentenza definitiva con cui il titolo del primo e del secondo richiedente era stato trovato privo di valore legale era stata resa l’ 8 gennaio 2001, più di sei mesi prima di aver depositato la presente richiesta.
22. Il primo e il secondo richiedente contestarono questi argomenti.
Ammissibilità
23. Il Governo dibatté, al primo posto, che l'azione di reclamo era inammissibile per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali siccome il primo e il secondo richiedente non aveva fatto domanda per il risarcimento in obbligazioni. La Corte si riferisce al suo ragionamento particolareggiato in Velikovi ed Altri, dove trovò che al tempo attinente lo schema di risarcimento in obbligazioni non garantiva il risarcimento adeguato con un qualsiasi grado di certezza (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, § 227). La Corte ha già esaminato inoltre, un'eccezione identica in una causa simile e l'ha respinta (vedere Dimitar ed Anka Dimitrovi c. Bulgaria, n. 56753/00, § 23 del 12 febbraio 2009). Non vede una ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa.
24. In queste circostanze, nasce la questione in merito a se l'azione di reclamo sotto esame fu presentata alla Corte entro i sei mesi dalla decisione nazionale definitiva, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, ed in particolare in merito alla data iniziale del periodo dei sei- mesi nella presente causa.
25. In cause simili a Velikovi ed Altri c. Bulgaria, citata sopra, in situazioni in cui i richiedenti erano stati in possesso di obbligazioni di risarcimento, la Corte trovò che gli eventi attinenti avrebbero dovuto essere visti come una situazione continua siccome loro non solo riguardavano una privazione di proprietà ma anche il diritto che ne conseguiva al risarcimento che era stato soggetto a sviluppi legislativi e cambi di pratica almeno sino a 2007 (vedere Shoilekovi ed Altri c. Bulgaria (dec.), N. 61330/00, 66840/01 e 69155/01 del 18 settembre 2007). In un'altra causa simile a Velikovi ed Altri, in cui i richiedenti non avevano ricevuto obbligazioni, a loro fu offerto l'affitto di un appartamento municipale che loro acquistarono successivamente ed anche introdussero procedimenti per danni contro lo Stato. Questi eventi ebbero luogo in seguito alla sentenza definitiva con cui i richiedenti erano stati privati della loro proprietà. Di nuovo, la Corte sostenne che, siccome c’erano stati degli sviluppi attinenti riguardo al risarcimento, gli eventi avrebbero dovuto essere visti come una situazione continua finché il problema del risarcimento non fosse stato risolto (vedere Vladimirova ed Altri c. Bulgaria, n. 42617/02, § 30 del 26 febbraio 2009).
26. Nella presente causa la Corte nota che il primo e il secondo richiedente non riuscirono a chiedere obbligazioni di risarcimento all'interno del tempo-limite attinente che nella loro caso scadeva l’ 8 marzo 2001, due -mesi dopo la sentenza definitiva della Corte Suprema di Cassazione (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra).
27. La Corte osserva, in oltre, che dopo il marzo 2001 tutti gli sviluppi legislativi sulla questione del risarcimento per persone che avevano perso la loro proprietà facendo seguito alla sezione 7 della Legge sulla Restituzione erano riferiti alle modalità delle obbligazioni di risarcimento dell’ uso e del loro valore (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 133-39). Il primo e il secondo richiedente che avevano perso il loro diritto per chiedere obbligazioni nel marzo 2001 non furono colpiti da questi sviluppi. In particolare, i cambi legislativi del giugno 2006 non generarono un nuovo diritto ad obbligazioni per le persone che non avevano rispettato il tempo-limite attinente (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, § 139; Panayotova c. Bulgaria, n. 27636/04, § 11 2 luglio 2009; e Gyuleva ed Altri c. Bulgaria, n. 76963/01, § 26 25 giugno 2009).
28. Inoltre, diversamente dalla causa Vladimirova ed Altri c. Bulgaria, citata sopra, nella presente causa non c'erano altri sviluppi attinenti. In particolare, i procedimenti dal 2001-2006 per danni contro i richiedenti (vedere paragrafi 13-14 sopra) non riferiscono qualsiasi possibile risarcimento dallo Stato per la proprietà presa dal primo e dal secondo richiedente. Non c'è così nessuna ragione di vedere gli eventi nella causa come una situazione continua.
29. La Corte conclude così che il periodo dei sei- mesi nella causa cominciò a decorrere dall’ 8 marzo 2001 quando il tempo-limite per il primo ed il secondo richiedente per chiedere obbligazioni era scaduto. La presente azione di reclamo fu introdotta il 16 agosto 2004. Ne segue che è stata introdotta fuori termini e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
B. Addotta violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo della responsabilità per danni del primo e del secondo richiedente
30. Il primo e il secondo richiedente si lamentarono anche sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 di essere stato ordinato loro retroattivamente dai tribunali di pagare i danni ai precedenti proprietari dell'appartamento, per un periodo precedente la sentenza che dichiarava il loro titolo privo di valore legale.
31. Il Governo esortò la Corte a respingere l'azione di reclamo come inammissibile per insuccesso nell’ esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali poiché il primo e il secondo richiedente non avevano depositato un ricorso in cassazione contro la sentenza della Corte della Città di Sofia del 7 marzo 2006 (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra). In qualsiasi caso, il Governo considerò che al primo ed al secondo richiedenti fu giustamente ordinato di pagare i danni siccome avevano usato l'appartamento su basi legali nulle.
32. Il primo e il secondo richiedente contestarono questi argomenti. A riguardo dell'insuccesso addotto nell’ esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali, loro contesero, che nella prospettiva della pratica continua dei tribunali nazionali un ricorso in cassazione contro la sentenza del 7 marzo 2006 non avrebbe avuto nessuna prospettiva di successo. Nella loro prospettiva, perciò la via di ricorso in questione era stata inefficace ed il suo esaurimento non era stato necessario. Loro dibatterono anche ordinando loro di pagare danni avevano dovuto sopportare un carico sproporzionato.
1. Ammissibilità
33. La Corte osserva che la Corte Suprema bulgara di Cassazione, la corte nazionale più alta ha esaminato e ha respinto argomenti identici a quelli che il primo ed il secondo richiedente avrebbero potuto sollevare in un ricorso in cassazione nella loro causa. In una sentenza del 10 luglio 2003 prese la prospettiva che persone nella posizione del primo e del secondo richiedente erano stati automaticamente responsabili dei danni, siccome dalla data di entrata in vigore della Legge sulla Restituzione, per continuare a vivere nei loro appartamenti nonostante il fatto che i procedimenti riguardo alla validità del loro titolo avessero avuto luogo anni dopo (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra). D'altra parte il Governo non ha presentato una sola decisione o sentenza in cui i tribunali nazionali hanno abbandonato questo approccio che era, apparentemente radicato nella pratica stabilita dei tribunali bulgari riguardo alle conseguenze legali della nullità (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, § 122).
34. C'è un piccolo dubbio, che per ciò che riguarda il problema di cui ci si lamenta cioè, la responsabilità “retroattiva” per danni, esistesse una pratica dei tribunali nazionali che privava delle prospettive di successo qualsiasi ricorso in cassazione da parte del primo e secondo richiedente.
35. La Corte reitera che un richiedente sarà assolto dall'usare una particolare via di ricorso nazionale se lui stabilisce che non aveva nessuna prospettiva di successo ed era perciò inadeguata o inefficace nelle particolari circostanze della causa (vedere, fra altre, Merger and Cros c. Francia (dec.), n. 68864/01, 11 marzo 2004).
36. Nella presente causa la Corte considera che il primo ed il secondo richiedente non erano obbligati ad intraprendere la via di ricorso in questione che sarebbe stata inefficace nel loro caso. Ne segue che la presente azione di reclamo non può essere respinta per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
37. Inoltre, la Corte costata che l'azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
38. La Corte osserva che l'attuazione, nel caso del primo e del secondo richiedente, della Legge sula Restituzione del 1992 in concomitanza con le disposizioni attinenti sulla nullità dei contratti, diede luogo in modo retrospettivo al loro essere responsabili del pagamento dei danni ai proprietari pre- nazionalizzazione del loro appartamento per avere continuato ad usarlo dopo l'entrata in vigore della Legge sulla Restituzione (vedere paragrafi 13-16 sopra). Il Governo non obiettò alla posizione dei richiedenti che quanto sopra ha costituito un’ intromissione dello stato coi loro diritti di proprietà. La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di sostenere altrimenti, notando, in particolare, che la responsabilità retrospettiva contestata era la conseguenza dell'entrata in vigore della Legge sulla Restituzione del 1992 che operava in un periodo di trasformazione eccezionali del regime legale dei beni immobili in Bulgaria (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 166 e 172).
39. La Corte nota inoltre che la responsabilità per il primo e il secondo richiedente aveva una base legale in diritto nazionale. Ognuna delle disposizioni attinenti di diritto nazionale applicate contro loro servivano il loro proprio fine legittimo, vale a dire le disposizioni sulla validità dei contratti cercavano di regolare operazioni civili, e la Legge sulla Restituzione del 1992 cercava di risolvere le questioni difficili di restituzione della proprietà nazionalizzata in un periodo di trasformazione sociale e legale (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 168-176).
40. La Corte deve esaminare, perciò, se le norme legali attinenti e la pratica, come applicate nella causa presente, hanno mantenuto l'equilibrio equo fra le mete legittime perseguite ed i diritti individuali richiesto sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. La legge contestata e la pratica sulla nullità dei contratti e delle decisioni delle corti nazionali nella causa dei richiedenti erano basate sul postulato teoretico, incorporato nel diritto civile bulgaro, che un contratto che viola la legge è ab initio privo di valore legale e non può dare mai origine a qualsiasi diritto ed obbligo per le parti. Siccome nel 2001 il titolo del primo e del secondo richiedente fu trovato difettoso, furono considerato come essere mai divenuti proprietari e, perciò, trattati come persone che avevano usato illegalmente la proprietà altrui (vedere paragrafi 13-14 sopra).
42. Non è il compito della Corte per fare costatazioni generali della regolamentazione legale della nullità dei contratti e delle sue conseguenze nel diritto bulgaro. La Corte non escluderebbe che in certe circostanze la responsabilità retrospettiva per danni per aver usato la proprietà ottenuta sotto un'operazione non valida possa essere una misura proporzionata compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
43. La specifica caratteristica della causa presente è, comunque, che la Legge sulla Restituzione del 1992, applicata in concomitanza con la legge attinente sui contratti aveva l'effetto di esporre automaticamente i richiedenti alla responsabilità retrospettiva per aver continuato a vivere nell'appartamento.
44. Siccome la Corte notò nella sua sentenza nella causa Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 122 e 165, che la Legge sulla Restituzione del 1992 era una novità in diritto bulgaro e che era soggetta ad un’interpretazione estremamente incerta per un periodo iniziale di molti anni. L'incertezza riguardava, inter alia, il tipo di omissioni che hanno procreato la nullità.
45. Nonostante il contesto sopra, i richiedenti furono messi in una situazione in cui, con il senno di poi, loro avrebbero potuto evitare la responsabilità per danni solamente abbandonando immediatamente il loro appartamento dopo l'adozione della Legge sulla Restituzione nel 1992. Nella prospettiva della Corte, i richiedenti non potevano essere ragionevolmente costretti a fare così né nel 1992 né dopo il 1993, quando un'azione introdotta contro loro sotto la Legge sulla Restituzione. A quel tempo e sino alla sentenza definitiva del gennaio 2001 il loro titolo era stato considerato valido a tutti i fini legali e a loro era stato concesso di utilizzare gli attinenti mezzi di difesa di fronte alla corte nazionale, come avevano fatto.
46. Inoltre, come fu notato dalla Corte in Velikovi ed Altri, sentenze attinenti sopra, ed altre e citate contro la Bulgaria la Legge sulla Restituzione del 1992, come applicata dai tribunali bulgari, non solo trattava come prive di valore legale ab initio le operazioni di beni immobili le cui violazioni sostanziali coinvolgevano norme legali ed effettive, ma anche le operazioni in cui erano state scoperte delle omissioni minori imputabili all'amministrazione Statale, non all'individuo riguardato, (vedere Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 79, 90 e 98-99; Peshevi c. Bulgaria, n. 29722/04, § 9 del 2 luglio 2009; e Panayotova c. Bulgaria, n. 27636/04, § 9 del 2 luglio 2009). Questa interpretazione eccessivamente ampia adottata dalle corti bulgare fu criticata dalla Corte in Velikovi ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 218-20, 223-4 e 229-30.
47. La Corte non può esaminare i motivi per cui il titolo del primo e del secondo richiedente fu dichiarato privo di valore legale nel 2001 siccome l'azione di reclamo attinente fu presentata fuori dal tempo-limite dei sei mesi sotto l’Articolo 35 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). Comunque, nel contesto del problema sotto esame-la proporzionalità dell’ approccio legislativo e giudiziale che impose la responsabilità retrospettiva sui richiedenti, la Corte nota che simile responsabilità è stata impegnata automaticamente in tutte le cause dia nullità e, perciò, in una ampia serie di circostanze sostanzialmente diverse, incluso dove l'amministrazione Statale era stata all'origine della catena di eventi. La Corte accetta che dopo l'azione sotto la sezione 7 della Legge sulla Restituzione introdotta contro loro all'inizio del 1993 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra), il primo e il secondo richiedente avrebbero dovuto essere consapevoli della possibilità di perdere l'appartamento. Ciononostante, nella prospettiva della Corte, l’applicazione automatica della responsabilità retrospettiva per danni ai proprietari in fides boni come loro quadra poco, coi requisiti della proporzionalità, della prevedibilità e dell’ equilibrio equo.
48. Il Governo non ha avanzato qualsiasi argomento che dimostri che è stata presa della cura dalle autorità per mantenere un equilibrio equo fra le mete legittime perseguite da ognuna delle disposizioni nazionali attinenti prese da sole ed il carico imposto sul primo ed il secondo richiedente come risultato della combinazione di quelle disposizioni e dell’applicazione automatica.
49. È vero che al primo ed al secondo richiedente fu ordinato infine di pagare i danni solamente per il periodo dal 1996-2001, poiché i proprietari pre- nazionalizzazione non avevano introdotto la loro azione prima e non potevano estendere la loro rivendicazione al periodo 1992-1996 come risultato dell’applicazione del termine di prescrizione legale quinquennale (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte questa limitazione non può ripristinare l'equilibrio equo richiesto, siccome i richiedenti dovevano pagare una somma significativa per avere vissuto nell'appartamento per un periodo in cui a tutti i fini legali fu considerato il loro.
50. La Corte trova, perciò, che l’interferenza coi diritti dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 era sproporzionata e così non giustificata. Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione di quella disposizione.
II. AZIONI DI RECLAMO DEL TERZO RICHIEDENTE
51. Il terzo richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 1 de Protocollo N.ro 1 e dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che gli era stato ordinato di pagare danni ai precedenti proprietari dell’ appartamento dei suoi genitori, sulla base dell’ interpretazione arbitraria della legge attinente da parte dei tribunali nazionali.
52. Il Governo indicò che non era riuscito a fare appello contro la sentenza della Corte della Città di Sofia del 7 marzo 2006.
53. La Corte reitera la sua conclusione nel paragrafo 34 sopra per cui i richiedenti non avevano una prospettiva di successo nei procedimenti di cassazione e considera che il terzo richiedente non era costretto a ricorrere a questa via di ricorso. Comunque, la Corte nota che la sentenza del 7 marzo 2006 era definitiva riguardo al suo obbligo di pagare le somme in questione e che le azioni di reclamo del terzo richiedente furono presentate alla Corte più di sei mesi dopo quella data, 15 dicembre 2007 (vedere paragrafo 1 sopra). Ne segue che sono state introdotte fuori termine e devono essere respinte in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
54. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
55. A riguardo del danno patrimoniale, il primo e il secondo richiedente chiesero la somma che loro avevano pagato ai precedenti proprietari della proprietà. A riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, loro chiesero EUR 15,000.
56. Il Governo esortò la Corte a respingere le rivendicazioni.
57. La Corte si riferisce alla sua costatazione sopra per cui c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in quanto il primo e il secondo richiedente furono trovati responsabili per danni per avere usato l'appartamento prima del gennaio 2001 (vedere paragrafi 38-50 sopra). Il primo e il secondo richiedente pagarono EUR 16,000 ai precedenti proprietari dell'appartamento (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Perciò, la Corte è della prospettiva che abbiano sofferto di danno patrimoniale come risultato della violazione trovata e si dovrebbe assegnare loro una somma in denaro a riguardo della soddisfazione equa. Riguardo all'importo da assegnare, la Corte osserva che parte del periodo per cui il primo e il secondo richiedente furono trovati responsabili era seguente alla sentenza definitiva con cui loro persero il loro appartamento (vedere paragrafi 10, 13 e 16 sopra). La costatazione dei violazione della Corte nella causa non riguarda quel periodo. Inoltre, come notato sopra (vedere paragrafo 47), dopo il 1993 il primo e il secondo richiedente dovevano essere consapevoli della possibilità che era probabile che loro perdessero la proprietà. Sulla base di queste considerazioni, la Corte assegna loro EUR 8,000 per danno patrimoniale.
58. A riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale, la Corte costata che il primo e il secondo richiedente hanno dovuto soffrire di angoscia e di frustrazione come risultato della violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà. Giudicando su base dell'equità, la Corte assegna loror , congiuntamente , EUR 4,000.
B. Costi e spese
59. I richiedenti chiesero EUR 4,490 per il lavoro legale dei loro avvocati, la Sig.ra S. M.-V. ed il Sig. Y. D.. In appoggio di questa rivendicazione loro presentarono un contratto per rappresentanza legale ed un foglio orario. I richiedenti richiesero che di questo importo, EUR 3,900 venissero trasferiti direttamente sul conto bancario del loro rappresentante legale la Sig.ra M.-V.a. Loro chiesero anche 552.70 lev bulgari (BGN), l'equivalente di circa EUR 280, per affrancatura e traduzione presentando le ricevute attinenti.
60. I richiedenti chiesero altri BGN 2,937.15, l'equivalente di EUR 1,500 per spese impegnate nei procedimenti nazionali per danni (2001-2006). In appoggio a questa rivendicazione loro presentarono le ricevute attinenti.
61. Il Governo esortò la Corte a respingere tutte le rivendicazioni per costi e spese.
62. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte,ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso di costi e spese solamente se viene mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati impegnati e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum.
63. A riguardo delle parcelle legali addebitate dalla Sig.ra M.-V. e dal Sig. Y. D. e delle altre spese per i presenti procedimenti, la Corte avendo riguardo al fatto che parte delle azioni di reclamo è stata respinta, assegna al primo e al secondo richiedente EUR 1,500, di cui EUR 1,000 devono essere trasferiti direttamente sul conto bancario del rappresentante dei richiedenti , la Sig.ra M.-V..
64. A riguardo delle spese impegnate nei procedimenti nazionali, la Corte avendo riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso, costata che sono stati davvero e necessariamente impegnati. Riguardo al a quantum, la Corte, considerando che le spese in questione hanno dovuto essere fatte dai tre richiedenti e che le azioni di reclamo del terzo richiedente a riguardo di quei procedimenti furono dichiarate inammissibili, assegna al primo e al secondo richiedente EUR 1,000.
C. Interesse di mora
65. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo del primo e del secondo richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 per cui loro furono trovati responsabili del pagamento di danni ai precedenti proprietari del loro appartamento ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che, in riguardo del primo e del secondo richiedente,c’ è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in quanto loro furono trovati responsabili per il pagamento di danni ai precedenti proprietari dell'appartamento;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare congiuntamente al primo ed al secondo richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire in lev bulgari al tasso applicabile in data dell’accordo:
(i) EUR 12,000 (dodici mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 2,500 (due mila cinquecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del primo e del secondo richiedente, a riguardo dei costi e delle spese di cui EUR 1,000 (mille euro) da trasferire direttamente sul conto bancario del rappresentante dei richiedenti , la Sig.ra M.-V.;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
4. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 7 gennaio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.