Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BASARBA OOD v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 77660/01/2010
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 07/01/2010
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF BASARBA OOD v. BULGARIA
(Application no. 77660/01)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
7 January 2010
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Basarba OOD v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, judges,
Pavlina Panova, ad hoc judge,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 December 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 77660/01) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Bulgarian limited liability company, B. O. (“the applicant company”), on 13 November 2001.
2. The applicant company was represented by Mrs N. S., a lawyer practising in Sofia. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs M. Kotseva, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicant company alleged that the authorities had failed to comply with a final court judgment in its favour and had deprived it of its legitimate expectation of acquiring a municipally-owned property.
4. On 4 January 2006 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
5. Judge Kalaydjieva, the judge elected in respect of Bulgaria, withdrew from sitting in the case. On 30 January 2009 the Government appointed in her stead Mrs Pavlina Panova as an ad hoc judge (Article 27 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 29 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant company was set up in 1991 and is based in Sofia.
7. On 1 October 1991 it entered into a lease agreement with a municipally-owned supermarket chain, under which it rented one of its shops (“the shop”). The term of the agreement was until 1 October 1994.
8. By a supplementary agreement of 1 September 1992 the term of the agreement was extended until 1 September 1997.
9. On 29 June 1995 the applicant company submitted a proposal to the Sofia Municipal Council to purchase the shop under the preferential privatisation procedure for lessees of State and municipally-owned properties provided for in section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act (see paragraph 20 below).
10. By a further supplementary agreement of 2 January 1996 the term of the lease agreement concerning the shop was amended and was set to expire on 2 July 1996.
11. In a decision of 27 September 1996 the Municipal Council rejected the applicant company’s request of 29 June 1995 on the grounds that the conditions under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act had not been met because the lease agreement for the shop “bore a date later than 15 October 1993”.
12. On 24 October 1996 the applicant company appealed against the refusal.
13. In a judgment of 5 March 1998 the Sofia City Court found in favour of the applicant company, quashed the decision of the Municipal Council of 27 September 1996 and referred to it the matter for re-examination. It found that on 15 October 1993 the applicant company had been a lessee of the shop and that in rejecting its privatisation proposal on the ground that it had not been a lessee the Municipal Council had acted in contravention with the law.
14. The Municipal Council did not appeal against the judgment and it became final on 2 April 1998.
15. On 7 May 1998 the applicant company informed the Municipal Council of the judgment in its favour and invited the latter to implement the court’s decision by selling it the shop in accordance with the applicable rules. No action was taken in response by the Municipal Council.
16. On 4 May 2001 the applicant company once again petitioned the Municipal Council to implement the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998.
17. In response, by letter of 9 July 2001, the Sofia Municipal Privatisation Agency informed the applicant company that on 27 April 1998 the Municipal Council had transformed the municipally-owned supermarket chain and had spun off two companies from it; the shop had been included in the capital of one of these companies which had been privatised on 24 February 1999.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
18. The Transformation and Privatisation of State and Municipally-Owned Enterprises Act (Закон за преобразуване и приватизация на държавни и общински предприятия: “the Privatisation Act”), adopted in 1992, provided for the transformation of public property and the privatisation of State and municipally-owned enterprises. In March 2002 it was superseded by other legislation.
19. Section 3 of the Act indicated the bodies competent to take decisions for privatisation. For municipally-owned property these were the respective municipal councils.
20. Section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act provided that lessees of State and municipally-owned property could propose to buy the properties rented by them, without a public auction or competition and for a price equal to the property’s valuation prepared by certified experts in accordance with rules adopted by the Government. Those preferential conditions were applicable to lessees of State and municipally-owned property who had concluded lease contracts before 15 October 1993 and where the said contracts were still in force on the date of the respective privatisation proposal.
21. Section 35(2) of the Privatisation Act, as worded after October 1997, provided that where a refusal by the competent administrative body to initiate a privatisation procedure following a proposal by the interested party had been quashed by means of a final court judgment, the relevant administrative body was obliged, within two months of the judgment becoming final, to initiate the privatisation procedure, prepare the privatisation of the property at issue and offer to sell the property to the entitled party.
22. In a similar case, in a decision of 10 February 1998, the Supreme Administrative Court declared inadmissible an appeal against the Sofia Municipal Council’s failure to act in implementing a final judgment against it with which an earlier refusal to initiate a privatisation procedure under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act had been quashed. The Supreme Administrative Court found that the appeal concerned the lack of enforcement of an earlier judgment which was not subject to separate judicial review because it did not represent a new “refusal” to privatise (see decision no. 310 of 10 February 1998, case no. 929/1997).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
23. The applicant company complained that the Municipal Council had failed to comply with the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998 in its favour, in breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, reads:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. Admissibility
24. The Government urged the Court to dismiss the complaint as inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies as the applicant company had not appealed against the failure of the Municipal Council to comply with the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998. The applicant company contested this argument.
25. The Court recalls that it has often found it to be inappropriate to require an individual who has obtained judgment against the State at the end of legal proceedings then to bring enforcement proceedings to obtain satisfaction (see, for example, Metaxas v. Greece, no. 8415/02, § 19, 27 May 2004, and Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 198, ECHR 2006-V).
26. However, even if the present case is to be considered differently as the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998 was an order to undertake particular actions, rather than a money judgment, the Government have not presented any domestic case-law or judgments in support of their assertion that this was a remedy that could have been successful. On the contrary, the domestic case-law that has been identified (see paragraph 22 above) indicates that such an appeal would not have even been examined by the courts. Accordingly, the Court does not see a reason to reach a conclusion different from the one in the cases above and dismisses the Government’s objection on the basis of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
27. Furthermore, the Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
28. The applicant company argued that the Municipal Council had been obliged, by virtue of section 35(2) of the Privatisation Act (see paragraph 20 above), to enforce the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998 by initiating a privatisation procedure and selling it the shop. However, the Council had not only failed to do so but had in effect obstructed and rendered impossible the enforcement of the said judgment by selling the shop to another party.
29. The Government argued that the judgment of 5 March 1998 did not imperatively oblige the Municipal Council to sell the shop to the applicant company but left the decision to the Council’s discretion. The Government considered that the Council had not failed to comply with the said judgment.
2. The Court’s assessment
30. The Court reiterates that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court or tribunal; in this way it embodies the “right to a court”, of which the right of access, that is the right to institute proceedings before courts in civil matters, constitutes one aspect. However, that right would be illusory if a Contracting State’s domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. Execution of a judgment given by a court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 of the Convention (see Hornsby v. Greece, judgment of 19 March 1997, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II, p. 510, § 40, and Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 67, ECHR 2009-...).
31. Turning to the case at hand, the Court, observing that the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998 concerned the applicant company’s alleged entitlement to acquire certain property under preferential conditions, is of the view that the said judgment was determinative for the applicant company’s civil rights and obligations, within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. Therefore, Article 6 § 1 is applicable in the case.
32. Furthermore, the Court notes that on 5 March 1998 the City Court quashed the Municipal Council’s refusal to initiate a privatisation procedure pursuant to the applicant company’s proposal under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act and referred the case to the Municipal Council for re-examination (see paragraphs 13-14 above). Thereafter, the Municipal Council not only had an obligation to comply with the said judgment but it also had a statutory obligation under section 35(2) of the Privatisation Act to initiate the preferential privatisation procedure within two months of the judgment becoming final, prepare the privatisation of the property at issue and offer to sell the property to the entitled party at the preferential price equal to the property’s valuation (see paragraphs 20 and 21 above). However, it failed to do so. What is more, by finalising a separate privatisation procedure and selling the property at issue to another buyer, it rendered any such enforcement impossible.
33. This is sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that in the case at hand there has been a violation of the applicant’s company right to have a final judgment in its favour enforced, as an aspect of its right of access to a court, as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
34. The applicant company further complained that the Municipal Council had infringed its statutory right to purchase the shop under the preferential conditions of section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act.
The Court finds that the complaint falls to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
35. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
36. The applicant company considered that in its judgment of 5 March 1998 the City Court had recognised that it met the preconditions under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act, that the Municipal Council had been obliged to sell to it the property and that it therefore had a legitimate expectation of buying the shop under the preferential conditions.
37. The Government contested this argument. They considered that the Municipal Council had enjoyed discretion as to what action to take pursuant to the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998 and that the applicant company had not had any legitimate expectation of being offered the shop for purchase.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) The existence of “possessions”
38. The Court reiterates that an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions related to his “possessions” within the meaning of this provision. “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (see Maltzan and Others v. Germany (dec.) [GC], nos. 71916/01, 71917/01 and 10260/02, § 74(c), ECHR 2005-V, and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35(c), ECHR 2004-IX).
39. As the present case does not concern any existing possessions of the applicant company, it remains to be examined whether it could have had any “legitimate expectation” of realising a property right.
40. The Court reiterates in this respect that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see Slivenko and Others v. Latvia (dec.) [GC], no. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II, and Kopecký, cited above, § 35(b)). However, the Court notes that in restitution cases it has held that once a Contracting State, having ratified the Convention including Protocol No. 1, enacts legislation providing for the full or partial restoration of property confiscated under a previous regime, such legislation may be regarded as generating a new property right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying the requirements for entitlement. The same may apply in respect of arrangements for restitution or compensation established under pre-ratification legislation, if such legislation remained in force after the Contracting State’s ratification of Protocol No. 1 (see Maltzan and Others v. Germany, cited above, § 74(d) and Kopecký, cited above, § 35(d)).
41. The Court finds it appropriate to apply this standard in the present case, which does not concern restitution of formerly nationalised property but the right to privatise leased municipal properties under preferential conditions once the person satisfies certain criteria and requirements for the said entitlement.
42. In this respect, the Court observes that domestic law as in force at the time outlined the conditions allowing a lessee of municipally-owned property to benefit from the preferential procedure under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act, namely the rent contract concerning the property at issue should have been concluded before 15 October 1993 and be still in force on the date of the respective privatisation proposal (see paragraph 20 above). The Court further notes that in its judgment of 5 March 1998 the City Court concluded that the applicant company met those conditions (see paragraph 13 above). The Court does not see a reason to doubt this conclusion, as it observes that the rent contract in the case was indeed concluded on 1 October 1991 and expired on 2 July 1996 (see paragraphs 7-8 and 10 above) whereas the privatisation proposal was made on 29 June 1995 (see paragraph 9 above), that is while the contract was still in force.
43. Furthermore, the Court notes that section 35(2) of the Privatisation Act, as in force at the time, provided that where the courts had quashed a refusal to initiate privatisation following a proposal by the interested party under section 35(1), as in the present case, the competent body was obliged to initiate privatisation procedure and to offer to sell the property to the entitled party (see paragraph 21 above). In view of the unequivocal wording of the provision of section 35(2), the Court cannot accept the Government’s argument that domestic law left the Municipal Council any room for discretion. In fact, under domestic law the Municipal Council had no latitude as to whether to commence a privatisation procedure under section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act, or as to the conditions of the future transaction, including the price to be paid by the prospective buyer (see paragraph 20 above).
44. In view of the above, the Court concludes that the applicant company had a legitimate expectation consisting of the right to be offered to purchase the shop at issue under the preferential conditions of section 35(1) of the Privatisation Act (see paragraph 20 above). Accordingly, the applicant company had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) The existence of interference
45. The Court considers that the Municipal Council’s failure to initiate a preferential privatisation procedure following the City Court’s judgment of 5 March 1998 and to offer to sell the shop to the applicant company represented an interference with the latter’s right to peaceful enjoyment of its possessions.
(c) The lawfulness of the interference
46. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000-XII).
47. In the case at hand, following the judgment of 5 March 1998 the Municipal Council had a statutory obligation under section 35(2) of the Privatisation Act to initiate the preferential privatisation procedure within two months of the judgment becoming final, prepare the privatisation of the property at issue and offer to sell the property to the entitled party at the preferential price equal to the property’s valuation (see paragraphs 20 and 21 above). However, it failed to comply with its statutory obligation and instead finalised a separate privatisation procedure by selling the property at issue to another buyer.
48. Therefore, the interference with the applicant company’s right to peaceful enjoyment of its possessions was not in accordance with domestic law and did not meet the requirement of lawfulness under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
49. It follows that there has been a breach of that provision.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
50. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
51. The applicant company claimed, in respect of pecuniary damage, the 2006 market value of the shop, reduced by the preferential price it would have paid had it been offered the property in 1996, plus interest. The applicant company submitted an expert report commissioned by it, assessing the market value of the shop in 2006 at 78,200 Bulgarian levs (BGN, 39,983 euros (EUR)), and the preferential price it would have paid in 1996 at BGN 9,962 (EUR 5,093). The difference claimed by the applicant company amounted therefore to BGN 68,238 (EUR 34,890).
52. The applicant company also claimed compensation for lost profit from the use of the shop in the amount of the market rent it would have received had it rented out the property between 1996 and 2006. On the basis of the above-mentioned expert report, it assessed its profit lost at BGN 49,463 (EUR 25,290).
53. The Government did not comment.
54. In the circumstances, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision in so far as it concerns the claims for damages, and reserves it, due regard being had to the possibility that an agreement between the applicant company and the respondent Government be reached (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of the Court).
B. Costs and expenses
55. For costs and expenses, the applicant company claimed EUR 1,100 for 22 hours of work by its legal representative, Mrs S., at an hourly rate of EUR 50. Furthermore, the applicant company claimed BGN 200 (EUR 100) for the cost of the expert report it submitted (see paragraph 51 above) and BGN 238 (EUR 120) for the translation of its observations in the present proceedings. In support of these claims it presented a contract for legal representation, a time sheet and the relevant receipts. It requested that any sum awarded under this head be transferred directly into the bank account of Mrs S..
56. The Government did not comment.
57. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum.
58. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers that the costs and expenses claimed were actually and necessarily incurred and reasonable as to quantum. It thus awards in full the amounts claimed, that is EUR 1,320 in total, to be transferred directly into the bank account of the applicant company’s legal representative.
C. Default interest
59. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible and accordingly dismisses the Government’s objection for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision in so far as it concerns the claims for damages;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant company to submit, within two months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant company, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 1,320 (one thousand three hundred and twenty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable on the applicant company, in respect of costs and expenses, to be transferred directly into the bank account of its legal representative, Mrs S.;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 7 January 2010, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA BASARBA OOD C. BULGARIA
(Richiesta n. 77660/01)
SENTENZA
(i meriti)
STRASBOURG
7 gennaio 2010
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Basarba OOD c. Bulgaria,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska giudici, Pavlina Panova giudice ad hoc,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato il 1 dicembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 77660/01) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da una società bulgara a responsabilità limitata, B. O. (“la società richiedente”), il 13 novembre 2001.
2. La società richiedente fu rappresentata col Sig.ra N. S., un avvocato che pratica a Sofia. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra M. Kotseva, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. La società richiedente addusse che le autorità erano andate a vuoto nell’ attenersi con una sentenza definitiva di corte a suo favore e l'avevano spogliata della sua aspettativa legittima di acquisire una proprietà posseduta al municipio.
4. Il 4 gennaio 2006 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
5. Il Giudice Kalaydjieva, il giudice eletto a riguardo della Bulgaria, rinunciò a riunirsi nella causa. Il 30 gennaio 2009 il Governo nominò a suo posto la Sig.ra Pavlina Panova come giudice ad hoc (Articolo 27 § 2 della Convenzione e Articolo 29 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. La società richiedente fu fondata nel 1991 e ha sede a Sofia.
7. Il 1 ottobre 1991 firmò un contratto d'affitto con una catena di supermercati posseduti dal municipio sotto il quale affittò uno dei suoi negozi (“il negozio”). Il termine dell'accordo era sino al 1 ottobre 1994.
8. Con un accordo supplementare del 1 settembre 1992 il termine dell'accordo fu prolungato fino al 1 settembre 1997.
9. Il 29 giugno 1995 la società richiedente presentò una proposta al Consiglio Municipale di Sofia per acquistare il negozio sotto la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale per affittuari dello Stato e proprietà possedute dal municipio prevista nella sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 20 sotto).
10. Con un ulteriore accordo supplementare del 2 gennaio 1996 il termine dell'accordo di contratto d'affitto riguardo al negozio fu corretto e fu fatto scadere il 2 luglio 1996.
11. In una decisione del 27 settembre 1996 il Consiglio Municipale respinse la richiesta della società richiedente del 29 giugno 1995 per i motivi che le condizioni sotto la sezione 35(1) dell’ Atto di Privatizzazione non era state rispettate perché l'accordo del contratto d'affitto per il negozio “presentava una data posteriore a quella del 15 ottobre 1993.”
12. Il 24 ottobre 1996 la società richiedente fece ricorso contro il rifiuto.
13. In una sentenza del 5 marzo 1998 la Corte della Città di Sofia si espresse a favore della società richiedente, annullò la decisione del Consiglio Municipale del 27 settembre 1996 e rimandò la questione a questo per riesame. Trovò che il 15 ottobre 1993 la società richiedente era stata un'affittuaria del negozio e che nel respingere la sua proposta di privatizzazione sulla base che non c’era stato un affittuario il Consiglio Municipale aveva agito in violazione della legge.
14. Il Consiglio Municipale non fece ricorso contro la sentenza e divenne definitiva il 2 aprile 1998.
15. Il 7 maggio 1998 la società richiedente informò il Consiglio Municipale della sentenza a suo favore ed invitò quest’ultima ad implementare la decisione della corte vendendogli il negozio in conformità con gli articoli applicabili. Nessuna causa fu intentata in risposta dal Consiglio Municipale.
16. Il 4 maggio 2001 la società richiedente fece ancora una volta petizione contro il Consiglio Municipale per implementare la sentenza della Corte della Città del 5 marzo 1998.
17. In risposta, con una lettera del 9 luglio 2001 l’ AGENZIA Municipale di Privatizzazione di Sofia informò la società richiedente che il 27 aprile 1998 il Consiglio Municipale aveva trasformato la catena di supermercati posseduti dal municipio ed aveva reso indipendenti due società da questa; il negozio era stato incluso nel capitale di una di queste società che erano state privatizzate il 24 febbraio 1999.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
18. L’Atto di Trasformazione e Privatizzazione delle Imprese di proprietà dello Stato o del municipio (Закон за преобразуване и приватизация на държавни и общински предприятия: “l’Atto di Privatizzazione”), adottato nel 1992, prevede la trasformazione della proprietà pubblica e la privatizzazione delle imprese di proprietà dello Stato o del municipio. Nel marzo 2002 fu sostituito con un’altra legislazione.
19. La Sezione 3 dell'Atto indicava i corpi competente per prendere delle decisioni di privatizzazione. Per proprietà possedute dal municipio questi erano i rispettivi consigli municipali.
20. La Sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione prevede che gli affittuari di proprietà possedute dallo Stato e dal municipio potrebbe proporre di comprare le proprietà affittate da loro, senza un'asta pubblica o la competizione e per un prezzo uguale alla valutazione della proprietà preparata da esperti muniti di certificato in conformità con le norme adottate dal Governo. Quelle condizioni preferenziali erano applicabili ad affittuari di proprietà possedute dallo Stato e dal municipio che aveva concluso contratti d'affitto prima del 15 ottobre 1993 e dove detti contratto erano ancora in vigore in data della rispettiva proposta di privatizzazione.
21. La Sezione 35(2) dell’ Atto di Privatizzazione, come tradotta in parole dopo ottobre 1997, prevedeva che dove un rifiuto col corpo amministrativo competente di iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione a seguito di una proposta da parte della parte interessata era stato annullato per mezzo di una sentenza definitiva di corte, il corpo amministrativo attinente era obbligato, entro due mesi dalla sentenza diventata definitiva, ad iniziare la procedura di privatizzazione, preparare la privatizzazione della proprietà in questione ed offrire di vendere la proprietà alla parte riguardata.
22. In una caso simile, in una decisione del 10 febbraio 1998 la Corte amministrativa Suprema dichiarò inammissibile un ricorso contro il fallimento del Consiglio Municipale di Sofia di implementare una sentenza definitiva contro di sé con cui un precedente rifiuto di iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione sotto la sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione era stato annullato. La Corte amministrativa Suprema trovò che il ricorso riguardava la mancanza di esecuzione di una precedente sentenza che non era soggetta a controllo giurisdizionale separato perché non rappresentava un nuovo “ rifiuto” a privatizzare (vedere decisione n. 310 10 febbraio 1998, causa n. 929/1997).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
23. La società richiedente si lamentò che il Consiglio Municipale era andato a vuoto ad attenersi con la sentenza della Corte Urbana di 5 marzo 1998 nel suo favore, in violazione di Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, in finora come attinente, letture:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale ...”
A. Ammissibilità
24. Il Governo esortò la Corte a respingere l'azione di reclamo come inammissibile per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali siccome la società richiedente non aveva fatto ricorso contro l'insuccesso del Consiglio Municipale per attenersi con la sentenza della Corte della Città del 5 marzo 1998. La società richiedente contestò questo argomento.
25. La Corte richiama che ha trovato spesso essere improprio richiedere ad un individuo che ha ottenuto una sentenza contro lo Stato alla fine di procedimenti legali introdurre poi dei procedimenti di esecuzione per ottenere soddisfazione (vedere, per esempio, Metaxas c. Grecia, n. 8415/02, § 19, 27 maggio 2004, e Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 198 il 2006-V di ECHR).
26. Comunque, anche se la presente causa deve essere considerata differentemente siccome il giudizio della Corte Urbana del 5 marzo 1998 era un ordine di intraprendere particolari azioni, piuttosto che un giudizio di denaro, il Governo non ha presentato qualsiasi giurisprudenza nazionale o sentenza in appoggio della sua asserzione che questa era una via di ricorso che avrebbe potuto avere successo. Al contrario, la giurisprudenza nazionale che è stata identificata (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra) indica che tale ricorso non sarebbe stato esaminato anche dai tribunali. Di conseguenza, la Corte non vede ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa da quella delle cause sopra e respinge l'eccezione del Governo sulla base del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
27. Inoltre, la Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
28. La società richiedente dibatté che il Consiglio Municipale era obbligato, in virtù della sezione 35(2) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra), ad eseguire la sentenza della Corte della Città del 5 marzo 1998 iniziando una procedura di privatizzazione e vendendogli il negozio. Comunque, il Consiglio non solo era andato a vuoto nel fare così ma aveva in effetti ostacolato e reso impossibile l'esecuzione della detta sentenza vendendo il negozio ad un'altra parte.
29. Il Governo dibatté che la sentenza del 5 marzo 1998 non obbligò imperativamente il Consiglio Municipale a vendere il negozio alla società richiedente ma lasciò la decisione a discrezione del Consiglio. Il Governo considerò che il Consiglio non era andato a vuoto nell’ attenersi con la detta sentenza.
2. La valutazione della Corte
30. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione garantisce ad ognuno il diritto a portare qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti civili ed obblighi di fronte ad una corte o tribunale; in questo modo incarna il “diritto ad un tribunale” il cui diritto di accesso cioè il diritto di avviare procedimenti di fronte a tribunali in questioni civili costituisce un aspetto. Comunque, questo diritto sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di uno Stato Contraente concedesse ad una decisione giudiziale vincolante e definitiva di rimanere non operante a danno di una parte. L’esecuzione di una sentenza resa da un tribunale deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “ processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, sentenza del 19 marzo 1997, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II, p. 510, § 40, e Burdov c. Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 67 ECHR 2009 -...).
31. Rivolgendosi alla causa in questione, la Corte osservando che la sentenza della Corte Urbana del 5 marzo 1998 riguardava il diritto addotto della società richiedente ad acquisire una certa proprietà sotto condizioni preferenziali, è della prospettiva che la detta sentenza era determinative per i diritti civili ed obblighi della società richiedente, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Perciò, l’Articolo 6 § 1 è applicabile alla causa.
32. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il 5 marzo 1998 la Corte della Città annullò il rifiuto del Consiglio Municipale di iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione facendo seguito alla proposta della società richiedente sotto la sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione e riferì la causa al Consiglio Municipale per riesame (vedere paragrafi 13-14 sopra). Il Consiglio Municipale non solo aveva da allora in poi, un obbligo di attenersi con la detta sentenza ma aveva anche un obbligo legale sotto la sezione 35(2) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione di iniziare la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale entro due mesi dalla sentenza diventata definitiva, preparare la privatizzazione della proprietà in questione ed offrire di vendere la proprietà alla parte riguardata al prezzo preferenziale uguale alla valutazione della proprietà (vedere paragrafi 20 e 21 sopra). Comunque, non riuscì a fare così. Inoltre, finalizzando una procedura di privatizzazione separata e vendendo la proprietà in questione ad un altro acquirente, rese qualsiasi simile esecuzione impossibile.
33. Questo è sufficiente per abilitare la Corte a concludere che nella causa in questione c’ è stata una violazione del diritto della società richiedente di far eseguire una sentenza definitiva a suo favore, come un aspetto del suo diritto di accesso ad un tribunale, come garantito dall’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
34. La società richiedente si lamentò inoltre che il Consiglio Municipale aveva infranto il suo diritto legale di acquistare il negozio sotto le condizioni preferenziali della sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione.
La Corte costata che l'azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che recita:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
35. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
36. La società richiedente considerò che nella sua sentenza del 5 marzo 1998 la Corte della Città aveva riconosciuto che soddisfece i requisiti indispensabili sotto la sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione che il Consiglio Municipale era stato obbligato a venderle la proprietà e che aveva perciò un'aspettativa legittima di comprare il negozio sotto le condizioni preferenziali.
37. Il Governo contestò questo argomento. Considerò che il Consiglio Municipale aveva goduto di discrezione riguardo a quale azione prendere facendo seguito alla sentenza della Corte Urbana del 5 marzo 1998 e che la società richiedente non aveva avuto qualsiasi aspettativa legittima di vedersi offrire il negozio per l’acquisto.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) L'esistenza della “proprietà”
38. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nella misura in cui le decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere una “proprietà esistente” o dei beni, incluse le rivendicazioni a riguardo delle quali il richiedente può dibattere di avere almeno una “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (vedere Maltzan ed Altri c. Germania (dec.) [GC], N. 71916/01, 71917/01 e 10260/02 § 74(c), il 2005-V di ECHR, e Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35(c), ECHR 2004-IX).
39. Siccome la presente causa non riguarda qualsiasi proprietà esistente della società richiedente, rimane da esaminare se avrebbe potuto avere qualsiasi “aspettativa legittima” di realizzazione di un diritto di proprietà.
40. La Corte reitera a questo riguardo che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non garantisce il diritto ad acquisire proprietà (vedere Slivenko ed Altri c. Lettonia (dec.) [GC], n. 48321/99, § 121, ECHR 2002-II, e Kopecký citata sopra, § 35(b)). Comunque, la Corte nota che in casi di restituzione ha sostenuto che una volta che un Stato Contraente, avendo ratificato la Convenzione incluso il Protocollo N.ro 1, decreta la legislazione che prevede la restituzione piena o parziale della proprietà confiscata sotto un precedente regime, simile legislazione che genera un nuovo diritto di proprietà protetto dall’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 può essere considerata per persone che soddisfano i requisiti per diritto. Gli stessi si possono applicare a riguardo di disposizioni per la restituzione o il risarcimento stabiliti sotto la legislazione pre-ratifica, se simile legislazione rimane in vigore dopo la ratifica dello Stato Contraente di Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Maltzan ed Altri c. la Germania, citata sopra, § 74(d) e Kopecký, citata sopra, § 35(d)).
41. La Corte trova appropriato applicare questo standard alla presente causa che non riguarda la restituzione di una proprietà precedentemente nazionalizzata ma il diritto a privatizzare proprietà municipali in affitto sotto condizioni preferenziali una volta che la persona soddisfa certi criteri e requisiti per detto il diritto.
42. A questo riguardo, la Corte osserva, che il diritto nazionale come in vigore al tempo sottolineava le condizioni che permettevano ad un affittuario di proprietà possedute dal municipio di trarre profitto dalla procedura preferenziale sotto la sezione (35) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione, vale a dire il contratto di affitto riguardo alla proprietà in questione avrebbe dovuto essere concluso prima del 15 ottobre 1993 e avrebbe dovuto essere stato ancora in vigore nella data della rispettiva proposta di privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). La Corte nota inoltre che nella sua sentenza del 5 marzo 1998 la Corte della Città concluse che la società richiedente soddisfaceva quelle condizioni (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). La Corte non vede alcuna ragione di dubitare questa conclusione, siccome osserva che il contratto di affitto nella causa fu concluso davvero il 1 ottobre 1991 ed era scaduto il 2 luglio 1996 (vedere paragrafi 7-8 e 10 sopra) mentre la proposta di privatizzazione fu fatta il 29 giugno 1995 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra), cioè mentre il contratto era ancora in vigore.
43. Inoltre, la Corte nota che la sezione 35(2) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione, come in vigore al tempo, prevedeva che dove i tribunali avevano annullato un rifiuto ad iniziare una privatizzazione a seguito di una proposta con la parte interessata sotto la sezione 35(1), come nella causa presente, il corpo competente era obbligato ad iniziare la procedura di privatizzazione e ad offrire di vendere la proprietà alla parte riguardata (veda paragrafo 21 sopra). Nella prospettiva dell'enunciazione inequivocabile della disposizione della sezione 35(2), la Corte non può accettare l'argomento del Governo per cui il diritto nazionale lasciò al Consiglio Municipale qualsiasi spazio per la discrezione. Infatti, sotto il diritto nazionale il Consiglio Municipale non aveva latitudine riguardo a se cominciare una procedura di privatizzazione sotto la sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione, o riguardo alle condizioni dell'operazione futura, incluso il prezzo da pagare da parte dell' eventuale acquirente (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra).
44. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte conclude, che la società richiedente aveva un'aspettativa legittima che consisteva nel diritto di vedersi offrire l’acquisto del negozio in questione sotto le condizioni preferenziali della sezione 35(1) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Di conseguenza, la società richiedente aveva una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) L'esistenza di un’ interferenza
45. La Corte considera che l'insuccesso del Consiglio Municipale nell’ iniziare una procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale a seguito della sentenza della Corte Urbana del 5 marzo 1998 e nell’offrire di vendere il negozio alla società richiedente rappresentò un'interferenza col diritto di quest’ultima al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
(c) La legalità dell'interferenza
46. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà deve essere legale (vedere Re Precedente di Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000-XII).
47. Nella presente causa, a seguito della sentenza di 5 marzo 1998 il Consiglio Municipale aveva un obbligo legale sotto la sezione 35(2) dell’Atto di Privatizzazione di iniziare la procedura di privatizzazione preferenziale entro due mesi dalla sentenza diventata definitiva, di preparare la privatizzazione della proprietà in questione e di offrire di vendere la proprietà alla parte riguradata al prezzo preferenziale uguale alla valutazione della proprietà (vedere paragrafi 20 e 21 sopra). Comunque, non riuscì ad attenersi con il suo obbligo legale ed invece fece alla fine una procedura di privatizzazione separata vendendo la proprietà in questione ad un altro acquirente.
48. Perciò, l'interferenza col diritto della società richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà non era in conformità con il diritto nazionale e non soddisfece il requisito della legalità sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
49. Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione di quella disposizione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
50. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
51. La società richiedente chiese, a riguardo del danno patrimoniale, il valore di mercato del 2006 del negozio, ridotto del prezzo preferenziale che avrebbe pagato se gli fosse stata offerta la proprietà nel 1996, più interesse. La società richiedente presentò un rapporto competente commissionato da lei, valutando il valore di mercato del negozio nel 2006 a 78,200 lev bulgari (BGN, 39,983 euro (EUR)), ed il prezzo preferenziale che avrebbe pagato nel 1996 a BGN 9,962 (EUR 5,093). La differenza chiesta dalla società richiedente corrispondeva perciò a BGN 68,238 (EUR 34,890).
52. La società richiedente ha anche chiesto il risarcimento per profitto perduto dall'uso del negozio nell'importo del mercato dell'affittato che avrebbe ricevuto se avesse affittato la proprietà fra il 1996 ed il 2006. Sulla base del summenzionato rapporto competente, valutò il suo profitto perso a BGN 49,463 (EUR 25,290).
53. Il Governo non fece commenti.
54. Nelle circostanze, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è finora pronta per una decisione per quanto riguarda le rivendicazioni per danni, e la riserve, avendo riguardo alla possibilità che la società richiedente ed il Governo rispondente giungano ad un accordo (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento della Corte).
B. Costi e spese
55. Per costi e spese, la società richiedente chiese EUR 1,100 per 22 ore di lavoro del suo rappresentante legale, la Sig.ra S., ad un tasso orario di EUR 50. Inoltre, la società richiedente chiese BGN 200 (EUR 100) per il costo del rapporto competente presentato (vedere paragrafo 51 sopra) e BGN 238 (EUR 120) per la traduzione delle sue osservazioni nei presenti procedimenti. In appoggio a queste rivendicazioni presentò un contratto per rappresentanza legale, un foglio orario e le ricevute attinenti. Richiese che qualsiasi somma assegnata sotto questo capo venisse trasferita direttamente sul conto bancario della Sig.ra S..
56. Il Governo non fece commenti.
57. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso di costi e spese solamente nella misura che viene mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli relativamente al quantum.
58. nella presente causa, avuto riguardo ai documenti in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera che i costi e le spese chieste davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti in e sono ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Assegna così in pieno gli importi chiesti, cioè EUR 1,320 in totale, da trasferire direttamente sul conto bancario del rappresentante legale della società richiedente.
C. Interesse di mora
59. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile e di conseguenza respinge l'eccezione del Governo per non-esaurimento dele via di ricorso nazionali;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 non è finora pronta per una decisione per quanto riguarda le rivendicazioni per danni;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserve la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo e la società richiedente a presentare, entro due mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare la società richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 1,320 (mille trecento e venti euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile sulla società richiedente, a riguardo di costi e spese da trasferire direttamente sul conto bancario del suo rappresentante legale, la Sig.ra S.;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 7 gennaio 2010, facendo seguito all’Articolo77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.