Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BUGAJNY AND OTHERS v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 29, P1-1

NUMERO: 22531/05/2007
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 06/11/2007
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF BUGAJNY AND OTHERS v. POLAND
(Application no. 22531/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
6 November 2007
Request for referral to the Grand Chamber pending
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Bugajny and Others v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Mr J. Casadevall, President,
Mr G. Bonello,
Mr K. Traja,
Mr S. Pavlovschi,
Mr L. Garlicki,
Ms L. Mijović,
Mr J. Å ikuta, judges,
and Mrs F. Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 9 October 2007,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 22531/05) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court on 31 May 2005 under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three Polish nationals, Mr P.B., Mr T. R. and Mr J. S. (“the applicants”). The applicants were represented before the Court by Mr A. Z., a lawyer practising in Poznań.
2. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicants alleged that their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions had been breached.
4. On 24 November 2005 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The first applicant was born in 1963. The second and third applicants were born in 1964. They live in Poznań.
A. Proceedings before the administrative authorities
6. The company “T.” Ltd. in which the applicants own all of the shares owned an estate of 6 hectares situated in Poznań. In 1995 the company requested the local administration to give a decision on the division of the estate, a decision necessary to proceed with construction on the land.
7. Eventually, on 15 November 1999 the Municipal Office gave a decision by which the division of the estate was approved. Certain plots of land were designated for construction purposes and others for open space and garages. A number of plots were designated for construction of “internal estate roads”. This decision became final on 30 November 1999.
8. Subsequently, the applicant company, relying on the provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997, requested the Mayor of Poznań to determine the compensation due for the plots designated for road construction. It submitted that under the relevant provisions of that Act plots designated, by virtue of decisions on the division of properties into smaller plots, were expropriated ex lege on the date on which such decisions became final.
9. By a decision of 15 March 2000 the President of the Poznań City dismissed the application to have the compensation determined, holding that the roads to be built on the estate concerned had not been provided for in the local land development plan. Hence, in the November 1999 decision they had been designated as “internal roads” which would serve the inhabitants of a housing estate the construction of which the company had been planning. Not having been provided for in the local land development plan, these roads did not belong to the category of public roads. Under the provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997, as amended in January 2000, only plots designated for the construction of “public roads” were to be expropriated ex lege, and only in respect of such expropriated plots could compensation be sought. In the applicants' case, the plots in question were designated for internal roads; they had therefore not been expropriated and, consequently, no compensation could be determined.
10. The applicants appealed. They argued that the roads to be constructed on the housing estate were to be public, for all practical purposes. They were to be open to all roads users, including all means of public and private transport. The term “internal roads” used in the contested decision did not exist in the Land Administration Act 1997 as applicable in November 1999. This Act had been amended after this decision had been given and it was only in its amended text that it was clearly stated that compensation was due only for “public” roads (see paragraphs 30-31 below).
11. The fact that the plots concerned were referred to in the decision of November 1999 as designated for the construction of “internal” roads was an unlawful attempt to deprive them of a public character and to exempt them thereby from the operation of that Act insofar as it provided for ex lege expropriation of plots designated for road construction. Most importantly, it was an attempt to evade the obligation to pay compensation for such plots.
12. The applicants further argued that the fact that these roads had not been provided for in the local land development plan was immaterial, given that the decision of 15 November 1999 had obviously been given in such a way as to be consistent with the local land development plan. Otherwise, the division of the estate could not have been approved.
13. They lastly argued that the decision complained of breached the constitutional guarantees of ownership.
14. On 31 May 2000 the Wielkopolski Governor upheld the decision. The Governor's decision referred to section 98 of the 1997 Act as applicable when the November 1999 decision had been given. It provided that plots designated for road construction under a decision on the division of property for the construction purposes were expropriated ex lege on the date on which such a decision became final. However, the essential purpose of the decisions on the division of property was to serve the implementation of local land development plans. In the absence of the inclusion in such a plan of roads on the land subject to the division decision given in the applicants' case in November 1999, the plots designated for road construction could not be regarded as designated for the construction of “public roads”. Hence, there were no grounds on which to expropriate them and to grant compensation to the owners.
15. The applicants appealed, essentially reiterating their arguments submitted in their appeal against the first-instance decision.
16. On 16 October 2001 the Supreme Administrative Court dismissed the appeal. It referred to section 93 (1) and (3) of the Land Administration Act 1997. It noted that under these provisions a decision on the division of property into smaller plots could be given only if the division proposal was compatible with the local land development plan and if the newly created plots had access to a public road.
17. In the present case the local development plan did not provide for any public roads on the land owned by the company. Hence, the fact that certain parts of the land as divided under the November 1999 decision had been designated for construction of roads could not entail their automatic expropriation under section 98 of the same Act. These roads remained in the ownership of the company and there were therefore no grounds on which to determine compensation.
18. In so far as the applicants relied on decisions of the Supreme Administrative Court in which it had expressed the view that under section 98 of the 1997 Act all land designated for roads in the division decisions was subject to expropriation ex lege, the court noted that judgments given in other cases were not binding on it.
19. It further noted that the February 2000 amendment to section 98 of the Land Administration Act 1997 (see paragraph 31 below) which provided that land designated for the construction of public roads only was subject to expropriation:
“did not so much limit the scope of roads to which that provision was applicable, but was only intended to make more precise the intentions of the lawmaker regarding [the application ] of this Act”.
It concluded that that the contested decision was in conformity with the law.
2. The civil proceedings
20. Later on, the applicants' lodged a claim in a civil court seeking a declaration under Article 189 of the Civil Code as to who was the owner of the plot of land concerned, listed in the land register as plot No. 6/25 and covering a surface area of 5,843 square metres.
21. By a judgment of 25 June 2003 the Poznań Regional Court established that the owner of the plots was Poznań City.
22. The court considered, inter alia, that the plan for the division of the land as adopted in the November 1999 decision was concordant with the local land development plan. It further observed that such compliance was an essential condition for the decision on division to be given in the first place. The court further noted that the local zoning plan was of a very general character and contained practically no details as to the planning of roads, apart from major thoroughfares, and that it did not determine which roads were to be regarded as public. In these circumstances, the court was of the view, having regard to the public use of the roads on the property concerned, that they had been expropriated by the city.
23. Poznań City appealed.
24. By a judgment of 9 December 2003 the Poznań Court of Appeal dismissed the claim for a declaration. It considered that the company had no legal interest in seeking clarification of the legal situation of the plots concerned by way of a declaratory judgment under Article 189 of the Code of Civil Procedure. The legal situation of the land had already been determined by the judgment of the Supreme Administrative Court which was binding on the civil court. Pursuant to this decision, the claimant remained the owners of the plots in question.
25. The court further observed:
“Obviously, there was also another legal problem in the case. The conduct of the city in the present case had caused a situation in which the owner could not use his land freely, as provided for in Article 140 of the Civil Code. At the same time, the property serves one of the purposes [road construction] which normally should be ensured by the local municipality; what is more, it is the owner who bears the costs of achieving of this purpose.
It can be argued that a situation worse even than a so-called de facto expropriation obtains in the present case. This is so because under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention the term “expropriation” covers not only formal expropriation or restriction of ownership carried out in proper expropriation proceedings. The case-law of the Strasbourg Court also distinguishes a category of de facto expropriation, namely such acts by the public authorities which lead to a practical deprivation of possessions or to restrictions on their use (Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece, 1993).”
26. The applicants lodged a cassation appeal with the Supreme Court. By a decision of 5 November 2004, served on the applicants on 1 December 2004, it refused to examine it.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
1. Relevant constitutional provisions and case-law
27. Article 21 of the Constitution provides:
“1. The Republic of Poland shall protect property and a right to inherit.
2. Expropriation is allowed only in the public interest and against payment of just compensation.”
28. Article 31of the Constitution reads:
“Freedom of the person shall be legally protected.
Everyone shall respect the freedoms and rights of others. No one shall be compelled to do anything which is not required by law.
Any limitation upon the exercise of constitutional freedoms and rights may by imposed only by statute, and only when necessary in a democratic state for the protection of its security or public order, or to protect the natural environment, health or public morals, or the freedoms and rights of other persons. Such limitations shall not violate the essence of freedoms and rights.”
29. Article 79 § 1 of the Constitution provides as follows:
“In accordance with principles specified by statute, everyone whose constitutional freedoms or rights have been infringed, shall have the right to appeal to the Constitutional Court for a judgment on the conformity with the Constitution of a statute or another normative act on the basis of which a court or an administrative authority has issued a final decision on his freedoms or rights or on his obligations specified in the Constitution.”
30. Under its settled case-law, the Constitutional Court has jurisdiction only to examine the compatibility of legal provisions with the Constitution and is not competent to examine the way in which courts interpreted applicable legal provisions in individual cases (e.g. SK 4/99, 19 October 1999; Ts 9/98, 6 April 1998; Ts 56/99, 21 June 1999).
31. On 8 May 1990 the Constitutional Court gave a judgment (K 1/90), following a request of the President of the Supreme Administrative Court to examine the compatibility of certain provisions of the 1985 Land Expropriation and Administration Act with the constitutional protection of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. The court noted that the impugned provisions of the 1985 Act provided, in respect of properties of an agricultural character, for a reduction of compensation to be paid to owners who had requested that they be divided, by way of an administrative decision, into smaller plots and to have certain plots of land expropriated for road construction purposes. This reduction was based on the premise that the land to be expropriated ceased to be used for agricultural purposes and that the negative results of such a change had to be offset by the owners.
The Constitutional Court observed that the nature of expropriations carried out in this context did not differ from expropriations effected for the purposes of public use, regardless of the fact that an expropriation was effected in proceedings different from ordinary expropriation proceedings. Hence, the provisions of the Constitution as they stood at that time and insofar as they provided for the protection of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions were applicable to such expropriations. The Constitution allowed for the expropriation of private properties only for the purposes of public use and only against compensation. Compensation, in order to comply with constitutional requirements, had to be just and fair. The notion of fair compensation, including for expropriation carried out at the request of the owner and in his or her interest, had to be in the amount corresponding to the value of the expropriated property. Only compensation satisfying these conditions was in compliance with the nature and purpose of the obligation of the public authorities to compensate an owner whose property was expropriated. Any restrictions on the right to a fair compensation, including by way of reductions of its amount, was in breach of constitutional principles.
2. Relevant provisions of the land expropriation legislation
32. On 1 January 1998 the Land Administration Act of 21 August 1997 (Ustawa o gospodarce nieruchomościami – “the 1997 Land Administration Act”) entered into force. Pursuant to section 112 of that Act, expropriation consists in taking away, by way of an administrative decision, of ownership or of other rights in rem. Expropriation can be carried out where public interest aims cannot be achieved without restriction of these rights and where it is impossible to acquire these rights by way of a civil law contract.
33. Under section 113 an expropriation can only be carried out for the benefit of the State Treasury or of the local municipality.
34. In accordance with section 128 § 1 of the Act, expropriation can be carried out against payment of compensation corresponding to the value of the property right concerned. Under section 130 § 1 of the Act, the amount of compensation shall be fixed, regard being had to the status and value of the property on the day on which the expropriation decision was given. The value of property shall be estimated on the basis of an opinion prepared by a certified expert.
35. Section 131 provides that a replacement property can be awarded to the expropriated owner, if he or she so agrees.
36. Pursuant to section 132, compensation shall be paid within fourteen days from the date on which the expropriation decision becomes subject to enforcement.
3. Changes in the relevant provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997
37. The question of expropriation of land for the purposes of road construction is regulated in that Act. Section 93 § 1 of the Act provides that the division of an estate into smaller plots is possible only when the division proposed by the owner is compatible with the local land development plan. Under § 3 of this section, a decision on the division can not be given if the plots resulting from the division would have no access to a public road. Access to a public road is also deemed to be available if a plot has access to an internal road.
38. Until 15 February 2000 section 98 of the Act read as follows:
1. Plots of land designated for the construction of roads in an administrative decision on the division of property shall be expropriated ex lege on the date on which such a division decision becomes final. (...)
3. The compensation due for such plots shall be established by way of negotiation between the expropriated owner and the relevant public authority; if negotiations fail, compensation shall be determined according to the principles applicable in respect of land expropriation.
39. On 15 February 2000 amendments to this Act came in force. Following these amendments, the text of subsection (1) read as follows:
“1. Plots of land designated in a decision on the division of property for the construction of public roads, such as municipal, county, regional and national roads shall be expropriated ex lege on the date on which such a division decision becomes final. (...) “
40. In a legal opinion of 29 May 2003, prepared for a different case from that of the applicants', the Central Urban Development Office stated that section 78 of the Land Administration Act in its version applicable until 15 February 2000 was a legal basis for the expropriation ex lege of all land designated for road construction purposes under decisions on the division of properties, regardless of whether these roads were of a public character or were to be considered internal roads, on the date when such decisions became final.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
41. The applicants alleged that their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions had been breached. They referred to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
42. The Government submitted that the applicants had failed to exhaust the relevant domestic remedies because they had not availed themselves of an individual constitutional complaint under Article 79 § 1 of the Constitution. The Court had recognised that, even if the Constitutional Court was not competent to quash individual decisions because its role was to rule on the constitutionality of laws, its judgments declaring a statutory or other provision unconstitutional gave rise to a right to have the impugned proceedings re-opened in an individual case. Consequently, the Government argued that, if the applicants had considered that certain provisions relied on in their case had violated their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, they should have asked the Constitutional Court to decide, by way of a judgment, whether those provisions were compatible with the Constitution.
43. The applicants submitted that the constitutional complaint was not a relevant remedy in their case. The applicable domestic law, namely section 98 of the Land Administration Act 1997, as it had stood before the amendment of 15 February 2000, was favourable to the applicants as it provided for expropriation ex lege and for compensation. They had not had any legal interest in challenging it and it was also plain that this provision was compatible with the Constitution.
44. The Court reiterates that it has held that a constitutional complaint is an effective remedy for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention only in situations where the alleged violation of the Convention resulted from the direct application of a legal provision considered by the complainant to be unconstitutional (see Szott-Medyńska v. Poland (dec.), no. 47414/99, 9 October 2003; Pachla v. Poland (dec.), no 8812/02, 8 November 2005; Wypych v. Poland (dec.), no. 2428/05, 25 October 2005).
45. In this connection, the Court observes that the breach of the Convention complained of in the present case cannot be said to have originated from the direct application of a legal provision which the applicants deemed to be unconstitutional. Rather, it resulted from the way in which various provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997, in particular its section 98 read in conjunction with section 93, were interpreted and applied in the applicants' case. However, it follows from the case-law of the Polish Constitutional Court that it lacks jurisdiction to examine the way in which the provisions of domestic law were applied in an individual case (see paragraph 30 above). The Government did not refer to any other domestic remedy which could have been used in this case.
46. The Court further notes that the civil court, in its judgment of 9 December 2003, stated that the applicants had no legal interest in obtaining a judgment clarifying their legal situation in respect of their entitlement to compensation because the matter had already been determined by the judgment of the administrative court (see paragraph 24 above). In the light of this conclusion of the domestic court, the Court is of the view that it has not been shown that the applicants had any other avenue open to them, judicial or otherwise, by which to try to vindicate their claim for expropriation and compensation.
47. Accordingly, the Court concludes, in the light of the above considerations, that the application cannot be rejected for failure to exhaust domestic remedies. The Court thus dismisses the Government's plea to that effect. It further notes that the application is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The Government's submissions
48. The Government averred that the assessment of the case had hinged on whether the roads concerned were public or not. They noted that the administrative authorities had found that, under systemic rules of interpretation, section 98 of the Land Administration Act 1997 as applicable at the material time concerned public roads only. There were no grounds on which to accept that this provision concerned all roads, regardless of whether they were public or not.
This approach was later specified in the amendment of February 2000 to that Act. In addition, the Supreme Administrative Court had also held, in its judgment of 16 October 2001 (see paragraph 17 above) that the roads on the applicants' land were not public because they had not been provided for in the local land development plan. Had that been the case, they would have been expropriated and compensation would have been paid.
The applicants' case could not be likened to the case of Papamichalopoulos v. Greece as in that case the applicants had lost all ability to make use of their property, to sell, bequeath, mortgage or make a gift of it. In the present case the applicants could use and dispose of the land concerned and no public authority had ever deprived them of possession of it.
49. The Government concluded that there had been no interference with the applicants' possessions as they remained the lawful owners of the land and could still use it. The mere fact that the land served public purposes in that it had been used for the construction of roads accessible to the general public and that the applicants had had to finance the construction of these roads themselves was insufficient for finding that their possessions had been interfered with.
50. In the absence of any interference, the Government stated that they would abstain from making any submissions as to the public interest, lawfulness and proportionality of the interference alleged by the applicants.
2. The applicants' submissions
51. The applicants submitted that they owned the entire estate, including the plot designated in the November 1999 decision for road construction purposes. However, this plot had to be used for such construction at the applicants' expense. Normally, under the applicable laws, the costs of the construction of local roads were to be borne by the local municipalities. By designating the plots concerned in the present case for the construction of roads, while considering that they were not to be regarded as “public”, the municipality had evaded its obligation to bear these costs. Moreover, it had de facto imposed such an obligation on the applicants.
52. The roads subsequently built on the estate served, for all practical purposes, as public roads and ensured access to the estate for the general public. Under the applicable legal provisions, a decision on the division of the property could not have been issued, had the division plan proposed by the applicants not complied with the requirements and restrictions originating in the local land development plan. Therefore, the roads on the estate constituted part of the normal road network in Poznań. The artificial description of the roads as “internal” served the purpose of evading the obligation on the part of the municipality to expropriate the land concerned and to pay compensation to the applicants.
53. The applicants submitted that the administrative authorities, when applying the provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997 as applicable in November 1999 to their case, had resorted to a systemic and teleological interpretation, but had entirely disregarded the plain meaning of section 98 of that Act according to which land designated for all roads was to be expropriated.
54. The applicants emphasised that they had been refused compensation by the municipality and that the administrative court had countenanced this decision. As a result of the manner in which the relevant provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997 had been applied in their case, the applicants had been de facto deprived of their property in a manner contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They referred to the judgment in the Papamichalopoulos v. Greece case in which the Court had found that the measures complained of had entailed sufficiently serious consequences for the applicants de facto to have been expropriated in a manner incompatible with their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
55. Theoretically the applicants could use the land concerned as its lawful owners, but only as roads. Therefore the possibility of their using the land was strictly limited. Nor could they, for obvious reasons, sell the roads to third parties.
3. The Court's assessment
56. The Court first reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which guarantees the right to the protection of one's possessions, contains three distinct rules: “The first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest [...]”. The three rules are not, however, 'distinct' in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among many other authorities, Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 62, ECHR 2007-...).
(a) Whether there was interference with the peaceful enjoyment of “possessions”
57. The Court must first examine whether there was interference with the peaceful enjoyment of the applicants' possessions.
58. In order to assess the conformity of the State's conduct with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must have regard to the fact that the Convention is intended to guarantee rights that are practical and effective. It must go beneath appearances and look into the reality of the situation, which requires an overall examination of the various interests in issue; this may call for an analysis not only of the compensation terms – if the situation is akin to the taking of property (see, for example, Lithgow and Others v the United Kingdom, judgment of 8 July 1986, Series A no. 102, pp. 50-51, §§ 120-121) – but also, as in the instant case, of the conduct of the State (Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 114, ECHR 2000-I, and Novoseltskiy v. Ukraine, no. 47148/98, ECHR 2005-II).
59. In the present case the applicants were obliged, by the authorities' refusal to expropriate the land and pay them compensation – a course of events which they might reasonably have expected in the light of the provisions on the expropriation of land designated for the construction of roads - to build the roads, to bear the costs of their construction and maintenance, and also, importantly, to accept the public use of their property. The measures complained of significantly reduced in practice the effective exercise of their ownership (mutatis mutandis, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, judgment of 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52, §§ 58-60; Skibińscy v. Poland, no. 52589/99, § 79, 14 November 2006).
The Court therefore concludes that there was indeed an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of the applicants' possessions.
60. The Court further observes that the findings of the domestic courts did not in any way adversely affect the applicants' position as the legal owners of the land. There is therefore no room for the application of the second sentence of the first paragraph in the present case (see, mutatis mutandis, Terazzi v. Italy, no. 27265/95, § 61, 17 October 2002).
61. Likewise, the measures complained of cannot be regarded as a control of use of property. Accordingly, the interference falls to be examined under the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (James and Others v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 21 February 1986, Series A no. 98, pp. 29-30, § 37; see also, among many other authorities, Belvedere Alberghiera S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 31524/96, § 51, ECHR 2000-VI).
(b) Whether the interference was “in the general interest”
62. Any interference with a right of property can only be justified if it serves a legitimate public (or general) interest. The Court reiterates that, because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to decide what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures interfering with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions (see Terazzi S.r.l. v. Italy, cited above, § 85, 17 October 2002; Elia S.r.l. v. Italy, no. 37710/97, § 77, ECHR 2001-IX).
63. In the present case the Court considers that the measures complained of pursued the legitimate aim of protecting the financial stability of the municipal budget. This corresponds to the general interest of the community (see, mutatis mutandis, Cooperativa La Laurentina v. Italy, no. 23529/94, § 94, 2 August 2001; Bahia Nova S.A. v. Spain, (dec.), no. 50924/99, 12 December 2000; Chapman v. the United Kingdom, no. 27238/95, § 82, ECHR 2001-I).
(c) Whether the interference was “provided for by law”
64. The Court reiterates in this connection that an essential condition for an interference to be deemed compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that it should be lawful. The rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II). However, the principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law be sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see, among other authorities, Hentrich v. France, judgment of 22 September 1994, Series A no. 296-A, pp. 19-20, § 42; Lithgow and Others v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 8 July 1986, Series A no. 102, p. 47, § 110).
65. In this connection the Court reiterates that it is in the first place for the domestic authorities, notably the courts, to interpret and apply domestic law (Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC] nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 86, ECHR 2005 - ). It observes that the interference with the applicants' property rights was based on the provisions of the Land Administration Act 1997. It further notes that the Supreme Administrative Court, in its judgment of 2001, found that the refusal to expropriate the plots in question was in compliance with the applicable laws.
66. In the light of the Court's limited jurisdiction to review the correctness of the judicial application of the domestic law, the Court concludes that the interference complained of satisfied the requirement of lawfulness within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(d) Proportionality of the interference
67. The Court must next examine whether the interference with the applicants' right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions struck the requisite fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights, or whether it imposed a disproportionate and excessive burden on them (see, among many other authorities, Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 93, ECHR 2005-VI).
68. The Court reiterates that, in the area of land development and town planning, the Contracting States should enjoy a wide margin of appreciation in order to implement their policies (see Terazzi S.r.l. and Elia S.r.l., cited above; Skibińscy v. Poland cited above, § 59). Nevertheless, in the exercise of its power of review, the Court must determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicant's right of property (see, mutatis mutandis, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, cited above, § 69).
69. The Court observes that the Supreme Administrative Court found, in its judgment of 16 October 2001, that the Land Administration Act, insofar as it provided for ex lege expropriation on the date on which the division of the property became final, was not applicable to the applicants' case. Therefore, the authorities refused to formally expropriate the plots belonging to the applicants and refused to determine the amount of compensation.
70. In this context, the Court notes that, following the division of the land owned by the applicants into smaller plots, the plots of land concerned in the present case were subsequently used for road construction purposes at the expense of the applicants. The applicants built also a housing estate on the remaining plots (see § 7 above). The Court observes that under the applicable provisions of the Land Administration Act, the division of the estate into smaller plots was possible because the division proposed by the owners was compatible with the local land development plan (see § 36 above). It further notes the applicants' argument that the roads built on the estate are connected to the network of public roads. They currently serve both the general public and the housing estate which the applicants developed and are open both to public and private transport of all kinds (see § 52 above). Given that the entire area of the housing estate covers nine hectares which were divided into as many as thirty-six plots of land designated for the construction purposes, it is reasonable to accept that a considerable number of people can be said to use these roads. It has not been shown or even argued that the access to the estate or the use of these roads is restricted or limited in any way. The situation examined in the present case must therefore be distinguished from that of “fenced” housing estates to which the public access is restricted by a decision of its inhabitants.
71. The only way in which the land in question can now be used is as roads. The applicants are also currently obliged to bear the costs of their maintenance. The Court emphasises that the burden which the applicants were made to bear is not limited in time in any way.
72. The Court observes that one of the arguments on which the authorities relied when refusing to expropriate the applicants' property was that the roads to be constructed on the estate had not been included in the local land development plan. However, it reiterates that it was not in dispute that the decision on the division could be issued only when the division plan submitted by the owners was compatible with the land development plan. The Court considers that by adopting such an approach the authorities could effectively evade the obligation to build and maintain roads other than major thoroughfares provided for in the plans and shift this obligation onto individual owners.
73. The Court finally notes that the Poznań Regional Court expressed serious doubts as to whether the applicants' situation was compatible with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This court expressly compared the applicants' position to that of the applicant in the Papamichalopoulos v. Greece case cited above and considered it to be “even worse”. In the Court's view, the applicants' situation in the present case was less serious than the situation examined in the Papamichalopoulos judgment, because they were not divested of all possibility of using their property. Nonetheless, such a critical assessment on the part of the domestic court is certainly, in the Court's view, of relevance for the overall assessment of the case.
74. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court is of the view that a fair balance was not struck between the competing general and individual interests and that the applicants had to bear an excessive individual burden.
75. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.”
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
76. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
77. The applicants claimed 1,019,988.50 Polish zlotys (PLN) in compensation for pecuniary damage and as reimbursement of costs and expenses. This amount was broken down as follows:
(i) PLN 946,566 in respect of the surface area of 5,843 square metres, covered by the plot of land currently being used as roads, the average price of 1 square metre of the estate being estimated on the basis of a report prepared by a certified expert submitted to the Court and dated February 2003, at PLN 152,07. The expert referred to the characteristics of the land in the area concerned and to the conditions obtaining on the local real-estate market in 2003. He noted that there was a period of stagnation on the market, linked to the general conditions in the national economy. However, the area offered attractive conditions and many transactions had been concluded, thus bringing the prices slightly above the average in the city.
(ii) PLN 73,422.50 in respect of the costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before the civil courts during which the applicants had sought to prevent the violation of their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
78. In respect of pecuniary damage, the Government reiterated that there had been no interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. Hence, there were no grounds on which to find that they had suffered pecuniary damage. They further observed that the applicants should have submitted to the Court documents showing that the income of their company resulting from the payment of the compensation would have been divided and paid to the shareholders. They further argued that the applicants should have tried to offset the negative financial consequences of the refusal to pay them compensation. In this connection, they could have obliged persons who had bought the houses developed on the estate to acquire shares in ownership of the land currently being used as roads.
79. They concluded that the applicants' claim should therefore be dismissed.
80. The Government did not make any submissions regarding the claim for costs and expenses.
81. The Court first observes that it has found that there has been an interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions (see paragraph 58 above). It further observes that the damage, in the present case, actually stems from the authorities' refusal to expropriate the land and to pay compensation determined in accordance with the domestic law.
82. The Court notes that the principles for determining the amount of compensation for expropriated land are laid down in the Land Administration Act 1997. Under sections 128 § 1 and 130 of that Act the compensation should correspond to the value of the land as assessed by a certified expert. In the present case, the applicants made detailed submissions as to the value of the land in question. The estimate makes reference to the average price of land in this area in 2003, when their civil claim, by which they tried to obtain redress for the financial setback they had suffered as a result of the refusal to expropriate their land, was dismissed. The Court further notes that this estimate has been prepared by a certified expert, who had taken into account the situation of the local market at that time and the particular characteristics of the area concerned.
The Court further notes that the Government have challenged neither the method used by the expert nor the overall amount.
The Court is therefore of the view that it has been shown that the amount claimed by the applicants is reasonably related to the value of the land concerned and to the amount of compensation which would have been paid to the applicants had their land been expropriated by the administrative authorities under the provisions of the Land Administration Act.
83. It notes that the Government have not indicated any legal basis on which the applicants could have obliged the present owners of the houses situated on the estate to buy the land currently used as roads.
84. In the circumstances of the case and having regard to the parties' submissions, the Court awards the applicants jointly EUR 247,000 under the head of pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount.
85. In respects of the costs, according to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to reimbursement of his costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the information and documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the amount of EUR 18,725 covering the costs incurred in the civil proceedings before the Polish courts, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount, to be converted into the national currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement.
C. Default interest
86. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants jointly, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the national currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable:
(a) EUR 247,000 (two hundred and forty-seven thousand euros) in respect of pecuniary damage;
EUR 18,725 (eighteen thousand seven hundred and twenty-five euros) in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points.
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants' claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 6 November 2007, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Josep Casadevall
Deputy Registrar President

BUGAJNY AND OTHERS v. POLAND JUDGMENT

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA BUGAJNY ED ALTRI C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 22531/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
6 novembre 2007
Richiesta per raccomandazione alla Grande Camera pendente
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Bugajny ed Altri c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Il Sig. J. Casadevall, Presidente, il
Sig. G. Bonello, il Sig. K. Traja, il Sig. S. Pavlovschi, il Sig. L. Garlicki, il Sig.ra L. Mijović, il Sig. J. Šikuta, giudici, ed i Sig.ra F. Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 9 ottobre 2007,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 22531/05) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte il 31 maggio 2005 sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da tre cittadini polacchi, il Sig. P. B., il Sig. T. R. ed il Sig. J. S. (“i richiedenti”). I richiedenti furono rappresentati di fronte alla Corte dal Sig. A. Z., un avvocato che pratica a Poznań.
2. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wolasiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. I richiedenti addussero che il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era stato violato.
4. Il 24 novembre 2005 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il primo richiedente nacque nel 1963. Il secondo e il terzo richiedente nacquero nel 1964. Loro vivono a Poznań.
A. Procedimenti di fronte alle autorità amministrative
6. La società “T.” Ltd. in cui i richiedenti possiedono tutte le quote possedeva un appezzamento di terreno di 6 ettari situato a Poznań. Nel 1995 la società richiese all'amministrazione locale di rendere una decisione sulla divisione dell'appezzamento di terreno, una decisione necessaria per procedere con la costruzione sul terreno.
7. Il 15 novembre 1999 l'Ufficio Municipale rese infine, una decisione con la quale fu approvata la divisione dell'appezzamento del terreno. Certe aree di terreno furono designate ai fini edili ed altri per spazi aperti e garage. Un numero di aree fu designato per la costruzione di “strade interne all’ appezzamento.” Questa decisione divenne definitiva il 30 novembre 1999.
8. Successivamente, la società richiedente, appellandosi alle disposizioni dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997, richiese al Sindaco di Poznań di determinare il risarcimento dovuto per le aree designate per la costruzione delle strade. Presentò che sotto le disposizioni attinenti di questo Atto le aree designate, in virtù di decisioni sulla divisione della proprietà in aree più piccole, furono espropriate ex lege nella data in cui simili decisioni divennero definitive.
9. Con una decisione del 15 marzo 2000 il Presidente della Città di Poznań respinse la richiesta per far determinare il risarcimento, sostenendo che le strade da costruire sull'appezzamento di terreno riguardato non erano state previste nel piano di sviluppo del terreno locale. Quindi, nella decisione del novembre 1999 erano state designate come “strade interne” che avrebbero servito gli abitanti dell’alloggio che la società stava progettando. Non essendo state previste nel piano di sviluppo di terreno locale, queste strade non appartenevano alla categoria di strade pubbliche. Sotto le disposizioni dell’Atto dell’Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997, nel gennaio 2000, solamente aree designate correttamente per la costruzione di “strade pubbliche” sarebbero state espropriate ex lege, e solamente a riguardo di simile aree espropriate poteva venire richiesto il risarcimento. Nella causa dei richiedenti, le aree in oggetto erano state designate come strade interne; non vi era stata espropriazione perciò e, di conseguenza, nessun risarcimento avrebbe potuto essere determinato.
10. I richiedenti fecero appello. Dibatterono che le strade da costruire sull'appezzamento di terreno dell’ alloggio dovevano essere pubbliche, per tutti i fini pratici. Loro dovevano essere aperte a tutti gli utenti stradali, incluso tutti i mezzi di trasporto pubblico e privato. Il termine “strade interne” usato nella decisione contestata non esisteva nell’Atto dell’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997 come applicabile nel novembre 1999. Questo Atto era stato corretto dopo che questa decisione era stata resa ed era solamente nel suo testo corretto che chiaramente era stato affermato che il risarcimento era dovuto solamente per le strade “pubbliche” (vedere paragrafi 30-31 sotto).
11. Il fatto che nella decisione del novembre 1999 si fa riferimento alle aree riguardate come designate per la costruzione di strade “interne” era un tentativo illegale di spogliarle di un carattere pubblico e di esentarle con ciò dall'operazione con cui l’Atto prevedeva l'espropriazione ex lege delle aree designate per la costruzione di strade. Più importante, era un tentativo di evadere l'obbligo di pagare il risarcimento per simili aree.
12. I richiedenti dibatterono inoltre che il fatto che queste strade non erano state previste nel piano di sviluppo di terreno locale era irrilevante, dato che la decisione del 15 novembre 1999 era stata resa evidentemente in modo tale da essere coerente col piano di sviluppo di terreno locale. Altrimenti, la divisione dell'appezzamento del terreno non poteva essere approvata.
13. Loro dibatterono infine che la decisione di cui si lamentava aveva violato le garanzie costituzionali della proprietà.
14. Il 31 maggio 2000 il Governatore di Wielkopolski sostenne la decisione. La decisione del Governatore si riferì alla sezione 98 dell'Atto del 1997 come applicabile nel novembre 1999 quando la decisione era stata resa. Prevedeva che le aree designate per la costruzione di strade sotto una decisione sulla divisione di proprietà ai fini edili venissero espropriate ex lege nella data in cui tale decisione diveniva definitiva. Comunque, il fine essenziale delle decisioni sulla divisione di proprietà doveva servire all'attuazione dei piani di sviluppo di terreni locali. In assenza dell'inclusione in tale piano di strade sulla terra soggetta alla decisione di divisione resa nella causa dei richiedenti nel novembre 1999, le aree designate per la costruzione di strade non potevano essere riguardate, come designato per la costruzione di “strade pubbliche.” Non c'erano quindi, motivi per cui espropriarle ed accordare il risarcimento ai proprietari.
15. I richiedenti fecero appello, reiterando essenzialmente i loro argomenti presentati nel loro ricorso contro la decisione di prima -istanza.
16. Il 16 ottobre 2001 la Corte amministrativa Suprema respinse il ricorso. Si riferì alla sezione 93 (1) e (3) dell’Atto sull’Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997. Notò che sotto queste disposizioni una decisione sulla divisione di proprietà in aree più piccole potrebbe essere resa solamente se la proposta di divisione fosse compatibile col piano di sviluppo di terreno locale e se le aree di recente create avessero un accesso su una strada pubblica.
17. Nella presente causa il piano di sviluppo locale non prevedeva qualsiasi strada pubblica sul terreno posseduto dalla società. Quindi, il fatto che certe parti del terreno come diviso sotto la decisione del novembre 1999 erano state designate per la costruzione di strade non poteva comportare la loro espropriazione automatica sotto la sezione 98 dello stesso Atto. Queste strade rimasero di proprietà della società e non c'erano perciò motivi su cui determinare il risarcimento.
18. Nella misura in cui i richiedenti si sono appellati su delle decisioni della Corte amministrativa Suprema nelle quali aveva espresso la prospettiva che sotto la sezione 98 dell'Atto del 1997 ogni terra designata per strade nelle decisioni di divisione era soggetta all'espropriazione ex lege, la corte notò chele sentenze date in altre cause non la vincolavano.
19. Notò inoltre che l’ emendamento del febbraio2000 alla sezione 98 dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997 (vedere paragrafo 31 sotto) prevedeva che solamente la terra designata per la costruzione di strade pubbliche era soggetta all'espropriazione:
“non limitava tanto lo scopo delle strade a cui questa disposizione era applicabile, ma intendeva solamente rendere più precise le intenzioni del legislatore a riguardo dell’ [applicazione] di questo Atto.”
Concluse che questa decisione contestata era in conformità alla legge.
2. I procedimenti civili
20. Più tardi, i richiedenti depositarono una rivendicazione in un tribunale civile chiedendo una dichiarazione sotto l’Articolo 189 del Codice civile riguardo a chi fosse il proprietario dell'area di terreno riguardato, elencata nel registro fondiario come area N.ro 6/25 e che copriva un'area della superficie di 5,843 metri quadrati.
21. Con una sentenza del 25 giugno 2003 la Corte Regionale di Poznań ha stabilito che il proprietario delle aree era la Città di Poznań.
22. La corte considerò, inter alia che il piano per la divisione della terra come adottato dalla decisione del novembre 1999 era concordante col piano di sviluppo di terreno locale. Osservò inoltre che simile ottemperanza era una condizione essenziale perché venisse resa la decisione sulla divisione in primo luogo. La corte notò inoltre che il piano di zonizzazione locale era di un carattere molto generale e non conteneva praticamente dettagli riguardi alla pianificazione di strade, a parte le maggiori idrovie e che non determinava quali strade sarebbero state riguardate come pubbliche. In queste circostanze, la corte era della prospettiva, avendo riguardo all'uso pubblico delle strade sulla proprietà riguardata, che loro erano stati espropriati dalla città.
23. La Città di Poznań fece ricorso.
24. Con una sentenza del 9 dicembre 2003 la Corte d'appello di Poznań respinse la rivendicazione per dichiarazione. Considerò che la società non aveva interesse legale nel chiedere la chiarifica della situazione legale delle aree riguardate tramite una sentenza dichiaratoria sotto l’Articolo 189 del Codice di Procedura Civile. La situazione legale della terra era già stata determinata dalla sentenza della Corte amministrativa Suprema che era vincolante per la corte civile. Facendo seguito a questa decisione, i rivendicatori rimasero i proprietari delle aree in oggetto.
25. La corte osservò inoltre:
“C'era anche evidentemente, un altro problema legale nella causa. La condotta della città nella presente causa aveva provocato una situazione nella quale il proprietario non poteva usare liberamente la sua terra, come previsto dall’Articolo 140 del Codice civile. Allo stesso tempo, la proprietà serva uno dei fini [costruzione di strade] che normalmente dovrebbe essere assicurato dal municipio locale; inoltre, è il proprietario che sopporta i costi di realizzazione di questo fine.
Può essere dibattuto che si ottiene nella causa presente una situazione peggiore persino della così definita espropriazione de facto. Ciò perché sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione il termine “espropriazione” non solo copre l'espropriazione formale o la restrizione di proprietà eseguita in procedimenti di espropriazione corretti. La giurisprudenza della Corte di Strasburgo distingue anche una categoria di espropriazione de facto, vale a dire simili atti da parte delle autorità pubbliche che conducono ad una privazione pratica di proprietà o a restrizioni sul suo uso (Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. Grecia, 1993).”
26. I richiedenti depositarono un ricorso in cassazione presso la Corte Suprema. Con una decisione del 5 novembre 2004, notificata ai richiedenti il 1 dicembre 2004, rifiutò di esaminarlo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
1. Disposizioni costituzionali ed attinenti e giurisprudenza
27. L’Articolo 21 della Costituzione prevede:
“1. La Repubblica della Polonia proteggerla proprietà ed il diritto di eredità.
2. L'espropriazione è concessa solamente nell'interesse pubblico e contro pagamento del risarcimento equo.”
28. L’Articolo della Costituzione recita:
“La libertà della persona sarà protetta giuridicamente.
Ognuno rispetterà le libertà e i diritti altrui. Nessuno sarà obbligato a fare una qualsiasi cosa che non sia richiesta dalla legge.
Una qualsiasi limitazione sull'esercizio delle libertà costituzionali e dei diritti può essere imposta solamente tramite statuto, e solamente quando necessaria in un stato democratico per la protezione della sua sicurezza o dell’ ordine pubblico, o per proteggere l’ ambiente naturale, la salute o la morale pubblica, o le libertà e i diritti di altre persone. Simili limitazioni non violeranno l'essenza delle libertà e dei diritti.”
29. L’Articolo 79 § 1 della Costituzione offre ciò che segue:
“In conformità con i principi specificati dallo statuto, ognuno le cui le libertà costituzionali o i diritti sono stati infranti avrà diritto a fare appello presso la Corte Costituzionale per un giudizio sulla conformità con la Costituzione di un statuto o di un altro atto normativo sulla base di cui una corte o un'autorità amministrativa ha emesso una decisione definitiva sulle sue libertà o sui suoi diritti o i sui suoi obblighi specificati nella Costituzione.”
30. Sotto la sua giurisprudenza stabilita , la Corte Costituzionale ha solamente giurisdizione per esaminare la compatibilità delledisposizioni legali con la Costituzione e non è competente per esaminare il modo in cui i tribunali interpretarono le disposizioni legali applicabili in cause individuali (e.g. SK 4/99, 19 ottobre 1999; Ts 9/98, 6 aprile 1998; Ts 56/99, 21 giugno 1999).
31. L’ 8 maggio 1990 la Corte Costituzionale rese una sentenza (K 1/90), a seguito di una richiesta del Presidente della Corte amministrativa Suprema per esaminare la compatibilità di certe disposizioni dell’Atto sull’ Espropriazione e Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1985 con la protezione costituzionale del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà. La corte notò che le disposizioni contestate dell'Atto del 1985 prevedevano, a riguardo della proprietà di carattere agricolo, una riduzione del risarcimento da pagare a proprietari che avevano richiesto che loro venissero divisi, tramite una decisione amministrativa, in aree più piccole ed che certe aree di terreno venissero espropriate ai fini della costruzione di strade. Questa riduzione fu basata sula premessa che la terra da espropriare cessava di essere usata ai fini agricoli e che i risultati negativi di tale cambio dovevano essere compensati dai proprietari.
La Corte Costituzionale osservò che la natura delle espropriazioni eseguite in questo contesto non differiva da espropriazioni effettuate ai fini di uso pubblico, a dispetto del fatto che un'espropriazione venisse effettuata in procedimenti diversi dai procedimenti di espropriazione ordinari. Quindi, le disposizioni della Costituzione come esistenti a quel tempo e nella misura in cui prevedevano la protezione del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà erano applicabili a simili espropriazioni. La Costituzione lasciò spazio solamente all'espropriazione di proprietà private ai fini di uso pubblico e solamente contro risarcimento. Il risarcimento per attenersi con i requisiti costituzionali, doveva essere equo e giusto. La nozione del risarcimento equo, incluso per espropriazione eseguita su richiesta del proprietario e nel suo interesse, doveva essere nell'importo che corrispondeva al valore della proprietà espropriata. Solamente un risarcimento che soddisfaceva queste condizioni era in ottemperanza con la natura e il fine dell'obbligo delle autorità pubbliche per compensare un proprietario la cui proprietà è stata espropriata. Qualsiasi restrizione sul diritto ad un risarcimento equo, incluso tramite riduzioni del suo importo, era in violazione dei principi costituzionali.
2. Disposizioni attinenti della legislazione di espropriazione del terreno
32. Il 1 gennaio 1998 l'Atto dell'Amministrazione Fondiaria del 21 agosto 1997 (Ustawa o gospodarce nieruchomościami -“l'Atto dell'Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997”) entrò in vigore. Facendo seguito alla sezione 112 di questo Atto, l'espropriazione consisteva nel portare via, tramite una decisione amministrativa, una proprietà o altri diritti in rem. L'espropriazione poteva essere eseguita dove degli scopi di interesse pubblico non potevano essere realizzati senza restrizione di questi diritti e dove era impossibile acquisire questi diritti tramite un contratto di diritto civile.
33. Sotto la sezione 113 un'espropriazione può essere eseguita solamente a beneficio della Tesoreria Statale o del municipio locale.
34. In conformità con la sezione 128 § 1 dell'Atto, l'espropriazione può essere eseguita contro pagamento di risarcimento corrispondente al valore del diritto di proprietà riguardato. Sotto la sezione 130 § 1 dell'Atto, l'importo del risarcimento sarà fissato, avendo riguardo allo status e al valore aggiornato della proprietà su cui fu resa la decisione di espropriazione. Il valore della proprietà sarà valutato sulla base di un'opinione preparata da un esperto munito di certificato.
35. La Sezione 131 prevede che una sostituzione di proprietà possa essere assegnata al proprietario espropriato, se lui concorda.
36. Facendo seguito alla sezione 132, il risarcimento sarà pagato entro quattordici giorni dalla data in cui la decisione di espropriazione diviene soggetta ad esecuzione.
3. Cambi nelle disposizioni attinenti dell’Atto dell’Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997
37. La questione dell'espropriazione di terreni ai fini della costruzione di strade è regolata in quell'Atto. La Sezione 93 § 1 dell'Atto prevede che la divisione di un appezzamento di terreno in aree più piccole è possibile solamente quando la divisione proposta dal proprietario è compatibile col piano di sviluppo di terreno locale. Sotto il § 3 di questa sezione, una decisione sulla divisione non si può dare nel caso in cui le aree che sono il risultato della divisione non avessero accesso ad una strada pubblica. Accesso ad una strada pubblica è ritenuto anche per essere disponibile se un'area ha accesso ad una strada interna.
38. Sino al 15 febbraio 2000 la sezione 98 dell'Atto si legge come segue:
1. Le Aree di terra designate alla costruzione di strade in una decisione amministrativa sulla divisione di proprietà saranno espropriate ex lege nella data in cui tale decisione di divisione diviene definitiva. (...)
3. Il risarcimento dovuto per simile aree sarà stabilito tramite negoziazione fra il proprietario espropriato e l'autorità pubblica attinente; se le negoziazioni vanno a vuoto, il risarcimento sarà determinato secondo i principi applicabili a riguardo dell'espropriazione del terreno.
39. Il15 febbraio 2000 degli emendamenti a questo Atto entrarono in vigore. A seguito di questi emendamenti, il testo della sottosezione (1) si legge come segue:
“1. Le Aree di terreno designate in una decisione sulla divisione di proprietà per la costruzione di strade pubbliche, come municipali, di contea, strade regionali e nazionali saranno espropriate ex lege nella data in cui tale decisione di divisione diviene definitiva. (...) “
40. In un'opinione giuridica del 29 maggio 2003, preparata per una causa diversa da quella dei richiedenti, L’Ufficio Centrale per lo Sviluppo Urbano affermò, che la sezione 78 dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione del Terreno nella sua versione applicabile fino al 15 febbraio 2000 era una base legale per l'espropriazione ex lege di ogni terreno designato ai fini della costruzione di strade sotto le decisioni sulla divisione di proprietà, nonostante queste strade fossero di un carattere pubblico o fossero state considerate strade interne, nella data in cui simili decisioni divennero definitive.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
41. I richiedenti addussero che il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà era stato violato. Loro si riferirono all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che recita:
“Ogni naturale o legale persona è concessa al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle “Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
42. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali attinenti perché loro non si erano giovati di un'azione di reclamo costituzionale individuale sotto l’Articolo 79 § 1 della Costituzione. La Corte aveva riconosciuto che, anche se la Corte Costituzionale non era competente per annullare le decisioni individuali perché il suo ruolo era di decidere sulla costituzionalità delle leggi, le sue sentenze che dichiaravano una disposizione legale o un’ altra incostituzionale generavano un diritto a far riaprire i procedimenti contestati in una causa individuale. Di conseguenza, il Governo dibatté che, se i richiedenti avessero considerato che certe disposizioni a cui ci si appellava nella loro causa aveva violato il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà, loro avrebbero dovuto chiedere alla Corte Costituzionale di decidere, tramite una sentenza se quelle disposizioni erano compatibili con la Costituzione.
43. I richiedenti presentarono che l'azione di reclamo costituzionale non era una via di ricorso attinente nella loro causa. Il diritto nazionale applicabile, vale a dire la sezione 98 dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997, come in vigore prima dell’emendamento del 15 febbraio 2000, era favorevole ai richiedenti siccome prevedeva l'espropriazione ex lege e il risarcimento. Loro non avevano avuto qualsiasi interesse legale nell'impugnarlo ed era anche semplice che questa disposizione fosse compatibile con la Costituzione.
44. La Corte reitera che ha sostenuto che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale è una via di ricorso effettiva ai fini di Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione solamente in situazioni in cui la violazione addotta della Convenzione è stato il risultato dell’applicazione diretta di una disposizione legale considerata dal reclamante come incostituzionale (vedere Szott-Medyńska c. Polonia (dec.), n. 47414/99, 9 ottobre 2003; Pachla c. Polonia (dec.), numero 8812/02, 8 novembre 2005; Wypych c. Polonia (dec.), n. 2428/05, 25 ottobre 2005).
45. In questo collegamento, la Corte osserva, che non si può dire che la violazione della Convenzione di cui ci si lamentava nella causa presente sia nato dall’applicazione diretta di una disposizione legale che i richiedenti ritenevano incostituzionale. Piuttosto, fu il risultato del modo in cui le varie disposizioni dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997, in particolare la sua sezione 98 letta in concomitanza con la sezione 93, furono interpretate e ed applicate nella causa dei richiedenti. Comunque, segue dalla giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale polacca che manca di giurisdizione per esaminare il modo in cui le disposizioni di diritto nazionale sono state applicate in una causa individuale (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra). Il Governo non ha fatto riferimento a qualsiasi altra via di ricorso nazionale che avrebbe potuto essere usata in questa causa.
46. La Corte nota inoltre che la corte civile, nella sua sentenza del 9 dicembre 2003 determinò che i richiedenti non avevano interesse legale nell'ottenere una sentenza che chiarisse la loro situazione legale a riguardo del loro diritto al risarcimento perché la questione era già stata determinata dalla sentenza della corte amministrativa (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Alla luce di questa conclusione del tribunale nazionale, la Corte è della prospettiva che non è stato mostrato che i richiedenti avessero una qualsiasi altra via aperto a loro, giudiziale o altrimenti con cui tentare di rivendicare la loro rivendicazione per l'espropriazione ed il risarcimento.
47. Di conseguenza, la Corte conclude, alla luce delle considerazioni sopra che la richiesta non può essere respinta per insuccesso nell’esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. La Corte respinge così la dichiarazione del Governo a quest'effetto. Nota inoltre che la richiesta non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni del Governo
48. Il Governo asserì che la valutazione della causa era basata sul fatto se le strade riguardate erano pubbliche o meno. Notò che le autorità amministrative avevano trovato che, sotto le norme sistematiche di interpretazione, la sezione 98 dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997 come applicabile al tempo attinente erano riguardate solo le strade pubbliche. Non c'erano motivi per cui accettare che questa disposizione riguardava tutte le strade, a prescindere che fossero pubbliche o meno.
Questo approccio fu specificato più tardi nell'emendamento del febbraio 2000 a quell'Atto. Inoltre, la Corte amministrativa Suprema aveva sostenuto anche, nella sua sentenza del 16 ottobre 2001 (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra) che le strade sul terreno dei richiedenti non erano pubbliche perché loro non erano state previste nel piano di sviluppo di terreno locale. Fosse stato così , sarebbe stato espropriato ed il risarcimento sarebbe stato pagato.
La causa dei richiedenti non poteva essere comparata alla causa Papamichalopoulos c. Grecia in quanto in questa causa i richiedenti avevano perso ogni capacità di avvalersi della loro proprietà, vendere o trasmetterla, ipotecarla o fare una donazione di questa. Nella presente causa i richiedenti potrebbero usare e potrebbero disporre della terra riguardata e nessuna autorità pubblica mai li aveva spogliati della proprietà di questa.
49. Il Governo concluse che non c'era stata interferenza con le proprietà dei richiedenti siccome loro rimasero i proprietari legali della terra ed ancora potrebbero usarla. Il mero fatto che la terra servisse scopi di pubblica utilità in quanto veniva usata per la costruzione di strade accessibili al pubblico generale e che i richiedenti avevano dovuto finanziare la costruzione di queste strade era insufficiente per trovare che c’era stata interferenza con le loro proprietà.
50. In assenza di qualsiasi l'interferenza, il Governo affermò che si sarebbe astenuto dal rendere qualsiasi osservazione riguardo all'interesse pubblico, la legalità e la proporzionalità dell'interferenza addotta dai richiedenti.
2. Le osservazioni dei richiedenti
51. I richiedenti presentarono di possedere l'intero appezzamento di terreno, incluso l'area designata dalla decisione del novembre 1999 ai fini della costruzione di strade. Questa area doveva comunque, essere usata per simile costruzione a spesa dei richiedenti. Sotto le leggi applicabili, i costi della costruzione di strade locali normalmente sarebbero sopportate dai municipi locali. Designando le aree riguardate nella presente causa per la costruzione di strade, considerando che loro non sarebbero state riguardate come “pubbliche”, il municipio aveva evaso il suo obbligo a sopportare questi costi. Inoltre, aveva de facto imposto tale obbligo ai richiedenti.
52. Le strade costruite successivamente sull'appezzamento di terreno servirono , a tutti i fini pratici, come strade pubbliche ed accesso assicurato all'appezzamento di terreno per il pubblico generale. Sotto le disposizioni legali applicabili, una decisione sulla divisione della proprietà non poteva essere emessa, se il piano di divisione proposto dai richiedenti non si fosse attenuto coi requisiti e le restrizioni scaturite dal piano di sviluppo di terreno locale. Perciò, le strade sull'appezzamento di terreno costituivano parte della rete stradale normale a Poznań. La descrizione artificiosa delle strade come “interne” serviva il fine di evadere l'obbligo da parte del municipio per espropriare la terra riguardata e pagare il risarcimento ai richiedenti.
53. I richiedenti presentarono che le autorità amministrative, applicando le disposizioni dell’Atto del 1997 sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria come applicabile nel novembre 1999 alla loro causa, aveva ricorso ad un’interpretazione sistematica ed di teleologica, ma aveva trascurato completamente il semplice significato della sezione 98 di quell’Atto secondo la quale la terra designata per tutte le strade sarebbe stata espropriata.
54. I richiedenti enfatizzarono che era stato rifiutato loro il risarcimento da parte del municipio e che la corte amministrativa aveva approvato questa decisione. Come risultato del modo in cui le disposizioni attinenti dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997 era stato applicato alla loro causa, i richiedenti erano stati de facto privati della loro proprietà in un modo contrario all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro si riferirono al giudizio nella causa Papamichalopoulos c. Grecia in cui la Corte aveva trovato che le misure di cui ci si lamentava avevano comportato conseguenze sufficientemente serie per i richiedenti per essere stati espropriati de facto in una maniera incompatibile col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
55. Teoreticamente i richiedenti avrebbero potuto usare la terra riguardata come suoi proprietari legali, ma solamente come strada. Perciò la possibilità di utilizzo del loro terreno fu gravemente limitata. Né potevano loro, per ragioni ovvie vendere le strade a terze parti.
3. La valutazione della Corte
56. La Corte prima reitera che l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che garantisce il diritto alla protezione delle proprietà di uno contiene tre articoli distinti: “Il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di una natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo della proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti possono, fra le altre cose, controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale [...].” Comunque, i tre articoli non sono 'distinti' nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 62 ECHR 2007 -...).
(a) Se c'era interferenza col godimento tranquillo della “proprietà”
57. La Corte prima deve esaminare se c'era interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle proprietà dei richiedenti.
58. Per valutare la conformità della condotta dello Stato coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve avere riguardo al fatto che si intende che la Convenzione garantisce i diritti che sono pratici ed effettivi. Deve andare sotto le apparenze e deve guardare nella realtà della situazione che richiede un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in causa; questo non solo può richiedere un'analisi dei termini di risarcimento-se la situazione è simile ad una presa di proprietà (vedere, per esempio, Lithgow ed Altri v Regno Unito, sentenza del 8 luglio 1986 Serie A n. 102, pp. 50-51, §§ 120-121)-ma anche, come nella presente causa, della condotta dello Stato (Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 114 ECHR 2000-io, e Novoseltskiy c. Ucraina, n. 47148/98, ECHR 2005-II).
59. Nella presente causa i richiedenti sono stati obbligati, col rifiuto delle autorità di espropriare la terra e pagare loro il risarcimento –ad un corso di eventi che loro non si sarebbero ragionevolmente aspettati alla luce delle disposizioni sull'espropriazione di terreno designati per la costruzione di strade – la costruzione delle strade, il sopportare i costi della loro costruzione ed il mantenimento ed anche, importante, l’accettazione dell'uso pubblico della loro proprietà. Le misure di cui ci si lamentava ridussero significativamente in pratica l'esercizio effettivo della loro proprietà (mutatis mutandis, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, sentenza di 23 settembre 1982 Serie A n. 52, §§ 58-60; Skibińscy c. Polonia, n. 52589/99, § 79 del 14 novembre 2006).
La Corte conclude perciò che c'è stata davvero un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle proprietà dei richiedenti.
60. La Corte osserva inoltre che le sentenze dei tribunali nazionali non hanno colpito in qualsiasi modo avversamente la posizione dei richiedenti come proprietari legali della terra. Non c'è perciò spazio per l’applicazuone della seconda frase del primo paragrafo nella presente causa (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Terazzi c. Italia, n. 27265/95, § 61 17 ottobre 2002)
61. Similmente, le misure di cui ci si lamentava di non potevano essere considerate un controllo dell’ uso di proprietà. Di conseguenza, l'interferenza deve essere esaminata sotto la prima frase dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, sentenza di 21 febbraio 1986 Serie A n. 98, pp. 29-30, § 37; vedere anche, fra molte altre autorità, Belvedere Alberghiera S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 31524/96, § 51 ECHR 2000-VI).
(b) Se l'interferenza era “nell'interesse generale”
62. Qualsiasi interferenza con un diritto di proprietà si può giustificare solamente se serve un interesse pubblico legittimo (o generale). La Corte reitera che, a causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono meglio in principio messe rispetto al giudice internazionale per decidere ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta così alle autorità nazionali fare la valutazione iniziale riguardo all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che garantisca misure che interferiscono col godimento tranquillo di proprietà (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. c. Italia, citata sopra, § 85, 17 ottobre 2002; Elia S.r.l. c. l'Italia, n. 37710/97, § 77 ECHR 2001-IX).
63. Nella presente causa la Corte considera che le misure di cui ci si lamentava perseguivano lo scopo legittimo di proteggere la stabilità finanziaria del bilancio municipale. Questo corrisponde all'interesse generale della comunità (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Cooperativa La Laurentina c. Italia, n. 23529/94, § 94 del 2 agosto 2001; Nova di Bahia S.A. c. Spagna, (dec.), n. 50924/99, 12 dicembre 2000; Chapman c. Regno Unito, n. 27238/95, § 82 ECHR 2001-io).
(c) Se l'interferenza era “prevista dalla legge”
64. La Corte reitera in questo collegamento che una condizione essenziale perché un'interferenza venga ritenuta compatibile con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è che dovrebbe essere legale. La preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II). Il principio della legalità presuppone anche comunque, che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Hentrich c. Francia, sentenza di 22 settembre 1994 Serie A n. 296-A, pp. 19-20, § 42; Lithgow ed Altri c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 8 luglio 1986 Serie A n. 102, p. 47, § 110).
65. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che spetta al primo posto alle autorità nazionali, in particolare i tribunali interpretare ed applicare il diritto nazionale (Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC] N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 86 ECHR 2005 -). Osserva che l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti fu basata sulle disposizioni dell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997. Nota inoltre che la Corte amministrativa Suprema, nella sua sentenza di 2001 trovò che il rifiuto di espropriare le aree in oggetto era in ottemperanza con le leggi applicabili.
66. Alla luce della giurisdizione limitata della Corte per revisionare la correttezza dell’applicazione giudiziale del diritto nazionale, la Corte conclude che l'interferenza di cui ci si lamentava ha soddisfatto il requisito della legalità all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(d) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
67. La Corte deve esaminare se l'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà ha danneggiato l'equilibrio equo richiesto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, o se ha imposto un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo su loro (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 93 ECHR 2005-VI).
68. La Corte reitera che, nell'area di sviluppo del territorio e della pianificazione delle città, gli Stati Contraenti dovrebbero godere di un margine ampio di valutazione per implementare le loro politiche (vedere Terazzi S.r.l. ed Elia S.r.l., citata sopra; Skibińscy c. Polonia citata sopra, § 59). Nell'esercizio del suo potere di revisione, la Corte deve determinare ciononostante, se l'equilibrio richiesto è stato mantenuto in un modo conforme col diritto del richiedente alla proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, citata sopra, § 69).
69. La Corte osserva che la Corte amministrativa Suprema trovò, nella sua sentenza del 16 ottobre 2001, che l'Atto dell'Amministrazione Fondiaria, nella misura che prevedeva l'espropriazione ex lege nella data in cui la divisione della proprietà diveniva definitiva, non era applicabile alla causa dei richiedenti. Perciò, le autorità rifiutarono di espropriare formalmente le aree appartenenti ai richiedenti e si rifiutarono di determinare l'importo del risarcimento.
70. In questo contesto, la Corte nota, che, a seguito della divisione della terra posseduta dai richiedenti in aree più piccole, le aree di terra riguardate nella presente causa furono usate successivamente ai fini della costruzione di strade a spese dei richiedenti. I richiedenti costruirono anche un alloggio sulle aree rimanenti (vedere § 7 sopra). La Corte osserva che sotto le disposizioni applicabili dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra, la divisione dell'appezzamento di terreno in aree più piccole era possibile perché la divisione proposta dai proprietari era compatibile col piano di sviluppo del terreno locale (vedere § 36 sopra). Nota inoltre l'argomento dei richiedenti per cui le strade costruite sull'appezzamento di terreno erano connesse alla rete di strade pubbliche. Loro servivano attualmente sia il pubblico generale sia l'appezzamento di terreno dell’ alloggio che i richiedenti svilupparono e sono aperte sia al trasporto pubblico che privato di qualsiasi genere (vedere § 52 sopra). Dato che l'intera area dell'appezzamento di terreno edile copre nove ettari che furono divisi in altrettante sei aree di terreno designate ai fini edili, è ragionevole accettare che si può dire che un numero considerevole di persone usi queste strade. Non è stato mostrato o ugualmente dibattuto che l'accesso all'appezzamento del terreno o l'uso di queste strade fosse restretto o limitato in qualsiasi modo. La situazione esaminata nella presente causa deve essere distinta perciò da quella “legata” agli appezzamenti di terreno edificabili ai quali l'accesso pubblico è ristretto da una decisione dei suoi abitanti.
71. Il solo modo in cui la terra in oggetto ora può essere usata è come strada. I richiedenti sono obbligati anche attualmente a sopportare i costi del loro mantenimento. La Corte enfatizza che il carico a cui i richiedenti furono sottoposti non era limitato nel tempo in qualsiasi modo.
72. La Corte osserva che uno degli argomenti sul quale le autorità si appellarono nel rifiutare di espropriare la proprietà dei richiedenti era che le strade da costruire sull'appezzamento di terreno non erano state incluse nel piano di sviluppo del terreno locale. Comunque, reitera che non era in controversia che la decisione sulla divisione avrebbe potuto essere emessa solamente quando il piano di divisione presentato dai proprietari fosse stato compatibile col piano di sviluppo del terreno. La Corte considera che adottando tale approccio le autorità poterono evadere effettivamente l'obbligo di costruire e mantenere delle strade differenti dalle maggiori idrovie previste nei piani e spostare questo obbligo sopra i proprietari individuali.
73. La Corte infine nota che la Corte Regionale di Poznań espresse dubbi seri riguardo a se la situazione dei richiedenti era compatibile coi requisiti dell’i Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa corte comparò espressamente la posizione dei richiedenti a quella del richiedente nella causa Papamichalopoulos c. Grecia citata sopra e la considerò essere “anche peggio.” Nella prospettiva della Corte, la situazione dei richiedenti nella presente causa era, meno seria della situazione esaminata nella sentenza Papamichalopoulos, perché loro non furono spossessati di ogni possibilità di usare la loro proprietà. Tale valutazione critica da parte della corte nazionale certamente è nondimeno, nella prospettiva della Corte, di attinenza per la valutazione complessiva della causa.
74. Avendo riguardo alle considerazioni sopra, la Corte è della prospettiva che non è stato previsto un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi generali ed individuali in competizione e il fatto che i richiedenti hanno dovuto sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo.
75. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.”
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
76. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
77. I richiedenti chiesero 1,019,988.50 zloty polacchi (PLN) nel risarcimento per danno patrimoniale e come rimborso di costi e spese. Questo importo fu ripartito come segue:
(i) PLN 946,566 a riguardo dell'area di superficie di 5,843 metri quadrati, coperta dall'area di terreno che è usata attualmente come strade, essendo valutato il prezzo medio di 1 metro quadrato dell'appezzamento di terreno sulla base di un rapporto preparato da un esperto munito di certificato presentato alla Corte e datato febbraio 2003, a PLN 152,07. L'esperto si riferì alle caratteristiche della terra nell'area riguardata ed alle condizioni ottenuto sul mercato immobiliare locale nel 2003. Lui notò che c'era un periodo di ristagno sul mercato, collegato alle condizioni generali nell'economia nazionale. Comunque, l'area offriva delle condizioni attraenti e molte operazioni erano state concluse, portando così i prezzi leggermente sopra la media della città.
(l'ii) PLN 73,422.50 a riguardo dei costi e delle spese incorsi nei procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali civili durante i quali i richiedenti avevano cercato di ostacolare la violazione del loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
78. A riguardo del danno patrimoniale, il Governo reiterò, che non c'era stata interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. Non c'erano quindi, motivo su cui trovare che loro avevano sofferto di danno patrimoniale. Osservò inoltre che i richiedenti avrebbero dovuto presentare all'esposizione dei documenti di Corte che il reddito della loro società essendo il risultato del pagamento del risarcimento sarebbe stato diviso e sarebbe stato pagato agli azionisti. Dibatté inoltre che i richiedenti avrebbero dovuto tentare di controbilanciare le conseguenze finanziarie negative del rifiuto del pagamento del risarcimento. In questo collegamento, avrebbero potuto obbligare le persone che avevano comprato gli alloggi sviluppati sull'appezzamento di terreno ad acquisire quote in proprietà della terra che è usata attualmente come strada.
79. Concluse perciò che la rivendicazione dei richiedenti avrebbe dovuto essere respinta.
80. Il Governo non fece qualsiasi osservazioni riguardo alla rivendicazione per costi e spese.
81. La Corte prima osserva che ha trovato che c'è stata un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà (vedere paragrafo 58 sopra). Osserva inoltre che il danno, nella presente causa, davvero è generato dal rifiuto delle autorità di espropriare la terra e pagare il risarcimento determinato in conformità col diritto nazionale.
82. La Corte nota che i principi per determinare l'importo del risarcimento per la terra espropriata sono stabiliti nell’Atto sull’ Amministrazione Fondiaria del 1997. Sotto le sezioni 128 § 1 e 130 di questo Atto il risarcimento dovrebbe corrispondere al valore della terra come valutato da un esperto munito di certificato. Nella presente causa, i richiedenti fecero osservazioni particolareggiate riguardo al valore della terra in oggetto. La stima fa riferimento al prezzo medio in questa area nel 2003, quando la loro rivendicazione civile con la quale loro tentarono di ottenere compensazione per la sconfitta finanziaria della quale loro avevano sofferto come risultato del rifiuto di espropriare la loro terra, fu respinta. La Corte nota inoltre che questa stima è stata preparata da un esperto munito di certificato a che aveva preso in considerazione la situazione del mercato locale a quel tempo e le particolari caratteristiche dell'area riguardata.
La Corte nota inoltre che il Governo non ha né impugnato il metodo usato dall'esperto né l'importo complessivo.
La Corte è perciò della prospettiva che è stato mostrato che l'importo chiesto dai richiedenti sa riferito ragionevolmente al valore della terra riguardata ed all'importo del risarcimento che sarebbe stato pagato ai richiedenti se la loro terra fosse stata espropriata dalle autorità amministrative sotto le disposizioni dell'Atto dell'Amministrazione della Terra.
83. Nota che il Governo non ha indicato qualsiasi base legale sulla quale i richiedenti avrebbero potuto obbligare gli attuali proprietari degli alloggi situati sull'appezzamento di terreno a comprare la terra usata attualmente come strada.
84. Nelle circostanze della causa ed avendo riguardo alle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte assegna congiuntamente EUR 247,000 ai richiedenti sotto il capo di danno patrimoniale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo.
85. A riguardi dei costi, secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte ad un richiedente viene concesso un rimborso dei suoi costi e spese solamente nella misura in cui viene mostrato che questi sono stati i davvero e necessariamente sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo alle informazioni e ai documenti in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare l'importo di EUR 18,725 che copre i costi incorsi nei procedimenti civili di fronte ai tribunali polacchi, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quell’ importo, da convertire nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo.
C. Interesse di mora
86. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare congiuntamente ai richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’accordo più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile:
(a) EUR 247,000 (duecento e quaranta-sette mila euro) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale;
EUR 18,725 (diciotto mila settecento e venticinque euro) a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale.
4. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 6 novembre 2007, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Josep Casadevall
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.