Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF PANOV v. UKRAINE

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 21231/05/2009
STATO: Ucraina
DATA: 10/12/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF PANOV v. UKRAINE
(Application no. 21231/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
10 December 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Panov v. Ukraine,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Mark Villiger,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, judges,
Mykhaylo Buromenskiy, ad hoc judge,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar.
Having deliberated in private on 17 November 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 21231/05) against Ukraine lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Ukrainian national, Mr I. M. P. (“the applicant”), on 17 May 2005.
2. The Ukrainian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Yuriy Zaytsev, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. On 20 January 2009 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant was born in 1958 and lives in Kyiv, Ukraine.
5. From 18 April 1997 until 10 July 2003 the applicant occupied the position of a judge in the Golosiyivskyy District Court.
6. On 19 July 2002 the Svyatoshynskyy District Court of Kyiv found that the applicant had been entitled to improvement of his housing conditions since 1999. It held that the State Treasury of Ukraine should transfer 177,650 Ukrainian hryvnias1 (UAH) to the Golosiyivskyy District Court for the purchase of an apartment for the applicant and his family.
7. On 22 November 2004 the Ministry of Justice of Ukraine informed the applicant that the writ of enforcement had been returned by the State Treasury of Ukraine and that the judgment should be enforced by the State Court Administration.
8. This judgment at issue remains unenforced allegedly because of lack of funds.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
9. In accordance with paragraph 7 of Article 44 of the Law of Ukraine “On the Status of Judges”, if a judge needs an improvement to his or her living conditions he or she has to be provided with an apartment or a house within six months of his or her election. Judges can also later privatise this apartment or house.
10. Other relevant domestic law is summarised in the judgment Voytenko v. Ukraine, no. 18966/02, §§ 20-22, 29 June 2004.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLES 1, 8 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO.1
11. The applicant complained that the non-enforcement of the court judgment in his favour violated his rights guaranteed by Articles 1 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. He further complained under Article 13 of the Convention that there was no effective remedy in respect of these complaints.
12. The Court is of the opinion that the applicant’s complaints have to be considered under Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which read as follows:
Article 13
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest ...”
A. Admissibility
13. The Government submitted that no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 could be found separately from Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in cases concerning the lengthy non-enforcement of judgments in the applicants’ favour, because the finding of a violation of the former provision was based on conclusions regarding the latter. As the applicant did not complain and the Court did not of its own motion qualify the complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, no violation of this provision can be presumed to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the present case. Consequently, the applicant’s complaints under Article 13 of the Convention are inadmissible too.
14. The applicant disagreed.
15. The Court notes that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is an independent provision, whose application does not depend on whether or not other Articles of the Convention are invoked by the applicant. Moreover, the Court has found on numerous occasions that the impossibility for an applicant to obtain the execution of a judgment in his or her favour constituted an interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among other authorities, Voytenko v. Ukraine, no. 18966/02, § 53, 29 June 2004). The applicant’s complaint under Article 13 of the Convention is accordingly considered in relation to his complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
16. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
17. The applicant reiterated his position that the lengthy non-enforcement of the judgment in his favour and the absence of any effective remedy in this respect constituted a violation of his rights guaranteed by Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
18. The Government did not submit any observations on the merits of the case.
19. The Court notes that the judgment in the applicant’s favour remained unenforced for seven years and four months.
20. The Court further notes that it has already found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in cases concerning lengthy non-enforcement of judgments in applicants’ favour (see, for instance, Voytenko v. Ukraine, cited above, § 55, and Dubenko v. Ukraine, no. 74221/01, § 51, 11 January 2005; see also Lopatyuk and Others v. Ukraine, nos. 903/05 et seq., §§ 14, 15 and 22, 17 January 2008).
21. Having examined all the material in its possession, the Court considers that the Government have not put forward any fact or argument capable of persuading it to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
22. There has, accordingly, been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the lengthy non-enforcement of the judgment in the applicant’s favour in the present application.
23. Lastly, the Court reiterates that it has held on numerous occasions that no remedy existed under Ukrainian law against non-enforcement of domestic court judgments given against State authorities (see, among many other authorities, Voytenko v. Ukraine, cited above, § 48). It finds no ground to depart from its case-law in the present case. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in the present application as well.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
24. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
25. The applicant did not submit a claim for just satisfaction. Accordingly, the Court considers that there is no call to award him any sum on that account.
26. It notes, however, that it is undisputed that the State still has an outstanding obligation to enforce the judgment at issue.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 10 December 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President
1 At the material time 34,131.60 euros (EUR)


TESTO TRADOTTO

QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA PANOV C. UCRAINA
(Richiesta n. 21231/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
10 dicembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Panov c. Ucraina,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste il Mark Villiger, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska giudici, Mykhaylo Buromenskiy giudice ad hoc,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione.
Avendo deliberato in privato il 17 novembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 21231/05) contro l'Ucraina depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino ucraino, Sig. I. M. P. (“il richiedente”), il 17 maggio 2005.
2. Il Governo ucraino (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Yuriy Zaytsev, del Ministero della Giustizia.
3. Il 20 gennaio 2009 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente nacque nel 1958 e vive a Kyiv, Ucraina.
5. Dal 18 aprile 1997 sino al 10 luglio 2003 il richiedente occupò la posizione di giudice nella Corte distrettuale di Golosiyivskyy.
6. Il 19 luglio 2002 la Corte distrettuale di Svyatoshynskyy di Kyiv trovò che al richiedente era stato concesso un miglioramento delle condizioni del suo alloggio dal 1999. Sostenne che la Tesoreria Statale dell'Ucraina avrebbe dovuto trasferire 177,650 hryvnia1 ucraini (UAH) alla Corte distrettuale di Golosiyivskyy per l'acquisto di un appartamento per il richiedente e la sua famiglia.
7. Il 22 novembre 2004 il Ministero della Giustizia dell'Ucraina informò il richiedente che il documento di esecuzione era stato restituito dalla Tesoreria Statale dell'Ucraina e che la sentenza avrebbe dovuto essere eseguita dall’Amministrazione della Corte Statale.
8. Questa sentenza in questione è rimasta non eseguita presumibilmente a causa di mancanza di finanziamenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
9. In conformità con il paragrafo 7 dell’ Articolo 44 della Legge dell'Ucraina “Sullo Status di Giudici”, se un giudice ha bisogno di un miglioramento delle sue condizioni abitative doveva essere fornito di un appartamento o di un alloggio entro sei mesi dalla sua elezione. I giudici possono anche privatizzare più tardi questo appartamento o alloggio.
10. L'altro diritto nazionale attinente è riassunto nella sentenza Voytenko c. Ucraina, (n. 18966/02, §§ 20-22, 29 giugno 2004).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DEGLI ARTICOLI 1, 8 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO NO.1
11. Il richiedente si lamentò che la non-esecuzione della sentenza di corte a suo favore violò i suoi diritti garantiti dagli Articoli 1 e 8 della Convenzione e dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Lui si lamentò inoltre sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione che non c'era via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo di queste azioni di reclamo.
12. La Corte è dell'opinione che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente debbano essere considerate sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si leggono come segue:
Articolo 13
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
13. Il Governo presentò che nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 potrebbe essere trovata separatamente dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in cause riguardanti la prolungata non-esecuzione di sentenze a favore dei richiedenti , perché la costatazione di una violazione della disposizione precedente è basata sulle conclusioni riguardanti il secondo. Siccome il richiedente non si lamentò sotto questo e la Corte non qualificò di sua propria iniziativa le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, non essendoci violazione di questa disposizione non si può presupporre di trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 nella presente causa. Anche le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione sono di conseguenza, inammissibili.
14. Il richiedente non fu d'accordo.
15. La Corte nota che l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 è una disposizione indipendente la cui applicazione non dipende da se o meno altri Articoli della Convenzione vengono invocati dal richiedente. Inoltre, la Corte ha trovato in numerose occasioni che l'impossibilità per un richiedente di ottenere l'esecuzione di una sentenza a suo favore costituiva un'interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà, come stabilito nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Voytenko c. Ucraina, n. 18966/02, § 53 29 giugno 2004). L'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione viene considerata di conseguenza in relazione alle sue azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
16. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
17. Il richiedente reiterò la sua posizione che la lunga non-esecuzione della sentenza a suo favore e l'assenza di qualsiasi via di ricorso effettiva a questo riguardo costituì una violazione dei suoi diritti garantiti dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione e dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
18. Il Governo non presentò nessuna osservazione sui meriti della causa.
19. La Corte nota che la sentenza a favore del richiedente rimase non eseguita per sette anni e quattro mesi.
20. La Corte nota inoltre che ha già ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in cause concernenti la lunga non-esecuzione di sentenze a favore dei richiedenti (vedere, per esempio, Voytenko c. Ucraina, citata sopra, § 55, e Dubenko c. Ucraina, n. 74221/01, § 51 11 gennaio 2005; vedere anche Lopatyuk ed Altri c. Ucraina, N. 903/05 et seq., §§ 14, 15 e 22 17 gennaio 2008).
21. Avendo esaminato tutto il materiale in suo possesso, la Corte considera che il Governo non ha esposto qualsiasi fatto o argomento capace di persuaderla a giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa.
22. Vi è stata, di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo della lunga non-esecuzione della sentenza a favore del richiedente nella presente richiesta.
23. Infine, la Corte reitera che ha sostenuti in numerose occasioni che nessuna via di ricorso esisteva sotto la legge ucraina contro la non-esecuzione di sentenze dei tribunali nazionali date contro autorità Statali (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Voytenko c. Ucraina, citata sopra, § 48). Non trova nessuna base per discostarsi dalla sua giurisprudenza nella presente causa. Di conseguenza, c’è stata una violazione dell’Articolo 13 della Convenzione nella richiesta presente.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
24. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
25. Il richiedente non presentò una rivendicazione per la soddisfazione equa. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna necessità di assegnargli qualsiasi somma sotto questo capo.
26. Comunque, nota che è incontrastato che lo Stato ha ancora un obbligo insoluto per eseguire la sentenza in questione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificò per iscritto 10 dicembre 2009, facendo seguito Decidere 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente
1 al tempo attinente 34,131.60 euro (EUR)




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.